Kónya. L. 
Export-Led Growth, Growth-Driven Export
83
Table 1. Wald tests for Granger causality - VAR(mlag)  
in levels of I(0) variables 
H
01
H
02
Country-
Model 
mlag 
Γ
1
-hat 
χ
2
-statistic mlag 
Β
2
-hat 
χ
2
-statistic 
At-3 
0.089 
0.898 
0.958 
6.638
b
Dk-3 
-0.097 
0.729 
0.147 
1.281 
Fr-3 
-0.069 
1.293 
0.386 
1.486 
Lu-2 
Lu-3 
0.010 
-0.039 
0.013 
0.156 
0.223 
0.087 
2.773 
2.953 
Pt-4 
0.032 
4.361 
-1.013 
8.963
b
Se-3 
0.140 
9.503
a
-0.679 
12.676
a
Note: 1) Γ
1
-hat and 
Β
2
-hat are the sums of the estimated 
γ
1i
, and 
β
2i
coefficients, respectively 2)  
a
: significant at the 1% level; 
b
: significant at 
the 5% level; 
c
: significant at the 10% level. 3) Model 1 - VAR(mlag) 
without deterministic terms;  Model 2 - VAR(mlag) with constant;  Model 3 
- VAR(mlag) with linear trend;  Model 4: VAR(mlag) with quadratic trend. 
4) At the 10% level the Breusch-Godfrey LM and the Ljung-Box 
portmanteau tests did not detect autocorrelation (of order 1-4) in the 
residuals.  5)  H
01 
: LNEXP does not cause LNGDP;  H
02 
: LNGDP does not 
cause LNEXP. 
Case b requires the estimation of (1) using the level of the I(0) 
variable and the first difference of the I(1) variable. Therefore, 
depending on the preliminary test outcomes, X = ∆LNEXP and Y = 
LNGDP or = LNEXP and = ∆LNGDP, where ∆ is the first-
difference operator. Otherwise, the specification and estimation of 
the model, and also the Granger-causality tests, are performed the 
same way as before.  
The results are shown in Tables 2 and 3. They indicate one-way 
causality running from LNEXP to ∆LNGDP for Denmark, from 
∆LNGDP to LNEXP for Korea, from ∆LNEXP to LNGDP for 
Convert pdf file to txt file - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to txt file online; c# read text from pdf
Convert pdf file to txt file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
change pdf to txt file; convert pdf to word editable text online
Applied Econometrics and International Development. AEEADE. Vol. 4-1 (2004) 
84
Austria and Portugal, from LNGDP to ∆LNEXP for Canada, 
Finland, France, Greece, Italy, Japan and the USA, while two-way 
causality is detected for Sweden.  
As regards the Γ
1
-hat and Β
2
-hat statistics, the first-difference 
operator, ∆, alters their interpretations, but their logical sign is still 
positive. In this sense the ELG hypothesis is supported only for 
Austria, Portugal and Sweden, and the GDE hypothesis is supported 
only for the USA.
9
Table 2. Wald tests for Granger causality - VAR(mlag) in mixed 
terms, ∆LNGDP and LNEXP
H
01
H
02
Country-
Model 
mlag 
Γ
1
-hat 
χ
2
-statistic mlag 
Β
2
-hat 
χ
2
-statistic 
Dk-3 
-0.184 
2.876
c
0.026 
0.017 
Ko-2 
-0.006 
2.554 
-0.979 
3.714
c
NZ-3 
0.013 
0.009 
0.011 
5.072 
Pt-4 
0.049 
3.612 
0.425 
0.379 
Ch-2 
-0.012 
1.274 
-0.516 
3.688 
Note:   See Table 1, Notes 1-4. 5)  H
01
: LNEXP does not cause ∆LNGDP;  
H
02
∆LNGDP does not cause LNEXP. 
Note that ∆LNGDP
t
and ∆LNEXP
t
are approximate growth rates. 
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
convert pdf to txt format online; c# convert pdf to text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
convert pdf to searchable text online; converting pdf to searchable text format
Kónya. L. 
Export-Led Growth, Growth-Driven Export
85
Table 3. Wald tests for Granger causality - VAR(mlag) in mixed terms
H
01
 
H
02
Country-
Model 
mlag Γ
1
-hat 
χ
2
-
statistic 
mlag Β
2
-hat 
χ
2
-
statistic 
At-2 
0.130 3.342
c
-0.041 
2.480 
Ca-2 
0.078 
1.289 
-0.068 7.754c 
Fi-4 
-0.080 
0.632 
-1.315 24.680
a
Fr-2 
0.067 
1.062 
-0.047 3.126
c
Gr-2 
-0.057 
1.194 
-0.103 5.879
b
It-2 
0.058 
0.673 
-0.067 4.696
b
Jp-3 
0.069 
0.700 
-0.112 10.283
a
Mx-2 
0.118 
1.962 
0.024 
0.791 
Pt-2 
0.078 2.909
c
0.021 
0.842 
Se-2 
0.196 11.512
a
-0.085 11.165
b
USA-3 
-0.080 
1.253 
0.280 4.837
c
Note:  See Table 1, Notes 1-4. 5. H
01 
: ∆LNEXP does not cause LNGDP;  
H
02 
: LNGDP does not cause ∆LNEXP
In Case c, LNGDP and LNEXP are both I(1), but not 
cointegrated. Since X and Y are supposed to be I(0) in (1), this time 
causality can be tested using VAR in first differences and the 
resulting Wald statistic has an asymptotic χ
2
distribution with mlag-1 
(mlag>1) degrees of freedom (Lütkepohl and Reimers, 1992, p. 265).      
The results, shown in Table 4, indicate one-way causality from 
∆LNEXP to ∆LNGDP for Italy and New Zealand, from ∆LNGDP to 
∆LNEXP for Australia, Canada, Finland and Korea, and two-way 
causality is likely in the case of the UK.  
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
convert pdf to word and edit text; convert pdf to word editable text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
pdf image to text; convert pdf to text file
Applied Econometrics and International Development. AEEADE. Vol. 4-1 (2004) 
86
Table 4.Wald tests for Granger causality- 
VAR(mlag) in first differences 
H
01
H
02
Country-
Model 
mlag Γ
1
-hat 
χ
2
-
statistic 
mlag Β
2
-hat 
χ
2
-
statistic 
Au-2 
0.152 
2.575 
0.188 
7.780
c
Be-3 
0.169 
3.653 
0.137 
0.119 
Ca-3 
0.093 
0.726 
-1.560 
6.430
b
Fi-2 
Fi-3 
0.156 
0.155 
2.216 
2.520 
-1.021 
-2.912 
7.549
b
25.114
a
Gr-3 
-0.081 
1.973 
0.381 
0.278 
Hu-2 
2
#
0.227 
0.816 
0.271 
0.097 
Ir-2 
0.340 
3.960 
0.216 
0.722 
It-3 
0.205 6.342
b
-1.110 
3.327 
Ko-3 
-0.011 
0.415 
-0.822 
5.469
c
Lu-2 
-0.097 
0.425 
0.277 
0.751 
Mx-3 
0.164 
2.669 
0.809 
3.887 
NZ-2 
3
#
0.333 7.291
c
0.026 
4.036 
No-2 
0.006 
0.290 
-0.337 
0.613 
Ch-3 
-0.004 
2.646 
-0.420 
2.803 
UK-2 
0.173 7.758
b
0.178 15.069
a
USA-2 
-0.152 
3.649 
0.928 
2.398 
Note:    See Table 1, Notes 1-3. 4)  H
01 
: ∆LNEXP does not cause 
∆LNGDP.  H
02 
: ∆LNGDP does not cause ∆LNEXP. 
#
: Autocorrelation has 
been detected at the 10% level. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
converting pdf to plain text; convert pdf to text document
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
message can be copied and pasted to PDF file by keeping NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
convert pdf to text c#; convert scanned pdf to text word
Kónya. L. 
Export-Led Growth, Growth-Driven Export
87
Apart from three cases (Canada, Finland and Korea) the Γ
1
-hat 
and Β
2
-hat are positive, supporting the ELG and GDE hypotheses.  
Finally, when LNGDP and LNEXP are cointegrated, Case d, they 
have an attainable long-run equilibrium and there must be causality 
between them at least in one direction (Granger, 1988). 
In cointegrated systems, however, the usual Wald test for linear 
restrictions may have a non-standard asymptotic distribution that 
depends on nuisance parameters. For this reason, causality is 
preferably tested within a vector error correction (VEC) framework 
instead of a first-difference VAR model. Yet, the Wald test in a level 
VAR still has a χ
2
distribution asymptotically when cointegration is 
‘sufficient’ in the sense of Toda and Phillips (1993).  
Although, it is usually not an easy task to figure out whether this 
condition holds, it is assured in bivariate cointegrated systems. Apart 
from causality inference, another advantage of the VEC framework 
might be that it provides additional information about the speed the 
system responds to disequilibrium. 
Since we are not concerned with this adjustment process, in order 
to keep the analysis as simple as possible, similarly to Case a, we 
conduct Wald tests for Granger causality in level VAR models. The 
results can be seen in Table 5.  
Apparently, there is support for one-way causality from LNEXP to 
LNGDP in the case of Australia,  Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Mexico and 
Norway, one-way causality in the opposite direction, i.e. from 
LNGDP to LNEXP, seems to exist in Japan and Korea, and causality 
is likely in both directions in the UK. With the exception of Korea 
and Mexico, 
Γ
1
-hat and Β
2
-hat 
are positive, justifying the ELG and 
GDE hypotheses. 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Except to process PDF, Microsoft Office documents and such as OpenOffice document, CSV file and TXT
convert scanned pdf to text; convert pdf to text online
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
Load Text file from computer, stream and byte array. Conversion. • Convert ODT to PDF document (.pdf). • Convert ODS to PDF document (.pdf).
convert pdf image to text online; convert pdf file to text
Applied Econometrics and International Development. AEEADE. Vol. 4-1 (2004) 
88
Table 5. Wald tests for Granger causality - VAR(mlag
in levels of CI(1,1) variables 
H
01
H
02
Country-
Model 
mlag Γ
1
-hat 
χ
2
-
statistic 
mlag Β
2
-hat 
χ
2
-
statistic 
Au-2 
0.083 6.798
a
0.098 0.485 
Ic-2 
0.103 21.452
a
0.308 1.981 
Ir-2 
0.123 5.359
c
-0.039 0.047 
It-3 
0.076 3.331
c
-0.243 1.902 
Ja-2 
0.068 1.552 
0.529 8.270
a
Ko-3 
0.022 1.228 
-0.158 5.981
c
Me-3 
-0.091 9.955
b
0.038 0.552 
Ne-3 
0.074 1.937 
0.345 1.362 
No-2 
0.067 3.112
c
-0.207 3.780 
Sp-2 
0.068 5.073 
-0.169 0.829 
UK-2 
0.039 7.395
c
0.366 18.616
a
Note: See Table 1. 
Direct Approach with MWald tests 
The test proposed by Toda and Yamamoto (1995) is a modified 
Wald (MWald) test for linear restrictions on some parameters of an 
augmented VAR(mlag+d) in levels, where d is the highest order of 
integration suspected in the system, usually at most two. The test 
statistic does not depend on any nuisance parameter and under the 
null hypothesis it has an asymptotic χ
2
distribution with the usual 
degrees of freedom, granted that d#mlag. The last d lags are not 
considered explicitly in the Wald test, but they are necessary to 
Kónya. L. 
Export-Led Growth, Growth-Driven Export
89
ensure the asymptotically χ
2
sampling distribution of the test 
statistic. 
This test procedure has three advantages. First of all, it can be 
used in possible integrated and cointegrated systems, without pre-
testing for cointegration. Secondly, Rambaldi and Doran (1996) have 
shown that computationally the MWald test is very simple, since it 
can be run in a seemingly unrelated regression. Thirdly, according to 
the Monte Carlo experiments on bivariate and trivariate models 
performed by Zapata and Rambaldi (1997), despite the intentional 
over-fitting, the MWald test performs as well as similar but more 
complicated test procedures in samples of size fifty at least.  
This time, unfortunately, we work with shorter time series, and the 
extra, redundant regressors may lead to costly losses in power and 
efficiency. Nevertheless, it is worth to apply this procedure and 
compare the outcomes to the results obtained via the indirect 
approach. 
First we use the MWald test on the LNGDP-LNEXP bivariate 
system. We assume that the maximal order of integration is one, i.e. 
d
=
1, and experiment with mlag
+
d
= 2, 3, 4, 5. For each country the 
preferred mlag value is selected on the basis of AIC, SBIC statistics 
from VAR(mlag) estimated by OLS over the same sample. When 
these statistics choose different mlag values, preference is given to 
the one which produces non-autocorrelated, or at least ‘whiter’, 
residuals.  
The results (see Kónya, 2004) suggest one-way causality from 
LNEXP to LNGDP in the case of Australia (Model 2), Austria 
(Model 2), Belgium, Hungary (Model 3), Iceland, Ireland, Spain and 
Switzerland, from LNGDP to LNEXP in Canada, Finland (Model 4), 
Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico (Model 2), New Zealand (Model 3), 
Portugal and the USA (Model 2), and two-way causality seems to be 
likely in Denmark (Model 3), Finland (Models 2, 3), New Zealand 
(Model 2), Sweden and the UK. In each of these cases but one (UK - 
Model 3) Γ
1
-hat is positive, while Β
2
-hat has unexpected sign in six 
Applied Econometrics and International Development. AEEADE. Vol. 4-1 (2004) 
90
cases (Canada, Finland, Italy, Korea - Model 3, New Zealand, 
Portugal and Sweden). 
Bivariate systems, like the ones we have used so far, are often 
criticised as incomplete, omitting potentially important variables. For 
this reason, we consider a trivariate system as well, namely LNGDP-
LNEXP-LNOPEN, where openness is expected to appraise the 
sensitivity of GDP and exports to each other.
We use d
=
2 uniformly 
on all countries. This choice is safe, but not parsimonious since 
according to the unit-root test results a second unit root in LNOPEN 
is an unlikely option for almost all countries. The MWald test 
requires mla
d, so we experiment with mlag
+
d = 4, 5, 6. 
It is important to realise, however, that in the trivariate system our 
analysis is partial and experimental, at best, for two reasons. Firstly, 
openness is treated as an auxiliary variable, i.e. it is not directly 
involved in the MWald tests.  
Consequently, we can study only direct, one-period-ahead 
causality between exports and economic growth, disregarding the 
possibility of indirect causality at longer time horizons. Since, unlike 
in a bivariate system, in a trivariate system no-causality for one 
period ahead does not imply no-causality for two or more periods 
ahead; the bivariate and trivariate causality test results are not really 
comparable. Secondly, having at most 39 observations for each 
variable and a maximal lag length of 6 years, the usable sample size 
is only 33, while each equation of the trivariate VAR has 19-21 
unknown parameters.
10
For these reasons, the results (see Kónya, 2004), must be treated 
with great care and we can draw only tentative conclusions from 
them. Nevertheless, it is worth to mention, that in the case of thirteen 
countries (Australia, Austria, Canada, Denmark, Hungary, Iceland, 
10 
There are 3×6=18 slope parameters belonging to the lagged LNGDP and 
LNEXP terms, a constant and, depending on the order of the time trend, the 
slope parameters of t and t
2
.
Kónya. L. 
Export-Led Growth, Growth-Driven Export
91
Ireland, Japan, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and the USA) 
the MWald test in the trivariate system provides definitely more 
support to causality between LNGDP and LNEXP than in the 
bivariate system, and there are only two examples (Belgium and 
Korea) for the opposite. This is a surprising outcome since, due to 
the potentially important omitted variables; the bivariate system is 
expected to produce more spurious causality. 
4.  Concluding remarks 
In this paper we aimed to explore whether in the last three and a 
half decades the OECD countries experienced export-led-growth or 
growth-driven-export, maybe both or none. We did so by studying 
Granger causality between economic growth, measured by the 
logarithm of real GDP, and the logarithm of real exports. In order to 
re-enforce the results, two complementary strategies were used.  
First, we studied the uni- and bivariate time-series properties of 
the data and, building on these characteristics, employed Wald tests 
on appropriate parameter restrictions in bivariate VAR models in 
levels and/or first differences. The obvious weakness of this 
approach is its dependence on pre-testing. Unfortunately, in practice 
different unit-root and cointegration tests, and also different model 
specifications, can lead to contradicting results. This shortcoming 
certainly does not come to light when applied researchers, without 
any serious reason, place all their faith in a single method or model. 
However, we used five unit-root and three cointegration tests, on 
various specifications.  
As expected, the results were often ambiguous, so testing for 
causality in a single model was unjustified. We distinguished four 
cases, namely when LNGDP and LNEXP are I(0)-I(0), I(0)-I(1) or 
I(1)-I(0), I(1)-I(1) but not CI(1,1), and CI(1,1). For most of the 
countries we considered at least two of these possibilities and 
experimented with different deterministic trends. Following this 
indirect approach, we also applied the modified Wald test of Toda 
Applied Econometrics and International Development. AEEADE. Vol. 4-1 (2004) 
92
and Yamamoto (1995) which does not rely so heavily on pre-testing, 
but performs better in larger samples.  
There are only eight countries where different methods and 
specifications lead to unanimous conclusions. They are Canada 
(GCE), Iceland (ECG), Japan (GCE), Korea (GCE), Luxembourg 
(NC), the Netherlands (NC), Sweden (TWC) and the UK (TWC). 
For all other countries the causality test results are mixed. This is 
partly due to the fact that in most cases the true time-series properties 
of the data could not be discovered beyond doubt. Still, this fact 
would not cause much difficulty, if the causality test results were 
invariant to the methods applied. However, in many cases, different 
strategies delivered different outcomes.  
The other reason for ambiguity is the uncertainty regarding the 
deterministic trend degree. What type of a deterministic trend should 
be included and what is its impact on Granger causality? For 
example, models with and without a linear time trend often produce 
different causality test results. Although one could expect a time 
trend to act as a proxy for omitted economic variables, thus 
decreasing the chance of spurious causality, there are 
counterexamples as well. All things considered, it is clear that the 
causality results are usually not robust to method and specification, 
so their interpretation calls for great care. 
In the light of this limitation, we can arrive at the following 
conclusions. We are confident to claim that there is NC between 
exports and growth in Luxembourg and in the Netherlands, ECG in 
Iceland, GCE in Canada, Japan and Korea, and TWC in Sweden and 
in the UK. There is probably NC also in Denmark, France, Greece, 
Hungary and Norway, ECG in Australia, Austria and Ireland, and 
GCE in Finland, Portugal and the USA. However, contrary to the 
spirits of the ELG and GDE hypotheses, some of the revealed causal 
relationships imply a negative delayed impact from exports to 
growth or from growth to exports. Finally, in the case of Belgium, 
Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain and Switzerland the results are 
too controversial to make a simple choice.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested