mvc display pdf in view : Convert pdf file to txt file SDK Library API wpf .net azure sharepoint AG%20review%20of%20the%20Export%20Control%20Act%201982,%20December%2019995-part1372

4. Stakeholder Views 
4.5  Prescribed Goods 
Stakeholders wanted all currently prescribed goods treated in the same 
fashion, allowing for differences in product types.  The Australian Meat 
Council extended this argument, calling the provision of exemptions under the 
Act for export of meat from domestic (only) approved establishments a ‘grave 
anomaly’. 
The Queensland Sugar Corporation was in favour of the single-desk 
marketing system but was not in favour of being subject to the Export Control 
Act (and losing responsiveness and flexibility): 
Turning to the present review, as currently structured sugar is not a prescribed 
product under the Export Control Act.  For this reason the QSC’s export activities 
are not currently affected by the legislation.  The QSC is keen to ensure raw sugar 
continues to be excluded from the operation of the Act.  The QSC’s ability to 
respond flexibly to the market changes in the light of increased competition from 
Brazil and other origins will be important to the ongoing profitability of the industry.  
The application of the Export Control Act to sugar would be a significant 
impediment to the QSC’s ability to respond flexibly to changing market conditions. 
There were requests for approaches which reflected the unique nature of 
products, for example, in the dairy industry: 
Our industry depends crucially on the efficient and competitively priced provision 
of export services.  The industry believes that as an exporter, it should be treated 
no differently than other food exporters such as confectionary, biscuits, sugar etc.  
These commodities are freely traded on the international market without any 
Government export controls. 
However, the industry recognises that its products are biologically active and that 
importing countries have a number of Government requirements that must be met 
for the certification of food imports.  [Australian Dairy Products Federation
A good summation of the issue was made by QDPI: 
Although there is an equity issue in the prescribed goods regulations, and it would 
be preferable if all industries were to be assessed against the same principles, it is 
not of paramount importance that equity should be achieved.  However, the need 
for any prescription of products should be transparent and be clearly explained.  
The risk management based approach in fish and dairy exports is fully justifiable 
relative to the more regulated meat export requirements. 
It is highly conceivable that some potential markets will require a higher quality 
assurance standard than that which applies as a base international standard.  
However there is no compulsion on producers to supply to that particular export 
market.  Many producers may wish to target markets in which there are no 
additional quality assurance standards required.  Therefore the decision to sell 
produce into a market with high quality entry standards is purely a commercial 
decision to be made by individual producers (or a group of producers). 
The higher quality standards required impose significant additional costs by way 
of testing and certification of product quality.  These additional costs should only 
apply to those producers who wish to access those markets and should not be 
incurred by those producers who do not need to comply with those same strict 
standards. 
49
Convert pdf file to txt file - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to text without losing formatting; convert pdf to searchable text
Convert pdf file to txt file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert scanned pdf to text; converting pdf to text
Export Assurance: NCP Review of the Export Control act 1982 
. . . the Government can provide the certification of quality assurance required 
without compelling those producers and exporters who do not need this level of 
quality assurance to meet the same standards and bear unnecessary costs.  
[Queensland Department of Primary Industries
Opinion varied industry by industry and case by case, depending on the 
circumstances of the trade.  Comments in other submissions have indicated 
that a large number of stakeholders wish to have the Act limited to health and 
hygiene.  However, there is still a substantial opinion which wants an all-
inclusive Act (grains in particular): 
Many importing authorities, such as the importing State Trading Enterprises in 
countries like Japan, South Korea and China, maintain very strict conditions in 
relation to the particular requirements that must be met by those wishing to import 
products.  These requirements relate to quality aspects such as hygiene, 
quarantine pests and trade and product descriptions.  The present export control 
arrangements help to ensure that Australian grain exporters are able to meet 
those requirements.  The GCA fears that changes to those arrangements could 
have the potential to restrict access to the quality conscious international markets 
for Australian grain products.  [Grains Council of Australia] 
DFAT is of the view that prescription of non-certified goods can be of 
assistance in gaining market entry in specific cases.  The National Meat 
Association, on the other hand, sees no rationale for eliminating the current 
exemption process. 
4.6  Commodities Regulated by Orders under the Act 
Stakeholders held reasonably consistent views of significant benefits of being 
regulated under the Act.  These included: 
• safeguards for industry against problems, 
• ease of access to markets, 
• confidence overseas in Australian foods, 
• importance in commerce, 
• meeting of international obligations, 
• damage control should problems arise,  and 
• maintenance of the quality of exported food. 
However, stakeholders saw that these benefits imposed significant costs 
associated with: 
• hardship in meeting prescriptive legislation, 
• duplication of processes, 
• documentation, 
• compliance audits, 
• fees and charges, 
• costs of compliance, 
• additional hidden costs, 
• opportunity costs due to costs of compliance, 
• time delays caused to exports through process,  and 
50
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
convert pdf file to text online; change pdf to txt format
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
convert pdf image to text; remove text from pdf
4. Stakeholder Views 
• disincentive for industry to innovate. 
The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, in their submission, 
suggested that  ‘A better informed and compliance-ready trading community 
would greatly ease the demands placed upon inspectors’.  It also targeted 
cross-subsidisation of establishments. 
Stakeholders also saw the need to demonstrate accountability in AQIS. 
The South Australian Government identified some important cost issues: 
Strategies that reduce costs and/or improve inspection efficiency need to be 
continually applied.  There needs to be transparency in the setting of inspection 
fees. 
For the Meat Industry, which is highly regulated under the Act, the costs to 
industry are high, much higher than our competitors in NZ and USA.  With 
horticultural products, AQIS inspection fees often represent 3-6% of export 
documentation and administrative costs.  Inspection fees are often a more 
pressing problem where: 
• 
the commodity is facing strong competition in the market place and has  
a small profit margin 
• 
packing facilities are remote from inspection services and incur high  
travel costs 
• 
competing countries subsidise their inspection fees 
• 
inconsistency of charging for like services occurs between regions. 
[South Australian Government
4.7  Standards 
There was a strong message from a number of stakeholders on the 
desirability of harmonising domestic and export standards, and promoting 
Australian standards as a suitable basis for export.  Significantly, the current 
‘two-tiered’ domestic and export standard was criticised as expensive and as 
sending out messages that Australian companies manufacture to a lower 
standard for domestic markets.  To take a typical response: 
Under domestic regulations, when the proposed National Food Safety Standards 
are implemented a food business in Australia must be: 
• registered; 
• have an approved HACCP based food safety plan in place; 
• undergo systems audits to ensure the food safety plan is achieving its 
objective that is the hygienic production of safe food; 
• ensure the products it produces conform with the relevant food product codes 
eg general standards such as labelling, additives and, microbiological 
requirements and product specific standards. 
The Export Control Act should recognise these domestic requirements and not 
duplicate them.  The aim of the Export Control Act should be to allow the 
responsible agency (AQIS) to certify to the extent required by foreign 
governments and our export customers that exports are fit for the purpose to 
which they will be put (eg human consumption, animal consumption, other 
applications).  Where necessary, the agency may also agree to certify other 
qualities to the extent required by foreign governments and our export customers 
if there is a reasonable basis for doing so. 
51
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
convert pdf to text format; convert pdf table to text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert scanned pdf to word text; batch pdf to text
Export Assurance: NCP Review of the Export Control act 1982 
Where the certification concerns fitness for human consumption on an export 
market, compliance by the processor with the National Food Safety Standard 
should be sufficient.  [Australian Dairy Products Federation] 
Access to export markets is not currently available to much Australian red meat 
which is prepared in accordance with Australian Standards.  [Victorian Quality 
Assured Meats
It needs to be recognised that within the framework of ANZFA and current 
legislation, Australia’s domestic food standards are well positioned to replace 
many of the areas contained in the current Export Control Act.  [WA Food and 
Beverage Exporters Association
Feedback from exporters indicates that regulatory arrangements can be made 
more efficient through further harmonising (of) domestic standards between the 
Commonwealth and the States.  [Pork Council of Australia] 
4.8  Regulation and its Administration 
The Review expected many comments about the length, structure and 
complexity of the legislation, but this was not the case.  There were few 
comments in this category, although there were more on the subject of over-
prescriptiveness. 
The requirement to meet detailed legislation imposes unreasonable limits on 
innovation in the industry as very prescriptive legislation can be prohibitive to 
prospective opportunity for trade.  The costs involved in meeting such legislation 
may have no benefit other than to satisfy the legislation.  An example of this can 
be seen where the prescription calls for levels of compliance above those required 
to meet base international standards of acceptance by a specific market and, as a 
result of this, a new market opportunity may be lost.  [Queensland Department of 
Primary Industries
Prescriptive criteria specified by export orders also excludes exporters who can 
meet importing nation requirements but not the prescribed criteria.  [Victorian 
Government
Current regulatory arrangements restrict active competition in, and 
competitiveness of, the Australian meat industry both directly and indirectly, via . . 
. prescriptive detail in the export regulations, and to a lesser degree the Australian 
Standard, which tell meat industry businesses ‘how’ to conduct their operation, 
rather than ‘what’ product and conduct standards they are expected to achieve, so 
limiting commercial innovation, initiative and decision making.  [Victorian Quality 
Assured Meats
On the other hand: 
Legislation by definition must be prescriptive; without this, national goals and 
interests would not be reached.  [Southern Game Meats
Most stakeholders thought the benefits outweighed the costs, although most 
thought that the situation could be improved.  According to the Australian 
Meat Council, benefits strongly outweighed costs, a cost-benefit analysis 
being required before any further changes to the Act. 
52
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
convert pdf to word and edit text; c# convert pdf to text file
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
message can be copied and pasted to PDF file by keeping NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
convert pdf image to text online; convert pdf to text online no email
4. Stakeholder Views 
DFAT and other stakeholders (see Sections 4.1 and 4.3) advocated reduction 
of compliance costs where possible and indicated that electronic 
trading/certification initiatives were worth considering. 
Substitution of Government-provided services with third party (contestable) 
performance of some audit/certification functions is an obvious proposition to 
satisfy competition issues and may contribute to cost reduction, yet comments 
were far from positive on this issue.  Stakeholders had two principal concerns 
- not to compromise Australia’s reputation and to contain costs. 
While positive about the benefits of regulation, stakeholders voiced concern 
about some of its administration.  Comments were made on delays, cost 
issues and the ‘double layer’ of legislation and processing control.  There were 
comments on the relatively high cost of AQIS inspection, but these were not 
common.  There were tangential comments about AQIS’s effectiveness (most 
stakeholders are of the opinion that some good comes out of the activity) but 
little direct comment. 
Among positive suggestions was the creation of a database of mandatory and 
non-mandatory import requirements and the development of a database on 
microbiological testing. 
The Grains Council was convinced of efficiency and effectiveness: 
The GCA believes that the present arrangements for the control of Australian 
grain exports, as outlined in the Export Control Act, provide for the most efficient 
structure for control of prescribed exports.  AQIS has the necessary expertise and 
experience to enable it to provide an efficient export testing service with regard to 
grain and to thereby help Australian grain marketers to operate effectively in 
international markets.  The GCA believes that these efficiency considerations 
mean that the export control function has natural monopoly characteristics and is 
thus best handled by a body operating on a national basis which can reap the 
benefits of economies of scale and scope. 
It can also be argued that the present export control arrangements provide for the 
operation of an efficient and cost effective service.  If the present arrangements 
were not in place there would still be a need for Australian grain marketers to 
provide some form of certification of their product in order to ensure that they 
could compete effectively internationally on quality and reputation grounds.  It 
would be likely that, without the existence of the present arrangements, the 
provision of such certification would be significantly more costly for the Australian 
grain marketers. 
The GCA concludes its view that there are very significant public benefits that 
stem from the present export control arrangements that are outlined in the Export 
Control Act.  The GCA firmly believes that these benefits act to outweigh any 
anticompetitive detriment that may arise out of the legislation.  As a consequence, 
the GCA would like to take the opportunity to advocate to the Review Committee 
that any changes to the Export Control Act that may be recommended by the 
Committee need to ensure that the benefits that arise from the present 
arrangements, both to the Australian community generally and to the grains 
industry in particular, are not lost.  [Grains Council of Australia
53
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Except to process PDF, Microsoft Office documents and such as OpenOffice document, CSV file and TXT
batch convert pdf to text; change pdf to text
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
Load Text file from computer, stream and byte array. Conversion. • Convert ODT to PDF document (.pdf). • Convert ODS to PDF document (.pdf).
converting pdf to editable text; converting image pdf to text
Export Assurance: NCP Review of the Export Control act 1982 
At a more specific level, there have been criticisms: 
Exporters expressed concern that AQIS is not flexible enough in processing 
requests for meat inspection on weekends.  Potential customers from Singapore, 
Hong Kong and Japan have apparently had difficulty in obtaining meat products 
from Australia during weekends.  AQIS’s requirement for two full working days’ 
notice to process weekend inspections results in potential export orders being 
lost.  PCA recommends that AQIS be more flexible in its inspection policy, 
especially as industry bears the full cost.  A more flexible approach by AQIS will 
boost Australia’s export competitiveness.  [Pork Council of Australia] 
4.9  Importing Country Requirements 
A very detailed submission was received from the Department of Foreign 
Affairs and Trade which outlined what importing countries valued about the 
Australian export certification system.  The main points were as follows: 
• There is strong support for government involvement in export certification. 
• Importing countries have greater confidence with government inspection. 
• Confidence in Australian products would decline if government involvement 
were withdrawn. 
• Many countries accept government assurance without being familiar with 
the internal operation of our system. 
• Some governments are receptive to detailed logical argument about 
changes to export inspection or certification--other governments are not 
receptive. 
• There are links between ease of establishing market access and 
government based certification. 
• The time taken to restore confidence in an Australian product when 
problems arise is shorter with government involvement in 
inspection/certification than without. 
• Food safety is a priority universally, with many countries less concerned 
about issues such as labelling and product quality. 
• Attention needs to be given to directing resources to resolving market 
penetration issues, which will give the best market return. 
DFAT believes that there is scope for reforming Australia’s inspection and 
certification regime with the possibility of using non-government inspectors.  
However, with the strong desire for the continuation of government 
involvement, there are many hurdles to overcome.  Discussions should be 
avoided if they are potentially damaging commercially. 
54
4. Stakeholder Views 
4.10  Stakeholder Feedback obtained by AQIS 
AQIS has set up a client feedback process which encourages clients to report 
back on its service performance, particularly where client expectations have 
not been met.  The client feedback information is acted on by the managers of 
the various AQIS export programs with an undertaking to give a prompt 
response.  This is included in the AQIS service charter for each of the export 
programs.  The following table shows some recent results. 
Figure 4.1:  AQIS Client Satisfaction 
Rating
Dairy
Fish - land
based
Fish - Vessel
based
Horticulture
Export Meat
0.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
1995/96
1997
This chart, drawn from information in the regular surveys, shows the relative 
satisfaction for the various programs from 0 (poor) to 10 (excellent). 
4.11 Committee’s Assessment of Key Points 
The Export Control Act in Principle 
¾ 
¾ 
Stakeholders view the Export Control Act as essential to the bulk of 
Australia’s food and agricultural products export trade.  Consumer 
protection, health and hygiene, animal welfare and common product 
descriptions were all stated by stakeholders as reasons why the Act is 
needed
Arrangements under the Act, in particular AQIS certification, are held in 
high regard by Australia’s major trading partners and supported by the 
majority of Australia’s food and agricultural product industries
55
Export Assurance: NCP Review of the Export Control act 1982 
Objectives and Coverage 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
Virtually all representations supported  the need for a clear statement of 
objectives in the legislation to cover facilitation of trade, access to markets, 
compliance with food, plant and animal health requirements set by foreign 
governments and protection of Australia’s  trading reputation. 
There was support for the Act to be based on Australian requirements, 
which are promoted to overseas governments as the export standard. 
Stakeholders were generally of the opinion that specific products or 
groups of products should only be prescribed when there is a need for 
certification to gain access to export markets, either when specifically 
sought by industry or in the event of market failure. 
Responses from industries not already subject to the Act argued such 
status should be retained.  However a number of submissions sought all 
food products to be subject to the requirements of the Act. 
Trade specification and product description requirements are viewed as 
commercial and could be excluded from the Act.  However some 
submissions argued for inclusion of descriptions if the trade is new, if 
description is a requirement of importing countries, or, if the actions of 
individual participants could threaten the trade for all exporters.  
Discharge of responsibilities under the Act 
There was a majority view that the Act is overly prescriptive and that the 
degree of regulatory scrutiny is not risk related.  Inhibitions to innovation 
increased with the degree of prescriptiveness within the administration of 
export ‘rules’.  
HACCP based QA and risk/performance based monitoring and auditing 
are the preferred means for achieving compliance. 
The existing Act imposes burdens on food and agricultural export 
industries in the areas of administration costs, inspection arrangements 
and registration of premises.  Such burdens are a concern under National 
Competition Policy (NCP) principles. 
Co-regulation and contestability 
The concept of reduced responsibilities for governments and increased 
roles for the exporter (co-regulation) has  strong support.  However there 
was not a common view on the exact roles for government and industry. 
The limited scope for contestability of services and the involvement of 
AQIS in all activities under the Act -– establishment of certification 
assurance programs, supervision of implementation (inspection) and final 
certification - is potentially at odds with NCP principles
56
4. Stakeholder Views 
57
Administration of the Act 
¾ 
¾ 
¾ 
Perceptions are strongly held within industries about AQIS  programs 
which administer the Act.  Particular criticisms were: 
• inconsistency of application within the same program across regions 
within Australia, 
• inconsistency of application of ‘rules’ by approved third party 
providers,  and 
• overlaps between  programs especially in dairy and processed foods. 
Users are especially critical of the cost of registration of premises and 
requirements for first time exporters.  
Prospects for the future (technology) 
There is strong support for advancing the rate of introduction of electronic 
based certification.  Concern was expressed, however, about the costs 
associated with such introduction especially on small exporters. 
Export Assurance: NCP Review of the Export Control Act 1982 
5.   ECONOMIC AND COMPETITION ANALYSIS 
5.1  Introduction 
As part of the NCP process, the Committee is required to assess the 
legislation and its administration against Section 5 of the Competition 
Principles Agreement.  Section 5 (9) (c – e) is particularly relevant, stating: 
Without limiting the terms of reference, a review should: . . . 
(c) analyse the likely effect of the restriction on competition and on the  
economy generally; 
(d) assess and balance the costs and benefits of the restriction; and 
(e) consider alternative means for achieving the same result including non- 
legislative approaches. 
The economic justification for government intervention to control exports 
under the Export Control Act rests upon the presumption that the net 
economic benefits to the Australian economy would be lower without the Act 
than with the Act. 
Under the Act, export of food products from Australia is conditional on 
‘acceptance of’ and ‘compliance with’ the requirements of importing countries.  
Therefore it can be argued that the economic value of the Act is the value of 
the market access and flow-on benefits that it facilitates.  Because access 
would be denied to certain markets in the absence of the Act, export volumes 
of certified product would be considerably lower than the present level of $13 
billion. 
Against this background, the chapter examines: 
• the case for regulation of food products, 
• costs and benefits of the Act, and 
• the effect of the Act on competition. 
Costs and benefits are considered in Section 5.3 and in the consultancy report 
prepared by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
(ABARE).  The Committee decided that the most appropriate method was to 
conduct a broad-based theoretical analysis of economic and competition 
issues, supported by: 
• commodity-based assessments through an indicative study of the cost of 
compliance, and 
• modelling by ABARE of the likely effects of loss of access to selected 
markets for two commodities. 
This was judged as the most effective way of tackling the task given its sheer 
size and complexity, reflecting the number of commodities to be covered and 
the inter-relationships between products and markets.  The consistency of the 
stakeholders’ support for the Act in general and the Committee’s analysis in 
particular have confirmed adoption of this approach. 
58
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested