mvc display pdf in view : Convert pdf to txt SDK Library project wpf .net windows UWP MO-Pond-Handbook0-part1396

Missouri
Pond
Handbook
Revised 2011
Convert pdf to txt - SDK Library project:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to txt - SDK Library project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library project:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
library from RasterEdge PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library project:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. ' txt convert to pdf Dim txt As BaseDocument = New RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter
www.rasteredge.com
1
Missouri
Pond
Handbook
Written by Ken Perry
Illustrated by Diana Jayne
Revised in 2011 by Mike Smith and Andrew Branson
SDK Library project:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Now you can convert text file to PDF document using Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# DocumentConverter.ToDocument(@"C:\input.txt", @"C:\output.pdf
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library project:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
2
Equal opportunity to participate in and benefit from programs of the Missouri 
Department of Conservation is available to all individuals without regard to 
their race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. Questions should be 
directed to the Department of Conservation, PO Box 180, Jefferson City, MO 
65102, 573-751-4115 (voice) or 800-735-2966 (TTY), or to the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service Division of Federal Assistance, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Mail 
Stop: MBSP-4020, Arlington, VA 22203.
Missouri Department of Conservation
2901 W. Truman Blvd.
PO Box 180
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0180
mdc.mo.gov
Copyright 1996, 2002, 2006, 2009, 2011 
by the Conservation Commission of the State of Missouri
SDK Library project:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library project:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
www.rasteredge.com
3
Table of contents
From the water’s edge ................................... 4
Developing a new fishing pond ........................... 5
Pond drainage area .................................... 6
Dam ............................................... 11
Construction ........................................ 12
Post construction ..................................... 17
Landscaping and habitat development ................... 19
Maintaining your pond ............................... 19
Managing a new fishing pond ........................... 21
How to stock ......................................... 27
Sources of fish ....................................... 29
Producing fish in your pond ............................ 30
Carrying capacity .................................... 32
Managing for good fishing ............................. 34
Harvesting fish ....................................... 34
Why ponds fail to provide good fishing .................. 37
Managing an old pond ................................. 38
Evaluating your pond ................................. 38
Evaluating your fish population ......................... 41
Improving and maintaining your fish population .......... 43
Pond renovation ..................................... 46
Nonfishing ponds .................................... 47
Common pond problems and recommendations ........... 48
Small pond management .............................. 48
Aquatic plant management ............................ 48
Muddy water ........................................ 52
Leaking ponds ....................................... 55
Fish diseases and parasites ............................. 56
Wildlife and your pond ............................... 57
Aquatic hitchhikers .................................. 59
Appendix A—Government Offices ....................... 61
Appendix B—Fish stocking recommendations ............. 64
Index ................................................ 66
SDK Library project:VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
PDF control. Users can export and convert PDF to Word, Tiff, TXT and various of image file formats. Print PDF in WPF PDF Viewer.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library project:C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images C:\input.pdf"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0 ocrPage.Recognize(); ocrPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, @"C:\output
www.rasteredge.com
4
From the water’s edge
A pond is more than water held back by a dam. It’s a place for deer to stop 
for a drink in the evening. For raccoons, it’s a smorgasbord furnishing tasty 
delights. To frogs, it’s a place to start their young on life’s adventure. To fish, 
it’s home sweet home.
For a pond owner, it might be a place to spend a quiet moment during 
a busy day or a place to toss out a line and be rewarded with fresh fish for 
dinner.
Or perhaps it’s just a spot to rest and observe the waterfowl and other 
wildlife that come for food, water and shelter. Ponds also may provide a 
water source for livestock, fire control or for watering the garden.
If you are ready to build a new pond or you currently care for and 
manage an older one, this handbook is for you. Many common pond 
problems are part of the natural aging process. Each drop of water that runs 
into the pond basin carries with it the mechanism for the pond’s eventual 
destruction. Every drop carries silt and organic material, some of which 
settle in the pond. The accumulation of this material over many years will 
eventually turn the pond into dry land. The life span of the pond depends 
on many factors. With poor preconstruction planning and no management, 
it might cease to meet your needs in less than 10 years. You can prolong 
the time that the pond is an enjoyable part of your life by using the 
building and management techniques in this handbook. A very productive, 
enjoyable and relatively maintenance-free pond will be the result of proper 
planning and management. Older ponds, too, can have a longer life span if 
good management techniques are followed.
This booklet is your guide to building, enjoying and prolonging 
the life of your pond. Use the diagnostic tools, recommendations and 
the additional sources whose addresses and telephone numbers are in 
Appendix A to create the best possible fishing water. Missouri Department 
of Conservation staff will gladly assist in your efforts to realize maximum 
enjoyment from your pond and its surroundings.
Then, on those lazy summer evenings when the day’s work is done and 
the fish are striking at each cast, you will know that all your planning, 
preparation and management were worth the effort.
Developing
a new fishing pond
The success or failure of a pond may depend upon the site you choose. 
Careful site selection will save construction and maintenance costs 
and increase the benefits you receive from your pond. Although most 
potential pond sites have some characteristics that are less than ideal, many 
deficiencies may be overcome with proper planning. When thinking about 
location, don’t forget about convenience.
Remember: A well-planned pond that is close to home and easily 
accessible will be used more often and provide more enjoyment 
than one that is far away and hard to reach. In addition, it is 
more likely to receive proper care.
You also may want to consider locating your pond where it is accessible to 
the disabled and elderly. This may mean building a nearby parking area with 
a gentle slope to good fishing spots.
Because moving earth is one of the biggest costs in pond building, you 
will want to pick an area that will keep this expense at a minimum. The most 
economical site is one that requires the smallest dam to impound the largest 
volume of water. An adequate amount of soil for dam construction must be 
on site or very near. An ideal location would be a natural low area or wide 
draw, narrowing on the downhill side.
The area to be flooded should be as flat and wide as possible to obtain the 
largest water volume in relation to dam height. Ideally, more than half of  
the pond should be deeper than 5 feet after filling to decrease potential 
aquatic vegetation problems. Most nuisance aquatic plant growth occurs in 
shallow water.
Creek beds or large, deep draws should not be dammed unless excess 
water can be diverted around the structure. Creek drainage areas often 
produce runoff water quantities that are too great to control except by large, 
expensive dams. They may require a permit from the Missouri Department 
of Natural Resources.
A word of caution: Conversion of streams or wetlands to 
construct a pond may be against the law. Check with the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers for more details.
While planning your pond, check your property deed for recorded 
easements for buried pipelines, power cables and overhead lines. The 
restrictions in these easements and their locations may alter the site you 
choose. Pond construction must not impact a public road or a neighbor.
Locating a pond near established wildlife cover will encourage use 
by birds and other animals. It is possible to develop wildlife cover and 
5
travel lanes after the pond is built, but it takes less time and effort to take 
advantage of what is already there.
For more information: Go to mdc.mo.gov/node/2684 for the 
Conservation Department’s resources on wildlife management for 
Missouri landowners.
Pond drainage area
The size of the drainage area, or watershed, is an important consideration 
in site selection. The drainage area includes the pond’s surface area and the 
land above the pond that provides water from runoff.
For fish production, about 15 acres of drainage area for each surface acre 
of water is best. The Conservation Department recommends that the ratio 
of drainage area to pond surface, also called watershed ratio, ranges between 
10-to-1 and 15-to-1. The exact ratio for a particular location depends upon 
annual precipitation, soil type and condition, the amount of and kind of 
vegetation covering the drainage area and the steepness of the drainage area.
Ponds with excessive drainage areas often are not suitable for fish 
production. They tend to be muddy, silt in rapidly and have erosion 
problems in the spillway area. Runoff from normal rainfall can flush out 
much of the microscopic plant and animal life that fish use for food. A 
temporary shortage of food may result, and fish growth will be slowed. In 
ponds with excessive drainage areas, fish may swim out of the pond during 
heavy rains.
If the drainage area is too small, the water level may drop too low to 
support aquatic life during extended periods of hot, dry weather. Less water 
means less oxygen available to fish. Warm water also holds less oxygen 
than cold water and could result in a fish kill. Smaller water volume means 
decreased surface area, decreased food production in the pond and slower 
than normal rates of fish growth. Shallow water allows aquatic weeds to 
become abundant.
If the drainage area of a potential pond site is too large or too small, the 
effective drainage area sometimes can be adjusted through terracing. In 
a watershed that is too small, terracing can be used to divert water to the 
pond. Similarly, water can be deflected or terraced away from a pond site if 
the drainage area is too large.
Note: The vegetative cover in a pond’s drainage area greatly 
influences both the quality and quantity of water that run into 
the pond. Ungrazed timberland and stable grasslands provide the 
cleanest water source.
Cultivated land in the drainage area contributes the poorest quality 
water to the pond. The silt-laden runoff from row crops and associated 
agricultural chemicals can shorten the life of a fishing pond, result in a fish 
kill, drastically reduce fish numbers or affect their rate of growth.
6
To avoid a muddy, unproductive pond, you should keep the percentage 
of cultivated land in the pond’s drainage area to a minimum. Good soil 
conservation measures, such as terracing, minimum tillage or no-till and 
strip-cropping, should be in place on row-crop land before a pond is built. A 
minimum of 100 feet of vegetated filter strip should be maintained between 
the pond edge and any cultivated land. A similar filter strip should be 
maintained between the pond edge and areas frequented by livestock.
Plant cover in the drainage area also affects the quantity and the rate of 
runoff a pond receives. The best situation is one where the entire drainage 
area is covered with thick vegetation. This slows runoff and may reduce 
expense in the design and construction of spillways.
The drainage area should be free of pollution sources. Ponds receiving 
barnyard or feedlot drainage, domestic sewage, runoff from heavily stocked 
or fertilized pastures or other high nutrient inputs won’t support fish 
successfully over many years. These materials promote the growth of aquatic 
plants. Too much plant growth leads to a loss of dissolved oxygen as these 
plants die and decay. These nutrient sources also promote the excessive 
growth of filamentous algae, which is also known as pond scum or moss.
To keep your pond healthy, eliminate these sources of pollution before 
you begin construction. Either build a lagoon large enough to contain all 
the nutrients so that none can flow into the pond or pipe the drainage from 
7
A healthy pond 
needs at least 
100 feet of 
dense vegetation 
between it  
and any 
cultivated land.
these sources to a point downstream from 
the pond.
Chemicals used in the watershed may 
impact the fish in your pond. Think 
about potential problems before using any 
chemical in your pond’s drainage area. 
Insecticides are particularly deadly to fish. 
Dead or contaminated fish could result 
from a moment of carelessness.
Water sources
Streams are usually not suitable water 
sources for fishing ponds. Their watersheds 
are generally large, which means they can 
carry a high inflow of silt into a pond. High 
flows result in muddy, unproductive water.
In addition, many stream fish are not 
adapted to the pond environment. They 
may not provide sustained good fishing and can carry parasites or disease 
organisms, which can impact the fish in your pond.
Springs usually are not good sources of water for fish ponds. The area 
where the spring water originally enters the ground may be miles from 
your pond. Because you have no control over this area, you won’t be able to 
monitor chemicals and other pollutants that are introduced into the spring.
Possible pollution isn’t the only problem. Spring water may be too cool 
for good growth of bass, bluegill and channel catfish, and it may be too 
warm to successfully raise trout. The clarity, high mineral content and stable 
water temperature encourages the growth of excessive aquatic vegetation. 
A bottom withdrawal spillway can sometimes solve these problems in a 
spring-fed pond.
Very few ponds are actually spring-fed. Cold water near the pond bottom 
is a common natural pond condition not necessarily related to springs. True 
spring-fed ponds will have water flowing out of the pond during all but the 
driest of times.
For more information: To build a spillway to use in a spring-fed 
pond, go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the aquaguide “Operating 
a Bottom Withdrawal Spillway.”
Types of soils and bedrock
The soil at the pond site should be deep and contain a high percentage 
of clay. The best soils are those that allow water to penetrate very slowly. 
Examples are clay, clayey and sandy loams, and loams.
Most Missouri upland soils contain enough clay for good pond 
construction. A simple test for clay content is to squeeze a handful of fairly 
8
Drainage from 
barnyards 
promotes the 
growth of 
nuisance aquatic 
plants and wide 
fluctuations of 
dissolved oxygen 
in the pond, 
which eventually 
results in 
unhealthy fish.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested