mvc display pdf in view : Convert pdf to txt online control SDK system web page wpf html console MO-Pond-Handbook1-part1399

moist soil into a firm ball. If the ball 
does not crumble with a little handling, 
the soil probably contains enough clay. 
Consult a professional soil scientist 
about the material to be used in the 
dam construction. A good clue to the 
soil suitability is the success of nearby 
ponds.
If the soil at the potential site 
does not contain enough clay, it is 
sometimes possible to bring in clay 
from a nearby location to build a good 
dam. Contact the nearest United States 
Department of Agriculture’s Natural 
Resources Conservation Service office 
for technical advice on the suitability of 
soil at the site.
Pay close attention to the soil after 
construction begins. If white, tan 
or blue clay is exposed, it should be covered with several inches of black 
topsoil, then mulched and seeded. These clays are easily suspended in water 
and will not readily settle out. This situation creates muddy water, which 
results in poor fish growth and a disappointing pond for the owner.
Note: As a general rule, avoid pond sites with springs or sinkholes 
as they may leak. Also, avoid sites in large valleys that have 
poorly defined stream channels and no standing water in pools.
Such sites, called “losing” stream valleys, are poor candidates for 
successful ponds. The surface water disappears into porous bedrock.
Also avoid areas that are sandy or gravelly or that have limestone or 
shale outcroppings because they sometimes allow water to flow under or 
around the dam after construction. Rocky areas often have open cracks 
that are invisible above ground. These cracks in the bedrock, which feed 
underground springs, cause water to flow out of the pond basin. Unless 
properly designed and constructed, a pond built in an area of cracked 
bedrock may be an expensive dry hole.
Design
Fishing ponds should be designed and constructed specifically for fishing. 
Fish populations are easier to manage and maintain, and the recreational 
potential is greater in a well-designed fishing pond.
Fishing ponds may be used for a variety of other uses. It is best if all 
planned uses are considered in the design stage. For example, livestock 
watering can seriously interfere with fish production, but it can be 
accommodated through proper pond design.
9
Before 
constructing 
a pond near a 
barnyard, build 
a lagoon large 
enough to contain 
all the nutrients 
so that none can 
flow into the 
pond. Another 
option is to pipe 
the drainage to a 
point downstream 
from the pond.
Convert pdf to txt online - control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to txt online - control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
You will probably need some technical help in preparing your pond’s 
construction plan. This assistance may be available from the Natural 
Resources Conservation Service. You also may contract this work to a 
private engineering firm.
Tip: Be sure your pond is built according to the plans and 
specifications. Many pond failures have resulted from cutting 
corners to save money.
Contact a Natural Resources Conservation Service office to find an 
engineer or technician to help you:
•  survey the pond site. Make sure you don’t impound water on roads, 
legal easements or a neighbor’s property.
• calculate the expected flow of water into the pond.
•  set elevations and size for grass and pipe spillways and for the top of the 
dam.
• determine the dimensions of the dam and spillways.
• establish the degree of slope of the sides of the dam.
• calculate how much earthfill and other materials will be needed.
• prepare drawings.
• figure out construction procedures.
• consider all intended uses in the design of the pond.
Thousands of successful ponds have been built by earth-moving 
contractors without formal plans, and this option is available to you. If you 
choose to go this route, come to a firm agreement before construction about 
expectations and responsibilities for correcting problems after construction 
is complete.
Size
Fish populations can be managed in a properly constructed pond of any 
size; however, larger ponds have a number of advantages. For example, they 
are less susceptible to water level fluctuations than small ponds. Smaller, 
shallow ponds may dry up completely in times of drought. Deeper ponds, 
on the other hand, may lose depth but will maintain enough water to 
sustain fish.
Ponds smaller than ㄯ acre can provide a lot of fishing pleasure, but they 
must be carefully managed. Very little harvest can be allowed because the 
pond supports relatively few fish. Catch-and-release fishing can work well 
in these small ponds.
10
control SDK system:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file Able to convert plain text to various fonts, colors and sizes of text content in PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
3 to 4 .
Pond
30 .
20 .
10 .
30 .
Depth
To protect fish through periods of oxygen stress, the pond should be a 
minimum of 8 feet deep. Shallower ponds have less water volume, freeze 
earlier, are subject to winter kill and fill with sediment sooner.
Shallow water around the pond’s edge invites the growth of aquatic plants. 
To help prevent some common aquatic vegetation problems, grade some 
of the edges of the pond to a 3:1 (horizontal to vertical ratio) slope to a 
water depth of at least 3 to 4 feet. This may not eliminate all aquatic plant 
problems, but it will ensure that problems will not start as soon or be as 
severe. Although grading the shoreline may be an added cost, it should be 
balanced against the future cost of aquatic plant control.
Deeper water does not mean more fish in your pond. Because fish 
production is based on the microscopic plant growth in the upper 3 to 
5 feet of water, depths greater than 15 feet are not necessary in a fishing 
pond. However, the greater depth will extend the usable life of the pond and 
provide more total oxygen for fish than a shallower pond of the same surface 
area. The pond may need to be deeper to accommodate other uses.
Dam
A dam less than 20 feet high should be at least 10 feet wide across the top. 
The top width should be increased by 2 feet for each 5 feet of dam height 
more than 20 feet. This width provides a roadway and minimizes the danger 
of dam failure caused by muskrat damage.
The front slope on the water side should be 3:1, and the back slope should 
be 2:1 to 3:1. These figures mean that the front slope of the dam will be 3 feet 
wide for each foot of dam height, and the back slope will be 2 or 3 feet wide 
for each foot of dam height. A 3:1 slope is much easier and safer to mow 
than a 2:1 slope, but it will increase construction costs.
11
Using the correct 
dimensions 
when building 
a dam will 
minimize 
muskrat damage 
and reduce 
maintenance.
control SDK system:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Now you can convert text file to PDF document using Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# DocumentConverter.ToDocument(@"C:\input.txt", @"C:\output.pdf
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
VB.NET convert PDF to Jpeg, VB.NET compress PDF, VB.NET print PDF, VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET Export and convert PDF to TXT file
www.rasteredge.com
Each foot of dam height will add 5 feet of width to dams that have slopes 
of 3:1 in the front and 2:1 in the back, while 3:1 slopes front and back will 
require 6 feet of width for each foot of dam height. 
Dam freeboard
The freeboard is the distance between the planned water level, or spillway 
level of the pond, and the top of the dam. It should be at least 3 feet, but it 
may need to be bigger if the drainage area is large. Three feet is usually the 
minimum freeboard necessary to keep water from topping the dam during 
runoff after a heavy rain and to minimize damage from muskrat dens.
Muskrats sometimes burrow into the dam to create an underwater 
entrance for the den, which has a living space above the water level. If 
the water level rises and remains high, the muskrat will burrow upward 
and construct a new dry den closer to the soil surface. It may pierce the 
surface or be so close that the den caves in easily. This damage to the den 
encourages muskrats to dig further into the dam.
These holes may eventually cause the dam to fail by providing a pathway 
for water to flow and cause erosion. An adequate freeboard usually 
eliminates leakage or dam failure due to muskrat burrowing.
Remember: To keep muskrats away from the dam, construct 
steeper slopes on the natural pond banks. Because these rodents 
prefer to live in the steeper slopes, they may leave the dam alone.
Spillway
Spillway design is based on a complex set of calculations using several 
variables. Because of its complexity, it’s important to get technical help. 
Contact the Natural Resources Conservation Service or a private engineer. 
Many contractors also are qualified to help with spillway design.
Construction
All topsoil should be removed from the dam site and borrow area and 
stockpiled for later use on the dam’s surface and shoreline. This will reduce 
suspended clay and aid in the production of rooted aquatic plants. All 
vegetation, roots, stumps and large rocks should be removed from the dam 
site. If they aren’t, the decay of organic materials will cause passages that 
allow water to seep through the base of the dam. Large rocks may prevent 
the soil from being properly compacted, which also could result in seepage.
Tip: All material used in the dam must be well compacted by 
either a sheepsfoot roller or earthmover with rubber tires. Loosely 
compacted dams may fail.
12
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Online Guide for Using RasterEdge WPF PDF Viewer to View PDF document with various notes and shapes, convert PDF to Word document, Tiff image, TXT file and
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Document Viewer Export and convert PDF to TXT file
www.rasteredge.com
Spillway width varies
3
1
To hillside
To top of dam
A core trench should be dug along the 
length of the dam’s centerline. This trench 
should be deep enough so that all soil, 
sand, gravel and loose rock is removed 
down to either solid rock or good clay. 
The trench should extend a minimum 
of 3 feet into impervious subsoil or be 
anchored into solid rock the length of the 
dam and into the valley walls at either end 
of the dam. It should have a minimum 
base width of 8 feet.
The core trench should be filled with 
the best available clay, which should be 
well compacted from the bottom of the 
trench up through the dam. If this clay 
core wall extends above the expected 
water level, it will resist seepage and 
prevent significant water loss through the 
dam. Many ponds leak because the core 
trench and wall were not constructed 
properly.
Almost all ponds are built to include 
a sodded-grass earthen spillway or 
emergency spillway, which will help 
remove excess water during heavy rainfalls. 
The bottom of the spillway channel should 
be 3 to 4 feet below the lowest point of the 
top of the dam and wide enough to carry 
expected runoff water in a thin sheet to a 
point below the dam.
13
Top view of dam with an earthen spillway
A sodded-grass earthen spillway removes 
excess water during heavy rainfalls. 
Consult the Natural Resources 
Conservation Service to determine 
the width needed for your pond.
Side view of an 
earthen spillway
Inlet 
channel 
Exit channel 
Dam 
Waterline 
Hillside 
Spillway 
Back face of dam 
Front face of dam 
Flat to
p
 of dam
control SDK system:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Online C# source code for convert PDF to various document and image file formats in .NET WinForms project. Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images C:\input.pdf"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0 ocrPage.Recognize(); ocrPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, @"C:\output
www.rasteredge.com
Drop inlet
Concrete base
Anti-seep collars
Core ll
Berm
Pond
Pipe
Valve well
Trash rack
Dam ll
Dam
Pond
Anti-seep collar
Core ll
Hooded Inlet
Support for cantilever
outlet (optional)
The width of the spillway is determined by a complex set of calculations 
that takes into consideration local rainfall duration and intensity, the slope 
of the watershed and the type of ground cover anticipated in the spillway. 
Consult with the Natural Resources Conservation Service to determine the 
size of your spillway.
A second type of spillway is a trickle tube, used in combination with 
earthen spillways. This tube is installed during construction with the upper 
opening at the planned water level. The lower opening should be at or near 
normal ground level at the back of the dam. See illustration above.
The upper tube opening, which determines the water level, is generally set 
14
A trickle tube extends the 
life of an earthen dam by 
cutting down on erosion.
A drop inlet spillway works well in 
ponds with a large watershed as it 
allows water to drain quickly.
Corrugated metal pipe with 1" holes.
Pipe lled with course gravel. 
Riser with 
¼" holes
6" concrete base  
Core ll 
Extend pipe above water level 
to show location of intake 
Bell tile around valve and 
pipe for suitable housing 
Pond 
Anti-seep collar 
Union 
Core ll 
Control value 
Cap connection  
may be used for 
other purposes 
Natural ground 
Dam ll 
Valve 
Trough 
Float 
Clean 
water 
supply 
Apex 
1–2 inch pipe with 
adjustable 
Clear 
water 
Trash guard 
airvent 
Dam ll 
Natural ground 
Stagnant water intake 
Core ll 
Anti-seep collar 
Outlet elbow 
Water supply 
to prime spillway 
12 inches below the earthen spillway level to keep water from flowing across 
the earthen spillway. Constant water flow over the earthen spillway will leave 
it moist and vulnerable to severe erosion during heavy rains. The trickle 
tube should be large enough to carry most runoff, or just large enough to 
draw the water level down in a short period of time after water quits flowing 
in the pond.
The drop inlet structure, as shown at the bottom of Page 14, is another 
type of spillway used in combination with an earthen spillway. Also called a 
principle spillway, it allows water to trickle over the rim of an open, vertical 
pipe with the rim set at the desired water level. Water is then drained from 
15
The bottom withdrawal 
spillway can extend the 
life of a pond by at least 
50 percent.
A waterline can be built 
into a dam to provide 
water for livestock.
the drop structure through a horizontal pipe through the dam.
If you think you might want to drain your pond, install a spillway that has 
a drain tube near the bottom of the dam. An accessible valve installed on the 
tube below frost line in the earthen toe at the back of the dam will allow you 
to control the water level.
An optional watering line may be installed along with the drain tube 
below the dam to provide water for livestock. The line could be tapped off 
the drain tube just upstream of the valve. A second valve can be installed to 
control water flow to a watering tank. See bottom illustration on Page 15.
Another type of spillway is the bottom withdrawal spillway, which 
discharges water from the bottom of the pond. This device is designed to 
carry much of the incoming muddy runoff water and some of the incoming 
sediment and organic debris through the pond and downstream without 
raising the water level to the earthen spillway level. This will improve the 
productivity of the pond and extend the usable life of the pond at least 50 
percent. Used as a drawdown structure, this spillway’s siphon capabilities can 
take the place of the drain tube. See top illustration on Page 15.
For more information: Go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the 
Conservation Department’s aquaguide “Operating a Bottom 
Withdrawal Spillway.”
Any tube or pipe through the dam requires the installation of anti-seep 
collars and thorough soil compaction to prevent water from leaking along 
the pipe and possibly undermining the dam.
Tip: Do your fish a favor. Leave some trees and brush piles in the 
pond basin to provide cover for the fish. These spots also enhance 
the production of aquatic insects fish eat.
Although it may be necessary to remove most vegetation to get soil for 
dam construction, any brush and trees that are left in water less than 12 feet 
deep will improve your pond for fishing.
Before the pond fills, build two 10-foot diameter brush piles per acre of 
surface water or leave their equivalent in standing brush. Two more brush 
piles per acre should be added at three- to five-year intervals after the pond 
fills. These brush piles should be in water no deeper than 8 to 12 feet and 
should extend near the water surface so anglers can find them. Be careful 
not to add too much brush too quickly. Too much organic material added to 
the pond can cause water quality problems.
For more information: Go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the 
Conservation Department’s aquaguide “Fishing in a Barrel,” 
which provides more details on fish cover and attractors.
You may want to remove trees and brush from areas that are planned for 
swimming and wading. The material from these areas may be used for brush 
piles or moved to the upper end of the pond to act as silt and debris traps to 
help keep the incoming water cleaner.
Excavate materials for dam construction from below the planned 
16
waterline in the basin or from outside the pond basin to keep the pond area 
attractive. If the soil in the basin is a thin layer, it should be left in place to 
maintain the pond’s water holding capabilities.
If it can be done without breaking the natural water-tight soil seal in 
the bottom of the pond, drop-offs, islands and trenches should be left or 
constructed in the pond. These changes in bottom elevation create a variety 
of habitat for aquatic species.
When construction is complete, spread the stockpiled topsoil over the 
dam and spillway areas to encourage the growth of ground cover.
To provide a grassy bank for fishing in areas accessible to anglers, clear 
trees and brush from a strip 20 to 30 feet wide along the water’s edge. 
However, several trees should be left to provide shade for anglers and to cool 
the water. If your pond is to be built in a wooded area, a fence of small mesh 
wire should be constructed parallel and as close to the shoreline as practical. 
This fence will trap falling and blowing leaves that would otherwise enter the 
water. The decay of large quantities of leaves releases tannic acid, which will 
cause the pond water to have a brown or black stained appearance. Besides 
being unsightly, this stain keeps sunlight from the pond that is necessary for 
fish growth.
Remember: Don’t disturb wooded draws leading into the pond 
area. They provide travel lanes for wildlife and help keep silt out 
of the pond.
Brush piles constructed in and along these draws will be used by rabbits 
and other wildlife. The vegetation also will slow runoff and trap silt.
Post construction
As soon as the pond is finished, the same day if possible, all raw areas 
including the pond basin, dam, spillway and banks should be limed and 
fertilized to soil-test specifications, then seeded and mulched. Soil can be 
17
Plant grass as 
soon as possible 
in the pond 
basin to prevent 
the sides from 
eroding as the 
pond fills for the 
first time.
tested by sending a sample to a University Outreach and Extension office. 
Be sure to allow plenty of time to get your sample tested before you need to 
plant.
Rain falling on bare or disturbed soil can wash large amounts of silt to the 
pond bottom. If the pond does not completely fill immediately, wave action 
and water level fluctuations on the bare soil in the basin can move a lot of 
silt to the bottom of your new pond.
A word of warning: A new unfilled pond can lose a significant 
part of its depth in only one rainfall from erosion of unprotected 
soil. 
The Natural Resources Conservation Service or the local University 
Outreach and Extension office can help you choose an appropriate seed or 
sod, or you can follow the general recommendations below. Ask about the 
use of warm-season grass mixtures because of their value as wildlife habitat 
as well as soil protection.
For the pond basin, recommended cover crops by season are:
• spring or early summer—oats, 75 pounds an acre
•  midsummer—Sudan grass, 25 pounds an acre; or millet species, 25 
pounds an acre; or proportional combination of Sudan grass and millet
•  late summer or fall—rye, 100 pounds an acre; or wheat, 50 pounds an 
acre; or proportional combination of rye and wheat.
After seeding, heavily mulch the area and fertilize to soil-test 
specifications if needed. If possible, the cover crop in the pond basin should 
be mowed if it grows more than 6 inches high before it is covered with water. 
As the vegetation decays underwater, it helps clear the water and promotes 
the growth of fish food organisms. Too much decaying green vegetation, 
however, can adversely affect water quality.
A dense sod is protection enough for pond dams that are not exposed to 
strong winds. Hardy native varieties such as western wheat grass or buffalo 
grass will quickly develop a protective layer. Check with the nearest Natural 
Resources Conservation Service or University Outreach and Extension office 
for recommendations for your area.
If the threat of wave damage is serious, the dam can be protected with 
large “shot” rock, placed in a continuous layer at least a foot thick from 
a minimum of 2 feet below to 1 foot above the planned water level. Any 
rock you wish to place deeper on the dam will provide excellent habitat for 
crayfish and fish, as well as added bank protection.
Remember: A thick grass sod in the spillway is extremely 
important to stop erosion. Follow the recommendations for basins 
listed above.
A buffer strip around the pond and the pond banks should be planted to 
permanent vegetation. The buffer strip provides wildlife habitat, prevents 
muddy water from silt entering the pond and reduces shoreline erosion. 
18
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested