49
For more information: Go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the 
Department’s aquaguide “Turn Your Pond into an Aquatic Briar 
Patch” to improve cover and food for fish in your pond.
Like fish, the plant population needs to be kept in balance. Too many 
large plants can restrict boating, swimming and fishing and can detract from 
the pond’s beauty. They also can provide too many hiding places for small 
fish. When the bass can’t find the smaller fish to eat, an unbalanced fish 
population is the result.
A very dense bloom of microscopic plants, like phytoplankton, imparts 
a soupy green quality to the water that most people find unappealing. This 
bloom of vegetation may cause a fish kill if large quantities of the plants die 
and decay over a short time because the decay process depletes the oxygen 
supply in the water.
This happens most often during the summer when the water temperature 
is at its highest and the amount of oxygen in the water is low. A rapid change 
in water temperature or several cloudy days in a row can also cause plankton 
to die off suddenly.
Caution: For more details about how you can keep your 
fish population healthy, go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the 
aquaguide “Fish Kills in Ponds and Lakes.”
Types of plants
Aquatic vegetation may be grouped into four broad categories: 
•  Algae include many species of microscopic plants and some species that 
look like a submersed rooted plant.
•  Floating plants, such as duckweed and watermeal, are not attached to 
the bottom and float freely on the surface.
•  Submersed plants are rooted to the bottom and grow beneath the 
surface; however, a few have leaves that float on the surface. Some 
common ones are the pondweeds or Potamogeton, coontail, milfoil, 
elodea, American lotus and watershield.
•  Emergent plants grow above the surface and along pond edges. 
Common examples include cattail, sedges, rushes and arrowhead.
Controlling aquatic vegetation
The method for controlling vegetation in ponds depends upon the species 
and circumstances. To identify problem aquatic plants and to find out 
how to treat them, go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the Conservation 
Department’s aquaguide series on aquatic weed control.
Converting image pdf to text - SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Converting image pdf to text - SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
50
Mechanical and physical control
Excessive aquatic plant problems in your pond can be reduced if you deepen 
the pond edges so that most of the area is at least 3 feet deep. Deepened 
edges, however, will not eliminate all aquatic plants.
Nuisance aquatic vegetation in small quantities may be controlled by 
pulling, digging, cutting or raking. Cattails, willows, bullrush, water willow, 
water shield, water lilies, lotus and water primrose may be kept under 
control by removing new growth. Aquatic plants grow fast, so you should 
weed often. To keep the plants under control, you may have to weed all 
summer. Underwater weed cutters are available but are expensive and not 
practical for ponds.
Covering the pond bottom with black plastic will control many species, 
but the unsightly appearance of the plastic may be objectionable in some 
locations. Sheets of black polyethylene 6 to 8 mils thick and 40 to 100 feet 
long can be placed in the water and anchored in place by fastening the 
corners to cement blocks or covering it with gravel. Puncture the plastic 
with numerous small holes to permit the escape of gas bubbles, or the plastic 
will float to the surface. Exclusion of sunlight kills most plants in a few 
days. This method doesn’t always work well in areas where muskrats are 
numerous because the animals often damage the plastic.
Using aquatic dyes to shade sunlight from filamentous algae can be 
effective. However, the use of dyes may decrease fish production by 
eliminating desirable algae populations necessary for production of food  
and oxygen.
Beware: Muddy water shades the bottom and eliminates most 
submersed aquatic plants, but it should not be created to prevent 
plant growth. Shading severe enough to retard plant growth will 
reduce fish growth in the pond.
Biological control
Few practical methods of biological control are available or recommended 
for Missouri ponds. Certain fishes, crayfish, snails, insects and plant diseases 
have been tried, but results have been disappointing. Sometimes the control 
organism is worse than the original problem.
Grass carp do not reproduce in ponds or lakes and have proven valuable 
in many situations. These large members of the minnow family feed almost 
exclusively on aquatic plants, eating two to three times their weight each 
day. Grass carp have definite preferences for certain types of vegetation, 
eliminating all of those types before impacting those less palatable. Algae 
is not eaten until all other vegetation is gone and rarely will they control it 
unless they are overstocked.
For more information: Go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the 
Conservation Department’s aquaguide “Catching Grass Carp.”
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
This guide give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office which users may quickly render and convert TIFF image file to PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
NET SDK library and components for converting PDF file in convert PDF to various document and image file formats Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
www.rasteredge.com
51
Another method of biological control is fertilization. Periodic applications 
of fertilizer, such as soluble ammonium phosphate, can produce tremendous 
quantities of phytoplankton. The bloom can become so thick that it shades 
the bottom much the same as black plastic or clay turbidity.
Once you start fertilizing, you usually have to keep it up on a regular 
basis during the growing season. If fertilization is stopped, nutrients tied 
up in microscopic algae growth will be recycled and will stimulate heavier 
rooted weed growth. Oxygen depletion, which could result in a fish kill, is a 
constant danger in a heavily fertilized pond.
Beware: Fertilization is a risky process and can disrupt the pond’s 
entire ecosystem. Before attempting this option, consult a fisheries 
management biologist.
Chemical control
Chemical plant control is not a simple matter. Frequently, only a small 
difference exists between the dosage rates that will kill aquatic plants and 
those which can lead to a fish kill. The tendency is to apply too much 
herbicide. This can be disastrous because an overdose of some chemicals 
may kill fish or other organisms important to fish production. On the 
other hand, using less than the recommended amount may act as a growth 
stimulant and actually cause plants to grow faster.
There is no all-purpose weed killer. You must select the best chemical 
for controlling your specific problem plants. Chemicals are typically most 
effective in the spring when leaves are new and plants are growing rapidly. 
However, plants like cattails and water lilies that store food in their roots 
should be treated when they begin to bloom, otherwise you may kill just the 
tops; and the roots will sprout new growth.
Regrowth of new plants from seeds is always a possibility, even if 
the current plants are completely eliminated. Most treatments provide 
temporary control and have to be repeated each year or several times 
each year. Chemical aquatic plant control in spring-fed ponds and lakes is 
particularly difficult because it is hard to maintain effective concentrations 
of chemicals.
Note: For help controlling plants in spring-fed ponds, go to 
mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the Conservation Department’s 
aquaguide “Operating a Bottom Withdrawal Spillway.”
While there are many disadvantages to using herbicides, chemicals are 
easy to apply with a hand sprayer and often produce rapid results. They are 
safe and effective when applied according to directions and can be selected 
to kill specific types of plants.
When choosing a chemical, be sure it will not harm the fish. Copper 
sulphate, for example, which has been used for algae control, should not be 
used extensively in fishing ponds. Fish food organisms may be adversely 
SDK application service:VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
VB.NET Project for Converting Image to Byte Array, Convert Word to Image in VB.NET Application. Use VB.NET Code to Convert Image to Stream, PDF to Image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#
www.rasteredge.com
52
affected by copper, and fish reproduction may be reduced.
Do not adopt the attitude that more is better. Treating too large an area 
or overdosing costs more and will result in the decay of a large quantity of 
vegetation, which will cause oxygen depletion and fish suffocation. For this 
reason you should treat no more than ㄯ of the problem plants at two-week 
intervals.
Precautions are printed on the label. For your safety and for the health 
of your pond, read the label of any chemical for precautions and warnings 
about its use. The label is the final authority on how to use a chemical 
correctly.
Tip: For more details about aquatic vegetation control 
recommendations, go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 to contact the 
Conservation Department office in your area.
Muddy water
Clay turbidity, or muddiness, is a result of a combination of factors but is 
primarily a result of water chemistry. The relative turbidity of a pond is a 
balance of the rate of settling of soil particles and the rate of resuspension, 
which is caused by erosion, wind action or aquatic organisms that stir up the 
mud. In other words, it is the balance of forces keeping the soil particles in 
suspension and those forces causing or allowing them to settle.
Soil type and water chemistry
To find out why your water is muddy, take a sample of the water in a clean, 
clear, glass half-gallon or gallon jar. Set the jar on a shelf away from any 
disturbance and observe how fast the mud settles to the bottom. Write the 
date on the jar.
If the water clears in a week or less, you can conclude that larval aquatic 
insects, crayfish, bullheads, channel catfish, carp, muskrats, soil erosion 
from bare soil or wave action in shallow water may be the main cause of 
the problem. On the other hand, if the mud has not settled after a couple 
of weeks, then the problem is water chemistry and soil type. In many cases, 
animals, erosion and chemistry are all involved. In some cases, once the silt 
particles are stirred into the water, they will not settle on their own.
For ponds with a chronic clay turbidity problem, the answer may be 
to leave the pond untreated and stock with channel catfish and fathead 
minnows—species that do not depend on sight to obtain food. Because  
food production will be minimal in such an environment, the fish will have 
to be artificially fed. To keep the catfish population in balance, develop a 
harvest schedule.
If, however, you want a good, well-balanced, fish population in your pond, 
you will have to take care of the problem. Muddiness due to soil type and 
water chemistry is the most difficult to correct.
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
source code for quick integration and converting PDF to HTML is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which that are included in target PDF document file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C# programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting. // Load a PDF file. String
www.rasteredge.com
53
Note: To test your sample, add 2 tablespoons of vinegar to 
your water sample. If it clears up overnight, this means that the 
following treatment will probably work.
Place two small square bales of good, dry green alfalfa or clover hay per 
surface acre of the pond in the water along the edge in the early spring or 
summer. Anchor the hay in place in shallow water by pushing one corner 
into the soft mud with your foot. The treatment will not be effective if all 
the hay is placed or blown into one corner of the pond. Reapply the bales at 
14-day intervals until the water clears, but no more than four applications 
should be made each year.
Weak organic acids similar to vinegar form as the plant material decays. 
The acids neutralize an electrical charge on the soil particles, allowing them 
to settle to the bottom. Besides clearing the water, the decaying vegetation 
stimulates growth of microscopic plants and animals that are important  
fish foods.
Caution: Because decaying vegetation removes oxygen from the 
water, it is important to not use more than the recommended 
amount to avoid killing fish. Don’t use uncured or fresh cut 
vegetation because it decomposes rapidly and may cause a fish kill.
For more details: Go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the 
Conservation Department’s aquaguide “Clearing Ponds that Have 
Turbid (Muddy) Water.”
Another way of clearing muddy ponds is with agricultural gypsum. It tends 
to clear the water faster than the hay treatment, but it is more expensive. Also, 
it does not produce fish food as the vegetation treatment does.
Pounds of gypsum needed to clear a pond
Average  
Size of pond in acres
depth* 
ㄯ 
ㄯ 
ㄯ 
㈯ 
1
2.0 
250 
350 
500 
700 
800 
1,050
2.5 
300 
400 
650 
900 
1,000 
1,300
3.0 
400 
500 
800  1,050 
1,200 
1,550
3.5 
450 
600 
900  1,200 
1,350 
1,850
4.0 
500 
700 
1,050  1,400 
1,550 
2,100
4.5 
600 
800 
1,200  1,550 
1,750 
2,350
5.0 
650 
900 
1,300  1,750 
2,000 
2,600
*Average depth is equal to ㄯ of the maximum measured depth.
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
RasterEdge PDF to JPEG converting control SDK (XDoc.PDF for .NET) supports converting PDF document to JPEG image file in .NET developing platforms using simple
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF Converting DLLs for PDF-to-Word. This is an example for converting PDF to Word (.docx) file in VB.NET program. ' Load a PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
54
Only use agricultural gypsum that is available at lumber yards or from 
fertilizer dealers. Scatter it evenly over the entire pond surface. If the water 
does not clear up within four weeks and if there is no run-off from rainfall, 
wave action, erosion or other sources of muddiness, apply more gypsum—
about one-fourth of the original dose. Once the water is cleared, you may 
have to add one or two bags per acre each year to keep it clear. Use no more 
gypsum than necessary.
Aquatic organisms
Bottom-feeding fish like carp, bullheads or excessive numbers of channel 
catfish keep silt stirred up by rooting in the bottom sediments for food. 
Adult channel catfish may enlarge muskrat or other holes in the bank and 
create muddy water temporarily during the spawning season. Young channel 
catfish produced in the pond can be so numerous that, like bullheads, their 
feeding activities can create a very muddy 
pond. Harvest channel catfish before adults 
reach 15 inches to minimize reproduction.
Ponds containing bottom feeders are likely 
to stay muddy in spite of any kind of treatment. 
The only remedy is to remove the fish and 
restock with fish that aren’t bottom feeders. If 
the water is clear, a good bass population will 
eat nearly all young catfish that are produced.
Crayfish and muskrats may muddy pond 
water by digging in banks and along  
shorelines, removing plants and loosening 
soil. Crayfish are readily controlled by bass. 
If crayfish are creating the problem, your 
bass population is seriously out of balance. 
Reduce bass harvest and consider supplemental 
stocking of adult fish.
Burrowing larval mayflies can be so 
numerous that they stir up bottom sediments. 
If you scoop up a double handful of mud from 
the bottom in the summer and see several 
brownish-yellow inch-long creatures with numerous legs and feathery 
appendages, your pond has too many burrowing larval mayflies. You 
may also see numerous pencil-size or smaller holes in the surface of the 
undisturbed bottom mud.
Too many mayflies means that the bluegill population is probably out of 
balance. Control of larval mayflies is uncertain at best. Stocking 300 to 400 
2-inch bluegill per acre of water may provide some control, but the mayflies 
are only vulnerable to the bluegill during the late summer and fall as they 
emerge from tunnels and swim to the surface.
A rapid drawdown of the water level in summer to dry out the burrows 
Burrowing 
mayfly nymphs 
can be found 
in most ponds. 
These insects 
provide food 
for bluegill.
55
and animals or in early winter to freeze out the insects may provide  
some control and give the bluegill a chance to control those mayflies 
remaining. A rapid drop in water level is necessary as the animals will 
attempt to leave their burrows and migrate down to deeper water if the 
water-level drop is too slow.
Tip: Electric bug lights placed over the pond in the late summer 
and early fall may attract and kill the emerging adults before they 
can reproduce. Place the lights so the insects fall back into the 
pond so the fish can feed on them.
Leaking ponds
Some water loss can be expected in most new ponds until the surrounding 
soil becomes saturated. A 6-inch to 1-foot loss in a dry month due to 
evaporation also is normal. If the losses exceed these rates, you should look 
for a leak.
Ponds usually leak through a porous layer of sand, gravel or broken  
rock extending under the dam. The water may come to the surface some 
distance below the dam. Persistently soggy places, particularly in dry 
weather, anywhere in this area should lead you to investigate further. The 
seepage could be a wet-weather spring and may not be related to a leak from 
the pond.
Leaks are difficult to locate. If the water level stops dropping, you can 
assume that the leak originates at or above this water level. Attempts to seal 
the leak should be concentrated above this level. Several different methods 
are used to stop leaks. The one to use depends upon the type of leak, type of 
soil and availability of equipment. Cost also is an important consideration in 
some cases.
For more information: To find the best method of repairing a 
leaky pond, go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the Conservation 
Department’s aquaguide “The Problem of Leaky Ponds.”
Bentonite, a volcanic clay that swells when wet, has long been 
recommended for sealing leaks. It is most effective in ponds that do not 
have fluctuating water levels and on soils with a high proportion of coarse-
grained particles.
Polyphosphate chemicals are the most effective materials for use in the 
red clay soils in the Ozark highlands. You should seek technical assistance 
from the local office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service in 
choosing the best method for this type of soil.
Clays or other suitable soil blankets may be used to seal a leaking pond. 
The determining factors are availability of material and cost of moving it 
to the pond. The amount needed and methods of application should be 
discussed with the Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Sometimes leaks can be stopped by compacting the existing soil. The clay 
56
content should be at least 10 percent for this method to succeed.
Other methods used in special cases include sealing with flexible 
membranes of plastics and butyl rubber and trampling by hogs or cattle. 
This last suggestion is not generally recommended, but it has been known to 
work in some ponds. It should be used only as a last resort, just before you 
decide to destroy the pond. Sealing sometimes results from feeding livestock 
on the wet pond bottom for a few days before it starts to fill with water. 
The livestock should be removed from the pond drainage after the leak is 
stopped because their activity may cause the water to become muddy.
Fish diseases and parasites
Fish can become ill with viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites and, in 
severe cases, will die. Fish are more vulnerable to diseases when they are 
overcrowded because many disease organisms are easily transferred from 
fish to fish. Overcrowding also causes stress, which causes fish to be more 
susceptible to illnesses.
Fish disease problems are more common in the spring. When the water 
temperatures start to rise, disease organisms may increase quickly and test 
the fish’s immune systems. Fish also may become stressed in late winter 
due to low oxygen concentrations or a lack of food. A logical question is: 
What is wrong with my fish, and what can I do about it? The answers are 
not simple. Few people are trained in diagnosing fish diseases and parasites. 
Treatment, if available, is expensive and difficult to administer because you 
have to treat the entire body of water. Under most conditions, treatment is 
neither practical nor economically feasible. Contact your local Conservation 
Department office for advice on your specific problem.
Parasites at normal, low-population levels usually have little effect on fish. 
However, when fish are stressed by unfavorable environmental conditions, 
parasite populations can increase rapidly and kill fish. Bacterial, viral and 
fungus organisms also can expand rapidly under these conditions and 
produce lethal infections. Disease outbreaks may kill individual fish, large 
numbers of one species or individuals of several species.
Common fish parasites, such as yellow and black grubs or flukes, are 
occasionally found under the skin of bass, bluegill and sometimes channel 
catfish. To control these parasites, one would have to eliminate all the fish-
eating birds, all the snails or all the fish in or around your pond—none 
of which is a reasonable solution. Each of these animals is the host of one 
stage of the grubs’ life cycle. However, one technique that might reduce 
the numbers of grubs is to introduce the snail-eating redear sunfish to 
your pond. This should decrease the abundance of both types of grubs in 
your fish. Because these parasites are destroyed by thorough cooking, fish 
infected with yellow or black grubs are safe for human consumption.
For more information: Contact your local Conservation 
Department office or go to mdc.mo.gov/node/3312 for the aquaguide 
“What’s Bugging My Fish?”
57
Wildlife and your pond
Many people enjoy watching animals that are attracted to the water. In a 
well-designed and properly constructed pond, wildlife will do little harm. 
If you want to attract more wildlife to your pond, contact the Conservation 
Department for information. However, occasionally an animal can be a 
nuisance. If control is necessary, you may consider the following:
Turtles
Turtles are generally harmless. Most are beneficial scavengers and are little 
threat to fish and wildlife. Only three species of turtles are commonly found 
in Missouri ponds. Two of these turtles, the red-eared slider and the painted 
turtle, are primarily vegetation eaters but will eat an occasional minnow, 
frog, crayfish or sick fish. Sometimes these turtles annoy anglers by feeding 
on fish on stringers, but a live box will keep fish safe in areas with high turtle 
concentrations.
The common snapping turtle also is found in ponds. Even though they 
feed to some extent on small fishes and young ducklings, they are more 
apt to feed on a slow-moving, sick, crippled or dead fish and other dead 
organisms. One recent study showed that 36 percent of a snapping turtle’s 
diet is aquatic vegetation.
Turtles are not a threat to the fish population, and attempts to reduce 
their numbers usually result in no noticeable benefit to fish or fishing. The 
presence of turtles should not deter swimmers as all three species are shy in 
the water and will attempt to keep a maximum distance between themselves 
and a larger animal in the water. However, if they become a nuisance, you 
can easily reduce their numbers by catching them on a hook and line. Bait 
the hook with fresh beef or pork or parts of freshly caught fish. Turtle traps 
also can be effective. Like other nuisance wildlife, turtles can be removed 
during the closed season with a conservation agent’s authorization.
For more details: Go to mdc.mo.gov/node/4663 to find more 
information on how to control turtles in your pond. 
Muskrats
Permanent ponds in Missouri will have muskrats sooner or later. Muskrats 
can be an enjoyable addition to a fish and wildlife pond. Whether or not 
they actually do damage is dependent upon the way the pond is constructed. 
Burrows in banks around the pond usually cause little damage. 
If muskrats become too numerous, control measures may be necessary. 
Eliminating muskrat food plants, especially on or near the dam, is good 
pond protection. The starchy plants that muskrats prefer include cattail, burr 
reed, bulrushes and arrowhead. Placing riprap along the waterline on the 
face of the dam will also limit muskrat damage.
58
For more information: Purchase a copy of “Water Plants 
for Missouri Ponds” from the Conservation Department at 
mdcnatureshop.com to learn about plants that muskrats use 
for food. Also go to mdc.mo.gov/node/4578 for information on 
controlling and preventing muskrat damage.
If damage requires immediate action, landowners or their agents may trap 
or shoot the animals at any time without a permit, provided they do not use 
any part of the animal for food or profit, and as long as they notify the local 
conservation agent within 24 hours of the action, according to Rule 3CSR10-
4.130 of the Wildlife Code of Missouri.
Muskrats are easily removed by using traps. If done during the trapping 
season, the pelts may be sold by the holder of a trapping permit. The 
recommended trap and the one many trappers prefer for muskrat control is 
the No. 110 Conibear trap because it kills the animal outright. The standard 
No. 1 steel trap also is effective. See Rule 3CSR10-8.510 and 3CSR10-8.515 in 
the Wildlife Code.
Selection of trap sites is important and should be made with care. Traps 
set in runways, den openings, slides or near natural resting places are 
generally productive. Muskrats in your pond could be considered a bonus 
and harvested and sold during the legal trapping season.
Beavers
Beavers may create a problem by constructing a dam or plug in the water 
outlet of your pond or by cutting desirable trees and shrubs. Protect trees 
and shrubs by placing heavy woven metal fencing around the trunks.
Beavers may be controlled with trapping techniques similar to those used 
for nuisance muskrats. Because this is a larger animal, traps used must be 
larger. The regulations governing control of these animals are found in Rule 
3CSR10-8.510 of the Wildlife Code.
Groundhogs
These animals may become a nuisance when they burrow into the 
downstream side of the dam. Denning activity may be discouraged by 
keeping the dam free from tall vegetation.
The most practical method of control is trapping. Contact the 
conservation agent or private land conservationist in your county 
concerning other potential methods for discouraging groundhogs from 
using your dam as a homesite. Groundhogs may be removed according to 
Rule 3CSR10-4.130 of the Wildlife Code. 
Fish-eating birds
Herons, kingfishers and other birds eat fish, but they normally do not impact 
a pond’s fish population. Some of these are intermediate hosts of the yellow 
and black grub.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested