mvc return pdf : Convert pdf to text file control Library system azure asp.net .net console 1159187220-part154

!
Export Processing Zones in  
Sub-Saharan Africa – Kenya and Lesotho 
Lene Kristin Vastveit 
01.09.2013 
Department of Economics 
University of Bergen
Convert pdf to text file - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to word text online; convert pdf into text file
Convert pdf to text file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf file to txt; convert scanned pdf to text online
Acknowledgements 
I would like to first thank my family and friends for their encouragement and 
wonderful support during my time writing this thesis.   
I also want to acknowledge my supervisor, Rune Jansen Hagen, who has given me 
guidance and advice, and who has been of great help and support during the year. I am 
grateful for the amount of time set aside to consult with me and guide me through this 
process.  
Lene Kristin Vastveit 
29.11.2013  
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
convert pdf to text open source; changing pdf to text
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to word to edit text online; convert pdf image to text
!
"" 
Abstract  
This thesis examines two cases of Export Processing Zone (EPZ) programmes in sub-
Saharan Africa (SSA), specifically in Kenya and Lesotho. Using data from the respective 
countries’ EPZ programme authorities, central banks, relevant studies, and country reports, I 
show that although the programmes have facilitated employment generation and foreign 
exchange earnings from textile and apparel exports, such exports rely highly on preferential 
trade agreements such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). The reliance on 
preferential market access, and the uncertainty regarding the continuation of such preferences 
are important sources of vulnerability. This causes fluctuations in investments and also helps 
explain the low level of backward linkages. This is especially evident in Lesotho. Moreover, 
such production within the zones is mainly of low productivity and low added value. The vast 
number of zone programmes that have materialised in the last decades has contributed to 
reducing the possible net benefit of EPZs, and the increase in competition has made it difficult 
to attract investors. Zone programmes in Kenya and Lesotho are seen as relatively successful 
compared to other SSA zone programmes, yet investment and employment levels within the 
zones are low compared to many programmes in other regions. Several factors hamper larger 
investments, such as high labour unit costs, high electricity prices, inefficient bureaucracy, 
corruption, as well as labour unions and political opposition. EPZ programmes may help 
make it easier to do business in the host countries, and improve investors’ perception of the 
countries’ attitudes towards foreign direct investment (FDI). However, SSA zone programmes 
should to a greater extent target industries and services in which they have good prospects of 
developing a competitive advantage, regardless of trade preferences, which provide good 
opportunities for human capital and technology transfers, and which generate demand 
linkages. SSA countries with large endowments of natural resources may be better able to 
capitalize upon their comparative advantage by focusing on industries that take advantage of 
the countries’ natural resources, rather than on the labour-intensive industries that have 
traditionally located in EPZs. Due to high competition and demand for good quality 
infrastructure, EPZ programmes are generally better suited in more developed SSA countries 
than as a tool to facilitate development in the poorest countries.  
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
convert pdf file to text; convert pdf to text online
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
convert pdf table to text; best pdf to text converter for
!
""" 
Table of Contents 
List of Tables and Figures.......................................................................................................v!
List of Acronyms......................................................................................................................vi!
Chapter 1 Introduction and Economic Theory.....................................................................1!
1.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................1!
1.2 The Aim and Definition of EPZs....................................................................................3!
1.3 The Benefits of and Obstacles to Trade and Industrialisation and the Role of EPZs....4!
1.4 Export-Led Growth and the Development of EPZ Policies...........................................9!
1.5 Measures of Performance.............................................................................................10!
1.6 Research Question........................................................................................................11!
1.7 Methodology.................................................................................................................11!
Chapter 2 Literature Review.................................................................................................12!
2.1 The Potential Benefits Linked to the Use of EPZ Incentives.......................................12!
2.1.1 Export Growth and Foreign Exchange Earnings.................................................12!
2.1.2 Employment........................................................................................................14!
2.1.3 Backward Linkages.............................................................................................19!
2.1.4 Transfers of Knowledge and Technology...........................................................20!
2.2 Potential Economic Costs Linked to the Use of EPZ Policies.....................................21!
2.3 The Determinants of Investments.................................................................................22!
2.3.1 The Role of Traditional EPZ Incentives..............................................................22!
2.3.2 Domestic Sales and Domestic Investments.........................................................23!
2.3.3 Labour Costs, Productivity, and Working Conditions........................................24!
2.3.4 Infrastructure.......................................................................................................25!
2.3.5 Location...............................................................................................................26!
2.3.6 Location within the Country and Regional Development...................................27!
2.3.7 Political and Economic Stability.........................................................................28!
2.3.8 Trade Agreements...............................................................................................28!
2.3.9 Timing and Number of Competing Zones...........................................................30!
2.4 Conclusion in the Literature.........................................................................................31!
Chapter 3 Case Study  Kenya.............................................................................................33!
3.1 Kenya’s EPZ Programme.............................................................................................33!
3.1.1 Introduction.........................................................................................................33!
3.1.2 The EPZ Programme...........................................................................................35!
3.2 The Success of Kenyan Zones......................................................................................36!
3.2.1 FDI and Export Diversity....................................................................................36!
3.2.2 Employment within the EPZs..............................................................................42!
3.2.3 Training Facilities and Knowledge and Technology Spillovers.........................45!
3.2.4 Backward Linkages.............................................................................................46!
3.3 Kenyan Investment Environment.................................................................................49!
3.3.1 Political and Macroeconomic Stability and Overall Competitiveness................49!
3.3.2 Infrastructure.......................................................................................................52!
3.3.3 Domestic Sales and Domestic Investments.........................................................54!
3.3.4 Wages, Labour Productivity, and Working Conditions......................................56!
3.5 Conclusion....................................................................................................................57!
Chapter 4 Case Study – Lesotho...........................................................................................59!
4.1 Introduction..................................................................................................................59!
4.2 Success of Lesotho’s Industrial Areas..........................................................................62!
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
converting pdf to text; convert pdf to txt file format
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
PDFPage page = (PDFPage)doc.GetPage(0); // Convert the first PDF page to a JPEG file. page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg");
change pdf to txt format; convert pdf to txt
!
"# 
4.2.1 FDI, Exports, and Export Diversity.....................................................................62!
4.2.2 Employment........................................................................................................68!
4.2.3 Training and Labour Productivity.......................................................................70!
4.2.4 Backward Linkages.............................................................................................71!
4.3 Lesotho’s Investment Environment..............................................................................73!
4.3.1 Political and Macroeconomic Stability and Overall Competitiveness................73!
4.3.2 Infrastructure.......................................................................................................75!
4.3.3 Working Conditions, Wages, and Productivity...................................................77!
4.4 Conclusion....................................................................................................................79!
Chapter 5 Discussion..............................................................................................................81!
5.1 Introduction..................................................................................................................81!
5.2 The Potential Benefits of EPZ Programmes in SSA....................................................81!
5.2.1 EPZ Programmes as a Policy to Increase in Foreign Exchange Earnings..........81!
5.2.2 EPZ Programmes as a Policy to Increase Export Diversity................................82!
5.2.3 EPZ Programmes as a Policy to Generate Employment; Labour Productivity...83!
5.2.4 EPZ Programmes to Foster Local Suppliers and Indirect Employment..............88!
5.2.5 EPZ Programmes as a Policy for Industrial Development..................................90!
5.2.6 EPZ Programmes as a Policy for Regional Development...................................91!
5.3. EPZ Programmes as a Policy to Increase Investments................................................94!
5.3.1 Political and Macroeconomic Stability...............................................................94!
5.2.2 EPZ Programmes as a Policy to Reduce Production and Trade Costs................95!
5.2.3 The Effect of Regional Trade Unions in SSA on EPZ Programmes...................98!
5.3.4 The Significance of Trade Preferences for Investments within SSA’s EPZs.....99!
5.3.5 SSA Countries’ Ability to Facilitate Labour-Intensive Industry.......................100!
5.4 Summary and Conclusions.........................................................................................104!
References.............................................................................................................................107!
Appendix...............................................................................................................................120!
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
convert scanned pdf to word text; c# extract text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page using VB.NET code efficiently.
convert pdf to rich text; convert pdf to text file
!
List of Tables and Figures 
TABLES 
Table 2.1. Employment within SSA zones in 2006...............................................................................................16
!
Table 2.2.  Employment within zones as a percentage of national employment in the different world regions...16
!
Table 2.3. Change in EPZ employment by region, 2002–2006.............................................................................17
!
Table 2.4.  Overview of African Zone Programmes by Decade of Launch...........................................................30
!
Table 3.1. Number of zones and enterprises, and level of investments within Kenyan zones...............................37
!
Table 3.2. Exports, share of total exports, sales, and EPZ contribution to GDP, 1999–2012...............................38
!
Table 3.3. Employment within Kenyan zones.......................................................................................................43
!
Table 3.4. Expenditures on utilities by EPZ firms, in KSh millions......................................................................48
!
Table 3.5. Local purchases, local salaries, other expenditures, and total domestic expenditures..........................48
!
Table 4.1. The textile and apparel sector in Lesotho, 1985−2008.........................................................................62
!
Table 4.2. Employment in LNDC-assisted firms, 2000−2011...............................................................................68
!
Table 5.1. Expected benefits – Do they materialize?.............................................................................................93
!
Table 5.2. Obstacles to investment within the zones in Kenya and Lesotho.......................................................103
!
Table A1. Beneficiaries of AGOA and EBA.......................................................................................................122
!
Table A2. Incentives given by the Kenyan EPZ programme...............................................................................123
!
Table A3.  Business environment indicators, from 2007 enterprise survey by the World Bank.........................124
!
Table A4. The main incentives given for manufacturing firms in Lesotho.........................................................125
!
Table A5. Business environment indicators, from 2009 Enterprise survey by the World Bank.........................126
!
FIGURES 
Figure 3.1. GDP growth (% annual), 1980–2011...................................................................................................34
!
Figure 3.2. GDP per capita (constant US$)............................................................................................................34
!
Figure 3.3. EPZs firms’ total sales, imports and exports.......................................................................................40
!
Figure 3.4.  Manufacturing and agriculture as share of GDP, 1980–2011.............................................................41
!
Figure 3.5. Exports structure (in %).......................................................................................................................41
!
Figure 3.6. Exports structure by destination (in %)...............................................................................................42
!
Figure 3.7. Total employment within the zones ....................................................................................................44
!
Figure 3.8. Average use of local inputs in the different sectors within the zones in 2008 (in %).........................47
!
Figure 3.9. Total domestic expenditures by EPZ firms (2001–2012)....................................................................49
!
Figure 3.10. Inflation in consumer prices (annual %)............................................................................................51
!
Figure 3.11. Official exchange rate (KSh per US$, period average).....................................................................51
!
Figure 3.12. Domestic sales as a share of total sales, 2001–2012..........................................................................55
!
Figure 4.1. GDP growth 1980–2011 (% annual)....................................................................................................60
!
Figure 4.2. GDP per capita 1980–2011 (constant US$).........................................................................................60
!
Figure 4.3. Number of LNDC-assisted firms ........................................................................................................64
!
Figure 4.4. Export structure (in %).........................................................................................................................65
!
Figure 4.5. Export structure by destination (in %).................................................................................................65
!
Figure 4.6. Value added in different sectors..........................................................................................................67
!
Figure 4.7. Employment in LNDC-assisted firms, public sector, and mines.........................................................70
!
Figure 4.8. Average local input use within the zones in 2008, by sector (in %)....................................................72
!
Figure 4.9. Real effective exchange rate index (2005 =100).................................................................................74
!
Figure 4.10. Official exchange rate (Loti per US$)...............................................................................................74
!
Figure 4.11. Inflation in consumer prices (annual %)............................................................................................75
!
!
vi 
List of Acronyms 
AEO 
African Economic Outlook  
AGOA 
African Growth and Opportunity Act 
ACTIF 
African Cotton and Textile Industries Federation 
CBL 
Central Bank of Lesotho 
CBK  
Central Bank of Kenya 
COMESA  
Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa 
EAC  
East African Community 
EC 
European Commission 
EPZ 
Export Processing Zones 
EPU 
Export Processing Units 
EBA 
Everything but Arms 
FDI 
Foreign Direct Investment 
FTZ 
Free Trade Zones 
GCI 
Global Competiveness Index 
GDP 
Gross Domestic Product 
GSP  
Generalised System of Preferences  
ICT 
Information and Communication Technology 
IDZ 
Industrial Development Zones 
IFC  
International Finance Corporation 
ILO 
International Labour Office 
KenInvest 
Kenya Investment Authority 
KEPZA 
Kenya Export Processing Zones Authority 
KNBS  
Kenyan National Bureau of Statistics 
KOL 
Kingdom of Lesotho 
KSh 
Kenyan Shilling 
LaRRI 
Labour Resource and Research Institute (Namibia) 
LHWP 
Lesotho Highlands Water Project 
LNDC 
Lesotho National Development Corporation 
LTEA  
Lesotho’s Textile Exporters Association 
MFA 
The Multi Fiber Arrangement 
MNC 
Multinational Corporations 
MTICM  
Ministry of Trade and Industry, Cooperatives and Marketing (Lesotho) 
NITA 
National Industrial Training Authority 
SACU 
Southern African Customs Union 
SADC 
Southern African Development Community 
SEZ 
Special Economic Zones 
UNIDO 
United Nations Industrial Development Organisation 
UNCTAD 
United Nations Conference and Trade and Development 
USTR  
Office of the United States Trade Representative 
USITC  
United States International Trade Commission 
WEF 
The World Economic Forum 
!
Chapter 1 
Introduction and Economic Theory 
1.1 Introduction 
The last decade has seen significant economic growth in a number of African 
countries, with sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) one of the fastest-growing developing regions in 
2011. Most SSA economies have struggled to generate structural transformations of their 
economies, changing their export structure from a heavy reliance on natural resources and 
increasing higher-value production. SSA also needs to generate large-scale employment, 
especially to absorb the expected growth in the labour force (United Conference on Trade and 
Development (UNCTAD), 2012a). This thesis attempts to understand the relevance of Export 
Processing Zones (EPZs) and Special Economic Zones (SEZs) in creating a more diverse 
economy and generating employment. This first chapter introduces relevant background for 
the topic and discusses the resource question and methodology in more detail.  
It is recognised that the manufacturing sector historically has been the most important 
engine of sustained and rapid growth in a number of countries. Manufacturing in SSA 
generally contributes to only a small share of gross domestic product (GDP), and SSA’s share 
of global light manufacturing has been declining rather than increasing.
1
Africa as a whole 
has experienced a decline in manufacturing as a share of total GDP from 15% in 1990 to 10% 
in 2008 (UNCTAD, 2012a; Dihn et al., 2012).
2
High export growth, especially of 
manufactured goods, has historically been closely correlated with high economic growth in 
developing countries.
3
Higher export earnings improve a country’s ability to import capital 
goods necessary for investments and to purchase intermediate goods required for production 
(Cline, 1984). Labour-intensive manufacturing has in previous decades furthermore 
contributed to structural transformation in a number of regions and countries with economic 
1
Today the share is less than 1%, despite a number of duty-free and quota-free agreements giving access to 
markets in the US and Europe (Dihn et al., 2012).  
2
Southern Africa experienced a fall from 23% to 18%, Eastern Africa from 13% to 10%, and Central Africa 
from 11% to 6%. West Africa experienced the largest decline from 13% to 5% (UNCTAD, 2012a, p. 3).  
3
See, e.g., Todaro and Smith (2009). Cline (1984) argues that analysis shows that growth in exports has a 
stimulating effect on GDP, even if one controls for the fact that exports are included in GDP. Chow (1987) 
furthermore finds strong causality between export growth and industrial development.  
!
success, such as in East Asia and China, but has yet to take place in SSA countries 
(UNCTAD, 2012a; Dihn et al., 2012).  
The establishment and use of EPZs, SEZs, and maquiladoras, as the zones are called 
in Mexico, is related to remarkable industrial development in some countries. The zones aim 
to enhance and diversify exports, and generate employment and foreign exchange earnings by 
attracting foreign capital.
4
Foreign direct investments (FDI) may facilitate further positive 
externalities, such as technology and knowledge spillovers, that may contribute to improving 
the host countries’ competitiveness and integration in the global economy. The number of 
zones has increased considerably in recent years from 176 zones in 47 countries in 1986, to a 
remarkable 3500 zones in 130 countries in 2006.
5
The number of SSA zone programmes has 
also increased substantially, with most of them established in the 1990s. Several countries 
have however had earlier comparable policies, e.g., South Africa (Stein, 2012; Jauch et al., 
1996). Today, between 20 and 30 African countries use different variations of EPZs to attract 
investments (Boyenge, 2007; Farole, 2011).
6
The significant growth in the number of zones 
may have a substantial effect on the net benefit of zone programmes, as elaborated further, 
later in this thesis. Zone programmes should optimally use the country’s comparative 
advantage, build economies of scale, utilize trade preferences to encourage investments, and 
facilitate trade. The general conclusion in the literature is that African zones, with a few 
exceptions, have been unsuccessful relative to many non-African zones. Despite this and the 
increasing costs associated with the EPZ incentive packages, many African and non-African 
governments remain committed to zone programmes.  
This thesis aims to answer if EPZ programmes can be expected to have a positive 
long-term effect on economic growth in SSA, by exploring the potential benefits of EPZ 
programmes and the factors that determine and hamper investments within SSA zones. The 
first chapter gives an introduction to the economic theory of export-led growth and the use of 
export zones, and, as noted above, also discusses the research question and methodology. The 
second chapter reviews the literature regarding empirical findings of the effect of zones as 
well as the determinants of investments in both non-African and African (with the focus on 
4
FDI may reduce the gap between domestically available savings and desired investment, with consequent 
positive effect on economic growth (Todaro & Smith, 2009).  
5
The different definitions of the zones and difficulties in attaining reliable data bring about some differences in 
the exact numbers of zones and employees reported in the literature.  
6
ILO data includes Cape Verde, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, 
Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Namibia, Nigeria, Mauritius, Mozambique, Togo, Senegal, Sudan, South Africa, and 
Zimbabwe (Boyenge, 2007).  
!
SSA) countries. The literature review also looks at different reasons given for the failure of 
many SSA zones. Chapters three and four provide case studies of SSA EPZs, specifically 
Kenya and Lesotho, respectively. The zones’ effect on growth, diversity of exports, and 
employment, and the countries’ ability to attract investors are explored. These two countries 
have been relatively more successful than other zones in SSA, which make them interesting 
cases to study. They both have had relative success in the apparel sector, which allows a 
degree of comparison. The two countries do however differ in population size, location, 
natural resources, and economic significance in their respective regions. The fifth chapter 
takes the form of a discussion, whose ultimate aim is to address the research question by 
applying the context provided in the literature review to the case studies. It concludes with an 
examination of the potential and the limitations of EPZ programmes, and the policy 
implications they may have.  
1.2 The Aim and Definition of EPZs 
‘EPZ’ is the most commonly used term among a variety of names and forms of a 
rather popular trade policy instrument used in the last few decades. Other names used include: 
‘SEZs’, such as those found in China, ‘free trade zones’ (FTZs), ‘industrial development 
zones’ (IDZs, in South Africa), and ‘maquiladoras’ (in Mexico). The terms are most often 
used interchangeably in the literature. This thesis mainly uses ‘EPZ’ as a common term for 
the zones. The International Labour Organization (ILO) defines EPZs as “industrial zones 
with special incentives set up to attract foreign investors, in which imported materials undergo 
some degree of processing before being (re-)exported again” (2003, p. 1).
7
Baissac (2011, p. 
23) defines SEZs as “geographical areas contained within a country’s national boundaries 
where the rules of business are different from those that prevail in the national territory”. The 
zones are intended to be both more liberal and more effective and the different rules include 
“investment conditions, international trade and customs, taxation and the regulatory 
environment” (Baissac, 2011, p. 23).  
The main objective of EPZs is to attract investments that would otherwise not 
materialize and, as such, promote nontraditional exports, generate employment, and enhance 
the host country’s foreign exchange earnings. The long-term logic of EPZs is that foreign 
investments have the ability to create much-needed transfers of skills and technology, 
fostering local spin-offs, increasing knowledge of how to enter the global market, and 
7
ILO (2003) includes free-trade zones, SEZs, and maquiladoras when talking about EPZs.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested