13 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
Kutner, Mark, Elizabeth Greenberg, and Justin Baer. 
2005. National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL): 
A First Look at the Literacy of America’s Adults in the 
21st Century. NCES 2006-470. Washington, DC: 
National Center for Education Statistics, Institute 
of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of 
Education. 
Matus-Grossman, Lisa, and Susan Gooden. 2002. 
Opening Doors: Students’ Perspectives on Juggling Work, 
Family, and College. New York: MDRC. 
Mazzeo, Christopher, Brandon Roberts, Christopher 
Spence, and Julie Strawn. 2006. Working Together: 
Aligning State Systems and Policies for Individual and 
Regional Prosperity. Brooklyn, NY: Workforce 
Strategy Center. 
Moore, David P., Education Division Director, 
Oregon Department of Community Colleges and 
Workforce Development. Email correspondence 
with Kristen Kulongoski. 2011, Feb. 22. 
National Institute for Literacy (NIFL). 2010. 
Integrating Curriculum: Lessons for Adult Education 
from Career and Technical Education. Washington, 
DC: Author. 
Obama, Barack. 2009. Remarks of President Barack 
Obama—As Prepared for Delivery Address to Joint 
Session of Congress Tuesday, February 24, 2009
Accessed April 4, 2011. 
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/ 
Remarks-of-President-Barack-Obama-Address-to-
Joint-Session-of-Congress/. 
Oertle, Kathleen M., Sujung Kim, Jason L. Taylor, 
Debra D. Bragg, and Timothy Harmon. 2010. 
Illinois Adult Education Bridge Evaluation: Technical 
Report. Champaign, IL: Office of Community 
College Research and Leadership, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
Park, Rosemarie J., Stacey Ernst, and Eunyoung Kim. 
2007. Moving Beyond the GED: Low-Skilled Adult 
Transition to Occupational Pathways at Community 
Colleges Leading to Family-Supporting Careers. St. Paul, 
MN: National Research Center for Career and 
Technical Education, University of Minnesota. 
Patterson, Margaret B. 2010. GED® Tests Passers in 
Postsecondary Institutions of Up to Two Years: 
Enrollment and Graduation Patterns. Washington, 
DC: GED Testing Service. 
Patterson, Margaret B., Jizhi Zhang, Wei Song, and 
Anne Guison-Dowdy. 2010. Crossing the Bridge: 
GED Credentials and Postsecondary Education 
Outcomes. Washington, DC: GED Testing Service. 
Perin, Dolores. 2011. Facilitating Student Learning 
Through Contextualization. (CCRC Working Paper 
No. 29). New York: Community College Research 
Center, Teachers College, Columbia Univeristy. 
Prince, David, and Davis Jenkins. 2005. Building 
Pathways to Success for Low-Skill Adult Students: 
Lessons for Community College Policy and Practice from a 
Statewide Longitudinal Tracking Study. New York: 
Community College Research Center, Teachers 
College, Columbia University. 
Reder, Stephen. 2007. Adult Education and Postsecondary 
Success. New York: Council for Advancement of 
Adult Literacy. 
Shulock, Nancy, and Davis Jenkins. 2011. Performance 
Incentives to Improve Community College Completion: 
Learning from Washington State’s Student Achievement 
Initiative. Sacramento, CA: Institute for Higher 
Education Leadership and Policy, California State 
University, Sacramento. 
Strawn, Julie. 2010. Shifting Gears: State Innovations to 
Advance Workers and the Economy in the Midwest
Chicago, IL: The Joyce Foundation. 
Taylor, Jason L., and Debra D. Bragg. Forthcoming 
2011. Immediate Student Outcomes of Adult Education 
Bridge Programs in Illinois. Champaign, IL: Office of 
Community College Research and Leadership, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey. 
2009. Annual Social and Economic Supplement
Washington, DC: Author. 
Convert pdf file to text document - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
change pdf to text; convert image pdf to text
Convert pdf file to text document - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
change pdf to text file; batch convert pdf to text
14 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational 
and Adult Education. 2007. Adult Education 
Annual Report to Congress Year 2004–05
Washington, DC: Author. 
Valentine, Jeffrey C., Amy S. Hirschy, Christine D. 
Bremer, Walter Novillo, Marisa Castellano, and 
Aaron Banister. 2009. Systematic Reviews of Research: 
Postsecondary Transitions - Identifying Effective Models 
and Practices. Louisville, KY: National Research 
Center for Career and Technical Education, 
University of Louisville. 
Wachen, John, Davis Jenkins, and Michelle Van Noy. 
2010. How I-BEST Works: Findings from a Field 
Study of Washington State’s Integrated Basic Education 
and Skills Training Program. New York: Community 
College Research Center, Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 
Washington State Board for Community and 
Technical Colleges. 2008. Application and Guidelines 
Combined: 2008 Integrated Basic Education and Skills 
Training (I-BEST). Accessed Feb. 25, 2011. 
http://www.sbctc.ctc.edu/college/ 
e_integratedbasiceducationandskillstraining.aspx. 
Washington State Board for Community and 
Technical Colleges. n.d. Create Your Own I-BEST 
Program. Accessed June 21, 2011. 
http://www.sbctc.ctc.edu/college/_e-
ibestcreateyourownprogram.aspx. 
WorkSource Oregon. 2011. Career Pathways.  
Accessed March 25, 2011 
http://www.worksourceoregon.org/ 
index.php/career-pathways. 
Zeidenberg, Matthew, Sung-Woo Cho, and Davis 
Jenkins. 2010. Washington State’s Integrated Basic 
Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST): New 
Evidence of Effectiveness. New York: Community 
College Research Center, Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 
Zhang, Jizhi. 2010. From GED Credential to College: 
Patterns of Participation in Postsecondary Education 
Programs. Washington, DC: GED Testing Service. 
Zhang, Jizhi, and Margaret B. Patterson. 2010. Repeat 
GED Tests Examinees: Who Persists and Who Passes? 
Washington, DC: GED Testing Service.  
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF for .NET offers advanced & mature APIs for developers to extract text content from PDF document file in C#.NET class application.
changing pdf to text; convert pdf to searchable text
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
convert pdf to text file; convert pdf to word to edit text online
15 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
Appendix 
Table A-1. Supporting policy or guidance of state bridge initiatives, by selected 
component and featured state 
Supporting policy  
or guidance 
Washington  
I-BEST 
Oregon  
OPABS 
Illinois  
AEBI 
Criteria for target 
population 
Students qualifying for federally 
funded adult education services.  
• These are adults with 
assessed reading, writing, 
math, and English language 
skills below the 12th-grade 
level. 
Students qualifying for 
federally funded adult 
education services. 
• NRS ABE High Intermediate 
level (6th- to 8th-grade 
reading or math levels). 
• Or NRS ASE levels (9th- to 
12th-grade reading or math 
levels).  
Students qualifying for 
federally funded adult 
education services.  
• NRS ABE High Intermediate 
level (6th- to 8th-grade 
reading or math levels). 
• Or NRS ASE levels (9th- to 
12th-grade reading or math 
levels). 
• Or ESL Intermediate level 
and above.  
Data collection/ 
program evaluation 
Students are pre- and post-
tested with state-approved 
assessment instruments. 
• CASAS assessment in 
reading, math, or listening for 
ESL learners (CASAS 2011). 
Student progress is evaluated 
using system-wide data, such as 
student characteristics, program 
enrollment and completion data, 
postsecondary-level data, and 
state-level data. 
Sample measures include: 
• NRS measures, including 
GED attainment, placement in 
postsecondary education, and 
placement and retention in 
employment.  
• Students who earned 
workforce certificates 
(credentials) or attained (non-
credential) skill levels 
recognized by the institution 
as a completion point.  
• Postsecondary-level credits 
attempted and earned, and 
college- level certificates or 
credentials earned. 
• I-BEST student grade point 
averages.  
Students are pre- and post-
tested with state-approved 
assessment instruments. 
• CASAS assessment in 
reading and/or math. 
Student progress is evaluated 
using system-wide data, such 
as student characteristics, 
program enrollment and 
completion data, 
postsecondary-level data, and 
state-level data. 
Instructor implementation data 
are collected to monitor the 
fidelity and use of the OPABS 
courses. Data also provide 
feedback on the use of 
standardized lesson plans and 
the occupational 
contextualization of the 
courses.  
Annual instructor surveys are 
administered to track 
instructors’ changes in 
instructional content and 
methods. 
Post-course standardized 
evaluations are collected from 
learners to assess their 
perceptions of the utility of the 
courses. 
Students are pre- and post-
tested with state-approved 
assessment instruments. 
• TABE, CELSA, or BEST 
Plus assessments. 
Student progress is evaluated 
using system-wide data, such 
as student characteristics, 
program enrollment and 
completion data, 
postsecondary-level data, and 
state-level data. 
Short-term measures 
• Higher numbers of low-
income working adults enroll 
in postsecondary education.  
• Bridge program graduates 
who enroll in credit 
programs will succeed in 
their courses.  
Long-term measures 
• Higher proportion of low-
income working adults attain 
degrees and/or certificates.  
• Higher proportion of ABE, 
GED, ASE, ESL, and 
developmental education 
students transition into and 
complete an associate’s 
degree and/or certificate 
program. 
• Increased earnings and job 
quality for low-income adults 
engaged in career pathways 
work.  
See notes at end of table. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
remove text from pdf; convert pdf to rich text
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Visual C# .NET PDF document splitter control toolkit SDK can not only offer C# developers a professional .NET solution to split PDF document file but also
convert pdf to text file using; convert pdf to openoffice text document
16 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
Table A-1. Supporting policy or guidance of state bridge initiatives, by selected 
component and featured state—cont. 
Supporting policy  
or guidance 
Washington  
I-BEST 
Oregon  
OPABS 
Illinois  
AEBI 
Professional 
development 
Optional state-sponsored as well 
as inter/intra-institutional 
professional development is 
provided, including state 
workshops and conferences, 
online modules and other 
resources, mentoring, and 
learning communities. 
Required professional 
development workshops 
prepare ABS faculty to teach 
OPABS courses and advising 
modules and integrate 
additional occupational 
information into courses. 
Optional state-sponsored 
professional development is 
provided, including a recently 
developed Bridge Training 
Workshop (three-day training 
with intensive technical 
assistance).  
NOTE: The following abbreviations were used in this table: National Reporting System (NRS); Adult Basic Education (ABE); Adult 
Secondary Education (ASE); English as a Second Language (ESL); General Educational Development (GED); Comprehensive Adult 
Student Assessment System (CASAS); Test for Adult Basic Education (TABE); Combined English Language Skills Assessment (CELSA); 
Basic English Skills Test (BEST Plus); Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST); Oregon Pathways for Adult Basic 
Skills Transition to Education and Work (OPABS); Adult Education Bridge Initiative (AEBI). 
SOURCE: Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges 2008, n.d.; Wachen, Jenkins, and Van Noy 2010; Alamprese 
2007, 2010, 2011; Illinois Community College Board 2009, 2011. 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
c# read text from pdf; convert pdf table to text
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Demo code to Append PDF Document. In addition, VB.NET users can append a PDF file to the end of a current PDF document and combine to a single PDF file.
convert pdf to rich text format; convert pdf to txt format
17 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
Table A-2. Definitions of core program elements of state bridge programs, by 
featured state 
Core program 
elements 
Washington  
I-BEST 
Oregon  
OPABS 
Illinois  
AEBI 
Planning process 
A required collaborative 
planning process includes adult 
education programs, community 
colleges, local and regional 
businesses, labor, community-
based organizations (CBOs), 
and employment services.  
Programs must focus on 
occupations and sectors in 
demand locally that provide high 
wages, as supported by local 
data on the number of job 
openings and wages. The most 
common I-BEST programs (88 
percent) focus on health-care, 
manufacturing, education, and 
business. 
Courses must build toward 
certificates and/or degrees and 
prepare students for 
employment. Courses must form 
a clearly articulated career 
pathway. 
A required collaborative 
planning process includes ABS 
faculty, CTE faculty, student 
services staff, and One-Stop 
Center staff. 
Standardized OPABS 
programs focus on Oregon’s 
high-demand occupations: 
health services, industrial and 
engineering systems, and 
business and management. 
A required collaborative 
planning process includes the 
adult education program, the 
community college, and/or 
employers and specifies the 
role of each partner and the 
services that each will provide. 
Programs may focus on one of 
the following state-identified 
industry/ 
occupational sectors: 
healthcare, manufacturing, or 
transportation, distribution, and 
logistics. 
The bridge program must 
prepare students to enter 
credit-bearing courses and 
programs within one of the 16 
nationally recognized career 
clusters. 
Curriculum 
development 
Locally developed 
contextualized and integrated 
curriculum. ABE and CTE 
faculty partner to develop a joint 
program of instruction including 
integrated learning outcomes 
encompassing all Washington 
ABE Learning Standards and 
relevant CTE skills standards. 
Standardized set of 
contextualized courses. Six 
academically accelerated 
basic skills courses in reading, 
math, and writing are aligned 
to the skill requirements of 
postsecondary, entry-level 
CTE courses and state ABS 
Learning Standards. Three of 
the two-term courses are at 
the bridge level (ASE levels), 
and three are at the pre-bridge 
(High Intermediate) level. 
Locally developed 
contextualized curriculum. 
Course content must contain 
the knowledge and skills 
needed for entry-level 
occupations within a broad 
cluster, as well as career 
information and planning. 
Alignment with recently revised 
state ABE/ASE and ESL 
content standards will be 
required in the near future. 
Instruction 
Faculty from ABE and CTE are 
involved in the delivery of 
instruction, with a minimum of 
50 percent co-teaching required 
in the integrated CTE courses. 
Integrated CTE courses are 
supported by an additional ABE 
course focused on both content 
reinforcement and basic skills 
improvement. 
ABE faculty instruction is 
based on standardized lesson 
plans that follow a scope and 
sequence and include 
instructor and learner 
materials. 
Contextualized instructional 
delivery by ABE faculty may 
include traditional classroom 
activities, a blended online 
approach, and co-teaching. 
Instruction is structured in 
short-term, intensive modules 
offered at times convenient to 
adult students’ schedules. 
See notes at end of table. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
converting pdf to editable text for; convert pdf to plain text online
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction.
convert pdf to text; convert pdf to text doc
18 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
Table A-2. Definitions of core program elements of state bridge programs, by 
featured state—cont. 
Core program 
elements 
Washington  
I-BEST 
Oregon  
OPABS 
Illinois  
AEBI 
Career and college 
awareness 
Coordination among college 
departments is required to 
identify student success 
strategies (e.g., acquiring 
financial aid, participating in 
career/education planning, 
mitigating barriers, navigating 
college systems, etc.). 
A required Career and College 
Awareness course—a two-
term reading course spanning 
the pre-bridge and bridge 
levels—provides information 
about local labor markets and 
the educational requirements 
of jobs in these markets. The 
course leads learners through 
an exploration of their skills, 
interests, and educational and 
work background to help them 
prepare a career pathway plan 
for further education and work. 
A required career development 
component includes career 
exploration, planning within a 
career area, and learning 
about the world of work. 
Advising and 
transition services 
Required transition strategies 
help students move to the next 
program level, whether that 
includes work or the next 
academic program (e.g., career 
pathway planning, financial aid 
assistance, and academic 
support). 
Three required two-hour pre-
college advising modules—
College Application Process, 
Placement Testing, and 
Financial Aid—prepare 
learners to begin the college 
admissions process. 
Required transition services 
provide college and career 
information and assistance to 
allow students to navigate the 
transition process successfully. 
Strategies target student 
recruitment, retention, support 
services, and transition. 
NOTE: The following abbreviations were used in this table: Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST); Oregon 
Pathways for Adult Basic Skills Transition to Education and Work (OPABS); Adult Education Bridge Initiative (AEBI); Adult Basic Skills 
(ABS); Career and Technical Education (CTE); Adult Basic Education (ABE); Adult Secondary Education (ASE); English as a Second 
Language (ESL). 
SOURCE: Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges 2008; Wachen, Jenkins, and Van Noy 2010; Alamprese 2007, 
2010; llinois Community College Board 2009, 2011. 
19 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
Table A-3. Variations of local implementation of state bridge initiatives, by featured 
state 
Local implementation 
variations 
Washington  
I-BEST 
Oregon  
OPABS 
Illinois  
AEBI 
Program design 
Program length typically spans 
one to four quarters, with a very 
small number of programs 
requiring more than four 
quarters. Seventy-nine percent 
of I-BEST programs are three 
quarters or less in length. The 
length of programs also varies 
by field of study and college. 
While ABS programs have 
flexibility in the number and 
types of OPABS courses 
taught during an academic 
year, programs implementing 
OPABS are expected to offer, 
at minimum, the Career and 
College Awareness course 
concurrently with a bridge or 
pre-bridge course. This 
combination of courses guides 
learners in preparing an initial 
career pathway plan, while 
developing their basic skills for 
transition to further education 
or work. Programs also are 
expected to offer both terms of 
the two-term courses. 
Program design options 
include a single course (for 
higher-level students) that 
transitions students into credit-
bearing courses or a series of 
courses in which students 
complete a lower-level bridge 
course that prepares them to 
enter a noncredit or credit 
occupational course, or 
program leading to an entry-
level job. This second 
approach allows students to 
stop out for work and return to 
a higher-level bridge course 
without having to repeat 
content. 
Curriculum 
development/ 
instruction 
Levels of integrated instruction 
(four models listed below), 
incorporating both basic skills 
and professional technical 
content, vary across programs 
and institutions. Four 
instructional models were 
documented in a recent 
qualitative study (Wachen, 
Jenkins, and Van Noy 2010) 
evaluating the effectiveness of 
the I-BEST program: (1) non-
integrated instruction; (2) non-
integrated instruction with 
separate, contextualized basic 
skills instruction; (3) partially 
integrated instruction; and (4) 
fully integrated instruction.  
Student population varies by 
course among colleges. Twenty-
seven colleges reported filling I-
BEST courses with both I-BEST 
and non-I-BEST students, a 
result of limited I-BEST 
enrollment and as a learning 
strategy in which higher-skill 
students support lower-skill 
students. Some colleges also fill 
I-BEST courses only with I-
BEST students. 
While OPABS courses are 
standardized in terms of 
lesson plans that follow a 
scope and sequence and 
include instructor and learner 
materials, ABS faculty have 
flexibility in the use of 
additional materials and 
resources to supplement the 
OPABS courses (e.g., inviting 
guest speakers to discuss 
high-demand careers and 
courses required for these 
careers). These activities link 
the courses directly to 
individual college career 
pathways. 
Some ABS programs have 
formed cohorts of ABS 
learners, in which the same 
learners are enrolled in the 
multiple OPABS courses (i.e., 
basic skills courses, College 
and Career Awareness course, 
advising module) over two 
terms. The use of cohorts 
creates a natural learning 
community of ABS learners 
who support each other in 
developing a career pathway 
plan and making the transition 
from ABS to postsecondary 
courses. 
Levels of curriculum and 
instructional integration vary 
among programs.  
Integration of technology 
varies among programs, 
including the use of computers 
and software, Web-based 
instruction, Internet research, 
and industry-specific tools. 
See notes at end of table. 
20 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
Table A-3. Variations of local implementation of state bridge initiatives, by featured 
state—cont. 
Local implementation 
variations 
Washington  
I-BEST 
Oregon  
OPABS 
Illinois  
AEBI 
Career and college 
awareness/ 
advising and 
transition services 
The breadth and intensity of 
student support services vary 
among I-BEST programs and 
colleges. Types of services 
include traditional student 
support services (i.e., 
counseling, financial aid 
planning, academic advising), 
pre- and post-assessment, 
program screening, career 
planning and employment 
assistance, and pre-I-BEST 
programs for adults with fewer 
skills. Staff providing support 
services also varied among 
colleges, from a dedicated I-
BEST coordinator or case 
manager to instructors and 
traditional support services 
personnel. 
See above under Curriculum 
development/instruction. 
Career exploration and 
development strategies are 
diverse and extensive among 
programs, as are the format 
and implementation of formal 
Individual Career Plans (ICP). 
Practices include integrated 
career exploration as part of 
the curriculum. Transition 
services vary by staff providing 
them (e.g., program 
coordinator, instructor, or a 
separate transition coordinator 
or case manager), types of 
transition services (e.g., guest 
speakers, child care, tutoring, 
flyers, mentors, workshops), 
format (e.g., individual or 
group advising), and strategy 
focus (e.g., recruitment, 
retention, support services, or 
transition to postsecondary). 
College credit and/or 
credentialing 
Programs vary in the amount of 
college credit and type of 
certificate and/or credential 
offered upon successful 
completion of the program. 
College credit is not yet 
provided, but the state will be 
piloting college 
credit/credentialing this fall. 
Programs vary in the amount 
of college credit and type of 
certificate and/or credential 
they offer. 
Programs may offer dual 
enrollment in credit and 
noncredit programs. 
Other elements with 
variation 
Student Recruitment 
To promote greater student 
success in I-BEST, programs 
have defined additional 
academic (e.g., minimum 
CASAS scores, minimum 
number of GED tests 
completed) and personal (e.g., 
preparedness, background 
checks) eligibility requirements 
beyond the state requirement of 
a CASAS score of 256 or below.  
Student recruitment and 
program entry points vary 
among programs and include 
referrals from adult education 
programs, programs within the 
college (e.g., CTE programs, 
workforce grant programs, 
TRIO), and partnerships outside 
the college (e.g., CBOs, 
workforce partners, businesses).  
Planning Process 
Approaches to building 
partnerships vary among 
programs and depend on the 
location of the adult education 
program (i.e., community 
college, community-based 
organization, local education 
agency) and involvement of 
local businesses. 
NOTE: The following abbreviations were used in this table: Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST); Oregon 
Pathways for Adult Basic Skills Transition to Education and Work (OPABS); Adult Education Bridge Initiative (AEBI); Adult Basic Skills 
(ABS); Career and Technical Education (CTE); General Educational Development (GED); Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment 
System (CASAS); community-based organizations (CBOs). 
SOURCE: Wachen, Jenkins, and Van Noy 2010; Alamprese 2007, 2010, 2011; Bagwell 2011; Illinois Community College Board 2009; 
Oertle et al. 2010. 
Page left intentionally blank. 
21 
PROMOTING COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS: BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR LOW-SKILL ADULTS 
The Department of Education’s mission is to promote student achievement and preparation  
for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access. 
www.ed.gov 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested