how to generate pdf in asp net mvc : Convert pdf to .txt file SDK software service wpf winforms web page dnn cdp8160-part1673

ECONOMIC GROWTH CENTER
YALE UNIVERSITY
P.O. Box 208269
New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8269
http://www.econ.yale.edu/~egcenter/
CENTER DISCUSSION PAPER NO. 816
EXPORT GROWTH IN INDIA: HAS FDI PLAYED A ROLE?
Kishor Sharma
Charles Sturt University
Australia
July 2000
Note:
Center Discussion Papers are preliminary materials circulated to stimulate discussions and critical
comments.
Convert pdf to .txt file - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to word and edit text; pdf to text converter
Convert pdf to .txt file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
change pdf to txt format; convert pdf to searchable text
Export Growth in India: Has FDI Played a Role?
Kishor Sharma
Charles Sturt University (Australia)
Abstract
Export growth in India has been much faster than GDP growth over the past few decades.
Several factors appear to have contributed to this phenomenon including foreign direct
investment (FDI). However, despite increasing inflows of FDI especially in recent years
there has not been any attempt to assess its contribution to India's export performance-
one of the channels through which FDI influences growth. Using annual data for 1970-98
we investigate the determinants of export performance in India in a simultaneous
equation framework. Results suggest that demand for Indian exports increases when its
export prices fall in relation to world prices. Furthermore, the real appreciation of the
rupee adversely effects India's exports. Export supply is positively related to the domestic
relative price of exports and higher domestic demand reduces export supply. Foreign
investment appears to have statistically no significant impact on export performance
although the coefficient of FDI has a positive sign.
Key Words: Exports, commercial policy, export subsidies, foreign direct investment,
exchange rates and India.
JEL Classification Codes: F1, F13, F14 and F21.
_______________
* I am grateful to Professor T. N. Srinivasan for his advice while I was working on this
paper during my visiting appointment at Yale University in Spring 2000. I am also
grateful to Edward Oczkowski for his advise on econometric work and Prema-Chandra
Athukorala for encouraging me to write this paper. All remaining errors are mine.
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
convert pdf to word to edit text; convert pdf to text without losing formatting
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
c# convert pdf to text file; convert pdf to openoffice text
2
I
Introduction
India's exports have grown much faster than GDP over the past few decades. For
example, its exports have grown over 11% per annum while growth in GDP is about 5%
during 1970-98 periods. Exports have grown even faster since 1945-95. Several factors
appear to have contributed to this phenomenon including foreign direct investment (FDI)
which has been rising consistently especially from the early 1990s. By 1997 India
became the ninth largest recipient of such investment among the developing economies
(World Bank, 1998:20).
1
However, despite increasing inflows of FDI there has not been
any attempt to assess its contribution to India's export performance- one of the channels
through which FDI affects growth.
2
The success stories of East and South East Asian countries suggest that FDI is a powerful
tool of export promotion because multinational companies (MNCs) through which most
FDI is undertaken have the well established contacts and up to date information about
foreign markets. However, the experience of these countries cannot be generalized to
India given the lower level of infrastructure, and the rigidity in both the factor as well as
commodity markets (Srinivasan, 1998). Furthermore, the role of FDI in export promotion
in developing countries remains controversial and depends crucially on the motive for
such investment. If the motive behind FDI is to capture domestic market (tariff-jumping
1
India has experienced a substantial increase in 
FDI 
inflows from US$ 46 million in 1970 to US$
3,351 million by 1997.
2
There are a few studies (Kumar, 1994 and Kumar and Siddharthan, 1993) which examine the role
of FDI in India's export performance based on data until the early 1980s. However, there has been
a major reform since then especially from the early 1990s. Thus, their results must be interpreted
with caution. In the analysis of 43 Indian industries during 1975-76 to 1980-81 Kumar (1994) did
not find any significant difference in the export-orientation of the affiliates of MNCs as compared
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
convert pdf to rich text; convert scanned pdf to editable text
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free .NET library for creating PDF from TXT in both C# C#.NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
convert pdf to .txt file; convert scanned pdf to text online
3
type investment), it may not contribute to export growth. On the other hand, if the motive
is to tap export markets by taking advantage of the country's comparative advantage, then
FDI may contribute to export growth. Thus, whether FDI contributes to export growth or
not depends on the nature of the policy regime. By now it is well known that an outward-
oriented regime encourages export-oriented FDI while an inward-oriented policy regime
attracts FDI mainly to capture domestic rather than export markets (World Bank, 1993).
India has opened up its market since the beginning of the last decade (especially from
July 1991) by lowering tariff and non-tariff barriers (NTBs), and liberalizing investment
policy. However, by any standard India is far less open than many developing
economies.
3
Furthermore, its factor market including infrastructure sector is less efficient
compared with many East and South East Asian countries with whom India competes in
international market (Srinivasan, 1998). Hence, it is possible to argue that even with the
policy liberalization India may have failed to attract a significant amount of export-
oriented FDI
4
and the export growth may have been brought about by factors other than
FDI namely the real depreciation of Indian currency, improvements in price
competitiveness and provision of export subsidies etc. In the light of the above debate,
the aim of this paper is to examine whether or not FDI has made any significant
contribution to India's export growth.
with their local counterparts. Kumar and Siddharthan (1993) also observed similar results in the
analysis of 13 Indian industries during the same period.
3
For example, by the mid 1990s import-weighted tariff in India was 33% as compared with 9% in
Korea (1985-92), 10% in Indonesia (1989-91), 10% in Mexico (1990) and 14% in Brazil (1993)
(See Ahluwalia et. al, 1996).
4
Efficient infrastructure facilities are vital in attracting efficiency-enhancing FDI in developing
countries. Since there have been substantial liberalization in these countries their ability to attract
efficiency-enhancing  FDI depends not only on the availability of cheap unskilled labor but also on
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
change pdf to text for editing; convert pdf to word for editing text
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
are allowed to view PDF on VB.NET project, annotate PDF document with various notes and shapes, convert PDF to Word document, Tiff image, TXT file and other
c# read text from pdf; convert pdf to word to edit text online
4
The paper is organized as follows. Following an introduction in section I, opening up of
the Indian economy and the magnitude of FDI are presented in section II. Section III
discusses India's export performance. A simultaneous equation model is developed in
section IV which is subsequently tested in section V. The paper concludes with
concluding remarks in section VI.
II
The Opening Up of the Indian Economy and the Magnitude of FDI
(a) Foreign Investment Policy  
The Industrial Policy resolution of 1948 and subsequent resolutions mark the beginning
of the import-substitution (IS) era in India. Although these resolutions recognized the
importance of foreign capital and technology in industrialization, the government evolved
a complex legal and institutional control under the Foreign Exchange Restriction Act
(FERA)
5
and Monopolies and Restrictive Trade Practice (MRTP) Act
6
to ensure a
marginal and highly circumscribed role of FDI in the economy. As a corollary, the
nominal ceiling on foreign equity participation was limited to 40% and FDI was largely
restricted to priority industries requiring sophisticated technology, undertakings with high
export-orientation and industries in which a critical production gap existed.
the quality of infrastructure facilities which are essential for MNCs in developing integrated
production system (World Investment Report 1998).
5
The FERA restricted foreign equity participation up to 40% with a view to controlling foreign
exchange outflows arising out of dividend and royalty payments.
6
The MRTP Act was enacted in 1969 to control the establishment, expansion and structure of large
enterprises to prevent the concentration of economic power and to curb restrictive practices. The
Act discouraged growth of large industries and thus prevented economies of scale being realized.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
batch pdf to text; convert scanned pdf to word text
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
convert image pdf to text; convert pdf to txt file format
5
By the early 1980s it was felt that these restrictions have discouraged foreign investment
which could enhance efficiency by bringing superior technologies and better work
practices. This led to some liberalization in the Industrial Policy Statements of 1980 and
1982. For example, 100% export-oriented foreign firms were exempted from 40% foreign
equity restrictions and licensing procedures for MRTP companies were simplified.
Furthermore, the production of leather footwear and other leather goods earlier reserved
exclusively for the small-scale industries was also allowed in the large and medium-scale
industries. By 1983, large industrial groups and foreign companies were no longer
restricted from producing transport machinery and tools, electric equipment, chemical
and pharmaceutical products, and industrial machinery.
7
By the mid 1980s, non-resident
Indians (NRIs) were allowed to invest in Indian companies through equity participation.
The establishment of four additional export-processing zones was announced in 1985
with a view to attracting export-oriented FDI.
A major deregulation took place in July 1991 when the government abolished the
industrial licensing system, except in 15 critical industries and drastically reduced the
number of industries reserved for the public sector from 17 to 6.
8
Prior government
approval for the expansion and diversification of large firms including foreign firms has
been ended. Foreign firms are allowed to have a major share holding and foreign
investment up to a maximum of 51% equity in 35 high priority industries receives
7
In October 1982, a formal agreement was signed between Maruti Udiyog Ltd, a Government
enterprise, and Suzuki Motor Company Ltd. of Japan for production of a car called the "Maruti".
Under the agreement for the first time foreign capital participation in an Indian public enterprise
was approved with Suzuki authorized to acquired a 40% equity. In the past, foreign participation
in public enterprise was permitted only in turnkey production of materials and services.
8
These include defense, atomic energy, coal and lignite, minerals, mining, and railway transport.
6
automatic approval.
9
Foreign investment is also permitted in 22 consumer goods
industries, subject to conditions of dividends being plough back. The manufacturing of
readymade garments, earlier reserved exclusively for the small-scale industrial
undertakings, has been open to large-scale undertakings including foreign companies,
subject to export obligation of 50% and investment limit of Rs. 30 million. The system of
phased Manufacturing Program designed to enforce progressively higher local content no
longer exits. Formerly widely used industrial location restrictions now remain to only a
limited extent in large cities, based on environmental considerations.
The new investment policy also spells out more incentives to attract FDI from NRIs and
overseas corporate bodies (OCBs) predominantly operated by NRIs. These include 100%
share in many areas and full repatriation of profit. FDI in power generation,
telecommunications, petroleum exploration, petroleum refining and marketing,
transportation sectors (specifically the roads and railways, ports and shipping, and air
service) has been offered special incentives by realizing the importance of these sectors
for trade and industrial development. Apart from liberalization in foreign investment
policy there have also been substantial reforms in trade and payment regimes.
10
(b) Magnitude of FDI Inflows
India was one of the lowest recipients of FDI among developing countries until 1970s.
During 1970s cumulative inflows of FDI was about US$454 million or 0.20% of gross
9
The Reserve Bank of India quickly checks the authenticity of foreign investor seeking to invest in
India as a joint venture.
10
See Ahluwalia (1996), Bhagwati (1993), and Joshi and Little (1994) for reforms in trade and
payment regimes. Our focus is primarily on reforms in foreign investment front.
7
domestic investment (GDI). Many factors contributed to a lower level of FDI. One
obvious factor was the restriction in foreign shareholdings of equity, which was limited to
the maximum of 40% under the FERA. Lengthy approval process and restrictions in
foreign participation in many areas also appear to have discouraged foreign investment.
Although the absolute value of FDI rose sharply in 1980s in comparison with the earlier
decade its share in GDI remained constant (see table 1). It was only in 1990s India
experienced a significant inflows of foreign capital in the form of both FDI and portfolio
capital. Table 1 presents India's absorption of foreign capital and its role in Indian
economy.
Table 1: India's absorption of foreign capital: 1970-98 (US$ million)
Year
Total
foreign
capital
(TFC) flows
FDI
Flows
FDI %
of TFC
Portfolio
Capital
flows
Portfolio
%  of
TFC
External
debt flows
External
debt %
of  TFC
FDI %  of
Gross Dom.
Invest
(GDI)
1970-80
142030.6
454.5
0.3
0
0
141622.1
99.7
0.2
1981-90
484149.3
1130.0
0.2
2981.6
0.5
480037.7
99.2
0.2
1991-97
682999.3
9795.3
1.4
18466.5
2.7
654737.5
95.9
1.6
1991
86875.5
74.0
0.1
1380.1
1.6
85421.4
98.3
0.1
1992
90576.8
277.0
0.3
35.5
0.04
90264.3
99.6
0.5
1993
97189.4
550.4
0.6
2296.6
2.4
94342.4
97.1
1.0
1994
108148.1
973.3
0.9
4692.1
4.3
102482.7
94.8
1.3
1995
98342.2
2143.6
2.2
1811.2
1.8
94387.4
95.9
2.3
1996
100076.8
2426.0
2.4
4215.7
4.2
93435.1
93.46
2.7
1997
101790.5
3351.0
3.3
4035.3
4.0
94404.2
92.7
3.7
Source: Calculated from World Development Indicators CD ROM, World Bank, 1999.
Note: Total foreign capital includes FDI, portfolio capital and external debt. FDI and portfolio
figures are net inflows. Portfolio capital included both investments in bonds and Euro-equities.
While India is not yet anywhere near ASEAN countries and far too behind China in
attracting FDI, it has done remarkably well in recent years compared with its own past
performance. For instance, FDI inflows reached US$ 9.8 billion during 1990-97 periods
from just over a billion US$ during 1980s. By 1997 India became the 9
th
largest recipient
8
of such investment among developing countries. The share of FDI in both total foreign
capital (TFC) and gross domestic investment (GDI) reached over 3% by 1997 from about
one-fifth of a percent during 1970s and 1980s (see columns 4 and 9 respectively in table
1). This abrupt increase in FDI inflows appears to be due to the opening up of the Indian
economy since 1991. However, investment climate in India is far less than satisfactory as
reflected by a huge difference between the approved and actual inflows of FDI. For
example, as of January 1999 the cumulative FDI approval was US$54 billion but the
actual inflows were only US$16 billion- less than 30%. This is even lower in the
infrastructure sector where only 16% of cumulative approvals translated into actual
investment- telecommunications 15% and oil refining 11% (The Economists Intelligent
Unit, 3
rd
quarter, 1999: 22).  As The Economist (22 February 1997: 23) points out (taken
from Srinivasan, 1998):
'the system simply does not work as it is supposed to. The rules may be liberal in principle…,
[but] delays, complexities, obfuscations, overlapping jurisdictions and endless request for more
information remain much the same as they always have been.'
In recent years portfolio capital has increased more rapidly than FDI, contributing 4% to
total foreign capital inflows by 1997 (see table 1 column 6).This has occurred from 1993
when the Foreign Institutional Investors (FIIs) were allowed access to the Indian capital
market. Portfolio capital inflows reached over US$4 billion by 1997 from just over a
billion US$ in 1991. Nearly 50% of this investment came from the FIIS followed by Euro
equities (Economic Survey, 1995/96: 97).
The sector-wise breakdown of FDI is presented in table 2. As shown until the early 1990s
FDI was heavily concentrated in manufacturing. This appears to be due to a bias in favor
9
of IS industrialization, which may have encouraged tariff-jumping type investment to
capture protected domestic market. Following the 1991 liberalization program, however,
there has been a sharp rise in foreign investment in tertiary sector that encompasses
critical elements of the modern economy namely telecommunication, power generation,
consulting services, and hotel & tourism. The share of tertiary sector in total FDI inflows
rose significantly from 5% by 1990 to about 59% during 1991-97. Increased FDI inflows
to tertiary sector, especially in infrastructure and power generation, is a welcome
development because this areas had long been reserved for the public sector enterprises
which were inefficient in managing these services, making India's trade and industrial
sector least competitive in international context.
Table 2: Sector-wise breakdown of FDI stock
(Rs = 10 million)
Industry group
March 1980
Value             %
March 1990
Value               %
Average annual
Aug.1991-Sep. '97
Value           %
Primary
83.1
8.9 267.0
9.9
363.2
0.2
(i) Agriculture
38.5
4.1 256
9.5
0
0
(ii) Mining
7.8
0.8 8.0
0.3
363.2
0.2
(iii) Petroleum
36.8
3.9 3.0
0.1
0
Secondary
811.6
87.0
2298.0
85.0
95282.4
41.2
(i) Food and beverages
39.1
4.2 162.0
6
14423.5
6.2
(ii) Textile
32.0
3.4 92.0
3.4
3817.1
1.6
(iii) Machinery & machine tools
71.0
7.6 354
13.0
17186.9
7.4
(iv) Transport equipment
51.5
5.5 282.0
10.0
14654.7
6.3
(v) Metal & metal products
118.7
13 141.0
5.2
12098.0
5.2
(vi) Electrical goods
97.5
10.0 295.0
11.0
7734.4
3.3
(vii) Chemical & chemical products s 301.8
32 769.0
28.0
17662.7
7.6
(viii) Paper & paper products
Na
Na Na
Na
3409.8
1.5
(ix) Rubber goods
Na
Na Na
Na
837.4
0.4
(x) Other Manufacturing
65.5
7 Na
-
3457.6
1.5
Tertiary
38.5
4.1 140.0
5.2
135884.5
58.7
(i) Telecommunication
-
- -
-
47196.2
20.4
(ii) Power generation
-
- -
-
65488.1
28.3
(iii) Services
38.5
4.1 140.0
5.2
23200.1
10.0
Total
933.2
100 2705.0
100
231530.1
100
Sources: Computed from Handbook of Statistics1997, Confederation of Indian Industry
and Kumar (1994).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested