31
savings in terms of fresh chrome and effluent treatment. The cost effectiveness depends on 
float collection efficiency, treatment efficiency, and capital and running costs. 
Chrome recovery techniques have a direct bearing on capital and running costs. The 
choice between an alkali sodium salt and MgO is decisive in terms of capital costs since as a 
rule a filter press is not needed to dewater the chrome oxide precipitated with MgO. For a 
daily chrome recovery capacity of 12 - 15m
3  
spent floats, capital costs of the following order 
can be expected: 
Chrome recovery with alkali sodium salt precipitation: 
US$ 150,000 - 200,000  
Chrome recovery with magnesium oxide precipitation: 
US$ 60,000 - 80,000  
As for running costs, details of the annual operating costs of an Indian chrome 
recovery plant are available (18). The corresponding data are summarised in Table 11. 
Table 11 
Annual operating costs of a chrome recovery plant 
Basic indications: processing capacity 3,000 t/year recovery  capacity 9 m
3
/day                              
of spent floats,   precipitation  with MgO, no mechanical dewatering 
Item 
Cost/US$ 
Maintenance 
1,500 
Labour 
1,000 
Chemicals 
9,000 
Electricity 
500 
Miscellaneous 
2,000 
Total operating costs 
14,000 
Financial costs 
7,800 
Depreciation 
5,200 
Total annual costs 
27,000 
It can be seen from Table 11 that chemicals (MgO, sulphuric acid) represent a 
significant share (60%) of the operating costs. Prices for precipitants are dependent on where 
they are produced. Typical European prices are as follows: 
MgO   
US$ 1.07 /kg 
Na
2
CO
3  
US$ 0.83 /kg 
NaOH   
US$ 0.29 /kg 
Conversion of pdf image to text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to editable text; .pdf to .txt converter
Conversion of pdf image to text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to word and edit text; convert image pdf to text pdf
32
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
Capacity
Cu m/day
Payback time years
Evidently the chemical costs will be higher when spent floats are precipitated using 
MgO. It follows from the data on the Indian chrome-recovery plant that total annual costs 
related to processed hides amount to US$ 9 /t raw hides. Taking into consideration the 
operating costs associated with mechanical dewatering, total annual costs related to one tonne 
of processed hides will be higher in most cases when the mechanical process is applied. 
Drawing on operational experience, the profitability of chrome recovery plant based 
on the use of  MgO (14, 21) can be calculated.  The profitability expressed in terms of the 
payback time is shown in Figure 22. 
Figure 22 
Payback Time as a Function of Recovery Plant Capacity 
Assuming a reasonable payback period of three years, a chrome recovery plant based on the 
use of MgO would be profitable at a capacity as low as 2.5 m
3
/day. Similar calculations with 
a longer payback period can also be made for a recovery plant using alkali sodium salt and 
mechanical dewatering. In general, the higher the recovery plant capacity, the greater the 
potential profitability. 
Profitability levels are influenced by the total volume of spent floats recovered. In 
conventional chrome tanning, up to 30 % of the chrome offer contained in spent floats can be 
recovered. In addition, profitability may also be heightened by the reuse of supernatant water 
or filtrate as a float in first soaking or pickling. 
The choice between direct float recycling or indirect recovery depends on individual 
circumstances in the tannery concerned. With regard to direct recycling technique, the 
following aspects deserve special mention: 
Lower capital costs (sieve, storage tanks, pumps, distribution pipes) 
No additional chemicals 
Lower running costs 
Excess float volume 
Lower chrome reuse in practice 
From the economic standpoint, no general explicit recommendation can be made as to 
the optimum mode of reusing chrome from spent tanning/retanning floats. 
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
from PDF can be achieved with this VB.NET tutorial of PDF to text conversion. page offers you a piece of vb.net demo code for PDF to TIFF image conversion.
batch convert pdf to text; convert pdf to ascii text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to Jpeg Conversion. If you want to transform and convert PDF document to Jpeg image file format, this article should be read.
convert pdf photo to text; converting pdf to text
33
7. 
ADVANTAGES AND LIMITATIONS OF VARIOUS METHODS 
Securing a substantial increase in the utilisation of chrome in tanning operations is the 
touchstone of advanced chrome management. Chrome utilisation can be increased in three 
ways: high-exhaustion chrome tanning; direct recycling of spent floats; and chrome 
recovery/reuse.  The efficiency of the various options has been described in the previous 
chapters.  The circumstances essential to minimising the chrome load in effluent have also 
been evaluated.  As a decision-making tool for tanners confronted with the task of choosing a 
suitable option, the features of the three options are summarised below in Figures 23-25. 
Figure 23 
Advantages and limitations of high-exhaustion chrome tanning 
Advantages 
Limitations 
Savings in chrome used 
Deliming should be as complete as 
possible 
Reduced level of chrome  
in waste streams 
Longer running time needed 
Reduced level of sulphates 
in waste streams 
Higher temperature required 
Reduced level of water consumption 
Slip agent needed to avoid abrasion of 
grain 
High chrome fixing, leaching 
minimised 
Improved drum drive system  
required 
Sammying immediately after leather 
unloading 
Increased level of process control 
needed 
Flexible, applicable to any type of 
leather 
Higher running costs 
No loss in leather quality 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert PDF to images, like Tiff. Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read. Extract text from PDF content.
convert pdf to rich text format online; convert pdf to rich text format
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF file to Jpeg image in C# programming. // Load a PDF file.
converting pdf to searchable text format; change pdf to txt format
34
Figure 24 
Advantages and limitations of chrome tanning with float recycling 
Advantages 
Limitations 
Savings in chrome used 
Build up of excess liquor volume 
Reduced level of chrome  
in waste streams 
Mechanical pretreatment  
of waste streams required 
Reduced level of neutral salts in waste 
streams 
Some change to tanning procedures 
needed 
Reduced level of water consumption 
Increased level of process control 
needed 
No additional chemicals needed 
Some differences in leather colour 
possible 
Simplest form of reuse 
Some capital costs needed 
Can be operated indefinitely 
Slightly increased running costs 
Flexible, applicable to any type of 
leather 
No loss in leather quality 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
In addition, our PDF document conversion library also enables developers to render and convert PDF document to TIFF and vector image SVG.
convert pdf to word to edit text online; c# convert pdf to text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF file to Jpeg image in VB.NET program. ' Load a PDF file.
convert pdf into text file; converting pdf to editable text
35
Figure 25 
Advantages and limitations of chrome tanning with chrome recovery/reuse 
Advantages 
Limitations 
Savings in chrome used 
Mechanical pretreatment of waste 
streams required  
Reduced level of chrome in waste 
streams 
Additional chemicals and man power 
required  
Increased discharge of neutral salts 
Close to using fresh chrome 
Minimum procedure change in 
tanning 
Treating all liquors 
Increased level of process control 
needed 
More complex plant needed 
No build up of excess liquor volume 
Some differences in leather colour 
possible 
Can be operated indefinitely 
Flexible, applicable to any type of 
leather 
Higher capital costs 
Higher running costs 
No loss in leather quality 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple VB.NET code. With this Visual PDF to HTML conversion control
convert pdf to word editable text online; best pdf to text
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
Image Conversion. RasterEdge XDoc.Windows Viewer will show how to convert images(include common image files, such as Bitmap, Jpeg, Png, Gif): Convert to PDF.
convert pdf file to text file; convert pdf to text on
36
8.  
CONCLUSIONS 
The efficient and effective management of the chrome tanning process and chrome 
wastes in a tannery are primary concerns in a successful operation. The material balance in 
leather manufacture has proved that in the traditional process less than 50 % of the chrome 
input is to be found in leather while more than 50 % is disposed in solid/liquid waste streams. 
For this reason, chrome management aims at improving chrome utilisation in tanning 
processes to a maximum degree in order to minimise the amount of chrome discharged into 
effluent. Under normal conditions, only 60 - 80 % of the chrome offer is utilised in tanning. 
In general, leather manufacture produces a chrome discharge of 3 - 7 kg Cr/t w/s hides, which 
corresponds to a concentration of 60 - 140 mg Cr/l in mixed wastewater streams with a water 
consumption of 50 m
3
/t w/s hides. This concentration is not acceptable according to current 
legislative limits in most countries. 
In practice, three principal approaches to maximising chrome utilisation in tanning 
processes have been developed: high chrome uptake in tanning; direct tanning floats 
recycling; and chrome recovery/reuse after its precipitation and redissolving. 
Optimising process parameters and modifying the tanning process are two 
effective ways of increasing the chrome uptake in tanning. Mechanical action, chrome 
concentration, chrome offer, pH, temperature and reaction time are the main parameters to be 
optimised. 
Improved chrome uptake can be achieved by finishing the tanning at the highest 
possible pH and temperature levels. End-values up to 40 - 45
o
C and pH 4.0 - 4.2 are 
advantageous. Benefits are secured by using the lowest possible amount of chrome offer 
combined with a tanning time of maximum length and high drum speeds. Unless the tanning 
process is modified, a chrome offer lower than 1.7 % Cr
2
O
3
on pelt weight is not 
recommended. It is reported that the amount of chrome discharged from a tanning operation 
fluctuates in a range of 2 - 5 kg Cr/t w/s hides. When optimising process parameters in order 
to increase the chrome uptake, the amount of chrome discharged in effluent is at the lower 
end of that range. 
Modifications to the tanning process may involve masking the chrome tanning 
complexes and increasing collagen reactivity. A combination of process modifications and 
process parameter optimisation are the basis for modern high-exhaustion chrome tanning 
processes. Chrome utilisation in high-exhaustion tanning can be increased by up to 98 %. The 
chrome offer can be reduced from a standard level 2.0 % Cr
2
O
3
to 1.3 % Cr
2
O
3
on pelt weight 
depending on the pelt thickness, yet without affecting the leather quality. Chrome leaching in 
post-tanning operations can also be minimised; it requires an improved drum drive system 
and an increased level of process control.  High-exhaustion tanning can result in a discharge 
of only 0.4 kg Cr/t w/s hides. In a modern tannery, a concentration of 13 mg Cr/l may be 
expected in mixed waste water streams when assuming maximum water consumption of 30 
m
3
/t w/s hides. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Using our VB.NET PDF Document Conversion Library, developers can easily convert PDF document to TIFF image file in VB.NET programming.
batch pdf to text; change pdf to text file
37
The direct recycling of spent floats from chrome tanning back into processing is the 
simplest form of reusing chrome.  The industry employs several recycling techniques. Using  
a simple recycling technique, 90 % efficiency can be attained. Efficiency, however, is limited 
by a build-up of excess liquor volume. Better float collection and more sophisticated 
recycling technique contribute to the attainment of 95 - 98 % efficiency, where after 
the amount of chrome discharged in effluent drops to 0.30-0.75 kg Cr/t w/s hides. This, too, 
calls for an increased level of process control and some capital investment. 
Chrome recovery is an indirect way of recycling chrome in leather production. It 
enables the tanner to avoid problems attributable to the accumulation of float volume. In 
principle, it entails recovering the chrome from floats containing residual chrome by means 
of precipitation and  separation of suspension, before ultimately  redissolving it in acid for 
reuse. Variations arise in terms of the alkali used to precipitate the chrome (sodium 
hydroxide/carbonate, magnesium oxide) and the need to apply a filtration technique. Higher 
capital and running costs are to be expected. 
The choice between high-exhaustion tanning, direct float recycling and indirect 
recovery/reuse depends on individual conditions in the tannery concerned. No explicit 
recommendation can be made as to the optimum way of reusing the chrome and reducing it to 
a minimal level in the wastewater stream. 
A brief survey of the chrome balance shows that when processing the leather by 
conventional tanning and/or chrome retanning with a chrome offer of 15-17 kg Cr/t w/s 
hides, 40-45 % of the chrome offer remains in the leather, 26-30 % in the solid waste and 
about 30 % in effluent, while 21-24 % of the chrome offer can be recovered and reused.  
When processing leather by high-exhaustion tanning and/or chrome retanning with a chrome 
offer of 10-13 kg Cr/t w/s hides, 57-60 % of the chrome offer remains in the leather, 32-38 % 
in the solid waste and 3-8 % in effluent.  Only 1-5 % of the chrome offer can be recovered 
and reused. 
The lowest practically attainable  amount of chrome in effluent lies somewhere 
between 0.3 and 0.4 kg Cr/t w/s hides. Thus, with a standard effluent production of 30 m
3
/t 
w/s hides, the chrome concentration ranges between 10 and 14 mg Cr/l.  However, legislative 
requirements most frequently stipulate a range of 1-4 mg Cr/l, thus making it mandatory to 
precipitate all waste streams from tanning/post-tanning operations, once the chrome has been 
recovered. Calcium hydroxide combined with ferric and/or aluminium salt is considered the 
most suitable precipitant.  Only after precipitation, can a concentration of about 1 mg Cr/l 
(corresponding to an amount of 0.03 kg Cr/t w/s hides) be attained.  
38
REFERENCES 
1. Bosnic, M., Buljan, J., Daniels, R. P.: Pollutants in Tannery Effluents. UNIDO,    
Vienna,  1998. 
2. Poncet, T: Sludge Landfill Model Site Manual. UNIDO, Vienna, 1998. 
3. Environment Commission of I.U.L.T.C.S.: IUE Recommendations for Solid By-Product 
Management. London 1997. 
4. Buljan, J., Reich, G., Ludvik, J.: Mass Balance in Leather Processing. UNIDO,     
Vienna,  1997. 
5. Environment Commission of I.U.L.T.C.S.: IUE Recommendations on Cleaner 
Technologies for Leather Production. London 1997. 
6. Covington, A. D.: Chrome Management. Proceedings of the Workshop on Pollution 
Abatement and Waste Management in the Tanning Industry. Ljubljana, 1995. 
7. Frendrup, W.: UNEP Cleaner Production Industrial Sector Guide. Leather Industry. 
Taastrup, 1995. 
8. Heidemann, E.: Fundamentals of Leather Manufacturing. Darmstadt, 1993. 
9. Covington, A. D.: JALCA 86
, 376 (1991). 
10. Covington, A. D.: JALCA 86
, 456, (1991). 
11. Daniels, R. P.: World Leather 7
, No.2, p.73 (1994). 
12. Fuchs, K. H., Kupfer, R., Mitchell, J. W.: JALCA 88
, 402, (1993). 
13. Bayer, AG.: Tanning, Dyeing, Finishing. Leverkusen, 1987. 
14. van Vliet, M.: Cleaner Technologies. Proceedings of the Workshop on Topical 
Questions of the Environment Protection in the Leather Manufacturing. Partizánske, 
1996. 
15. Francke, H.: Das Leder 44
, 89 (1993). 
16. Ludvik, J.: Scope for Decreasing the Pollution Load in Leather Processing. UNIDO, 
Vienna, 1998. 
17. Davis, M. H., Scroggie, J. G.: JSLTC 57
, 13, 35, 53, 81,173 (1973). 
18. Rajamani, S.: Appropriate Chrome Recovery and Reuse System - Experience in Indian 
Tanneries. Proceedings of the Workshop on Pollution Abatement and Waste 
Management in the Tanning Industry. Ljubljana, 1995. 
19. Hellinger, K.: Chrom-Rückgewinnung und Eliminierung bei der Lederherstellung. 
1. Freiberger Polymertag. Freiberg, 1993. 
20. Rydin, S.: Reduction of Chrome Discharge from the Leather Industry. Minutes of the 
European Workshop on Environmental Technologies in the Leather Industry. Bologna, 
1995. 
21. van Vliet, M.: World Leather 7
, No.6, p.15 (1994).
39
ANNEX 1 
Standards for land-application of Cr-containing sludge (Compilation of different legislations) 
Parameter 
Denmark 
France 
Germany 
The 
Netherlands 
Belgium 
Norway 
Sweden 
Switzerland 
United 
Kingdom 
USA 
Maximum 
acceptable 
concentration in the 
soil mg Cr/kg of dry 
soil 
100 
150 
100 
100
1
150 
600 
No limit (3,000 
before 1993 
Maximum 
concentration in 
sludge  
mg Cr/kg of dry 
sludge 
100 
1,000 
900 
500 
500 
200 
150 
1,000 
No limit (150 before 
1993) 
Suggested annual 
chrome loading 
(kg/ha/yr) 
6.0 
2.0 
1.0 
2.0 
0.4 
1.0 
2.5 
No limit (3,000 
before 1993) 
Maximum 
recommended 
chrome loading 
(kg/ha) 
360 
210 
100 
1,000 
Suggested 
maximum annual 
sludge solids 
application 
(t/ha/year) 
1.5 
3.0 
1.7 
2 (arable) 
1 (grass) 
2.5 
Maximum sludge 
solids loading 
(t/ha) 
167 
200 
20 
5 in 5 
years 
Minimal soil pH 
6.0 
6.5 (arable) 
6.0 (grass) 
Varies according to clay content 
40
Abstract
Securing a substantial increase in the utilisation of chrome in tanning 
be increased in three ways: high-exhaustion chrome tanning; direct recycling of spent 
floats; and chrome recovery/reuse. Focused on maximising chrome utilisation and 
operational requirements.  The paper describes the efficiency of the various options 
It also provides extensive material on chrome tanning, recovery and recycling 
techniques and the cost ratios, supplemented by a series of summary tables. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested