Schermelleh-Engel et al.: Evaluating the fit of Structural Equation Models 
53 
small-sample bias, effects of violation of normality and independence, and estimation-
method effects (Hu & Bentler, 1998). Therefore it is always possible that a model may 
fit the data although one or more fit measures may suggest bad fit.  
Examples 
Data Generation 
In the following, we will evaluate the fit of four alternative models as examples of 
poor model fit, adequate fit, and good fit. Using the EQS program (Bentler, 1995), we 
generated data for N = 200 cases according to the "true" model depicted in Figure 1. In 
this population model, two latent predictor variables and two latent criterion variables 
are  each measured by two indicator variables, and each predictor variable  influences 
both  criterion  variables.  We generated data  for  the eight X- and Y-variables of the 
model and computed the sample covariance matrix, which is given in Table 2. 
δ
1
δ
2
δ
3
δ
4
ε
1
ε
2
ε
3
ε
4
ξ
1
ξ
2
η
1
η
2
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
ζ
1
ζ
2
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
(.38)
(.30)
(.30)
(.38)
(.36)
(.30)
(.33)
(.33)
(.64)
(.64)
(.67)
(.82)
.32
β
21
=.25
γ
11
=.90
γ
22
=
.82
γ
21
=.53
γ
12
=
.40
δ
1
δ
2
δ
3
δ
1
δ
2
δ
3
δ
4
ε
1
ε
2
ε
3
ε
4
ε
1
ε
2
ε
1
ε
2
ε
3
ε
4
ε
3
ε
4
ξ
1
ξ
2
ξ
1
ξ
2
η
1
η
2
η
1
η
2
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
ζ
1
ζ
2
ζ
1
ζ
2
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
(.38)
(.30)
(.30)
(.38)
(.36)
(.30)
(.33)
(.33)
(.64)
(.64)
(.67)
(.82)
.32
β
21
=.25
γ
11
=.90
γ
22
=
.82
γ
21
=.53
γ
12
=
.40
Figure 1. Population model with known parameter values used for data generation.  
Specifications of Models A, B, C, and D 
According to Hu & Bentler (1998), there are four major problems involved in using 
fit indices for evaluating goodness of fit: sensitivity of a fit index to model misspecifica-
tion, small-sample bias, estimation-method effect, and effects of violation of normality 
and independence. In our present examples, we will only demonstrate the problem of 
model misspecification.  
Convert image pdf to text - control application utility:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert image pdf to text - control application utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
54 
MPR-Online 2003, Vol. 8, No. 2 
Table 2 
Empirical Covariance Matrix (N = 200) 
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
1.429 
Y
2
1.069 
1.369 
Y
3
0.516 
0.536 
1.681 
Y
4
0.436 
0.425 
1.321 
1.621 
X
1
0.384 
0.485 
0.192 
0.183 
1.021 
X
2
0.494 
0.424 
0.181 
0.191 
0.640 
0.940 
X
3
0.021 
0.045 
-0.350 
-0.352 
0.325 
0.319 
1.032 
X
4
0.035 
0.013 
-0.347 
-0.348 
0.324 
0.320 
0.642 
0.941 
δ
1
δ
2
δ
3
δ
4
ε
1
ε
2
ε
3
ε
4
ξ
1
ξ
2
η
1
η
2
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
ζ
1
ζ
2
γ
22
γ
12
δ
1
δ
2
δ
3
δ
1
δ
2
δ
3
δ
4
ε
1
ε
2
ε
3
ε
4
ε
1
ε
2
ε
1
ε
2
ε
3
ε
4
ε
3
ε
4
ξ
1
ξ
2
ξ
1
ξ
2
η
1
η
2
η
1
η
2
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
ζ
1
ζ
2
ζ
1
ζ
2
γ
22
γ
12
Figure 2. Path diagram for hypothesized models. Four models were analyzed, two mis-
specified models and two correctly specified models. In the misspecified models, path 
coefficients γ
12
and γ
22
(Model  A) or γ
12
(Model  B)  were fixed  to zero  (indicated by  
dashed lines).  In  the correctly  specified models, all parameters were estimated freely 
(Model C) or additionally, all factor loadings pertaining to a latent construct were con-
strained to be equal (Model D).  
control application utility:C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class. Here, we take Gif image file as an example.
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
www.rasteredge.com
Schermelleh-Engel et al.: Evaluating the fit of Structural Equation Models 
55 
Four models were specified and analyzed, two misspecified models and two correctly 
specified models (cf. Figure 2). The first misspecified model (Model A) is severely mis-
specified with path coefficients γ
12
and γ
22
fixed to zero as indicated by dashed lines in 
Figure 2. In the second misspecified model (Model B) only γ
12
was fixed to zero. In the 
first correctly specified model (Model C), all parameters were estimated freely. With the 
second correctly specified model (Model D), we will demonstrate the effects of parsi-
mony.  In  this  model,  all  factor  loadings  pertaining  to  a  latent  construct  were  con-
strained to be equal, i.e., all factor loadings were fixed to one. 
Model Evaluation Procedure 
Generally, the first gauge of model-data fit should be the inspection of the fit indices. 
If there is some indication of misfit, the second gauge should be the inspection of the 
residual matrix. As the fitted residuals, i.e., discrepancies between the covariance matri-
ces S and 
)
ˆ
Σ
, are difficult to interpret if the manifest variables have different vari-
ances (or scale units), a more general recommendation is to inspect standardized residu-
als.  Standardized residuals  provided by the  LISREL  program (see  above, section  on 
RMR and SRMR) that are greater than an absolute value of 1.96 (
p < .05) or 2.58  
(
p < .01) can be useful for detecting the cause of model misfit. The largest absolute 
value indicates the element that is most poorly fit by the model. A good model should 
have a high number of standardized residuals close to zero, implying high correspon-
dence between elements of the empirical and the model-implied covariance matrix.  
The third gauge  should be  the inspection of  the modification indices provided by 
LISREL (or the Lagrange multiplier test provided by EQS). These indices provide an 
estimate of the change in the χ
2
value that results from relaxing model restrictions by 
freeing parameters that were fixed in the initial specification. Each modification index 
possesses a χ
2
distribution with df = 1 and measures the expected decrease in the χ
2
value when the parameter in question is freed and the model reestimated. Thus, the 
modification index is approximately equal to the χ
2
difference of two nested models in 
which the respective parameter is fixed or constrained in one model and set free in the 
other. The largest modification index belongs to the parameter that improves the fit 
most when set free. A good model should have modification indices close to one, because 
E(χ
2
) = df.  
If the fit indices suggest a bad model-data fit, if one or more standardized residuals 
are more extreme than ±
1.96 (
p < .05) or ±
2.58 (
p < .01), and if at least one modifica-
tion index is larger than 3.84 (
p < .05) or 6.63 (
p < .01), then one may consider to  
control application utility:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
www.rasteredge.com
56 
MPR-Online 2003, Vol. 8, No. 2 
Table 3 
Goodness-of-Fit Indices for Misspecified and Correctly Specified Models Based on an 
Artificial Data Set of N = 200 
Misspecified models 
Correctly specified models 
Model A 
Model B 
Model C 
Model D 
Fit Index 
Two paths 
fixed to zero 
One path fixed 
to zero 
All parameters 
estimated freely 
All factor load-
ings fixed to 1 
χ
2
(df
54.340 (16) 
27.480 (15) 
17.109 (14) 
17.715 (18) 
p value 
.000 
.025 
.250 
.475 
χ
2
/df 
3.396 
1.832 
1.222 
0.984 
RMSEA 
.110 
.065 
.033 
.000 
p value for test of close fit 
(RMSEA < .05) 
.001 
.238 
.668 
.871 
90% CI 
.079 ; .142 
.023 ; .102 
.000 ; .080 
.000 ; .062 
SRMR 
.120 
.058 
.016 
.018 
NFI 
.922 
.963 
.977 
.977 
NNFI 
.896 
.966 
.991 
1.000 
CFI 
.941 
.982 
.995 
1.000 
GFI 
.936 
.967 
.979 
.978 
AGFI 
.856 
.920 
.946 
.956 
PGFI 
.416 
.403 
.381 
.489 
PNFI 
.527 
.516 
.489 
.628 
Model AIC 
94.340 
69.480 
61.109 
53.715 
Saturated AIC
a
72.000 
72.000 
72.000 
72.000 
Model CAIC 
180.306 
159.744 
155.672 
131.085 
Saturated CAIC
a
226.739 
226.739 
226.739 
226.739 
Model ECVI 
.474 
.349 
.307 
.271 
90% CI 
.380 ; .606 
.294 ; .443 
.291 ; .381 
.271 ; .341 
Saturated ECVI
a
.362 
.362 
.362 
.362 
Note. AGFI = Adjusted Goodness-of-Fit-Index, AIC = Akaike Information Criterion, CAIC = Consistent 
AIC, CFI = Comparative Fit Index, ECVI = Expected Cross Validation Index, GFI = Goodness-of-Fit 
Index, NFI = Normed Fit Index, NNFI = Nonnormed Fit Index, PGFI = Parsimony Goodness-of-Fit 
Index, PNFI = Parsimony Normed Fit Index, RMSEA = Root Mean Square Error of Approximation, 
SRMR = Standardized Root Mean Square Residual. 
a
Saturated AIC, CAIC, and ECVI serve as possible comparative values for the model AIC, CAIC, and 
ECVI, respectively. 
control application utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET. .NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. High quality jpeg file can be exported from PDF in .NET framework.
www.rasteredge.com
Schermelleh-Engel et al.: Evaluating the fit of Structural Equation Models 
57 
modify the model by freeing a fixed parameter. But this practice is controversial, as it 
implies changing the model only in order to improve fit. It would be better to have a 
substantive theory on which to base modifications, as modifications devoid of a theo-
retical basis are ill advised (Field, 2000).  
In our examples, we will assume to have a theoretical basis for model modifications 
according to the model depicted in Figure 1. We will modify our initial model (Model 
A)  three  times  and  analyze the  covariance  matrix given in Table 2  repeatedly. The 
goodness-of-fit indices taken from the LISREL outputs pertaining to the four models are 
listed in Table 3.  
Although Table 3 lists all fit measures discussed in this article, not all of these meas-
ures are necessary for evaluating the fit of the models. It is quite sufficient to assess χ
2
and its associated p-value, χ
2
/df, RMSEA and its associated confidence interval, SRMR, 
NNFI, and CFI. For model comparisons it is recommended to assess additionally the χ
2
difference tests (nested models only) and the AIC values of all models investigated. 
Model A (Severely Misspecified Model)  
An inspection of the fit indices for Model A (Table 3) suggests to reject the model, as 
χ
2
/df > 3, RMSEA > .08, p-value for test of close fit (RMSEA < .05) is almost zero, 
lower boundary of the confidence interval does not include zero, SRMR > .10, NNFI < 
.95, and CFI < .95. Only NFI > .90 and GFI > .90 are indicative of an acceptable 
model fit.  
An inspection of the standardized residuals in Table 4 reveals 11 significant residuals. 
Because of the misspecifications in Model A, relations of Y
1
and Y
2
with X
3
and X
4
are 
overestimated by the model (residuals are negative while the respective sample covari-
ances are positive, cf. Table 2), whereas relations of Y
3
and Y
4
with X
3
and X
4
are un-
derestimated (residuals are negative while the respective empirical covariances are nega-
tive).  
An  inspection  of  the  modification  indices  (Appendix  B1)  reveals  that  the  largest 
modification index of 24.873 pertains to parameter γ
22
. This suggests that the most sub-
stantive change in the model in terms of improvement of fit would arise from relaxing 
the constraint on the respective structural coefficient, which would result in an unstan-
dardized γ
22
estimate of about .715 according to the LISREL output. We followed this 
suggestion and set γ
22
free. 
control application utility:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
control application utility:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
58 
MPR-Online 2003, Vol. 8, No. 2 
Table 4 
Standardized Residuals of Model A (Severely Misspecified Model) 
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
-- 
Y
2
-- 
-- 
Y
3
-0.256 
0.237 
-- 
Y
4
0.379 
-0.111 
-- 
-- 
X
1
-1.056 
2.079 
1.216 
1.168 
-- 
X
2
2.408 
-0.587 
1.268 
1.425 
-2.727 
-- 
X
3
-2.620  -2.390  -4.953  -4.752 
0.871 
0.481 
-- 
X
4
-2.540  -3.026  -5.194  -4.955 
0.944 
0.642 
-- 
-- 
Note. Significant values are in boldface. 
An inspection of the standardized residuals in Table 4 reveals 11 significant residuals. 
Because of the misspecifications in Model A, relations of Y
1
and Y
2
with X
3
and X
4
are 
overestimated by the model (residuals are negative while the respective sample covari-
ances are positive, cf. Table 2), whereas relations of Y
3
and Y
4
with X
3
and X
4
are un-
derestimated (residuals are negative while the respective empirical covariances are nega-
tive).  
An  inspection  of  the  modification  indices  (Appendix  B1)  reveals  that  the  largest 
modification index of 24.873 pertains to parameter γ
22
. This suggests that the most sub-
stantive change in the model in terms of improvement of fit would arise from relaxing 
the constraint on the respective structural coefficient, which would result in an unstan-
dardized γ
22
estimate of about .715 according to the LISREL output. We followed this 
suggestion and set γ
22
free. 
Model B (Misspecified Model) 
The fit indices for Model B point to conflicting conclusions about the extent to which 
this model actually matches the observed data. All fit indices  with the exception of 
the parsimony indices PNFI and PGFI  are improved compared to Model A, and the 
model modification resulted in a significant χ
2
difference test (54.34  27.48 = 26.86, 
Schermelleh-Engel et al.: Evaluating the fit of Structural Equation Models 
59 
df = 1, p < .01). Furthermore, model AIC, model CAIC, and model ECVI are smaller 
for Model B than for Model A. Indications of a good model fit are χ
2
/df < 2, NFI > .95, 
GFI > .95, and CFI > .97, whereas other descriptive goodness-of-fit indices suggest only 
an acceptable  fit  (RMSEA > .05,  SRMR  >  .05, NNFI < .97).  Moreover,  the lower 
boundary of the RMSEA confidence interval still does not include zero.  
An inspection of the standardized residuals for Model B (Table 5) reveals that rela-
tions of Y
1
and Y
2
with X
3
and X
4
are still overestimated by the model (note that the 
empirical covariances are positive), but that the largest standardized residuals show an 
underestimation of the relation between Y
3
and Y
4
and an overestimation of the relation 
between X
1
and X
2
.  
An inspection of the modification indices (Appendix B2) shows that two modification 
indices are equally large (10.533) suggesting to either free parameter γ
12
(with an ex-
pected unstandardized estimate of about –.389), or to free β
12
(with an expected un-
standardized estimate of about .488).  As both modification indices are of the same size, 
the decision which constraint to relax can only be made on a theoretical basis. In our 
example, we relaxed the constraint on parameter γ
21
Table 5  
Standardized Residuals of Model B (Misspecified Model) 
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
-- 
Y
2
-- 
-- 
Y
3
2.329 
2.923 
3.245 
Y
4
1.181 
1.005 
3.245 
3.245 
X
1
-1.204 
1.997 
-0.069 
0.033 
-- 
X
2
2.465 
-0.478  -0.533 
0.139 
-3.246 
-- 
X
3
-2.569  -2.315 
-0.920  -1.344  0.708 
0.423 
-- 
X
4
-2.480  -2.927  -1.075  -1.493  0.859 
0.652 
-- 
-- 
Note. Significant values are in boldface. 
60 
MPR-Online 2003, Vol. 8, No. 2 
Model C (Correctly Specified Model) 
After  the  second  model  modification  with  parameter γ
21
now  set  free,  the  fit  of 
Model C (correctly specified model) improved substantially with a significant drop in 
the χ
2
value (27.480  17.109 = 10.371, df = 1, p < .01) and smaller AIC, CAIC, and 
ECVI values for Model C compared to Model B. The descriptive goodness-of-fit indices 
point  to  a  good  model  fit  with χ
2
/df  <  2,  RMSEA  <  .05  (lower  boundary  of  the 
RMSEA confidence interval contains zero), NNFI and CFI > .97, NFI and GFI > .95, 
AGFI > .90, and SRMR < .05. The only exceptions are again the parsimony fit indices 
PNFI and PGFI with smaller values for Model C than for Model B. The standardized 
residuals (Table 6) for Model C are now all close to zero and not significant.  
Table 6 
Standardized Residuals of Model C (Correctly Specified Model) 
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
-- 
Y
2
-- 
-- 
Y
3
0.432 
0.982 
-- 
Y
4
-0.667  -1.216 
-- 
-- 
X
1
-1.823 
1.161 
0.018 
0.107 
-- 
X
2
1.736 
-1.139  -0.297 
0.291 
-- 
-- 
X
3
-0.134 
0.381 
0.224 
-0.424  0.110 
-0.117 
-- 
X
4
0.175 
-0.400 
0.356 
-0.403  0.107 
-0.081 
-- 
-- 
An inspection of the modification indices (Appendix B3) reveals that the parameters 
of four covariances between error variables should be freed to improve the model fit. 
But as our theory (Figure 1) does not support this modification, such suggestions can be 
ignored.  
Model D (Correctly Specified Parsimonious Model) 
In order to demonstrate the effects of parsimony on model fit, we fixed all factor 
loadings to one. The resulting Model D (correctly specified parsimonious model) is still 
Schermelleh-Engel et al.: Evaluating the fit of Structural Equation Models 
61 
in accordance with the population model depicted in Figure 1. The model fit again im-
proved with χ
2
/df < 1, RMSEA = .00, NNFI = 1.00, CFI = 1.00, and AGFI > .95. 
Model D is more parsimonious than Model C with smaller values of AIC, CAIC, ECVI, 
and RMSEA, and with larger parsimony indices PNFI, PGFI, and larger AGFI. Stan-
dardized residuals are all small (Table 7), most of them close to zero. But still modifica-
tion indices (Appendix B4) suggest to lower the constraints on four error covariances, a 
suggestion that we will not follow because our theory (Figure 1) does not support such 
modification.  
Table 7  
Standardized Residuals of Model D (Correctly Specified Parsimonious Model) 
Y
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
X
1
X
2
X
3
X
4
Y
1
-0.108 
Y
2
-0.108 
0.108 
Y
3
0.729 
1.251 
0.764 
Y
4
-0.815  -1.157 
0.763 
-0.764 
X
1
-1.326 
0.811 
0.107 
-0.074  -0.075 
X
2
1.087 
-0.648  -0.135 
0.104 
-0.075  0.075 
X
3
-0.139 
0.379 
-0.019  -0.060  0.074 
-0.068  0.014 
X
4
0.172 
-0.391 
0.048 
0.025 
0.059 
-0.050  0.014 
-0.014 
Discussion 
Our examples demonstrate how to evaluate model fit and model misfit and how to 
modify a model. If goodness-of-fit indices suggest that a model does not fit, an inspec-
tion of significant standardized residuals and the largest modification indices may be 
extremely helpful in deciding at which part of the model a modification should be con-
sidered. But one should never modify a model solely on the basis of modification indices, 
although the program might suggest to do so. Model modification based on modification 
indices may result in models that lack validity (MacCallum, 1986) and are highly sus-
62 
MPR-Online 2003, Vol. 8, No. 2 
ceptible to capitalization on chance (MacCallum, Roznowski, & Necowitz, 1992). There-
fore the modifications should be defensible from a theoretical point of view. 
To sum up, model fit improved substantially from Model A to Model D as expected 
from the construction of our simulated example. One may ask why there is no "perfect 
fit" of Models C and D although both models are correctly specified. The first reason is 
that even Model D is not yet the most parsimonious model. The most parsimonious 
model requires that all parameters are fixed at their true population values, but these 
values are of course unknown in practice. Usually the best one can do is to fix some pa-
rameters or to impose certain equality constraints, which also leads to more parsimoni-
ous models. The second reason is that only sample covariance matrices are analyzed 
instead of the population covariance matrix. Whereas the population covariance matrix 
should fit a correctly specified model "perfectly", sample covariance matrices will usually 
do not, as they are subject to sampling fluctuations. Of course, the χ
2
test takes these 
fluctuations into account and most fit indices should signalize "good fit", as we could 
demonstrate for Models C and D. 
As has been pointed out by Jöreskog (1993), it is important to distinguish between 
three  types of  analyses  with  SEM:  strictly  confirmatory  approach  (CM),  alternative 
models approach  (AM), and model generating approach (MG). If the analysis is not 
strictly confirmatory, that is, if the first model for a given data set must be modified 
several times until a good or acceptable fit is reached – either because of testing alterna-
tive models (AM) or because of developing a new model (MG) – it is possible or even 
likely that the resulting model to a considerable degree only reflects capitalization on 
chance. In other words, subsequent modifications based on the same data always imply 
the danger that a model is only fitted to some peculiarities of the given sample. If our 
example would rest on real (instead of simulated) empirical data, we would strongly 
suggest to cross-validate Model D.  
It should be kept in mind that even if cross-validation is successful, it is not allowed 
to infer that the respective model has been "proved". As is known from the work of 
Stelzl  (1986),  Lee  and  Hershberger  (1990),  and  MacCallum,  Wegener,  Uchino,  and 
Fabrigar (1993), several different models may fit the data equally well. Different models 
can imply the same covariance matrix and thus be empirically indistinguishable from 
the SEM viewpoint. This even holds if the competing models are contradictory from a 
causal perspective. In order to decide if the model of interest is the "best'' model one 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested