21 
World Wide Name (WWN) naming conventions  
A best practice for acquiring and renaming World Wide Names (WWN) for the MSA2000sa G1 is 
to plug-in one SAS cable connection at a time and then rename the WWN to an identifiable name. 
Procedure: 
4. 
Open up the HP StorageWorks Storage Management Utility (SMU). 
5. 
Click Manage  General Config.  manage host list. 
Convert pdf file to text online - control Library utility:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to text online - control Library utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
22 
6. 
Locate the WWN of the first SAS HBA under the “Current Global Host Port List” and type this 
WWN into the “Port WWN.” Type in a nickname for this port in the “Port Nickname” box. 
7. 
Click “Add New Port” Click OK when the pop up window appears. 
8. 
Plug in the SAS port of the HBA on the second server into the MSA2000sa controller port. Make 
sure the server is powered on. 
9. 
Return to the Manage  General Config.  manage host list of the SMU. The new WWN should 
now appear. 
10. 
Repeat steps 3–5 for the remaining servers. 
Cache configuration 
Controller cache options can be set for individual volumes to improve a volume’s fault tolerance and 
I/O performance.  
Note: 
To change the following cache settings, the user—who logs into the HP 
SMU—must have the “advanced” user credential. The manage user has the 
“standard” user credential by default. This credential can be changed using 
the HP SMU and going to the Manage  General Config.  User 
Configuration  Modify Users 
Read-ahead cache settings 
The read-ahead cache settings enable you to change the amount of data read in advance after two 
back-to-back reads are made. Read ahead is triggered by two back-to-back accesses to consecutive 
logical block address (LBA) ranges. Read ahead can be forward (that is, increasing LBAs) or reverse 
(that is, decreasing LBAs). Increasing the read-ahead cache size can greatly improve performance for 
multiple sequential read streams. However, increasing read-ahead size will likely decrease random 
read performance. 
control Library utility:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your PDF file into
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
23 
The default read-ahead size, which sets one chunk for the first access in a sequential read and one 
stripe for all subsequent accesses, works well for most users in most applications. The controllers treat 
volumes and mirrored virtual disks (RAID 1) internally as if they have a stripe size of 64 KB, even 
though they are not striped. 
Caution: The read-ahead cache settings should only be changed if you fully understand how your 
operating system, application, and HBA (FC) or Ethernet adapter (iSCSI) move data so that you can 
adjust the settings accordingly. You should be prepared to monitor system performance using the 
virtual disk statistics and adjust read-ahead size until you find the right size for your application. 
The Read Ahead Size can be set to one of the following options:  
• Default: Sets one chunk for the first access in a sequential read and one stripe for all subsequent 
accesses. The size of the chunk is based on the block size used when you created the virtual disk (the 
default is 64 KB). Non-RAID and RAID 1 virtual disks are considered to have a stripe size of 64 KB. 
• Disabled: Turns off read-ahead cache. This is useful if the host is triggering read ahead for what are 
random accesses. This can happen if the host breaks up the random I/O into two smaller reads, 
triggering read ahead. You can use the volume statistics read histogram to determine what size 
accesses the host is doing. 
• 64, 128, 256, or 512 KB; 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 MB: Sets the amount of data to read first and the 
same amount is read for all read-ahead accesses. 
• Maximum: Let the controller dynamically calculate the maximum read-ahead cache size for the 
volume. For example, if a single volume exists, this setting enables the controller to use nearly half 
the memory for read-ahead cache. 
Note: 
Only use “Maximum” when host-side performance is critical and disk drive 
latencies must be absorbed by cache. For example, for read-intensive 
applications, you may want data that is most often read in cache so that 
the response to the read request is very fast; otherwise, the controller has to 
locate which disks the data is on, move it up to cache, and then send 
it to the host. 
Note: 
If there are more than two volumes, there is contention on the cache as to 
which volume’s read data should be held and which has the priority; the 
volumes begin to constantly overwrite the other volume’s data, which could 
result in taking a lot of the controller’s processing power. Avoid using this 
setting if more than two volumes exist. 
Cache optimization can be set to one of the following options: 
• Standard: Works well for typical applications where accesses are a combination of sequential and 
random access. This method is the default. 
• Super-Sequential: Slightly modifies the controller’s standard read-ahead caching algorithm by 
enabling the controller to discard cache contents that have been accessed by the host, making more 
room for read-ahead data. This setting is not effective if random accesses occur; use it only if your 
application is strictly sequential and requires extremely low latency. 
control Library utility:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
www.rasteredge.com
24 
Write-back cache settings 
Write back is a cache-writing strategy in which the controller receives the data to be written to disk, 
stores it in the memory buffer, and immediately sends the host operating system a signal that the write 
operation is complete, without waiting until the data is actually written to the disk drive. Write-back 
cache mirrors all of the data from one controller module cache to the other. Write-back cache 
improves the performance of write operations and the throughput of the controller. 
When write-back cache is disabled, write-through becomes the cache-writing strategy. Using  
write-through cache, the controller writes the data to the disk before signaling the host operating 
system that the process is complete. Write-through cache has lower throughput and write operation 
performance than write back, but it is the safer strategy, with low risk of data loss on power failure. 
However, write-through cache does not mirror the write data because the data is written to the disk 
before posting command completion and mirroring is not required. You can set conditions that cause 
the controller to switch from write-back caching to write-through caching as described in  
“Auto-Write Through Trigger and Behavior Settings” later in this paper. 
In both caching strategies, active-active failover of the controllers is enabled. 
You can enable and disable the write-back cache for each volume, as volume write-back cache is 
enabled by default. Data is not lost if the system loses power because controller cache is backed by 
super capacitor technology. For most applications this is the correct setting, but because backend 
bandwidth is used to mirror cache, if you are writing large chunks of sequential data (as would be 
done in video editing, telemetry acquisition, or data logging) write-through cache has much better 
performance. Therefore, you might want to experiment with disabling the write-back cache.  
You might see large performance gains (as much as 70 percent) if you are writing data under the 
following circumstances: 
• Sequential writes 
• Large I/Os in relation to the chunk size 
• Deep queue depth 
If you are doing any type of random access to this volume, leave the write-back cache enabled. 
Caution: Write-back cache should only be disabled if you fully understand how your operating 
system, application, and HBA (SAS) move data. You might hinder your storage system’s performance 
if used incorrectly. 
Auto-write through trigger and behavior settings 
You can set the trigger conditions that cause the controller to change the cache policy from write-back 
to write-through. While in write-through mode, system performance might be decreased. 
A default setting makes the system revert to write-back mode when the trigger condition clears. To 
make sure that this occurs and that the system doesn’t operate in write-through mode longer than 
necessary, make sure you check the setting in HP SMU or the Command-line Interface (CLI). 
You can specify actions for the system to take when write-through caching is triggered: 
• Revert when Trigger Condition Clears: Switches back to write-back caching after the trigger 
condition is cleared. The default and best practice is Enabled. 
• Notify Other Controller: In a dual-controller configuration, the partner controller is notified that the 
trigger condition is met. The default is Disabled. 
control Library utility:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
25 
Cache-mirroring mode 
In the default active-active mode, data for volumes configured to use write-back cache is automatically 
mirrored between the two controllers. Cache mirroring has a slight impact on performance but 
provides fault tolerance. You can disable cache mirroring, which permits independent cache 
operation for each controller; this is called independent cache performance mode (ICPM). 
The advantage of ICPM is that the two controllers can achieve very high write bandwidth and still use 
write-back caching. User data is still safely stored in non-volatile RAM, with backup power provided 
by super capacitors should a power failure occur. This feature is useful for high-performance 
applications that do not require a fault-tolerant environment for operation; that is, where speed is 
more important than the possibility of data loss due to a drive fault prior to a write completion. 
The disadvantage of ICPM is that if a controller fails, the other controller may not be able to failover 
(that is, take over I/O processing for the failed controller). If a controller experiences a complete 
hardware failure, and needs to be replaced, then user data in its write-back cache is lost. 
Data loss does not automatically occur if a controller experiences a software exception, or if a 
controller module is removed from the enclosure. If a controller should experience a software 
exception, the controller module goes offline; no data is lost, and it is written to disks when you restart 
the controller. However, if a controller is damaged in a non-recoverable way then you might lose data 
in ICPM. 
Caution: Data might be compromised if a RAID controller failure occurs after it has accepted write 
data, but before that data has reached the disk drives. ICPM should not be used in an environment 
that requires fault tolerance. 
Cache configuration summary 
The following guidelines list the general best practices. When configuring cache: 
• For a fault-tolerant configuration, use the write-back cache policy, instead of the write-through  
cache policy 
• For applications that access both sequential and random data, use the standard optimization mode, 
which sets the cache block size to 32 KB. For example, use this mode for transaction-based and 
database update applications that write small files in random order 
• For applications that access sequential data only and that require extremely low latency, use the 
super-sequential optimization mode, which sets the cache block size to 128 KB. For example, use 
this mode for video playback and multimedia post-production video- and audio-editing applications 
that read and write large files in sequential order 
Parameter settings for performance optimization 
You can configure your storage system to optimize performance for your specific application by 
setting the parameters as shown in the following table. This section provides a basic starting point for 
fine-tuning your system, which should be done during performance baseline modeling. 
control Library utility:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
SharePoint. C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
26 
Table 2: Optimizing performance for your application 
Application 
RAID level 
Read ahead cache size 
Cache optimization 
Default 
5 or 6 
Default 
Standard 
HPC (High-Performance Computing) 
5 or 6 
Maximum 
Standard 
MailSpooling 
Default 
Standard 
NFS_Mirror 
Default 
Standard 
Oracle_DSS 
5 or 6 
Maximum 
Standard 
Oracle_OLTP 
5 or 6 
Maximum 
Standard 
Oracle_OLTP_HA 
10 
Maximum 
Standard 
Random1 
Default 
Standard 
Random5 
5 or 6 
Default 
Standard 
Sequential 
5 or 6 
Maximum 
Super-Sequential 
Sybase_DSS 
5 or 6 
Maximum 
Standard 
Sybase_OLTP 
5 or 6 
Maximum 
Standard 
Sybase_OLTP_HA 
10 
Maximum 
Standard 
Video Streaming 
1 or 5 or 6 
Maximum 
Super-Sequential 
Exchange Database 
10 
Default 
Standard 
SAP 
10 
Default 
Standard 
SQL 
10 
Default 
Standard 
Fastest throughput optimization 
The following guidelines list the general best practices to follow when configuring your storage system 
for fastest throughput: 
• Host interconnects should be disabled when using the MSA2000fc G1. 
• Host ports should be configured for 4 Gb/sec on the MSA2000fc G1. 
• Host ports should be configured for 1 Gb/sec on the MSA2000i G1. 
• Virtual disks should be balanced between the two controllers. 
• Disk drives should be balanced between the two controllers. 
• Cache settings should be set to match Table 2 (Optimizing performance for your application) for 
the application. 
Highest fault tolerance optimization 
The following guidelines list the general best practices to follow when configuring your storage system 
for highest fault tolerance: 
• Use dual controllers. 
• Use two cable connections from each host. 
• If using a direct attach connection on the MSA2000fc G1, host port interconnects must be enabled. 
• If using a switch attach connection on the MSA2000fc G1, host port interconnects are disabled 
and controllers are cross-connected to two physical switches. 
• Use Multipath Input/Output (MPIO) software. 
27 
The MSA2000 G2  
Topics covered  
This section examines the following: 
• Hardware overview 
• Unified LUN Presentation (ULP) 
• Choosing single or dual controllers 
• Choosing DAS or SAN attach 
• Dealing with controller failures 
• Virtual disks 
• Volume mapping 
• RAID levels 
• Cache configuration 
• Fastest throughput optimization 
• Highest fault tolerance optimization 
• Boot from storage considerations 
• MSA70 considerations 
• Administering with HP SMU 
• MSA2000i G2 Considerations 
What’s New in the MSA2000 G2 
• New Small Form Factor Chassis with 24 bays 
• Support for Small Form Factor (SFF) SAS and SATA drives, common with ProLiant 
• Support for attachment of three dual I/O MSA70 SFF JBODs (ninety-nine SFF drives) 
• Increased support to four MSA2000 LFF disk enclosures (sixty LFF drives) 
• Support for HP-UX along with Integrity servers 
• Support for OpenVMS 
• New high-performance controller with upgraded processing power 
• Increased support of up to 512 LUNs in a dual controller system (511 on MSA2000sa G2) 
• Increased optional snapshot capability to 255 snaps 
• Improved Management Interface 
• JBOD expansion ports changed from SAS to mini-SAS 
• Optional DC-power chassis and a carrier-grade, NEBS certified solution 
• Support for up to 8 direct attach hosts on the MSA2000sa G2 
• Support for up to 4 direct attach hosts on the MSA2000i G2 
• Support for up to 64 host port connections on the MSA2000fc G2  
• Support for up to 32 host port connections on the MSA2000i G2 
• Support for up to 32 hosts in a blade server environment on the MSA2000sa G2 
• ULP (new for MSA2000fc G2 and MSA2000i G2 only) 
28 
Hardware overview 
HP StorageWorks MSA2000fc G2 Modular Smart Array 
The MSA2000fc G2 is a 4 Gb Fibre Channel connected 2U SAN or direct-connect solution designed 
for small to medium-sized departments or remote locations. The controller-less chassis is offered in two 
models—one comes standard with 12 3.5-inch drive bays, the other can accommodate 24 SFF 2.5 
inch drives. Both are able to simultaneously support enterprise-class SAS drives and archival-class 
SATA drives. 
Additional capacity can easily be added when needed by attaching either the MSA2000 12 bay 
drive enclosure or the MSA70 drive enclosure. Maximum raw capacity ranges from 5.4 TB SAS or 
12 TB SATA in the base cabinet, to over 27 TB SAS or 60 TB SATA with the addition of the maximum 
number of drive enclosures and necessary drives. Configurations utilizing SFF drive chassis can grow 
to a total of 99 SFF drives. The LFF drive chassis can grow up to a total of 60 drives. The MSA2000fc 
G2 supports up to 64 single path hosts for Fibre Channel attach.  
HP StorageWorks MSA2000i G2 Modular Smart Array 
The MSA2000i G2 is an iSCSI GbE connected 2U SAN solution designed for small to medium-sized 
deployments or remote locations. The controller-less chassis is offered in two models—one comes 
standard with 12 LFF 3.5-inch drive bays, the other can accommodate 24 SFF 2.5-inch drives. Both 
are able to simultaneously support enterprise-class SAS drives and archival-class SATA drives. The 
chassis can have one or two MSA2000i G2 controllers. 
The user can opt for the 24 drive bay SFF chassis for the highest spindle counts in the most dense 
form factor, or go for the 12 drive bay LFF model to max out total capacity. Choose a single controller 
unit for low initial cost with the ability to upgrade later; or decide on a model with dual controllers for 
the most demanding entry-level situations. Capacity can easily be added when needed by attaching 
additional drive enclosures. Maximum capacity ranges with LFF drives up to 27 TB SAS or 60 TB 
SATA with the addition of the maximum number of drive enclosures. Configurations utilizing the SFF 
drive chassis and the maximum number of drive enclosures can grow to 29.7 TB of SAS or 11.8 TB of 
SATA with a total of ninety-nine drives. The MSA2000i G2 has been fully tested up to 64 hosts. 
HP StorageWorks 2000sa G2 Modular Smart Array 
The MSA2000sa G2 is a 3 Gb SAS direct attach, external shared storage solution designed for small 
to medium-sized deployments or remote locations. The controller-less chassis is offered in two 
models—one comes standard with 12 LFF 3.5-inch drive bays, the other can accommodate 24 SFF 
2.5-inch drives. Both are able to simultaneously support enterprise-class SAS drives and archival-class 
SATA drives. The chassis can have one or two MSA2300sa G2 controllers. 
The user can opt for the 24-drive bay SFF chassis for the highest spindle counts in the most dense form 
factor, or go for the 12 drive bay LFF model to max out total capacity. Choose a single controller unit 
for low initial cost with the ability to upgrade later; or decide on a model with dual controllers for the 
most demanding entry-level situations. Capacity can easily be added when needed by attaching 
additional drive enclosures. Maximum capacity ranges with LFF drives up to 27 TB SAS or 60 TB 
SATA with the addition of the maximum number of drive enclosures. Configurations utilizing the SFF 
drive chassis and the maximum number of drive enclosures can grow to 29.7 TB of SAS or 11.8 TB of 
SATA with a total of ninety-nine drives. The MSA2000sa G2 has been fully tested up to 64 hosts. 
29 
Unified LUN Presentation (ULP) 
The MSA2000 G2 uses the concept of ULP. ULP can expose all LUNs through all host ports on both 
controllers. The interconnect information is managed in the controller firmware and therefore the host 
port interconnect setting found in the MSA2000fc G1 is no longer needed. ULP appears to the host as 
an active-active storage system where the host can choose any available path to access a LUN 
regardless of vdisk ownership. 
ULP uses the T10 Technical Committee of INCITS Asymmetric Logical Unit Access (ALUA) extensions, in 
SPC-3, to negotiate paths with aware host systems. Unaware host systems see all paths as being equal. 
Overview: 
ULP presents all LUNS to all host ports 
• Removes the need for controller interconnect path  
• Presents the same World Wide Node Name (WWNN) for both controllers 
Shared LUN number between controllers with a maximum of 512 LUNs 
• No duplicate LUNs allowed between controllers 
• Either controller can use any unused logical unit number 
ULP recognizes which paths are “preferred” 
• The preferred path indicates which is the owning controller per ALUA specifications 
• “Report Target Port Groups” identifies preferred path 
• Performance is slightly better on preferred path 
Write I/O Processing with ULP 
• Write command to controller A for LUN 1 owned by Controller B 
• The data is written to Controller A cache and broadcast to Controller A mirror 
• Controller A acknowledges I/O completion back to host 
• Data written back to LUN 1 by Controller B from Controller A mirror 
Figure 11: Write I/O Processing with ULP 
Read I/O Processing with ULP 
• Read command to controller A for LUN 1 owned by Controller B:  
– Controller A asks Controller B if data is in Controller B cache 
– If found, Controller B tells Controller A where in Controller B read mirror cache it resides 
– Controller A sends data to host from Controller B read mirror, I/O complete 
– If not found, request is sent from Controller B to disk to retrieve data 
Controller A
Controller B
A read cache
B read mirror
A write cache
B write mirror
A read mirror
B read cache
A write mirror
B write cache
LUN 1
B Owned
Controller A
Controller B
A read cache
B read mirror
A write cache
B write mirror
A read mirror
B read cache
A write mirror
B write cache
LUN 1
B Owned
30 
– Disk data is placed in Controller B cache and broadcast to Controller B mirror 
– Read data sent to host by Controller A from Controller B mirror, I/O complete 
Figure 12: Read I/O Processing with ULP 
Choosing single or dual controllers 
Although you can purchase a single-controller configuration, it is best practice to use the  
dual-controller configuration to enable high availability and better performance. However, under 
certain circumstances, a single-controller configuration can be used as an overall redundant solution. 
Dual controller 
A dual-controller configuration improves application availability because in the unlikely event of a 
controller failure, the affected controller fails over to the surviving controller with little interruption to 
the flow of data. The failed controller can be replaced without shutting down the storage system, 
thereby providing further increased data availability. An additional benefit of dual controllers is 
increased performance as storage resources can be divided between the two controllers, enabling 
them to share the task of processing I/O operations. For the MSA2000fc G2, a single controller 
array is limited to 256 LUNs. With the addition of a second controller, the support increases to  
512 LUNs. Controller failure results in the surviving controller by: 
• Taking ownership of all RAID sets 
• Managing the failed controller’s cache data 
• Restarting data protection services 
• Assuming the host port characteristics of both controllers 
The dual-controller configuration takes advantage of mirrored cache. By automatically “broadcasting” 
one controller’s write data to the other controller’s cache, the primary latency overhead is removed 
and bandwidth requirements are reduced on the primary cache. Any power loss situation will result in 
the immediate writing of cache data into both controllers’ compact flash devices, reducing any data 
loss concern. The broadcast write implementation provides the advantage of enhanced data 
protection options without sacrificing application performance or end-user responsiveness. 
Note: 
When using dual controllers, it is highly recommended that dual-ported 
hard drives be used for redundancy. If you use single-ported drives in a 
dual controller system and the connecting path is lost, the data on the 
drives would remain unaffected, but connection to the drives would be lost 
until the path to them is restored. 
Controller A
Controller B
A read cache
B read mirror
A write cache
B write mirror
A read mirror
B read cache
A write mirror
B write cache
LUN 1
B Owned
Controller A
Controller B
A read cache
B read mirror
A write cache
B write mirror
A read mirror
B read cache
A write mirror
B write cache
LUN 1
B Owned
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested