31 
Single controller 
A single-controller configuration provides no redundancy in the event that the controller fails; 
therefore, the single controller is a potential Single Point of Failure (SPOF). Multiple hosts can be 
supported in this configuration (up to two for direct attach). In this configuration, each host can have 
access to the storage resources. If the controller fails, the host loses access to the storage. 
The single-controller configuration is less expensive than the dual-controller configuration. It is a 
suitable solution in cases where high availability is not required and loss of access to the data can be 
tolerated until failure recovery actions are complete. A single-controller configuration is also an 
appropriate choice in storage systems where redundancy is achieved at a higher level, such as a  
two-node cluster. For example, a two-node cluster where each node is attached to an MSA2000fc G2 
enclosure with a single controller and the nodes do not depend upon shared storage. In this case, the 
failure of a controller is equivalent to the failure of the node to which it is attached.  
Another suitable example of a high-availability storage system using a single controller configuration 
is where a host uses a volume manager to mirror the data on two independent single-controller 
MSA2000fc G2 storage systems. If one MSA2000fc G2 storage system fails, the other MSA2000fc 
G2 storage system can continue to serve the I/O operations. Once the failed controller is replaced, 
the data from the survivor can be used to rebuild the failed system. 
Note:  
When using a single-controller system, the controller must be installed in the 
slot A of the array. 
Choosing DAS or SAN attach 
There are two basic methods for connecting storage to data hosts: Direct Attached Storage (DAS) and 
Storage Area Network (SAN). The option you select depends on the number of hosts you plan to 
connect and how rapidly you need your storage solution to expand. 
Direct attach 
DAS uses a direct connection between a data host and its storage system. The DAS solution of 
connecting each data host to a dedicated storage system is straightforward and the absence of 
storage switches can reduce cost. Like a SAN, a DAS solution can also share a storage system, but it 
is limited by the number of ports on the storage system.  
A powerful feature of the storage system is its ability to support four direct attach single-port data 
hosts, or two direct attach dual-port data hosts without requiring storage switches. The MSA2000fc 
G2 can also support 2 single-connected hosts and 1 dual connected host for a total of 3 hosts. 
If the number of connected hosts is not going to change or increase beyond four then the DAS solution 
is appropriate. However, if the number of connected hosts is going to expand beyond the limit 
imposed by the use of DAS, it is best to implement a SAN.  
Tip: 
It is a best practice to use a dual-port connection to data hosts when 
implementing a DAS solution. This includes using dual-ported hard drives 
for redundancy. 
Convert pdf to word to edit text - SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to word to edit text - SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
32 
Switch attach 
A switch attach solution, or SAN, places a switch between the servers and storage systems. This 
strategy tends to use storage resources more effectively and is commonly referred to as storage 
consolidation. A SAN solution shares a storage system among multiple servers using switches and 
reduces the total number of storage systems required for a particular environment, at the cost of 
additional element management (switches), and path complexity. 
Using switches increases the number of servers that can be connected. Essentially, the maximum 
number of data hosts that can be connected to the SAN becomes equal to the number of available 
switch ports.  
Note: 
The HP StorageWorks MSA2000fc G2 supports 64 hosts. 
Tip: 
It is a best practice to use a switched SAN environment anytime more than 
four hosts or when growth in required or storage or number of hosts is 
expected. 
Dealing with controller failovers 
Since the MSA2000fc G2 uses Unified LUN Presentation, all host ports see all LUNs; thus failovers 
are dealt with differently than with the MSA2000fc.  
FC direct-attach configurations 
In a dual-controller system, both controllers share a unique node WWN so they appear as a single 
device to hosts. The controllers also share one set of LUNs to use for mapping volumes to hosts. 
A host can use any available data path to access a volume owned by either controller. The preferred 
path, which offers slightly better performance, is through target ports on a volume’s owning controller. 
Note: 
Ownership of volumes is not visible to hosts. However, in SMU you  
can view volume ownership and change the owner of a virtual disk  
and its volumes. 
Note:  
Changing the ownership of a virtual disk should never be done with I/O  
in progress. I/O should be quiesced prior to changing ownership. 
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
third-party software, you can hardly edit PDF document Under this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word document
www.rasteredge.com
33 
In the following configuration, both hosts have redundant connections to all mapped volumes. 
Figure 13: FC storage presentation during normal operation (high-availability, dual-controller, and direct attach with two hosts) 
If a controller fails, the hosts maintain access to all of the volumes through the host ports on the 
surviving controller, as shown in the Figure 14. 
Figure 14: FC storage presentation during failover (high-availability, dual-controller, and direct attach with two hosts) 
SDK Library service:C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft
C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft Word (.docx) File. Empower C# users to easily convert PDF document to Word document.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. XImage.Raster. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
34 
In the following configuration, each host has a non-redundant connection to all mapped volumes. If a 
controller fails, the hosts connected to the surviving controller maintain access to all volumes owned 
by that controller. The hosts connected to the failed controller will lose access to volumes owned by 
the failed controller. 
Figure 15: FC storage presentation during normal operation (High-availability, dual-controller, direct attach with four hosts) 
FC switch-attach configuration 
When using a switch configuration, it is important to have at least one port connected from each 
switch to each controller for redundancy. See Figure 16. 
Figure 16: FC storage presentation during normal operation (high-availability, dual-controller, and switch attach with four hosts) 
If controller B fails in this setup, the preferred path will shift to controller A and all volumes will be still 
accessible to both servers as in Figure 14. Each switch has a redundant connection to all mapped 
volumes; therefore, the hosts connected to the surviving controller maintain access to all volumes.  
SDK Library service:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert multiple pages Word to
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
source PDF document file for word processing, presentation extract text content from source PDF document file obtain text information and edit PDF text content
www.rasteredge.com
35 
Virtual disks 
A vdisk is a group of disk drives configured with a RAID level. Each virtual disk can be configured 
with a different RAID level. A virtual disk can contain SATA drives or SAS drives, but not both. The 
controller safeguards against improperly combining SAS and SATA drives in a virtual disk. The system 
displays an error message if you choose drives that are not of the same type. 
The HP StorageWorks MSA2000 G2 system can have a maximum of 16 virtual disks per controller 
for a maximum of 32 virtual disks with a dual controller configuration. 
For storage configurations with many drives, it is recommended to consider creating a few virtual disks 
each containing many drives, as opposed to many virtual disks each containing a few drives. Having 
many virtual disks is not very efficient in terms of drive usage when using RAID 3. For example,  
one 12-drive RAID-5 virtual disk has one parity drive and 11 data drives, whereas four  
3-drive RAID-5 virtual disks each have one parity drive (four total) and two data drives (only eight total). 
A virtual disk can be larger than 2 TB. This can increase the usable storage capacity of configurations 
by reducing the total number of parity disks required when using parity-protected RAID levels. 
However, this differs from using volumes larger than 2 TB, which requires specific operating system, 
HBA driver, and application-program support. 
Note: 
The MSA2000 G2 can support a maximum vdisk size of 16 TB. 
Supporting large storage capacities requires advanced planning because it requires using large 
virtual disks with several volumes each or many virtual disks. To increase capacity and drive usage 
(but not performance), you can create virtual disks larger than 2 TB and divide them into multiple 
volumes with a capacity of 2 TB or less. 
The largest supported vdisk is the number of drives allowed in a RAID set multiplied by the largest 
drive size.  
• RAID 0, 3, 5, 6, 10 can support up to 16 drives (with 1 TB SATA drives that is 16 TB raw)  
• RAID 50 can support up to 32 drives (with 1 TB SATA drives that is 32 TB raw)  
Tip: 
The best practice for creating virtual disks is to add them evenly across both 
controllers. With at least one virtual disk assigned to each controller, both 
controllers are active. This active-active controller configuration allows 
maximum use of a dual-controller configuration’s resources. 
Tip: 
Another best practice is to stripe virtual disks across shelf enclosures to 
enable data integrity in the event of an enclosure failure. A virtual disk 
created with RAID 1, 10, 3, 5, 50, or 6 can sustain an enclosure failure 
without loss of data depending on the number of shelf enclosures attached. 
The design should take into account whether spares are being used and 
whether the use of a spare can break the original design. A plan for 
evaluation and possible reconfiguration after a failure and recovery should 
be addressed. Non-fault tolerant vdisks do not need to be dealt with in this 
context because a shelf enclosure failure with any part of a non-fault 
tolerant vdisk can cause the vdisk to fail. 
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
easy for C# developers to convert and transform style that are included in target PDF document file original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET convert csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
36 
Chunk size 
When you create a virtual disk, you can use the default chunk size or one that better suits your 
application. The chunk (also referred to as stripe unit) size is the amount of contiguous data that is 
written to a virtual disk member before moving to the next member of the virtual disk. This size is fixed 
throughout the life of the virtual disk and cannot be changed. A stripe is a set of stripe units that are 
written to the same logical locations on each drive in the virtual disk. The size of the stripe is 
determined by the number of drives in the virtual disk. The stripe size can be increased by adding 
one or more drives to the virtual disk. 
Available chunk sizes include: 
• 16 KB 
• 32 KB 
• 64 KB (default) 
If the host is writing data in 16 KB transfers, for example, then that size would be a good choice for 
random transfers because one host read would generate the read of exactly one drive in the volume. 
That means if the requests are random-like, then the requests would be spread evenly over all of the 
drives, which is good for performance. 
If you have 16-KB accesses from the host and a 64 KB block size, then some of the host’s accesses 
would hit the same drive; each stripe unit contains four possible 16-KB groups of data that the host 
might want to read. 
Alternatively, if the host accesses were 128 KB in size, then each host read would have to access two 
drives in the virtual disk. For random patterns, that ties up twice as many drives. 
Tip: 
The best practice for setting the chuck size is to match the transfer block 
size of the application 
Vdisk initialization 
During the creation of a vdisk, the manage user has the option to create a vdisk in online mode 
(default) or offline mode, only after the manage user has the advanced user type. By default, the 
manage user has the standard user type. 
If the “online initialization” option is enabled, you can use the vdisk while it is initializing, but 
because the verify method is used to initialize the vdisk, initialization takes more time. Online 
initialization is fault tolerant.  
If the “online initialization” option is unchecked (“offline initialization”), you must wait for initialization 
to complete before using the vdisk, but the initialization takes less time.  
To assign the advanced user type to the manage user, log into the HP Storage Management Utility 
(SMU) and make sure the MSA23xx on the left frame is highlighted and then click the Configuration 
drop-down box. Then click Users  Modify User. 
37 
Click the radio button next to the manage user and type in the manage user password. From User 
Type, select “Advanced” and then to save the change, click the Modify User button  then OK. 
38 
Volume mapping  
It is a best practice to map volumes to the preferred path. The preferred path is both ports on the 
controller that owns the vdisk.  
If a controller fails, the surviving controller will report it is now the preferred path for all vdisks. When 
the failed controller is back online, the vdisks and preferred paths switch back. 
Best Practice 
For fault tolerance, HP recommends mapping the volumes to all available ports on the controller. 
For performance, HP recommends mapping the volumes to the ports on the controller that owns the 
vdisk. Mapping to the non-preferred path results in a slight performance degradation.  
Note: 
By default, a new volume will have the “all other hosts read-write access” 
mapping, so the manage user must go in and explicitly assign the correct 
volume mapping access. 
Configuring background scrub 
By default, the system background scrub or the MSA2000 G2 is enabled. However, you can disable 
the background scrub if desired. The background scrub continuously analyzes disks in vdisks to 
detect, report, and store information about disk defects.  
Vdisk-level errors reported include:  
Hard errors, medium errors, and bad block replacements (BBRs).  
Disk-level errors reported include:  
Metadata read errors, SMART events during scrub, bad blocks during scrub, and new disk defects 
during scrub.  
For RAID 3, 5, 6, and 50, the utility checks all parity blocks to find data-parity mismatches. For RAID 
1 and 10, the utility compares the primary and secondary disks to find mirror-verify errors. For NRAID 
and RAID 0, the utility checks for media errors.  
You can use a vdisk while it is being scrubbed. Background scrub always runs at background utility 
priority, which reduces to no activity if CPU usage is above a certain percentage or if I/O is 
occurring on the vdisk being scrubbed. A background scrub may be in process on multiple vdisks at 
once. A new vdisk will first be scrubbed 20 minutes after creation. After a vdisk has been scrubbed, it 
will not be scrubbed again for 24 hours. When a scrub is complete, the number of errors found is 
reported with event code 207 in the event log. 
Note:  
If you choose to disable background scrub, you can still scrub selected 
vdisks by using Media Scrub Vdisk. 
39 
To change the background scrub setting:  
In the Configuration View panel, right-click the system and select Configuration  Advanced Settings 
 System Utilities. 
Either select (enable) or clear (disable) the Background Scrub option. The default is enabled. Click 
Apply. 
Best Practice: Leave the default setting of Background Scrub ON in the background priority. 
RAID levels 
Choosing the correct RAID level is important whether your configuration is for fault tolerance or 
performance. Table 3 gives an overview of supported RAID implementations highlighting performance 
and protection levels. 
Note: 
Non-RAID is supported for use when the data redundancy or performance 
benefits of RAID are not needed; no fault tolerance. 
Table 3: An overview of supported RAID implementations 
RAID level 
Cost 
Performance 
Protection level 
RAID 0  
Striping 
N/A 
Highest 
No data protection 
RAID 1  
Mirroring 
High cost—
2x drives 
High 
Protects against individual drive failure 
RAID 3 
Block striping with dedicated parity drive 
1 drive 
Good 
Protects against individual drive failure 
RAID 5 
Block striping with striped parity drive 
1 drive 
Good 
Protects against any individual drive 
failure; medium level of fault tolerance 
RAID 6 
Block striping with multiple striped parity 
2 drives 
Good 
Protects against multiple (2) drive failures; 
high level of fault tolerance 
RAID 10 
Mirrored striped array 
High cost 
2x drives 
High 
Protects against certain multiple drive 
failures; high level of fault tolerance 
RAID 50 
Data striped across RAID 5 
At least  
2 drives 
Good 
Protects against certain multiple drive 
failures; high level of fault tolerance 
Spares 
You can designate a maximum of eight global spares for the system. If a disk in any redundant vdisk 
(RAID 1, 3, 5, 6, 10, and 50) fails, a global spare is automatically used to reconstruct the vdisk. 
At least one vdisk must exist before you can add a global spare. A spare must have sufficient 
capacity to replace the smallest disk in an existing vdisk. If a drive in the virtual disk fails, the 
controller automatically uses the vdisk spare for reconstruction of the critical virtual disk to which it 
belongs. A spare drive must be the same type (SAS or SATA) as other drives in the virtual disk. You 
cannot add a spare that has insufficient capacity to replace the largest drive in the virtual disk. If two 
drives fail in a RAID 6 virtual disk, two properly sized spare drives must be available before 
reconstruction can begin. For RAID 50 virtual disks, if more than one sub-disk becomes critical, 
reconstruction and use of vdisk spares occur in the order sub-vdisks are numbered. 
40 
You can designate a global spare to replace a failed drive in any virtual disk, or a vdisk spare to 
replace a failed drive in only a specific virtual disk. Alternatively, you can enable dynamic spares in 
HP SMU. Dynamic sparing enables the system to use any drive that is not part of a virtual disk to 
replace a failed drive in any virtual disk. 
Working with Failed Drives and Global Spares 
When a failed drive rebuilds to a spare, the spare drive now becomes the new drive in the virtual 
disk. At this point, the original drive slot position that failed is no longer part of the virtual disk. The 
original drive now becomes a “Leftover” drive. 
In order to get the original drive slot position to become part of the virtual disk again, do the following: 
1. 
Replace the failed drive with a new drive. 
2. 
If the drive slot is still marked as “Leftover”, use the “Clear Disk Metadata” option found in the 
“Tools” submenu.   
3. 
When the new drive is online and marked as “Available”, configure the drive as a global spare drive. 
4. 
Fail the drive in the original global spare location by removing it from the enclosure. The RAID engine 
will rebuild to the new global spare which will then become an active drive in the RAID set again. 
5. 
Replace the drive you manually removed from the enclosure. 
6. 
If the drive is marked as “Leftover”, clear the metadata as in step 2 above. 
7. 
Re-configure the drive as the new global spare. 
Tip: 
A best practice is to designate a spare disk drive for use if a drive fails. 
Although using a dedicated vdisk spare is the best way to provide spares 
for your virtual disks, it is also expensive to keep a spare assigned to each 
virtual disk. An alternative method is to enable dynamic spares or to assign 
one or more unused drives as global spares. 
Cache configuration 
Controller cache options can be set for individual volumes to improve a volume’s fault tolerance and 
I/O performance.  
Note: 
To change the following cache settings, the user—who logs into the HP 
SMU—must have the “advanced” user credential. The manage user has the 
“standard” user credential by default. This credential can be changed using 
the HP SMU and click on “Configuration,” then “Users,” then “Modify Users.”  
Write-back cache settings 
Write back is a cache-writing strategy in which the controller receives the data to be written to disk, 
stores it in the memory buffer, and immediately sends the host operating system a signal that the write 
operation is complete, without waiting until the data is actually written to the disk drive. Write-back 
cache mirrors all of the data from one controller module cache to the other. Write-back cache 
improves the performance of write operations and the throughput of the controller. 
When write-back cache is disabled, write-through becomes the cache-writing strategy. Using  
write-through cache, the controller writes the data to the disk before signaling the host operating 
system that the process is complete. Write-through cache has lower throughput and write operation 
performance than write back, but it is the safer strategy, with low risk of data loss on power failure. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested