Let's Do a Creation Science Unit! 
How much do you know about Creation? Like most of us, you are probably familiar 
with the Genesis account of the six days of Creation and Noah's Ark. This unit is designed to 
take you further than you ever thought possible! We have thoroughly researched the topic. (Jill 
has studied Creation science since 1984!) We have tried to make a technical subject easy to 
understand and teach.  
To make this study useful to teachers of different grades, it has been divided into three 
levels. The divisions are kindergarten through grade three, grades four through eight, and 
grades nine through twelve. Another feature is subject divisions, which follow the study 
outlines to give you some ideas on how to incorporate reading, vocabulary, spelling, 
grammar, language arts, math reinforcements, geography, history, science projects, 
activities, experiments, art, and music into your unit studies. We have included ideas that we 
believe to be the most helpful. Some of the games and activities are old favorites which have 
been revised a little to fit the occasion.  
A resource guide is provided to aid you in obtaining materials; many of the books listed 
are readily available. Unfortunately most libraries do not carry a wide selection of Creation 
science books, so we list various sources where these materials may be purchased. There is also 
a guide to Creation science videos and audiotapes. We have included a materials list and field 
trip guide, as well as pages you may copy: science experiment sheets and materials chart. 
We have supplied Internet information. 
When your child is learning a new scientific concept, make sure you have him re-tell in 
his own words what he has just learned. For example, if you are teaching about density, you 
may want to do an experiment which illustrates the concept: float a "toy ark" in water and drop a 
shell in beside it. Ask, "Which one floats and which one sinks?" A young child may answer, 
"The boat floats and the shell sinks." An older child should be required to explain why: "The 
shell is denser than the water it displaces, and the ark floats because the weight of the ark is less 
than the weight of the fluid it displaces." This is a quick way to check to make sure your child is 
following the concept and not getting sidetracked by the fun! 
Creation science is a challenging area to study. Please refer to the detailed Teaching 
Outline in the front of the book, beginning on page 9. This outline corresponds to those in each 
of the three grade-level divisions, although not precisely. (We have obviously left out some of 
the complicated points and discussions in the outlines for younger students; therefore, the 
outlines are numbered differently.) Look for the topic headings when looking for a further 
explanation in the Teaching Outline. You will easily be able to spot the sections that Felice 
Gerwitz, educator, and Jill Whitlock, scientist, have written! (I tried to keep her to the basics, 
but alas, it was not possible in some areas....)  
With some preparation, your children will soon be sharing with others all that they are 
learning. They will be able to recognize the difference between beliefs held by evolutionists and 
those held by Creationists. It is our hope that this unit encourages you and your children to 
further study the subject and discover the exciting truth of Creation! Are you ready? Let's start 
our adventure... 
Felice Gerwitz 
Best pdf to text converter - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
change pdf to txt format; convert pdf image to text online
Best pdf to text converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
batch convert pdf to text; remove text from pdf
How To Prepare a Unit Study 
What is a unit study, and what are the advantages of teaching in such a manner? This is 
an often-asked question which we will attempt to answer. For additional information, one 
excellent book that we recommend is Valerie Bendt’s How to Create Your Own Unit Study, 
which gives an in-depth explanation of how to plan a unit.  
What is a unit study? 
A unit study is taking one topic, in this case Creation science, and interrelating all the 
other subjects into a unified teaching approach. In other words, while studying the topic of 
Creation science, the children will read Creation science books and research materials, write 
assignments relating to what they’ve read, spell words they may have had difficulty reading or 
writing, learn vocabulary words dealing with Creation science, do math problems based on 
scientific principles, read and research historical periods relating to Creation and time periods 
in which noteworthy evolutionists or Creation scientists lived, study geographical locations of 
scientific discoveries and Biblical events (e.g., where Noah’s Ark now rests), create art works 
dealing with the flood (such as drawing the animals that went into Noah’s Ark), and for music 
play instruments that make sounds similar to those in nature. In other words, all the subjects 
will relate to the main topic. (The authors suggest that you supplement grammar, phonics, and 
math with other programs, where age appropriate.)  
Why teach a unit study?  
The unit study approach emphasizes that reading many books related to a topic, rather 
than isolated textbooks, encourages discussion and research on the part of the children, 
therefore making learning more natural and retention of information much more successful. 
This is ideal for parents with children at different grade levels. It makes teaching much easier. 
The main area of interest can be taught in a group; then children can work on age-appropriate 
activities individually. It keeps the family together most of the time, rather than separating 
children to do their own individual work. It also encourages older siblings to assist younger 
ones and thereby learn by teaching. 
Traditionally, subjects are taught in an isolated manner in textbooks or workbooks with 
fill-in-the-blank format. Very few, if any, of the subjects are interrelated, and all of the learning 
is done in an individual manner. Unit studies relate all academic subjects under one main idea 
and can easily work with one child or a group of children. 
Does a unit study cover all of the topics I need to teach in every grade? 
Yes and no! It depends on the grade level of your child and what your goals are for your 
home school. Many children know all they need to know for kindergarten by the time they are 
preschoolers, leaving the kindergarten year free to implement unit studies on many different 
topics. Often, as the child progresses, because of all the reading, research, projects, and 
experimentation that he does, his learning will surpass what is generally considered “normal” 
for his grade level. Still, if you are concerned about standardized testing, the authors 
recommend you use these study guides as supplements to your core curriculum. However, in 
many cases, when homeschool students who have been taught with the unit study approach take 
a standardized test, they score in the 90+ percentile. 
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
converting pdf to plain text; convert pdf to txt file
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application.
extract text from pdf; convert pdf to openoffice text
How long does it take to complete a unit study? 
Unit studies may be completed in several weeks or studied for an entire year depending 
on the depth of your coverage of a topic and the varying abilities of your children. For example, 
we have used our Creation Anatomy study guide in our family as a unit study covering three 
months. We will use it again as a core subject for high school credit for Anatomy when the time 
comes. With units you are not bound to a routine of one hour for each subject. The relationships 
between the topics are natural, and you will often find many subjects are covered without much 
effort. You will also be free to spend more time on a particularly interesting topic as you see 
your children’s interest level rise in that area. These study guides are meant to be supplemental 
to your core curriculum, and you can tailor them to meet your family’s needs. 
How do I get started with planning? 
We have done much of the planning for you with our ready-to-go lesson plans (see be-
low). If you are interested in planning your own lessons, the best place to start is with a 
calendar, paper, pencil, and the Teaching Outline in this study guide. Read through the outline 
and choose the points you wish to cover. You may use the topics provided in each of the three 
grade levels, or you may utilize them as starters in creating your own outline. The grade level 
teaching outlines are geared for each of three levels: K-3, 4-8, and 9-12. They are not as 
extensive as the Teaching Outline in the front of the book; therefore, the numerical labels do not 
correspond exactly. Use the Teaching Outline to familiarize yourself with the topic; it is de-
signed specifically to be read by the parent as preparation for teaching the topic. It will give you 
the necessary information and background to teach the unit. We encourage you to read portions 
aloud to younger children and have older children read them alone or with you. 
As you write your outline or points you want to cover, leave room for additions (you 
may later run across a book or topic that you want to include). Decide how long you want your 
unit to take. What months are you considering? Is this time before a major holiday? If so, you 
may want to do a shorter unit. Is it the beginning of school, summer, or other longer period of 
time? If so, you may wish to do a more complicated unit or spend more time digging deeper 
into the topic you choose. Decide what subjects you want to incorporate and what days you will 
do each. For example you can work on reading, writing, grammar, and math every day, but 
perhaps science experimentation and history will only be done three out of five days. You may 
prefer a Mon.-Wed.-Fri./ Tues.-Thurs. type of routine, or if you take Fridays off, your schedule 
might be Mon.-Wed./Tues.-Thurs. (See sample schedules on page 6.) Remember, it’s up to you. 
Approximately 6-8 weeks is a good time span for the study of Creation science. We feel 
this is an excellent preparation to counter secular materials, where it is almost impossible to 
avoid the evolutionary viewpoint.  
How do I use the lesson plans provided? 
Included are sample lessons for a six-week study for each grade. You will find these af-
ter each outline. Here you will find specific Bible verses to read, as well as science experiments 
or activities, language arts and spelling, history, music, and art activities mapped out daily for 
you. You will notice that some areas are left blank for you to include books of your choice. We 
understand that not every book we specify will be available to you. You may not find any of the 
books you are looking for. Do know that the teaching outline gives you the major points you 
should understand after the end of the lesson. If you do not like the activity we have specified,  
Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Buy Now. Raster XImage.Raster for .NET. Best .NET imaging SDK Buy Now. OCR XImage.OCR for .NET. Scan text from raster images, like jpeg, tiff, scanned pdf.
convert pdf to txt file format; converting .pdf to text
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
PDF Page in C#.NET Class. Best PDF document reader SDK control that can highlight PDF text in Visual C# .NET framework application.
convert pdf into text file; change pdf to text file
feel free to omit it and substitute your own! We have supplied a blank lesson plan sheet for you 
to photocopy. 
Go through the age-appropriate outlines and look for the activities and assignments sug-
gested in the lesson plans. If you have a mix of older and younger children, try to find a middle 
ground as a starting place. Check off the activities that interest you in each subject area. Decide 
which supplemental books you will need, and plan on obtaining them. Interlibrary loans are 
able to obtain books from private libraries. Did you know that in most cities you can order li-
brary books online and have them ready to be picked up at the checkout desk? What a time 
saver, especially if you have younger children. 
This study contains a list of a greater number of books than necessary so that if you 
can’t obtain one particular book, you may be able to find another. Use the topics as your guide. 
This is too overwhelming! Will I be able to implement it all? 
Don’t become discouraged or feel overwhelmed. It takes one or two unit studies to 
become comfortable and feel like an “old pro.” One way to fit everything in is a day-by-day 
approach. You may want to do all of the reading and research on day one, geography or history 
on day two, math and language arts (vocabulary, spelling, and grammar) on day three, science 
experiments on day four, art and music on day five. Day five can also be used as the catch-up 
day to finish any work not completed on the previous four days. I highly recommend a “game” 
day on Friday for grades six and under. This entitles your child to bring out educational games 
to play on this day. 
Decide which books you want your children to read on their own. Many times older 
siblings can be a great help in teaching the younger ones and will have lots of great ideas for 
projects. Remember, unit studies have the goal of tying in as many subjects as possible, so you 
don’t need to supplement with a spelling workbook or vocabulary workbook unless your child 
has a definite need that can’t be met any other way. Consider that it might be overloading the 
kids with seat work and creating frustration when they can’t get it all done. (We speak from 
experience!)  
How do I test to find out if my children have learned what I am teaching with the unit 
approach? 
We have found that working closely with our children tells us all we need to know 
about what they know and don’t know. By reading materials orally and then verbally 
questioning them, we know what needs review and what doesn’t. They do many hands-on 
activities that reinforce previously read materials. For example, in this book there is a 
discussion of evolutionary principles. One of the points made is how evolution violates the 
second law of thermodynamics. That in itself sounds very dry and scholarly, yet a follow-up 
activity, the “Entropy” experiment, presented after the discussion, is a very visual way to 
reinforce what they have learned. If the children can explain it to you, then you know they 
understand the concept. After reading all this, if you feel the need to create tests to find out 
what they know, feel free to do so! You could easily generate oral tests for the little ones, and 
essay questions for the older ones. One of the great things about homeschooling is the freedom 
to teach as you wish.  
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET An advanced .NET WPF PDF converter library for converting Export PDF text content to TXT file with original
convert pdf to text file using; convert pdf to plain text
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and
convert pdf to text on; convert pdf into text
What about co-oping? 
Co-oping is teaching a unit study with another family (or several families) and taking 
time—usually once a week—to work together on projects, experiments, or activities for the 
entire day. Each family focuses on the unit topic at home during the week by reading books or 
completing additional projects the co-op will not be covering. The co-op is a way of reinforcing 
the subjects taught at home with hands-on and group activities. This unit lends itself well to co-
ops. There are many experiments that would be fun to do as a group. Still, they can be done just 
as easily with a single family. A great resource is Co-Oping for Cowards by Pat Wesolowski of 
DP& Kids Productions. Pat’s e-mail address is bisb@juno.com, and her website is www.co-
oping4cowards.com. 
Why teach using a science approach rather than literature or history? 
Each of the approaches has its pros and cons. We prefer science because it focuses on 
experimenting, which encourages creative thinking and exploration on a greater scale than 
either literature or history. Truly, it is a matter of preference. We have done literature and 
history as well as science units with our children. Of course we feel that the knowledge of Crea-
tion is important to counteract what the secular media is teaching. 
We pray that this will help you with unit studies. We believe that learning should be fun 
for you and your children, while still being educational. When it’s fun, hands-on, and messy 
(especially messy!), the learning experience will stay with them. Try not to get bogged down 
and become a slave to a schedule (recipe for disaster!). While Jill was living in Washington 
state, a friend of hers was doing a unit on Washington state history. They traveled all over the 
state visiting historical sites. After a boat ride to see the orcas migrating, they were so intrigued 
that they visited the Sea-aquarium and beaches, etc. Soon they realized they were no longer 
doing a unit on history but one on marine biology. That’s the way unit studies should flow!                                                          
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class. Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
convert pdf to text format; change pdf to txt file
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. View & Process. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF
convert pdf to text document; converting pdf to editable text
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Math textbook 
Math textbook 
Math textbook 
Math textbook 
Math textbook 
Reading/Phonics 
program 
Reading/Phonics 
program 
Reading/Phonics 
program 
Reading/Phonics 
program 
Reading/Phonics 
program 
Suggested reading 
Math  
reinforcements 
Suggested reading 
Math  
reinforcements 
Suggested reading 
Language Arts  
activities 
Vocabulary, Spelling, 
and Grammar 
Language Arts  
activities 
Vocabulary, Spelling, 
and Grammar 
Language Arts  
activities 
Science activities 
Geography/History 
Science activities 
Geography/History 
Science activities 
Music 
Art 
Music 
Art 
Music 
For those of you who would like help planning a schedule for this study, I have drawn 
up some thumbnail sketches to use as a basis for planning. Please use these loosely and feel free 
to add or delete anything you wish. Notice that I have not included times. This is intentional, as 
there is no way I can know what will work for you and your family. The next page contains a 
blank weekly lesson plan sheet. Before each grade level you will find weekly lesson plans if 
you wish for a more detailed chart.  
Schedule A 
Schedule B 
Schedule C 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Suggested reading 
Language Arts  
activities 
Suggested reading 
Language Arts 
activities 
Suggested reading 
Vocabulary, Spelling, 
and Grammar 
Math  
reinforcements 
Vocabulary, Spelling, 
and Grammar 
Math  
reinforcements 
Vocabulary, Spelling, 
and Grammar 
Science activities 
Geography/History 
Science activities 
Geography/History 
Science activities 
Art 
Music 
Art 
Music 
Art 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Bible/Prayer 
Suggested reading 
Math  
reinforcements 
Suggested reading 
Math  
reinforcements 
Suggested reading 
Language Arts  
activities 
Vocabulary, Spelling, 
and Grammar 
Language Arts  
activities 
Vocabulary, Spelling, 
and Grammar 
Language Arts  
activities 
Geography/History 
Science activities 
Geography/History 
Science activities 
Geography/History 
Finish activities 
Music 
Finish activities 
Art 
Finish activities 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
convert pdf to word and edit text; convert pdf to text doc
Subject 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Bible/Religion Studies 
Creation 
Teaching Outline 
Reading Selection 
Language Arts 
Math Reinforcement 
Science Activities and 
Experiments 
Geography/History 
Ideas 
Art/Music 
CR= Creation Resource  
TS= Teacher Selection
Copyright 2003 Media Angels, Inc. 
Teaching Outline
Around the world today there are many accounts of how our universe came into being. 
Here in the United States, two diametrically opposed beliefs are very strongly held and argued 
by both sides. One is said to be scientific, the other purely religious. Creation scientists look at 
the universe as having been specially created by God. This view rules out any possibility of 
evolution occurring. Neo-Darwinian scientists look at the universe as having been formed 
slowly over millions and billions of years. This view rules out any possibility of Special Crea-
tion by an Intelligent Designer. 
These two diametrically opposing views cannot be resolved, so the debate continues. How-
ever, a belief in evolution actually requires more faith than a belief in specific creation by a di-
vine Creator. Evolution is really more myth and hypothesis. Many points offered in support of 
evolution have been disproved, as we will show you. More and more scientists are abandoning 
the theory of evolution for a belief in Intelligent Design and acknowledging that a Creator was 
necessary. Many of these scientists started out as staunch evolutionists, but with new informa-
tion and discoveries, they have changed their views. A few of these scientists are: Dr. Paul A. 
Nelson, a philosopher of Biology; Dr. Dean H. Kenyon, professor of biology at the University 
of San Francisco; Dr. Michael J. Behe, biochemist at Lehigh University; Dr. Stephen C. Myer, a 
former evolutionary biochemist at the Discover Institute; Dr. William Dembski, a geneticist 
from Australia; Ed Macosko, a molecular biologist from the University of California Berkeley; 
Scott Minnisch, a molecular biologist from the University of Idaho.  Geologists, physicists, and 
scientists already working in the Creation science field include Dr. Henry Morris, Dr. John 
Morris, Dr. Steve Austin, Dr. Russell Humphreys, Dr. Carl Wieland, Dr. John Baumgardner, 
Dr. Andrew Snelling, Dr. Larry Vardiman, and many others. 
I. Days of Creation 
A Day Is a Day  — There is much controversy over the meaning of time in the days of the 
Creation week. Some theologians propose the Day-Age Theory, in which each day represents a 
thousand years. Others, such as proponents of the Gap Theory, find ways to put long ages into 
the Genesis account. Most Creation scientists believe the days of Creation were twenty-four-
hour time periods. The words used in the text of Genesis clearly indicate that this is so. The 
definition of the Hebrew word yom, which is used in Genesis 1, is “a regular day.” The use of 
the terms “evening and morning” also designates one day. Whenever the word yom is used with 
an ordinal number (1, 2, 3 . . .), it means a twenty-four-hour day. This is a frame of reference 
that would have been familiar to Moses and his people when he was writing this book for the 
Hebrews. This same word, yom, is used 359 times outside of the book of Genesis to mean a 
twenty-four-hour day. To the Hebrews, there would have been no doubt as to the meaning of 
this word: a literal, twenty-four-hour day. God Himself, when writing the Ten Commandments, 
wrote in stone, “For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, 
and rested the seventh day” (Ex. 20:11). 
The Space-Time-Matter Continuum — “In the beginning God created the heavens and 
the earth” (Gen 1:1). In this very first verse of the Bible, God establishes the space-time-matter 
continuum. “In the beginning” starts time. God is eternal, but we can only try to understand 
Him in the limited terms of what we define as time such as minute, day, hour, etc. “The       
10 
heavens” is the space. That includes our atmosphere, the stars we see in the universe, and the 
dwelling places of God and the angels. And “the earth” is the matter. Matter and light (energy) 
are related according to Einstein’s theory of relativity where E=mc
2
(Energy = mass times the 
speed of light squared). Here the energy of a substance is related to its mass multiplied by the 
square of light speed. Nehemiah 9:6 states, “You made the heavens, even the highest heavens, 
and all their host, the earth and all that is on it, the seas and all that is in them.” This leaves 
nothing out of the days of Creation. God created everything that has ever been. That leaves no 
room for the Gap theory, the Day-Age theory or any other compromise position that theologians 
have come up with to try to make the Bible fit into secular science. (See False Concepts page 
13.) 
Day One: Light and Dark — “God is light” (1 John 1:5). On the first day of Creation, 
God separated light from dark and day from night. Gen. 1:5 says, “And there was evening and 
there was morning—the first day.” The phrase “there was evening and there was morning” indi-
cates a normal day. Because a day on Earth is measured by one complete rotation, we under-
stand the earth began to rotate. However, there was no sun yet, as it was created on the fourth 
day. The light came from the presence of God. The Bible repeatedly refers to God and Jesus as 
light—physical and spiritual light. As Christians we believe Jesus to be totally divine and to-
tally human, one being with two inseparable natures. Science does not have a precise determi-
nation of what light is, but it has revealed that light has two natures. Light functions as a wave 
and as particles. These two functions seem to be contradictory, but both are very real character-
istics of light. So too is the character of Jesus, The Light of the World. He was born of a woman 
and is totally human, and He is the Son of God and is totally divine. (I personally believe that 
one of the greatest miracles God ever performed was to place His infinite glory in the body of a 
small baby.) 
Day Two: Waters Above and Waters Below — There is currently much controversy over 
the long-accepted theory of a vapor canopy surrounding the pre-Flood earth protecting it from 
harmful radiation. A canopy of water vapor at the edge of the stratosphere would also have pro-
vided an increase of atmospheric pressure to at least two atmospheres, which would have been 
beneficial for exceptional growth and rapid healing. A vapor canopy would have caused a 
greenhouse effect on the planet resulting in a more tropical climate over the entire globe. Some 
scientists, however, have calculated that such a vapor canopy would have increased the green-
house effect so much that life would not be possible on earth. Dr. Larry Vardiman, a scientist 
with the Institute for Creation Research, presented a paper at the International Conference on 
Creationism in Pittsburgh in August of 2003 entitled, “Temperature Profiles For An Optimized 
Water Vapor Canopy.” In his paper, Dr. Vardiman uses calculations of temperatures beneath a 
water vapor canopy, varying certain parameters, to show how the greenhouse effect could have 
been minimized (Vardiman 2003). Also, recent experiments at Texas A & M University have 
indicated that the long-necked dinosaurs—such as the brachiosaurus, diplodocus, and the apato-
saurus—could not have been able to breathe unless there were at least two atmospheres of pres-
sure due to the time it would take for oxygen to flow into their very long necks. Breathing 
would have required the assistance of double atmospheric pressure.  
Waters Above — In the pre-Flood environment, the earth could possibly have been 
surrounded by a canopy of water vapor. “So God made the expanse and separated the water un-
der the expanse from the water above it” (Gen. 1:7). Picture a bubble of water surrounding the 
earth causing a greenhouse effect and temperate climate world-wide. (See Section III—Flood 
Geology and Noah’s Ark.) This is not such a strange concept because our neighbor, Venus, is 
40 
Creation Science Outline 
K-3 
Outline: 
I.  Days of Creation 
A.  Day One — Light and dark 
B.  Day Two — Waters above and waters below 
1.  Water vapor canopy  
2.  Shielded harmful sun rays—longer life span 
(see timeline chart on page vi) 
3.  Warm climate worldwide — no storms, no rain 
4.  Fountains of the great deep 
C.  Day Three — Dry land and plants 
1.  Seas gathered in one place 
2.  Land in one place with plants 
D.  Day Four — Sun, moon, and stars 
1.  Light before sun 
2.  Stars for signs and to mark seasons, days, years 
E.  Day Five — Fish and birds 
F.  Day Six — All other animals and Man 
II.  Flood Geology and Noah’s Ark 
A.  Noah’s Ark designed by God 
B.  Water for the Flood came from the fountains of the great deep  
C.  Mountains and other geological formations were formed during the Flood or   
soon after 
1.  Tibetan Plateau 
2.  Grand Canyon formed from a natural breached dam 
3.  Volcanoes 
D.  Earth’s axis is tilted 
1.  Now we have seasons 
2.  Polar ice caps form 
E.  Evidence for a worldwide Flood 
1.  Fossils can only be preserved by rapid burial 
2.  Fossils that go through many layers  
3.  Earth is mostly covered with water 
III. Young Earth Theory 
A.  False age dating 
B.  Not enough salt in the oceans 
C.  Evidence from Grand Canyon and Mt. St. Helens 
IV.  Darwin’s Theory Is False 
A.  Fossils record supports separate classification of kinds 
B.  No transitional creatures (plants or animals) are seen 
C.  Mutations are harmful or neutral; very few are beneficial 
D.  Animals always reproduce their own kind (i.e. dogs-dog; fish-fish; etc.) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested