ATTITUDES OF TEACHING STAFF AT THE FACULTY OF HEALTH SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF THE 
WITWATERSRAND TOWARDS EMBEDDING EVIDENCE-BASED INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS 
PROGRAMMES INTO THE GRADUATE ENTRY MEDICAL PROGRAMME 1 AND 2 CURRIUCLUM 
by 
Glenda Avrylle Myers 
RESEARCH REPORT 
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of 
Master of Education in the field of Educational Technology 
in the Faculty of Humanities 
at the 
University of the Witwatersrand 
Supervisor: Dr S Cohen 
February 2011 
Pdf image to text - Library application component:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf image to text - Library application component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
DECLARATION 
I hereby declare that the research report submitted in partial fulfillment for the Master of Education 
in the field of Educational Technology, apart from any help acknowledged, is my own work and has 
not been formerly submitted to another university for a degree. 
Glenda Myers 
Library application component:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
ii 
ABSTRACT 
Information literacy (IL) is recognized as the overall critical literacy for the 21
st
Century. Although 
large amounts of digital information are available, there is concern within higher education that 
students  lack  the  competencies  to  assess  and  analyse  sources  in  terms  of  relevance  to  their 
courses.  Information  literacy  skills  are  of  critical  importance  in  teaching  medical  students  to 
engage  with  evidence-based  medicine  (EBM),  often  within  a  problem-based  learning  (PBL) 
curriculum.  Information  practices  that  underpin  academic  and  professional  life  should  be 
embedded  into the  learning experience of  the subject, and not taught extraneously  in isolated 
silos.  
Attitudes of teaching staff at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand towards 
embedding evidence-based information literacy skills into the Graduate Entry Medical Programme 1 
and 2 curriculum were examined. Existing integration of IL skills into the curriculum was shown to be 
limited, and not as high as perceived by educators. Five barriers against the integration of IL skills, 
and  six  opportunities  for  embedding  information  literacy,  were  identified  in  the  curriculum. 
Awareness of evidence-based practice was found to be high, and collaborative teaching of IL skills 
with librarians was accepted by a large majority of educators. Dynamic Purposeful Learning (DPL) was 
proposed as a constructivist framework into which collaborative teaching of IL skills could be placed. 
DPL draws on active and collaborative learning, as well as cognitive scaffolding and apprenticeship, 
and is suited to PBL in the context of medical education.  
Library application component:C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
www.rasteredge.com
iii 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
The guidance and advice of many is acknowledged with gratitude. Mention must be made of staff 
in the School of Education: my supervisor, Dr Sue Cohen, and course co-ordinator and lecturer, 
Prof Ian Moll. The encouragement of Ms Lynne Slonimsky is also appreciated.  
Especial thanks are due to Prof Detlef Prozesky of the Centre for Health Sciences Education (CHSE) 
at the Faculty of Health Sciences for permission to carry out this study, and in particular to Prof 
Patricia McInerney  and  Dr  Dianne  Manning  of  CHSE  for  their  assistance,  counsel  and  support 
throughout. Approval for the topic of this study from the Chair of the GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
Committee,  Dr  Penny  Keene,  is  also  acknowledged,  as  is  her  continued  encouragement  and 
interest. Educators in  GEMP 1 and  2  are thanked for  their support and assistance  in returning 
questionnaires at a very busy time of the year. Their comments and responses were extremely 
insightful. 
Prof  Elly  Grossman,  a  colleague  for  nearly  four  decades  in  various  capacities  and  at  various 
institutions  and  departments,  lately  of  the  Postgraduate  Office  at  the  University  of  the 
Witwatersrand, is singled out for her sage and constructive advice at all times.  
My colleagues and staff at the Witwatersrand Health Sciences Library once again held the fort for 
me, and they are thanked for their support and for assisting me in teaching information literacy 
skills to thousands of students over many years.   
Final thanks are due, once again, to my unbelievably tolerant family and friends, who remain in 
my life, despite long and frequent absences owing to my academic studies.  
Library application component:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
www.rasteredge.com
iv 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Page 
DECLARATION 
ABSTRACT 
ii 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
iii 
1.
INTRODUCTION 
1.1
Background  
1.2
Identification of the Problem 
1.3
Aim of the Research 
1.3.1
Research Question 
1.3.2
Sub-Problems 
1.4
Relevance of Research to the Overall Field of Reference 
1.5
Justification of the Research Project 
1.6
Delimitation of the Field of Study 
1.7
Glossary and Definitions 
1.8
Outline of the Following Chapters 
2.
REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE 
10 
2.1
Information Literacy 
10 
2.1.1
Information Literacy: the Library Perspective 
12 
2.1.2
Information Literacy: the Pedagogical Perspective 
15 
2.1.3
Information Literacy in the Curricula of the Health Sciences 
17 
2.2
Summary 
19 
3.
METHODOLOGY 
20 
3.1
Rationale for Methodology Selected 
20 
3.2
Study Population and Sampling 
21 
3.3
Research Instruments 
22 
3.3.1
Analysis of the GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
22 
3.3.2
Embedded Information Literacy Skills Assessment Rubric 
23 
3.3.3
Questionnaire Sent to GEMP 1 and 2 Educators 
23 
3.4
Summary 
27 
4.
RESEARCH DATA, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 
28 
4.1
The GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
28 
4.1.1
Analysis of the GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum for Evidence of Levels  
of IL Integration 
30 
4.1.1.1
GEMP 1  
31 
4.1.1.2
GEMP 2 
34 
4.1.2
Comparison of IL Skills Embedding in GEMP 1 and GEMP 2 
36 
4.2
Educators͛ Perceptions of their Information-Seeking Practices 
36 
Library application component:C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application component:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
www.rasteredge.com
4.2.1
Educators͛ Information-Seeking Practice and Frequency  
37 
4.2.2
Importance of Resources Used for Teaching 
37 
4.2.3
Source of Resources Used for Teaching 
39 
4.2.4
Perceived Levels of Educators͛ IL Skills Integration into the  
Curriculum 
39 
4.3
Educators͛ Perceptions of Evidence-Based Practice 
41 
4.3.1
Educators͛ Awareness of Evidence-Based Sources of Information 
42 
4.3.2
Educators͛ Expectations of GEMP 1 and 2 Students with Regard  to 
Evidence-Based Information-Seeking 
43 
4.3.3
Educators͛ Perceptions of Who should Teach Evidence-Based 
Information-Seeking Skills 
45 
4.4
Comparison of Used and Recommended Resources for Teaching 
and Practice 
45 
4.5
Summary 
46 
5.
DISCUSSION 
48 
5.1
Extent of IL Skills Integration into the GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
48 
5.2
Opportunities and Barriers Regarding IL Skills Integration into the 
GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
49 
5.2.1
Barrier: The ͞Silo͟ Effect 
49 
5.2.2
arrier: The  onflict of ͞ ore͟ and Self-Directed Learning 
51 
5.2.3
Barrier: The Reading List 
52 
5.2.4
Barrier: Resources for Novice and Expert Learning 
53 
5.2.5
Barrier: Terminological Confusion 
54 
5.2.6
Opportunity: Changing Pedagogical Practice 
55 
5.2.7
Opportunity: The Link between e-Learning and IL Skills Integration 
56 
5.2.8
Opportunity: The Link between the Librarian and IL Skills Integration  56 
5.2.9
Opportunity: The Link between the Practice of EBM and IL Skills 
Integration 
57 
5.2.10
Opportunity: Communities of Practice and IL Skills Integration 
58 
5.2.11
Opportunity: Curriculum Review and Accreditation Standards as an 
Agent for Change 
58 
5.3
Educators͛ Attitudes Regarding Evidence-Based Practice and 
Recognition of Opportunities that Exist for the Teaching of 
Critical Thinking and IL Skills within the Practice of Evidence- 
Based Medicine 
59 
5.4
The Possibility of Using Dynamic Purposeful Learning (DPL) as a 
Pedagogical Framework to Integrate IL Skills into the GEMP 
Curriculum 
60 
5.5
Summary 
62 
6.
CONCLUSIONS 
63 
6.1
Extent of IL Skills Integration into the GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
63 
6.2
Opportunities and Barriers Regarding IL Skills Integration into the 
vi 
GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
63 
6.3
Educators͛ Attitudes Regarding Evidence-Based Practice and 
Recognition of Opportunities that Exist for the Teaching of 
Critical Thinking and IL Skills within the Practice of EBM 
65 
6.4
The Possibility of Using Dynamic Purposeful Learning (DPL) as a 
Pedagogical Framework to Integrate IL Skills into the GEMP 
Curriculum 
65 
6.5
Study Limitations 
66 
6.6
Areas for Further Research 
67 
REFERENCES 
69 
Appendix A: Ethics Protocol 2010ECE63C 
86 
Appendix B: Questionnaire Information Sheet 
87 
Appendix C: Questionnaire 
88 
LIST OF FIGURES 
4.1           Average Scores for IL Skills Integration in GEMP 1 
31 
4.2           Scores for All Blocks in GEMP 1 Expressed as Percentages 
32 
4.3           Average Scores for IL Skills Integration in GEMP 2 
34 
4.4           Mode for IL Skills Integration in GEMP 2 
35 
4.5           Scores for All Blocks in GEMP 2 Expressed as Percentages 
36 
LIST OF TABLES 
4.1           Topic Blocks in the GEMP 1 and 2 Curriculum 
28 
4.2            Representative Example of Weekly Cases from Block 3: 
Cardiovascular System 
29 
4.3            Embedded Information Literacy Skills Assessment Rubric 
30 
4.4            Comparison of Average Scores for IL Skills Integration in 
GEMP 1 and 2 
36 
4.5            Importance of Resources Used for Teaching 
38 
4.6            Active and Passive Learning Resources 
40 
4.7            Comparison of Observed and Reported Levels of Resource  
Integration 
41 
4.8            Sources Considered Important by Educators for Evidence-Based 
Information-Seeking Practice 
42 
4.9            Comparison of Top-Ranked Resources Used in Educators͛ Own 
Teaching, Recommended to Students and Believed Important 
for Evidence-Based Information-Seeking 
46 
Chapter 1 
INTRODUCTION  
1.1     Background  
Information literacy (IL) is recognized as the overall critical literacy for the 21
st
Century (Bruce, 2002). 
IL skills can be defined as a core set of competencies required to access, evaluate, organize and use 
information in order to learn, solve problems, and make decisions in formal and informal learning 
contexts  (SCONUL,  1999;  ACRL,  2000;  Bruce,  2003;  CILIP,  2004;  Bundy,  2004;  Weiner,  2010).  
Information literacy can be regarded as a ͞natural extension of the concept of literacy … inextricably 
associated with information  practices and critical thinking͟ (Bruce, 2002). Like literacy  itself in the 
context  of  education,  IL  forms  the  foundation  for  learning  in  an  environment  of  constant 
technological change (Bruce, 2002).  
The advent of Web 2.0 and the availability of open content publications have significantly increased 
the amount of information available to students. However, there is increasing concern within higher 
education that students lack the competencies to assess these sources in terms of relevance to their 
courses  (Barnes,  Marateo  &  Ferris,  2007;  Katz  &  Macklin,  2007;  Shanahan,  2009).  This  lack  of 
competence  occurs  despite  a  wide-spread  perception  that  so-called  ͞digital  natives͟  think 
differently,  and  that  therefore  IL  skills  are  somehow  inherent  in  the  so-called  ͞Net  Generation͟ 
(Prensky, 2001; Prensky, 2009; Van Deursen & Van Dijk, 2009). For educators, simply providing the 
technology required to engage these students may not be as effective as improving students͛ IL and 
critical  thinking  skills  (Barnes,  Marateo  &  Ferris,  2007).  While  many  of  today͛s  educators  are 
concerned with creating learning activities that incorporate engagement with the ICT environment, 
what  is  required  are  fundamental  IL  skills  that  need  to  be  incorporated  into  students͛  learning 
practice. The way in which information is sought and interpreted is critical to higher order cognitive 
levels inherent in  loom͛s Taxonomy of cognitive skills (Keene, Colvin, & Sissons, 2010), as there are 
definite  cognitive  aspects  inherent  in  the  information-seeking  process  (Kuhlthau,  1988,  1991).  If 
students are to learn from the vast quantity of digital resources available to them, IL skills need to be 
͞woven  into͟ the learning experience itself  (ACRL,  2000; Bruce, 2002).  Thus information  practices 
that underpin academic and professional life need to be brought directly into the curriculum of the 
subject discipline, rather than being taught as an isolated ͞silo-like͟ entity. When IL skills are taught 
in  a  collaborative  framework,  the  link  between  student-centred  active  learning  and  higher  order 
cognitive skills such as critical thinking, is effectively demonstrated and clear (Colvin & Keene, 2006). 
Information  literacy  skills  are  of  critical  importance  in  teaching  medical  students  to  engage  with 
evidence-based medicine (EBM), often within a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum (Gruppen, 
Rana & Arndt, 2005; Kingsley & Kingsley, 2009).  Evidence-based medicine is defined as the process 
of  systematically  finding,  appraising  and  using  current  research  findings  as  the  basis  for  clinical 
decision  making.  The  practice  of  EBM  therefore  requires  the  conscious  integration  of  clinical 
knowledge and skills  with  the  ability  to search the  literature  to retrieve  the  evidence  needed  to 
support  a  clinical  decision.  The  acquired  information must subsequently be  assessed critically for 
validity,  reliability  and  appropriateness  according  to  specific  EBM  criteria,  in  order  to  apply  the 
evidence  to  patient  care  (Rosenberg  &  Donald,  1995).  IL  skills  for  medical  students  need  to  go 
beyond  digital  searching  and  retrieval  to  include  the  contextualization,  analysis  and  synthesis  of 
medical  information.  These  are  complex  skills  that  require  critical  thinking  (Lorenzo  &  Dziuban, 
2006).  Evidence-based practice is listed as one of the core competencies in international standards 
for health professions͛ education (Greiner & Knebel, 2003), and one of the stated outcomes of the 
medical  curriculum  for  the  MBBCh  (Bachelor  of  Medicine)  degree  at  the  University  of  the 
Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2000). 
At this University, a new curriculum for the medical degree (MBBCh), known as the Graduate Entry 
Medical Programme (GEMP), was introduced in 2003. The GEMP runs across the final four years of 
the six-year MBBCh degree (from the third to the sixth year of study), henceforth designated GEMP 
1, 2, 3 and 4. It aims to provide different integrated learning opportunities for medical students in 
order to assimilate large amounts of facts (Tosteson, 1990).  The GEMP curriculum is ͞hybrid͟ in that 
it  contains  some  elements  of  problem-based  learning  (PBL),  alongside more  traditional elements 
such as lectures and practical tutorials, with EBM as a common theme throughout. This curriculum 
was  adopted  in  order  to  foster  the  critical  thinking  skills  required  for  self-directed  and  lifelong 
learning, identified as an essential component of medical education (General Medical Council, 2003; 
World Federation for Medical Education, 2003; Greiner & Knebel, 2003). The first two years of the 
curriculum  (GEMP  1  and  2)  are  viewed  as  part  of  a  continuum,  and  so  the  use  of  the  singular 
͞curriculum͟ is therefore used throughout this study to denote the two years.  
Problem-based  learning  (PBL)  is  intended  to  be  constructivist,  self-directed,  collaborative  and 
contextual (Dolmans, Snellen-Balendong,  Wolfhagen &  Van der  Vleuten,  1997).   A problem-based 
learning  curriculum  is  generally  believed  to  assist  students,  as  self-directed  learners,  to  develop 
critical thinking skills (Norman & Schmidt, 1992; Epstein, 2004).  PBL has for some time been used as 
a method to instill lifelong learning together with the more traditional, clinically orientated medical 
curricula worldwide (Burton & Underwood, 2000). Essentially, a PBL curriculum includes the use of 
clinical problem solving in a small group setting, so that fundamental knowledge can be mastered 
(Donner & Bickley, 1993; Buga, 1998). PBL strategies play a major role in the education for evidence-
based medicine (EBM).   
1.2      Identification of the Problem  
Despite  opportunities  afforded  for  self-directed  information-seeking  in  the  GEMP,  there  is  little 
evidence that students are in fact transferring EBM skills into practice in terms of their information-
seeking  activities. Critical thinking skills,  deemed so necessary for medical students, are taught  by 
educators only in respect of clinical knowledge, while the information retrieval aspects are taught by 
librarians in relative isolation from the rest of the curriculum. The role that IL can play in developing 
more  integrated  cognitive  techniques  for  the  comprehension  of  complex  data  (Jackson,  2008), 
particularly as far as information-seeking for EBM is concerned, has not been addressed. 
 study  of  information  use  by  residents  and  interns  (Phua  &  Lim,  2007  suggests  that  EBM 
information  literacy  skills  have  not  yet  made  inroads  into  the  practice  of  junior  doctors  either, 
despite the emphasis afforded to EBM in medical curricula worldwide. The lack of use of specific EBM 
resources may in fact therefore be based on a lack of understanding of the need to use resources 
other than print books within the context of IL skills training amongst medical educators, as well as 
the  lack  of  role  models  using  EBM  amongst  educators  themselves  (Ulvenes,  Aasland,  Nylenna  & 
Kristiansen, 2009). 
Although the  library  at  the Faculty of Health  Sciences,  University of the  Witwatersrand  has  been 
involved in training medical students to use a set of IL skills from the outset of the introduction of the 
new GEMP curriculum, there have been limited opportunities to integrate IL into the curriculum. The 
literature from all subject domains however suggests that best results in terms of student outcomes 
arise from information literacy programmes that are ͞embedded͟ into the curriculum (Reed, Kinder 
&  Farnum,  2007;  Bent & Stockdale, 2009).  The information practice that underpins  academic  and 
professional practice needs to be brought directly into the curriculum of the subject discipline, rather 
than  being  taught  as  an  isolated  entity  (Bruce,  2002).  Collaboration  across  disciplines  has  been 
shown  to  add  benefit  by  bringing  together  expertise,  knowledge  and  training  from  the  various 
subject perspectives in teaching and when developing curricula (Montiel-Overall, 2006, 2008; Miller, 
Jones, Graves & Sievert, 2010).   
For the most part it has been to the librarian that the task of information literacy skills training has 
been delegated within the higher education sector (Blummer, 2009; Johnson, Sproles & Detmering, 
2009,  2010).  While  there  are  some  reports of collaborative  teaching of information  literacy skills 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested