mvc view pdf : Change pdf to txt format SDK control service wpf web page azure dnn Myers_MEdResearchReport_20114-part1991

34 
initial information-seeking skills are taught, IL skills integration in this block could reduce the ͞silo͟ 
effect of IL teaching in the GEMP. 
4.1.1.2 GEMP 2 
The average  (arithmetic  mean) of all  scores  for  each  block  was  calculated for  GEMP 2,  using  the 
rubric  depicted  in  Table  4.3,  and  graphically  represented  in  Figure  4.3.  The  mode  for  all  Blocks 
(except Endocrinology) is 1. In the Endocrinology Block, the mode for lectures (L), learning topics (LT) 
and clinical skills practical tutorials (CSP) is 2, while the mode for the theme sessions (TS) in this block 
is 3. In terms of the rubric (Table 4.3), this represents no embedding of IL skills at all in Blocks 8, 9, 10 
and 11, with almost no embedding of IL skills occurring in Block 7 (Endocrinology). Theme Sessions 
(TS) in Block 7 (Endocrinology) were the exception, demonstrating moderate embedding of IL skills.  
Figure 4.3 
Average Scores for IL Skills Integration in GEMP 2  
The low level of IL skills integration in GEMP 2 is depicted by a graphic representation of the mode 
for each Block (Figure 4.4), according to the rubric (Table 4.3). The mode for theme sessions (TS) in 
Block 7 (Endocrinology) is significantly higher  than that  for all other Blocks in GEMP 2, and higher 
than all other teaching modalities in GEMP 2.  
As two theme session lecturers in the Endocrinology Block are known proponents of evidence-based 
medicine  (EBM),  it  could  be  that  EBM  informs  their  teaching  practice  with  regard  to  IL  skills 
integration.  The  effect  that  EBM  has  on  the  integration  of  new  knowledge  obtained  from  the 
literature into current knowledge has been outlined earlier in Chapter 2, section 2.1.3. 
Three  different  lecturers  contributed  to  the  increased  use  of  IL  skills  integration  in  the  theme 
sessions  of  the  Endocrinology  Block.  Two  were  from  the  same  department  (lecturers  B  and  E). 
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
7 ENDOCR
8 MS
9 GIT
10 REPRO
11 NEURO
Level of IL Skills Integration
Blocks
GEMP 2
L
LT
TS
CSP
Change pdf to txt format - SDK control service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Change pdf to txt format - SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
35 
Lecturer   was earlier shown to have been influenced by a ͞senior gatekeeper͟ (lecturer A) in the 
Renal  Block in  GEMP  1, and may  also have  exerted  influence regarding teaching practice  on her 
colleague (lecturer E). The third lecturer (F) was from a different School. 
Figure 4.4 
Mode for IL Skills Integration in GEMP 2 
In  addition  to  observed  increased  IL  skills  integration  in  the  Endocrinology  theme  sessions,  only 
lecturer  F  fully  embedded  IL  skills  into  her  learning  topic  material  in  Block  10  (Reproduction).  
Students were instructed to carry out a literature search in a suggested database in order to locate 
relevant material themselves. Lecturer F is a member of the School of Allied Health Sciences. As a 
whole, this School has shown a much deeper awareness of the role of IL skills in student learning 
compared to the  School of Clinical Medicine, in which the  GEMP  falls.  Educators in  the  School  of 
Allied Health Sciences already co-teach IL skills with the librarian to students in their own disciplines. 
Lecturer F͛s teaching practice is therefore consistent for all students, irrespective of the degree for 
which they have registered.  
Percentages of scores across all blocks were calculated for GEMP 2, and graphically represented in 
Figure 4.5. The distribution of scores across all types of teaching modality (L, LT, TS and CSP) was 62% 
or greater for score 1 (no embedding), Content that received a score of 2 (almost no embedding) fell 
between 22.03% and 36.08%. Content with a score of 3 (moderately embedded) ranged from only 
1.61 % to 12.71%, whilst content with a score of 4 (fully embedded) was negligible (0.52%). 
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
7 ENDOCR
8 MS
9 GIT
10 REPRO 11 NEURO
IL Skills Integration Indicated by 
Mode
Blocks
GEMP 2
L
LT
TS
CSP
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. DocumentConverter.ToDocument(@"C:\input.txt", @"C:\output.pdf", FileType.DOC_PDF);
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:How to C#: File Format Support
PDF. Write pdf. DPX. TIFF(TrueType Font File). Read all truetype convert to image. TXT(A text format). Convert ANSI-Encoding text format to image.
www.rasteredge.com
36 
Figure 4.5 
Scores for All Blocks in GEMP 2 Expressed as Percentages 
4.1.2 Comparison of IL Skills Embedding in GEMP 1 and GEMP 2 
Using the same rubric for scoring as shown in Table 4.3, the average (arithmetic mean) scores for IL 
skills embedding for both years of the GEMP curriculum were calculated, and compared in Table 4.4.  
GEMP 1   
GEMP 2 
No embedding 
59.06% 
4  
Fully embedded 
0.27% 
No embedding 
64.08% 
4  
Fully embedded 
0.13% 
Almost no 
embedding 
30.95% 
3  
Moderately 
embedded 
9.72% 
Almost no 
embedding 
29.40% 
3  
Moderately 
embedded 
6.38% 
Table 4.4 
Comparison of Average Scores for IL Skills Integration in GEMP 1 and 2  
From this comparison it is clear that integration of IL skills into curriculum content of GEMP 1 and 2 is 
small. Exceptions are limited to certain individuals, who show consistency in their teaching practice.  
4.2  Educators’ Perceptions of their Information-Seeking Practices  
In order to match perceptions of teaching practice with the reality observed in the analysis of the 
GEMP  1  and  2  curriculum  as  reflected  above,  a  questionnaire  (Appendix  C)  exploring  educators͛ 
L
LT
TS
CSP
Score 1
74.19
55.15
65.25
61.76
Score 2
24.19
36.08
22.03
35.29
Score 3
1.61
8.25
12.71
2.94
Score 4
0
0.52
0
0
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Percentage
GEMP 2
SDK control service:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout. C#.NET PDF to Jpeg Conversion. If you want to transform and convert PDF document to Jpeg image file format, this
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file
www.rasteredge.com
37 
perceived  practice  and  attitudes  towards  IL  skills  embedding  was  devised.  This  questionnaire 
attempted to ascertain the readiness of educators towards the use of evidence-based information-
seeking skills. A response rate of 42% was obtained (63 respondents). 
Results obtained from the responses to the questionnaire are shown in the following Sections.  
4.2.1 Educators’ Information-Seeking Practice and Frequency 
The majority  of  respondents  (98.4%)  indicated  that they  searched  for  information  related  to  the 
subjects that they taught. Most (34.4%) searched for information every week; 26.2% indicated that 
they searched daily; while 24.6% indicated that they searched every couple of months. The balance 
(13.2%) indicated that they searched for material at the point of need 
͞As needed – when I am preparing a lecture, presentation, workshop, etc. or when I am writing an article.  
Varies  from every few days to every couple of months depending on what is going on͟ 
͞Do not teach frequently, but look up the website every time I do͟ 
4.2.2 Importance of Resources Used for Teaching 
Respondents were asked to rate the order of importance of the different information resources used 
for teaching. Although eight sources were suggested, respondents were given considerable leeway 
(from 1 = high importance to 10 =  low importance) in their  rating of these resources rendered in 
Table 4.5 into a 5-point Likert scale.  Leeway was allowed to avoid  a forced ranking of  resources, 
which might have obscured patterns in the choices made by respondents. Results are tabulated in 
Table 4.5.  
The  most  important  rated  resource  (very  important  or  important)  for  teaching  was  electronic 
journals (86.9%) followed closely by subject specific databases (86.7%). Print journals were rated as 
very important or important by 66% of respondents. Use of journals by educators in teaching was 
therefore rated very highly.  
Several  respondents  commented  on  the  availability  of  electronic  journals  in  the  biomedical 
disciplines
͞I very seldom consult a printed journal. All the print journals I use are also available electronically and 
that͛s how I access them͘͟ 
͞I only use electronically available journals. Nevertheless, most good journals are also available in print. 
Conversely the content of most electronic only journals is not yet good enough to make them worthwhile͘͟ 
This  last  comment  indicates  a  bias  that  may  indicate  lack  of  awareness  of  the  need  for  EBM 
resources.  New  e-journals  are  proliferating  rapidly  in  many  biomedical  areas,  with  fast  growing 
SDK control service:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Text Extractor SDK; Extract Text Content from
extract.txt"). VB.NET TIFF Text Extractor SDK FAQs. Q: I want to extract text information from source TIFF file and output extracted text content to other format
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file
www.rasteredge.com
38 
impact factors and peer-review processes that enable rapid publication, to satisfy EBM requirements 
for current information.     
Very 
Important 
Important 
Doesn’t 
Matter 
Unimportant 
Completely 
Unimportant 
N/A 
Print Journals 
30% 
33% 
23% 
6% 
8% 
0% 
Print Textbooks 
24.6% 
24.6% 
42% 
8.8% 
0% 
0% 
E-Journals 
73.8% 
13.1% 
3.3% 
1.6% 
8.2% 
0% 
E-Textbooks 
23% 
21.2% 
40.4% 
5.8% 
9.6% 
0% 
Subject Specific 
Websites 
34.5% 
36.3% 
22.4% 
3.4% 
3.4% 
0% 
Subject Specific 
e-Databases 
73.3% 
13.4% 
1.7% 
0% 
11.6% 
0% 
Blogs 
7.4% 
1.9% 
5.6% 
24% 
42.6% 
18.5% 
Wikipedia 
7% 
8.8% 
12.3% 
31.6% 
29.8% 
10.5% 
Other 
10.3% 
0% 
3.4% 
0% 
0% 
86.3% 
Table 4.5 
Importance of Resources Used for Teaching 
After  journals,  subject-specific  web  sites  (70.8%)  were  rated  next  in  importance.  Importance  of 
textbooks for educators for teaching purposes was rated fairly low, with 49.2% rating print textbooks 
as  very  important  or  important,  while  electronic  textbooks  rated  slightly  lower  (44.2%).  Other 
sources of information used for teaching were listed variously as  
͞ lecture notes from other universities e͘g͘*sic+ Harvard͟ 
͞Google scholar͟ 
͞evidence based guidelines from specialist societies͟ 
The last comment is indicative of evidence-based practice used in teaching; the first comment may 
include EBM material, as Harvard Medical School is known for its endorsement of EBM (Tosteson, 
1990;  McMahon  &  Dluhy,  2006).  It  would  seem  therefore  that  there  are  some  champions  of 
evidence-based  practice amongst educators who responded  to  the  survey, and who  may  well be 
emerging as E M ͞gatekeepers͟ within teaching and clinical practice The need to keep up to date in 
respective  subject  fields  is  indicated  by  the  importance  attributed  to  electronic  sources  of 
information, such as journals, subject specific databases and websites. 
The use of Wikipedia as a source of information for teaching and learning is a controversial topic, and 
so  it  was  interesting  to  see  that  while  the  greatest  number  of  respondents  (84.2%)  rated  this 
information source as unimportant or not applicable for teaching, 15.8% were in fact using Wikipedia 
as a source in their teaching practice.   
SDK control service:C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. input.pdf"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0 Recognize(); ocrPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, @"C:\output
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# TIFF: Use C#.NET Code to Extract Text from TIFF File
Moreover, text content, style, and format of original Tiff image can be retained txt"; // Save ocr result as other documet formats, like txt, pdf, and svg.
www.rasteredge.com
39 
4.2.3 Source of Resources Used for Teaching 
The majority of respondents (93.5%) reported using their own personal collections as a source from 
which they obtained subject information used in teaching. Internet Web sites were used by 87.1% of 
the  respondents,  and  the  University  Library  collections  by  85.5%.  Attendance  at  conferences, 
workshops and symposia were listed as a source of information by 79%. Assumptions regarding the 
importance  of  keeping  up  to  date  in  subject  matter,  as  discussed  in  Section  4.2.2,  were  thus 
confirmed.  
4.2.4  Perceived Levels of Educators’ IL Skills Integration into the Curriculum 
Analysis of items 8 and 9 in the questionnaire revealed some interesting findings regarding perceived 
levels of IL skills͛ integration into the curriculum 
Do you incorporate additional resources (in addition to your own lectures and handouts) into your students͛ 
courses? 
In what form do you incorporate these additional resources into the GEMP 1 and 2 curriculum? 
Copies  of  lecture presentations comprised 79.4%  of material  perceived  to be  additional material; 
58.7% were recommendations to use the ͞core͟ print textbooks available in the P L seminar rooms; 
while 55.6% were bibliographies of suggested additional reading (without hyperlinks). Notes (defined 
as summaries of educators͛ own readings) were given by 59.6% of respondents, and 41.3% reported 
attaching relevant journal articles in the form of PDF files.  One respondent reported integration of 
͞study guides͟, but no evidence of such guides was found in the curriculum content analysis. Only 
two respondents reported that they made reference to relevant Web sites. 
While 43.9% expected students to find material in the Library or on the Internet themselves as part 
of their self-directed learning, a further 15.8% stated that it was not necessary for students to know 
more than what was core to the subject content in the subject/s taught, or what had already been 
provided as lectures, learning topics, theme sessions or clinical skills sessions.  Five respondents 
(7.9%) did not feel it was necessary for students to use resources other than what was prescribed or 
recommended. Some form of hyperlinking to resources was reported by 61.9% of respondents, with 
the majority of this reported linking (56.2%) being to either the library catalogue, or journal articles.   
As the majority of respondents (43.9%) expected students to find material in the Library or on the 
Internet themselves as part of their self-directed learning, types of resources reported by educators 
were  classified  in  Table  4.6  as  ͞active͟  or  ͞passive͟.  An  ͞active͟  classification  suggests  that 
incorporation of this type of resource would lead to self-directed exploration by students. ͞Passive͟ 
SDK control service:C#: How to Extract Text from Adobe PDF Document Using OCR Library
to load a program with an incorrect format", please check pageZone.SaveTo(MIMEType. TXT, @"C:\output.txt"); Recognize Scanned PDF and Output OCR Result to PDF
www.rasteredge.com
40 
suggests that the resource was not likely to be explored actively. The following table shows that the 
resources  used  most  often  by  educators  are  those  least  likely  to  lead  to  active  learning,  or  to 
encourage IL competency.  The greatest number of resources used by educators  in the GEMP fell 
under the category of ͞passive͟. 
Resources Recommended to 
Students 
Percentage Educators 
Using Resource 
Active Learning 
Resources 
Passive Learning  
Resources 
Power Point Slides of Lectures 
79.4% 
Notes  
59.6% 
͞ ore͟ P L Seminar Room Textbooks 
58.7% 
Bibliographies 
55.6% 
PDF Copies of Print and E-Journal 
Articles  
41.3% 
Hyperlinks to e-Textbooks 
11.1% 
Web Sites 
3.2% 
Subject Specific Databases 
3.2% 
Table 4.6 
Active and Passive Learning Resources
One respondent noted difficulty with using the e-Wits Library catalogue for hyperlinked resources  
͞I provide in my printed notes the URLs that I used to access the library͛s electronic text books that 
I used to prepare my lectures͘ Unfortunately they (the URLs) change with time͘͟ 
While aware that IL skills do need to be integrated into the curriculum, the respondent highlights a 
lack of  understanding  about  how hyperlinks  are  intended  to  be  used. If the  URLs reported  were 
embedded into the electronic curriculum (as opposed to being included in ͞printed notes͟), these 
could be easily updated when change occurs. Use of DOIs could also alleviate the problem.  
Only  two  respondents  made  mention  of  web  sites  being  incorporated  into  the  content  of  the 
material being taught 
͞Reference to selected websites I have found͟ 
͞Hyperlinks to relevant Web sites͟ 
The first comment suggests that websites were incorporated as a reading list; the second indicates 
an awareness of how embedded hyperlinks can assist active learning. 
One respondent indicated that resources consulted were already integrated into lecture content, so 
students do not have to consult these sources themselves 
͞I incorporate the information into my lecture͟ 
41 
This can be construed as another form of ͞active lecturing͟, as opposed to facilitating active learning 
on the part of the students. 
Although 91.9% of respondents reported that they incorporated resources in addition to lectures and 
handouts in  course  material,  this  was  in fact  not  corroborated  by  the analysis  of the  curriculum. 
Respondents were asked to report all instances of perceived use of embedded resources. These are 
contrasted with actual observed occurrences in Table 4.7, calculated according to the rubric shown in 
Table  4.3.  Table  4.7  shows  that  reported  embedding  was  far  higher  than  observed  levels  of 
embedding. The level of ͞no embedding͟ (a score of 1 on the
rubric in Table 4.3) was perceived to be 
lower than was observed. 
Observed Integration (GEMP 1 and 2)                           Reported Integration (GEMP 1 and 2) 
No embedding 
61.57% 
Fully embedded 
0.2% 
No embedding 
No extra resources  
required 22.22% 
Fully embedded 
Hyperlinks to websites 3.17% 
Hyperlinks to e-books 11.11% 
Hyperlinks to e-journals 28.57% 
Almost no embedding 
30.18% 
Moderate embedding 
8.05% 
Almost no embedding 
Print bibliographies 55.56% 
Notes or handouts 53.97% 
Power Point slides of lectures 
79.37% 
Attached PDF journal articles 
41.27% 
Attached PDF chapters from 
print textbooks 25.4% 
P L Seminar Room ͞core͟ 
textbooks 58.73% 
Moderate embedding 
Hyperlinks to Library 
catalogue 22.22% 
Table 4.7 
Comparison of Observed and Reported Levels of Resource Integration 
4.3 Educators’ Perceptions of Evidence-Based Practice 
Educators in GEMP 1 and 2 from all disciplines were asked to indicate if they used evidence-based 
practice. Although evidence-based practice is widely used in clinical medicine, it is also being adopted 
in other subject disciplines allied to the health sciences (Pravikoff, Tanner & Pierce, 2005; Michael, 
2006).  
All  respondents  indicated they  were  aware  of  evidence-based  practice.  Responses  indicated  that 
46.8%  were  medical  practitioners  who  used  evidence-based  information-seeking  in  their  own 
42 
teaching  and  research;  while  14.5%  were  medical  practitioners  not  currently  active  in  clinical 
practice,  and  consequently  did  not  use  evidence-based  practice.  Of  the  remaining  respondents, 
30.6% indicated that they were not medical practitioners, but did use evidence-based information-
seeking practices in their teaching and research; while only 7.9% of respondents indicated that they 
did not need to use evidence-based information-seeking as they were not medical practitioners. No 
respondent  indicated  that  they  found  evidence-based  practices  too  time-consuming  to  use,  a 
frequently reported bias (Scott, Heyworth & Fairweather, 2000). 
Thus 77.4% of respondents used evidence-based practice, indicating that there was a high degree of 
awareness  about  evidence-based  medicine  and  evidence-based  information-seeking  practice 
amongst educators at the University of the Witwatersrand, based on this sample. 
4.3.1 Educators’ Awareness of Evidence-Based Sources of Information 
Item  12  on  the  questionnaire  asked  educators  to  rate  sources  they  considered  important  for 
evidence-based  information,  using  a  5-point  Likert  scale,  from  very  important  to  completely 
unimportant. The results are tabulated in Table 4.8.  
Very 
Important 
Important  Doesn’t 
Matter 
Unimportant 
Completely 
Unimportant 
N/A 
Print Text Books 
9.7% 
58.1% 
22.6% 
6.5% 
1.6% 
1.5% 
E-Text Books 
12.9% 
50.0% 
27.4% 
4.8% 
1.6% 
3.3% 
Print Journal 
Articles 
50.0% 
38.7% 
6.5% 
0.0% 
1.6% 
3.2% 
E-Journal Articles 
69.4% 
29.0% 
0.0% 
0.0% 
1.6% 
0.0% 
Print or E-Reviews  
54.8% 
37.1% 
4.8% 
3.3% 
0.0% 
0.0% 
Systematic Reviews 
80.6% 
16.2% 
1.6% 
1.6% 
0.0% 
0.0% 
Evidence-Based Specialist 
Databases 
36.5% 
38.7% 
19.4% 
1.6% 
0.0% 
3.8% 
Consultation with 
Colleagues 
6.5% 
62.9% 
14.5% 
12.9% 
3.2% 
0.0% 
Table 4.8 
Sources Considered Important by Educators for Evidence-Based Information-seeking Practice 
Levels of awareness about evidence-based medicine resources were corroborated by the literature 
(McColl, Smith, White & Field, 1998). Although 96.8% of respondents regarded systematic reviews as 
very important or important, 91.9% of educators in this study still consider traditional reviews as very 
43 
important  or  important  in  the  context  of  evidence-based  information-seeking.  Ordinary  review 
articles (traditional overviews of the literature) have been  largely  replaced  by systematic reviews, 
which limit bias by the use of rigorous objective methodological approaches not only to identify and 
synthesize, but also critically appraise, high-quality research evidence (Mulrow, 1987; Cook, Mulrow 
& Haynes, 1997; Mulrow, Cook & Davidoff, 1997; Kaczorowski, 2009).  
Less  reliance  by  questionnaire  respondents  seems to  be  placed on  the  specialist  evidence-based 
databases (rated very important or important by 75.2%) than on print or e-journal articles (rated very 
important or important by 98.4% in the case of e-journal articles and very important or important by 
88.7% in the case of print journals). However, evidence-based databases help to synthesize evidence 
reported in the literature, and have been introduced to contain the information overload that arises 
from  the  necessity  to  read  widely  (Kaczorowski,  2009).  This  may  indicate  a  need  to  increase 
awareness amongst educators of the intent and use of such products.  
It  is  also  interesting  that  69.4%  of  respondents  still  see  consultation  with  colleagues  as  a  very 
important or  important  source of evidence-based  information.  Consultation with  colleagues  is  an 
acknowledged source of information for medical practitioners (Smith, 1996; Olatunbosun, Edouard & 
Pierson, 1998). However, colleagues who are consulted need to be authoritative and well versed in 
the  latest  accepted  evidence,  otherwise  there  is  a  danger  that  information  transmitted  in  this 
manner is outdated and no longer relevant (Schaafsma, Verbeek, Hulshof & Van Dijk, 2005). 
E-textbooks are rated as very important or important for EBM by 62.9% of respondents. As only a 
slightly  more  (67.8%)  think  this  way  with  regard  to  print  textbooks,  this  is  surprising,  given  the 
observed lack of use of e-textbooks in the curriculum (see Table 4.7). While the idea of e-textbooks 
that can accommodate rapidly changing information is acknowledged, it appears from the results of 
this  survey  that  use  of  these  textbooks  in  teaching  practice  still  lags  behind.  E-textbook  use  at 
undergraduate level (as opposed to e-journal article use, where content is often highly specialised) is 
a way to incorporate new material into fundamental knowledge, while demonstrating the practice of 
EBM to students in a very meaningful way.  
4.3.2 Educators’ Expectations of GEMP 1 and 2 Students with Regard to Evidence-Based 
Information-Seeking 
An overwhelming 93.5% of respondents feel that evidence-based information-seeking skills should 
be  taught to  GEMP 1 and 2 students.  Of the  remainder, reservations were  expressed in  terms of 
students͛ lack of clinical knowledge 
͞They don͛t have enough clinical knowledge to apply the evidence͟ 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested