mvc view pdf : Convert pdf to text online control application platform web page html wpf web browser CU_Online_Handbook_20092-part2006

16 
Bio 
Dr. Donna Sobel is an associate professor in the School of Education & Human 
Development’s Special Education program at the University of Colorado Denver. Dr. 
Sobel teaches general and special education teacher candidates in methods courses on-
campus and provides on-site professional development for pre-service and inservice 
teachers in schools across the Denver metropolitan area. Dr. Sobel’s concerns about the 
attitudes that teachers hold regarding issues of responsive teaching practices has led to a 
series of investigations examining the developing pedagogical understanding of teachers 
to meet the educational needs of learners from diverse backgrounds and with diverse 
needs. 
Convert pdf to text online - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf picture to text; convert image pdf to text
Convert pdf to text online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to txt; c# convert pdf to text
17 
Chapter 3 
Using eCollege to Facilitate Learning, Provide for Program 
Coherence, Manage Accountability Innovations, and 
Ensure the Evolution of a Principal  
Licensure Program 
Connie Fulmer 
My love affair with online learning started at Northern Illinois University (NIU) 
when an email for professional development landed in my inbox with an opportunity 
for curriculum enhancement and how to hang it on the Web. The specific curricular 
enhance was writing across the curriculum, but it was the Web part that caught by eye. I 
signed up and two weeks later I had mastered some basic HTML and was able to create 
web pages to support my leadership classes at NIU. With these newfound skills, I set 
about the task of creating an online environment intended to support the learning 
activities in my courses. I uploaded specific course information that included: (a) the 
official course description, (b) information about me as the instructor, (c) course 
objectives and assignments, (d) reading assignments for each class meeting, (e) structural 
outline notes for each reading assignment, (f) a glossary of terms specific to this course 
for students to add definitions during the course, and (g) a clickable calendar. Lost in 
this work, I spent hours in these labor-of-love activities using technology to enhance my 
teaching repertoire.  
Later when I joined the Administrative Leadership and Policy Studies (ALPS) 
faculty at the University of Colorado Denver, we began using Colorado Education 
Online (CEO), powered by the FirstClass system, to deliver our distance-learning 
programs. By creatively using folders and icons, we were able to create an environment 
where students could find assignments, upload letters of introduction, and other 
assignments as needed. Even though CEO was primarily an email system, it provided a 
commons area where we could create folders for anyone to access. We soon learned 
that we could create one folder for the entire program, and within that one program 
folder we could add a folder for each of the learning domains (which for the Principal 
program was four domains). This simple common folder structure provided students 
continuity and structure as they proceed thorough our intensive 32 credit-hour principal 
licensure program. Within each of the four domain folders, faculty added folders with 
assignments, assessments, reading lists and other course activities and strategies. We also 
added a folder for the clinical-practice element of our program. While CEO was not 
designed to host online courses, it did a great job and had some special features. For 
instance, you could create work in an email message and send it directly to the 
appropriate program folder. However, over time, faculty were encouraged to make the 
switch to eCollege.  
At first, we were skeptical. We questioned whether or not eCollege could meet the 
needs of our already strong teaching and learning culture. We also questioned whether 
eCollege would enable us to transfer the nested folder structure for our program. 
Finally, we questioned whether eCollege would enable us the ability to give faculty and 
students access to course shells beyond the traditional single semester time frame (e.g., 
ALPS cohorts require a four-semester time frame for completion) as well after the end 
of a particular cohort. We found out that eCollege could meet all of our needs so, 
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
pdf to text; change pdf to text
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF
convert pdf to editable text online; convert pdf to openoffice text document
18 
eCollege became our course delivery system. We were pleased to find out that eCollege 
was easy to master. As the years have passed, we have become quite comfortable with 
eCollege. It can be heard around the sixth floor in the Lawrence Street Center, that 
before we’d switch to a new course delivery system, someone would have to pry our 
“mice” out of our cold dead fingers.  
Providing for Program Coherence 
We begin each new principal licensure cohort with a dedicated course shell in 
eCollege that stays active and accessible to students throughout their entire program. 
We use this program course shell to provide structure and coherence for students, just 
as we did in CEO.  I will briefly outline how we structure this course shell (see Table 1) 
because the structure illustrates how we use this course shell. 
Course Home 
The first unit in the left navigation area is by default called “Course Home.” 
Under this unit we include the following content items (a) program syllabus, (b) ALPS 
Handbook, (c) Wacky Weather Protocols, (d) Registration Information, (e) information 
for students seeking a Master of Arts MA or an Educational Specialist EdS degree, (f) 
graduation information, (g) licensure information, and (h) a class list.  
Program Texts 
The second unit is called “Program Texts.” This tab not only lists the names of all 
the required and optional reading for the entire program but also includes links to 
publishers, book vendors, and other resources separated by learning domains (i.e., 
leadership; school improvement, instructional leadership and evaluation, and equity).  
PBAs 
The third unit is called “PBAs,” which stands for performance-based assessments. 
Under this unit, there are four content items—one for each of the learning domains in 
the program. This unit (and the four content items) outlines information about each of 
the performance-based assessment in our program. Things such as rationale statements, 
descriptions for specific PBAs, guiding questions for student learning activities, specific 
reading assignments, web-based resources, required learning activities and work 
products, and grading rubrics are included to help prepare students for the PBAs. 
Clinical Practice 
The fourth unit is called “Clinical Practice.”  Because of the complex nature of 
clinical practice, there are six different content items under this unit. Specifically, there is 
one for (a) a clinical practice contract between the intern and the school site supervisor, 
(b) a form and directions for writing clinical practice goals, (c) a form and directions for 
writing clinical practice logs, (d) the clinical practice evaluation form and instructions for 
its administration and collection, (e) a data sheet for collecting information regarding 
the site of the clinical practice experience and the school site supervisor, (e) information 
on how to register your school supervisor to receive university credit for supervising the 
principal candidate, and (f) the clinical practice handbook. Each of the items are 
included to help ensure students have a successful clinical practice.  
Portfolio 
The fourth unit is called “Portfolio.” This section of the course shell describes the 
requirements for the end of program portfolio that students complete. More 
specifically, here students learn how to construct the required elements of their program 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF
converting .pdf to text; change pdf to txt format
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and component for free download. Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation.
.pdf to .txt converter; convert pdf to text file using
19 
portfolios (i.e., portfolio cover page, table of contents, leadership resume, CDE 
standards evidence matrix, performance-based assessments, clinical-practice 
documentation, professional growth plan, graduate degree requirements and faculty 
approval of final portfolio).      
Table 1. Overall Structure of Program Course Shell in eCollege 
Course Home 
 
Program Syllabus 
 
ALPS Handbook 
 
Wacky Weather Protocols 
 
Registration Information 
 
MA & EdS 
 
Graduation Information 
 
Licensure Information 
 
Class List 
Program Texts 
PBAs 
 
PBA1 
 
PBA2 
 
PBA3 
 
PBA4 
Clinical Practice
 
CP Contract 
 
CP Goals 
 
CP Log 
 
CP Reflections 
 
CP Evaluation 
 
Data Sheet 
 
SS Reg Form 
 
CP Handbook 
Portfolio 
 
Initial Review 
 
2
nd
Review 
 
3
rd
Review 
 
Final Review 
 
Portfolio Guidelines 
Standards 
Self-Assessment
 
Surveys 1-4 
 
Professional Growth Charts 
 
Professional Growth Plan
Denver Dates 
Standards 
The sixth unit is called “Standards.” Our principal program was designed to meet 
three sets of standards:  (a) Colorado performance standards for principals, (b) 
Colorado performance standards for administrators (CDE), and (c) the national 
standards called the ELCC-NCATE standards (National Policy Board for Educational 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file.
convert pdf to text vb; changing pdf to text
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF
convert pdf to plain text online; convert scanned pdf to word text
20 
Administration, 2002). During their program, students must demonstrate their 
knowledge of these standards and are evaluated on this knowledge.  
Self-Assessment 
The seventh unit is called “Self-Assessment.” Self-assessment is an important 
component of the principal program and under this unit students can find 11 online 
surveys that they must complete at four times throughout their program to demonstrate 
their levels of understanding. A Professional Growth Chart is also located under this 
unit. The Professional Growth Chart is an excel file that students use to enter their self-
assessment scores (from the 11 online self-assessment surveys) throughout their 
program. The excel file creates a visual representation in the form of a graph of 
students’ progress during their program. This graph is then used by students to help 
them to create a professional growth plan for once they graduate.  
Denver Dates 
The last unit is called “Denver Dates.” This unit includes information about all 
face-to-face meetings (e.g., dates, times, location, agenda) organized by semester. 
This overall structure is common to each ALPS principal licensure cohort. Using 
these eCollege tools to support the teaching and learning culture we developed in our 
days of using CEO has served us well to provide an organized learning environment 
and therefore, program coherence between faculty teaching in the program and between 
cohorts starting in different semesters and in partnership with different school districts.  
Managing Accountability Innovations 
eCollege has provided our team with the virtual space to create, manage, and 
administer several online accountability tools (i.e., self assessments for Colorado 
Department of Education principal performance standards, performance-based 
assessments, a reflective justification paragraphs and grading rubrics, a scurry matrix, 
and a professional growth plan). Keeping in mind the literature on effective assessment 
(Chappius, Stioggins, Arter, & Chappius, 2003; Wiggins & McTighe, 1998, 2007) and 
effective online delivery (Baker, 2003; Hutchins, 2003; Pennsylvania State University, 
2002), we developed these accountability tools to address both the assessment ‘of’ 
learning and ‘for’ learning.  Each of these accountability tools is described in more detail 
in the following paragraphs.  
Self-Assessments 
We ask students to self assess their perceived levels of competency for each of the 
principal standards. We initially had students rate themselves using the following scale: 
(a) no to little evidence, (b) some evidence, (c) conceptual evidence, or (d) performance 
evidence (Fulmer, 2005). However, we have since adopted Wiggin’s and McTighe’s 
(1998) six facets of understanding to structure our self-assessments using a three levels 
of proficiency scale (i.e., emergent, proficient, and exemplary) which is explained in 
Table 2. 
The rationale behind this is that if a leader can explain, interpret, and apply 
knowledge, dispositions, and skills, then they can pretty much get the work of a leader 
accomplished. But if they can do those three skills and add characteristics of 
perspective, empathy, and self-reflection, they are providing evidence of a polished 
professional leader. These self-assessments are administered online in eCollege.  
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF
batch convert pdf to txt; change pdf to txt file
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online.
c# read text from pdf; change pdf to text file
21 
Table 2. Three Levels of Proficiency Scale 
Emergent 
Understanding 
If students select Emergent Understanding , it means they can provide an 
explanation
of (a) the knowledge, dispositions, and skills, related to the 
standard, (b) the appropriate and related literature and the general contents 
of those works to the standard, (c) how the context of their school 
environment might influence their choices for action as a leader, and (d) 
what strategies they might employ as a future leader. 
Proficient 
Understanding 
If students select Proficient Understanding, it means they can not only can 
explain
, but also interpret
and apply
(a) the knowledge, dispositions, and 
skills, related to the standard, (b) the appropriate and related literature and 
the general contents of those works to the standard, (c) how the context of 
their specific school environment might influence their choices for action as 
a leader, and (d) what strategies they might employ in the future. 
Exemplary 
Understanding 
If students select Exemplary Understanding, it means they are able to not only 
explain
, interpret
, and apply
(a) the knowledge, dispositions, and skills, 
related to the standard, (b) the appropriate and related literature and the 
general contents of those works to the standard, (c) how the context of their 
specific school environment might influence their choices of action as a 
leader, and (d) what strategies they might use in the future, but also do so 
with perspective
, empathy
, and self-reflection
Performance-Based Assessments 
The basic idea of a PBA in our program is that there are certain activities that 
principals need to be able to do to run a school. PBAs provide students with structured 
opportunities to demonstrate that they know and are able to complete these specific 
activities. Thus, students carry out these activities in their own school environment with 
other teachers and administrators. Each of our four learning domains (i.e., leadership, 
school improvement, instructional leadership and evaluation, and equity) has specific 
PBAs and each PBA is structured around specific activities and aligned with certain 
standards.  
Students can read about each PBA in the eCollege program course shell. Each 
PBA has an outline that explains the rationale for the assessment as well as descriptions, 
guiding questions, reading requirements and web-based resources. Once the student has 
completed the PBA, he or she prepares what we call a learning narrative (which follows 
a specific format with standard headings). Throughout the learning narrative, students 
determine where best to add specific reflective-justification paragraphs demonstrating 
what they have done and learned. The PBAs are then evaluated with rubrics specifically 
created for these projects (using the same levels of proficiency as listed in Table 2). 
Students’ work is viewed as developmental and students are expected to improve their 
work based on the feedback they receive throughout their program.  
Reflective-Justification Paragraphs and Rubrics  
In addition to Self-Assessments and PBAs, students in our program also write 
reflective justification paragraphs for each CDE standard cited in their learning 
narratives.  When writing these, students strive (a) to use the standard correctly, (b) to 
cite relevant literature to support the use of the standard, (c) to use the standard and the 
22 
literature citation in the context of their specific school environment, and (d) to (based 
on the information provided in the prior three sections) outline the steps, stages, 
strategies, or their preferred response repertoire for how they would behave as a leader.  
The Reflective-Justification rubric has been created for both students and faculty. 
Students use the rubric to create their reflective-justification paragraphs.  Faculty use the 
rubric to determine if the reflective-justification paragraphs meet the program 
requirements. 
The Scurry Matrix 
The scurry matrix tool, is a simple standards matrix. It is named after the character 
Scurry from Johnson and Blanchard’s (1998) book Who Moved My Cheese. The standards 
are listed down the left side of the document and the four learning domains of the 
program are listed across the top. Students use this matrix to demonstrate their mastery 
of standards by learning domain. While student work is only required to be at the 
proficient level, we encourage students to reach the exemplary level. Students use the 
Scurry Matrix and their Self Assessment results to complete their Professional Growth 
plan.   
The Professional Growth Plan  
The Professional Growth Plan is the last accountability innovation that we use.  
The plan is a structured interview protocol that student’s complete in preparation for 
their final portfolio evaluation. Students are asked to think about their self-assessment 
results and any standards they might still need to provide evidence of mastery on.  
Students are also asked whether or not there are any areas of knowledge or skills they 
feel they still need to acquire and if so, how they plan to acquire them. Similarly, 
students are asked how they plan to stay current in their field (e.g., what journals will 
they read or what professional organizations will they join). Students are also asked how 
they plan to improve their leadership skills. And finally students are asked to identify 
some  leadership goals they hope to attain once they graduate. This Professional 
Growth Plan is meant to serve as a link between the end of our program and the 
beginning of their practice as school leaders.  
Reflecting on the Student Experience 
The learning curve for our program is quite predictable. During the first semester 
students and faculty alike are quite pleased with the program. However, the second 
semester is perhaps the toughest semester –which our FCQs reflect. We surmise that 
this has something to do with the tuition bill being due for a second semester in a row 
while at the same time, the pile of books (and therefore reading) seems to be increasing 
almost exponentially. No one believes they can read all of the required information in a 
lifetime let alone in the four short semesters of the program. 
The goal of the program is take teachers who want to be principals into the 
program and to push out future leaders at the end of the program who are capable of 
running a school on day one. But in the middle of the program, many students question 
their sanity and try to figure out how to balance their work, their program, and their 
families day-to-day. Some think of quitting. Some actually do. But for those who stay, 
the magic happens in the third semester.  
By the third semester, students have figured out how our innovative accountability 
and assessment system works. They become more familiar with the literature and their 
required readings and begin to “name drop” key authors and concepts they found in the 
readings. They stand taller and take on a new more confident identity of an educator 
23 
ready for a new position of leadership in the future. They find themselves more 
comfortable with the workload of the program while at the same time realizing that the 
work of a principal is more difficult than previously thought.  
During the fourth and last semester, most are pushing hard to graduate on time. 
However, many are already looking for an open principal position. Faculty, on the other 
hand, are already thinking about how to modify learning assignments and elements in 
the eCollege shell to better support student learning. 
Ensuring the Continual Evolution of the Principal Licensure Program 
eCollege has provided the virtual space in which to offer a fully online principal 
licensure program. This space became our training ground to develop new 
performance-based assessments and accountability systems to help us prepare 
educational leaders. As we perfected our program and performance-based assessments 
in the online cohort, we took them to our face-to-face cohorts. However, our program 
is continually evolving and improving. We are always happy to start each new cohort, 
because we get a chance to make any needed changes to our program. As a result, this 
next group of students is always getting the best possible version of our program.   
References 
Baker, R. (2003). A framework for design and evaluation of internet-based distance  
learning courses: Phase one – Framework justification design and evaluation.   
Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 6(2), Retrieved from  
http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/summer62/baker62.html 
Chappuis, S., Stiggins, R. J., Arter, J., & Chappuis, J. (2004).  Assessment for learning: An  
action guide for school leaders. Portland, OR: Assessment Training Institute. 
Fulmer, C. L. (2005). Managing accountability innovations in distance learning  
programs. In A. Tatnall, J. Osorio & Visscher (Eds.), Information technology and  
educational management in the knowledge society (pp. 37-46). New York: Springer. 
Hutchins, H. (2003). Instructional immediacy and the seven principles: Strategies for  
facilitating online courses. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 6(3), 
Retrieved from http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/fall63/hutchins63.html 
Johnson, S., & Blanchard, K. (1998). Who moved my cheese? New York: Putnam.  
National Policy Board for Educational Administration (2002). Standards for advanced  
programs in educational leadership for principals, superintendents, curriculum directors, and  
supervisors. Author, Arlington, VA, USA. Retrieved from http://www.ncate.org/ 
institutions/programStandards.asp?ch=90 
Pennsylvania State University (2002). An emerging set of guiding principles and  
practices for the design and development of distance education. Pennsylvania 
State University. Retrieved from http://www.worldcampus.psu.edu/ 
AboutUs_DETeaching.shtml 
Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2007). Schooling by design: Mission, action and achievement.  
Alexandria, VA: Association of Curriculum and Supervision. 
Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VA:  
Association for Supervision and  Curriculum Development. 
24 
Bio 
Connie Fulmer earned her Ph.D. in Educational Administration at The Pennsylvania 
State University and started her academic career at Northern Illinois University, where 
she held the following leadership positions: Faculty Chair of Educational 
Administration and School Business Management; Associate Department Chair of 
Leadership and Educational Policy Studies; and Interim Chair of the Teacher Education 
Department. In July of 2000, Connie joined the Administrative Leadership and Policy 
Studies faculty here at UCD and became first Program Chair of the ALPS Principal 
Licensure Program, then Division Coordinator of Administrative Leadership and Policy 
Studies, and most recently Director of the Teacher Education Division. 
25 
Chapter 4 
Make, Share, Find: Web 2.0 and  
Informal Learning 
Phil Antonelli 
In the last decade of the 1990s excitement bordering on hysteria contributed to 
what was referred to as the “New Economy.” Fueled by the proliferation of personal 
computers and Web-based “dot-com” technology, the NASDAQ Composite soared 
4,000 points in the years between 1995 and 2000. Inevitably, the dot-com bubble burst 
and in the months between March 2000 and October 2002; the NASDAQ Composite 
shed almost 80% of its value. 
As Web technologies evolved in the aftermath of the 
collapse, a subtle but important shift began to take place in the nature of the Web. In 
simple terms, the Web moved from being static to dynamic. People started to refer 
these new dynamic technologies as Web 2.0 (to distinguish them from those that 
proliferated during the dot-com era) because they signified a shift in which anyone 
could publish content to the Web. Thus, one of the key differences between Web 1.0 
and Web 2.0 is that content is now largely created by day-to-day users and not a select 
group of web developers. Web 2.0 can be defined as: Web-based tools and systems that 
enable the creation, dissemination, and acquisition of user created content. However, I 
think that Web 2.0 can be further distilled into three words: Make, Share, Find.  
Perhaps the most well known examples of Web 2.0 are social networking sites like 
MySpace, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and Flickr Web sites like these enable users to 
actively communicate, collaborate, create, and share content with people all over the 
world. The rapid adoption of social networking has been nothing short of phenomenal. 
For instance, as of April 2009, Facebook claims to have 200 million active users.  
The growth of Web 2.0 can be attributed to its natural characteristics, these 
include ease of use, low cost (in many cases they are free) and user enjoyment. Given 
the huge growth and participation in Web 2.0, learning professionals at all levels of 
education have begun to question how these Web 2.0 applications can be used for 
learning purposes.  
Formal vs. Informal Learning 
Educators—whether in K12, higher education, or corporate spaces—tend to 
focus on formal learning that involves such things as content delivery, practice, 
feedback, assessment, and evaluation. However, learning is a natural human cognitive 
process that is constantly occurring whether someone is in a formal learning setting or 
not. A simple example of this is how toddlers learn to speak their native tongue. They 
may be “coached” by parents and family members but barring physical deficits there are 
no formal classes necessary to learn to speak. This type of learning has been defined as 
informal learning.  
One study conducted on informal learning in the workplace found that employees 
acquire 70 percent of job related knowledge from informal learning activities (Cofer, 
n.d.). It is probably not a great stretch to infer that a similar amount of informal learning 
takes place across all settings, populations, and age groups. What this suggests is that we 
are spending the majority of our time and resources on the smallest segment of learning 
when we are focusing on formal learning rather than day-to-day just-in time informal 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested