ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
1
ABCs of ADCs
Analog-to-Digital Converter Basics
Nicholas Gray
Data Conversion Systems
Staff Applications Engineer
November 24, 2003
Corrected August 13, 2004
Additional Corrections June 27, 2006
Best pdf to text converter for - Library software component:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Best pdf to text converter for - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
2
2
Agenda - ABCs of ADCs
What’s an ADC?
Review of Definitions
Sources of Distortion and Noise
Common Design Mistakes
High Speed ADCs at National
Library software component:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
3
3
October 2001
What Is an ADC?
Mixed-Signal Device
– Analog Input
– Digital Output
May be Considered to be a Divider
Output says: Input is What Fraction of V
REF
?
Output = 2
n
x G x A
IN
/ V
REF
• n = # of Output Bits (Resolution)
• G = Gain Factor (usually “1”)
• A
IN
= Analog Input Voltage (or Current)
• V
REF
(I
REF
)= Reference Voltage (or Current) 
Because the Analog-to-Digital Converter (A/D Converter or ADC) has both analog and digital 
functions, it is a mixed-signal device.  Many of us consider the ADC to be a mysterious device. 
It can, however, be considered very simply to be the instrument that it is: a device that 
provides an output that digitally represents the input voltage or current level.
Notice I said voltage or current. Most ADCs convert an input voltage to a digital word, but the 
true definition of an ADC does include the possibility of an input current.
An ADC has an analog reference voltage or current against which the analog input is 
compared. The digital output word tells us what fraction of the reference voltage or current is 
the input voltage or current. So, basically, the ADC is a divider.
The Input/Output transfer function is given by the formula indicated here. If you have seen this 
formula before, you probably did not see the “G” term (gain factor). This is because we 
generally consider this to be unity. However, National Semiconductor has introduced ADCs 
with other gain factors, so it is important to understand that this factor is present.
___________________________________________________________________________
_
PLEASE NOTE: The discussion here assumes an ADC with a binary output. Some of the 
statements here would be modified slightly for Offset Binary or 2’s Complement outputs.
Library software component:Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Buy Now. Raster XImage.Raster for .NET. Best .NET imaging SDK Buy Now. OCR XImage.OCR for .NET. Scan text from raster images, like jpeg, tiff, scanned pdf.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
PDF Page in C#.NET Class. Best PDF document reader SDK control that can highlight PDF text in Visual C# .NET framework application.
www.rasteredge.com
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
4
Here is an example of a 3-bit A/D converter. Because it has 3 bits, there are 23 = 8 possible 
output codes. The difference between each output code is V
REF
/ 23.
Assuming that the output response has no errors, every time you increase the voltage at the 
input by 1 Volt, the output code will increase by one bit. This means, in this example, that the 
least significant bit (LSB) represents 1 Volt, which is the smallest increment that this converter 
can resolve. For this reason, we can say that the resolution of this converter is 1.0V because 
we can resolve voltages as small as a volt. Resolution may also be stated in bits.
Note that if you reduce the reference voltage to 0.8V, the LSB would then represent 100mV, 
allowing you to measure a smaller range of voltages (0 to 0.8V) with greater accuracy. This is 
a common way for our customers to get better precision from a converter without buying a 
more expensive, higher resolution converter.
The Resolution
of an A/D converter is the number of output bits it has (3 bits, in this example). 
Resolution
may also be defined as the size of the LSB (Least Significant Bit) or one count (1 
Volt, in this example).
4
What, Exactly, Does An Analog-
to-Digital Converter Do?
• For a 3-bit ADC, there are 8 
possible output codes.
• In this example, if the input 
voltage is 5.5V and the 
reference is 8V, then the 
output will be 101.
• More bits give better 
resolution and smaller steps.
• A lower reference voltage 
gives smaller steps, but can 
be at the expense of noise.
A/D
Converter
Analog
Input
0V < 000 < 1V
1V < 001 < 2V
2V < 010 < 3V
3V < 011 < 4V
4V < 100 < 5V
5V < 101 < 6V
6V < 110 < 7V
7V < 111 < 8V
+V
CC
V
REF
(8V)
GND
Library software component:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET An advanced .NET WPF PDF converter library for converting Export PDF text content to TXT file with original
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and
www.rasteredge.com
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
5
The Least and Most Significant Bits (LSB and MSB) are just what their name implies: those 
bits that have the least weight (LSB) and most weight (MSB) in a digital word. For an n-bit 
word, the MSB has a weight of 2(n-1) = 2n / 2 where “n” is the total number of bits in the word. 
The LSB has a weight of 1.
5
Least Significant Bit (LSB)
and
Most Significant Bit (MSB)
NCG 9/99
B7
B6
B5
B4
B3
B2
B1
B0
Bit Weights of an 8-Bit Word
MSB
LSB
128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
  1   1   0   0   1   0  . . . 0
Weight
Least Significant Bit
2(n-?)
7th Most Significant Bit
2(n-7)
6th Most Significant Bit
2(n-6)
5th Most Significant Bit
2(n-5)
4th Most Significant Bit
2(n-4)
3rd Most Significant Bit 2(n-3)
2nd Most Significant Bit 2(n-2)
Most Significant Bit 
2(n-1)
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class. Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. View & Process. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF
www.rasteredge.com
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
6
Since one LSB is equal to V
REF
/ 2n, it stands to reason that better accuracy (lower error) can 
be realized if we did either (or both) of two things: (1) use a higher resolution converter and/or 
(2) use a smaller reference voltage. 
The problem with higher resolution (more bits) is the cost. Also, the smaller LSB means it is 
difficult to find a really small signal as it becomes lost in the noise, reducing SNR performance 
of the converter.
The problem with reducing the reference voltage is a loss of input dynamic range. Again, we 
also can lose a small signal in the noise, causing a loss of SNR performance. 
6
LSB Values by Resolution and 
Reference Voltage
• The value of an LSB depends upon the 
ADC Reference Voltage and Resolution 
V
REF
Resolution
1 LSB
1.00V
8
3.9062 mV
1.00V
12
244.14 µµµµV
2.00V
8
7.8125 mV
2.00V
10
1.9531 mV
2.00V
12
488.28 µµµµV
2.048V
10
2.0000 mV
2.048V
12
500.00 µ
µµ
µV
4.00V
8
15.625 mV
4.00V
10
3.9062 mV
4.00V
12
976.56 µ
µµ
µV
NCG 9/99
Library software component:C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
7
Continuing with the simple example of a 3-bit ADC, an ADC input of zero produces an output code of 
zero (000). As the input voltage increases towards V
REF
/8, the error also increases because the input 
is no longer zero, but the output code remains at zero because a range of input voltages is 
represented by a single output code. When the input reaches V
REF
/8, the output code changes from 
000 to 001, where the output exactly represents the input voltage and the error reduces to zero. As 
the input voltage increases past V
REF
/8, the error again increases until the input voltage reaches 
V
REF
/4, where the error again drops to zero. This process continues through the entire input range 
and the error plot is a saw tooth, as shown here.
The maximum error we have here is 1 LSB. This 0 to 1 LSB range is known as the “quantization 
uncertainty” because there are a range of analog input values that could have caused any given code 
and we are uncertain at to exactly what the input voltage was that caused a given code. The 
maximum quantization uncertainty is also known as the “quantization error”. This error results from 
the finite resolution of the ADC. That is, the ADC can only resolve the input into 2n discrete values. 
Each output code represents a range of input values. This range of values is a quanta, to which we 
assign the symbol q.
The converter resolution, then, is 2n. So, for an 8 Volt reference (with a unity gain factor), a 3-bit 
converter resolves the input into V
REF
/8 = 8V/8 = 1 Volt steps. Quantization error, then, is a round off 
error.
But an error of 0 to 1 LSB is not as desirable as is an error of ±1/
2
LSB, so we introduce an offset into 
the A/D converter to force an error range of ±1/
2
LSB.
7
Quantization Error
The Magnitude of the Error Ranges from Zero to 1 LSB 
1 LSB
ERROR
0
0                                                               
V
REF
Input (V)
V
REF
8
V
REF
4
3V
REF
8
V
REF
2
5V
REF
8
3V
REF
4
7V
REF
8
111
110
101
100
011
010
001
000
igital Output
1 LSB
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
8
If we add 1/
2
LSB offset to the ADC input, the output code will change 1/
2
LSB before it 
otherwise would. The output changes from 000 to 001 with an input value of 1/
2
LSB rather 
than 1 LSB and all subsequent codes change at a point 1/
2
LSB below where they would have 
changed without the added offset.
With an input voltage of zero, the output code is zero (000), as before. As the input voltage 
increases towards the 1/
2
LSB level, the error increases because the input is no longer zero, 
but the output code remains at zero. When the input reaches 1/
2
LSB, the output code changes 
from 000 to 001. The input is not yet at the 1 LSB level, but only at 1/
2
LSB, so the error is now 
-1/
2
LSB. As the input increases past 1/
2
LSB, the error becomes less negative, until the input 
reaches 1 LSB, where the error is zero. As the input increases beyond 1 LSB, the error 
increases until the input reaches 11/
2
LSB, where output code is increased by one and the sign 
of the error again becomes negative. This process continues through the entire input range.
Note that each code transition point decreased by 1/
2
LSB compared with the no offset of 
previous page, so that the first code transition (from 000 to 001) is at +1/
2
LSB and the last 
code transition (from 110 to 111) is at 11/
2
LSB below V
REF
. The output of the ADC should 
NOT “rotate” with an over range input as would a digital counter that is given more clock cycles 
than enough to cause a full count.
8
Adding 
1
/
2
LSB Offset
+
1
/
2
LSB
ERROR
0
-
1
/
2
LSB
                                                              
V
REF
Input (V)
V
REF
8
V
REF
4
3V
REF
8
V
REF
2
5V
REF
8
3V
REF
4
7V
REF
8
111
110
101
100
011
010
001
000
igital Output
1 LSB
1
/
2
LSB
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
9
In an ideal A/D converter, an input voltage of q / 2 will just barely cause an output code 
transition from zero to a count of one. Any deviation from this is called Zero Scale Error
, Zero 
Scale Offset Error
, or Offset  Error
. This error is positive or negative when the first transition 
point is higher or lower than ideal, respectively. Offset error is a constant and can easily be 
factored or calibrated out. Offset error may be expressed in percent of full scale voltage, Volts 
or in LSB.
Bottom Offset
differs from Offset Error in that Bottom Offset is the input voltage required to 
cause a transition of the output code to the first count.
9
Offset Error
111
110
101
100
011
010
001
000
1/8      1/4      3/8       1/2     5/8      3/4      7/8     FS
ANALOG INPUT (V)
OUTPUT CODE
IDEAL
ACTUAL
Offset
Error
NCG 9/99
ABCs of ADCs  - Rev 3, June 2006
Authored by:  Nicholas “Nick” Gray
Copyright  2003, 2004, 2006 National Semiconductor 
Corporation
All rights reserved
10
In an ideal A/D converter, the output code transition to full scale just barely occurs when the 
input voltage equals G * V
REF
* (2n - 1.5) / 2n, where “G” is the gain of the converter (usually 
“1”), V
REF
is the ADC reference voltage and “n” is the resolution (number of output bits) of the 
ADC.
In an actual ADC the full-scale analog input causing this transition may differ somewhat from 
this ideal value. Full Scale Error
is the error in the actual full-scale output transition point from 
the ideal value. Part of this error will be due to offset voltage and the rest will be due to an 
error in the slope of the transfer function. Full Scale Error may be expressed in LSBs or as a 
percentage of the full-scale voltage.
Full Scale Error
is sometimes called Full Scale Offset Error
and is expressed in LSBs, Volts or 
as a percentage of ideal full scale input.
Top Offset
is yet another type of full scale error, defined as the difference between the positive 
reference voltage and the input voltage that just causes the output code to transition to full 
scale plus 1.5 LSB, or V
FS
:
E
OT
= V
FT
+1.5 LSB - V
REF
= V
FS
–V
REF 
where E
OT
is the Top Offset voltage
V
FT
is the input voltage causing the full-scale transition
V
REF
is the ADC reference voltage
V
FS
is 1.5 LSB above V
FT
.
Top Offset is a very unusual specification.
10
Full-Scale (Offset) Error
111
110
101
100
011
010
001
000
1/8      1/4      3/8       1/2     5/8      3/4      7/8     FS
ANALOG INPUT (V)
OUTPUT CODE
ACTUAL
Full-Scale
Error
IDEAL
NCG 9/99
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested