free asp. net mvc pdf viewer : Convert pdf to rich text format online SDK control service wpf azure web page dnn manual_on_transcription2-part265

Manual (on) Transcription – 3
rd
engl.Edition 
20 
not, do you understand each other͛s languages well enough to under-
stand semantic aspects? What do you do with technical terms or slang 
you don͛t understand?
6
“Role Conflicts” – Depending on your research question and your in-
terviewees͛ situation or position, role conflicts may emerge. Depend-
ing on whom you͛ll be interviewing, you should be prepared for certain 
role conflicts and how you͛ll deal with them. 
7
Thus  prepared,  your  first  interviews  should  go  well.  Once  they  are 
stored on your computer as digital audio files, the next step awaits: 
transcription.  
6
Cf. Liamputtong (2008) for an introductory collection of essays on methodology issues 
in cross-cultural research.  
7
f. ogner et al. (2009) for role conflicts in interviews with ‘experts’; cf. Odendahl/Shaw 
(2002) and  ertz/ mber (eds., 1995) for interviews with ‘elites’. 
Convert pdf to rich text format online - SDK control service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to rich text format online - SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Rules are necessary! 
21 
Transcription:  
The challenge of producing a text 
Rules are necessary! 
Transcription (lat. trans-scribere = to rewrite) is the transfer of an au-
dio or video recording into written form. A transcript usually originates 
from  simply  typewriting  the  recorded  content.  Typically,  conversa-
tions, interviews or dictations are subject to transcription. 
Verbal statements are ephemeral and what we remember from con-
versations  is  often  sketchy.  Transcription  aims  at  overcoming  this 
problem by supporting memory. In a transcript, speech is registered in 
writing and therefore made accessible for analysis. One the one hand, 
one wants to represent speech in as much detail and in as multifaceted 
a way as possible in order to provide the reader with an accurate im-
pression of the conversation and thus facilitate its reconstruction. On 
the other hand, too many details and too much information can make 
a transcript difficult to read. There is thus a tension between the op-
posing poles of accurate representation and practical limitations.  
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET class source code for creating PDF document from rich text in .NET framework project. Now you can convert text file to PDF document using the C#
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Offer rich APIs to process Tiff file and its pages, like Convert Tiff file to bmp, gif, png, jpeg, and scanned 2. Word/Excel/PPT/PDF/Jpeg to Tiff conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
Manual (on) Transcription – 3
rd
engl.Edition 
22 
The transcription process is obviously paradoxical: with the aspiration 
to accurately represent the multi-faceted verbal discourse, you create 
a written text that is a linear, one-dimensional document. Ultimately, 
producing a transcript is a dilemma oscillating between realistic repre-
sentation and practically possible presentation or compression. Hence 
the challenge of transcription lies in knowing this discrepancy and in 
dealing with it as adequately as possible with regards to your method-
ology and topic.  
Anyone transcribing or working with transcripts should be aware that 
a transcript will never be able to fully represent the interview situa-
tion. Too many elements factor into communication and it is impossi-
ble to transcribe them all. Even a transcript closely guided by phonetics 
neglects
non-verbal aspects such as odor, room and time setting, visual 
aspects, facial expressions and gestures. As one cannot include every-
thing, one must focus on certain aspects. These aspects will vary de-
pending on your research objective or intended use of the transcript 
or situation, respectively. 
Leaving out – or  including, or transforming – certain aspects  of rec-
orded speech may radically change the content a transcript conveys to 
its readers (especially if they do not have the chance to listen to the 
SDK control service:C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF Offer rich annotation support for marking & highlighting PDF document using C#; Modified web PDF document, like
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
PDF Features. Viewable and printable on virtually cross-platform; Rich in file an easy-to-use interface enabling you to quickly convert your PDF images into
www.rasteredge.com
Rules are necessary! 
23 
recording, or if they have not been present in the recording situation). 
An example: A researcher asks a manger whether there will be any job 
cuts the following year. The manager takes ten seconds to think, rubs 
her chin, looks down and softly replies ͞Nope͟. If the transcript only 
recorded  ͞No͟  instead  of  including  pause  length  and  facial  expres-
sions, the reader would probably come to quite a different interpreta-
tion. 
In simple transcripts, paraverbal and non-verbal elements of commu-
nication are usually omitted. Dialect and colloquial language is approx-
imated to standard language. The focus of simple transcripts lies on 
readability. It is easier to learn to produce such a transcript and the 
transcription takes less time. These transcription conventions priori-
tize  content.  Well-known  conventions  like  those  by  Kallmeyer  and 
Schütze (1976) and Hoffmann-Riem (1984) focus on this goal.
8
A detailed transcript based on a complex set of transcription rules is 
necessary if the subsequent analysis does not merely focus on the se-
mantic  content  of  a  conversation.  In such  cases,  prosodic elements 
(e.g. intonation, primary and secondary emphasis, volume, speed and 
pitch) are included. If necessary, a phonetic transcription is added, e.g. 
8
See Dittmar (2004),  Kuckartz (2008; 2010)  and Dresing & Pehl (2010) for detailed 
overviews of transcription systems. 
SDK control service:VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Text Extractor SDK; Extract Text Content from
library of RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK, which contains rich APIs for from source TIFF file and output extracted text content to other format files, like Word
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:XImage.OCR for .NET, Comprehensive Feature Details
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. OCR scanned result to Adobe PDF, Tiff image Rich format text recognition supported, like text font family and
www.rasteredge.com
Manual (on) Transcription – 3
rd
engl.Edition 
24 
in dialect research) and non-verbal phenomena are documented in a 
more complex way.
9
To illustrate the difference between a simple and a more detailed tran-
script, we  have  included  two short  transcript  passages  below.  They 
originate from the same recording, but they have been transcribed ac-
cording to different conventions.
10
9
While simple transcripts can be easily produced in word processors and specialized pro-
grams such as f4, more complex transcriptions need partitures in order to represent an 
increased amount of complexity. Transcriptions in partiture also call for specialized data 
analysis software in order to be produced and managed (eg. ELAN or Transana). 
10
Excerpt 
from 
GAT 
fine 
transcript, 
cf.: 
http://www.mediensprache.net/de/medienanalyse/transcription/gat/gat.pdf,  p.  35 
(accessed on 08/16/2010). 
SDK control service:VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Code to Scan Document into TIFF Image File
those scanned documents in TIFF or PDF file format. to save scanned document file into TIFF file format. TIFF scanner control add-on contains rich imaging APIs
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
article layout of this VB.NET image editor control SDK online tutorial page. Compact rich image editing functions into several small-size libraries that are
www.rasteredge.com
Rules are necessary! 
25 
Simple transcript 
Complex transcript 
S1: ...or whether they'll get divorced 
after all. 
S1: =<<dim>  or WHEther  they'll get 
divorced  ј`after all.> 
S2: Hm. (...) 
S2: ˇhm, 
(- -) 
S1: This is still. (...) . It is a transition.   S1: <<pp>  this is still - > ((breathes 
out for  2.1 sec)) <<p> t'is a  ј` tran-
sition.> 
S2: Our former neighbors, they are 
a good example for this. (...) Mar-
ried for thirty years  (...) the last kid 
was finally out of the house, took 
off to study, (...) left, you know, to 
Berlin. 
S2: our former neighbors  ј` they 
are a good example for this 
(- - -) 
err (- - -) 
ј married for THIRty years °hh 
the last kid (.) `finally outta-the 
´HOUSE, 
took off to STUdy, (-) 
´LEFT, =´you know, °h 
to ber´LIN, °h
You have probably noticed that the simple transcript allows faster ac-
cess to the content of the conversation. It dispenses with intonation 
details, which makes the transcript easier to read. The detailed tran-
script on the other hand provides the reader with a better impression 
of  the  speakers  themselves by  including  intonation  and vernacular. 
SDK control service:VB.NET Image: Image Drawing SDK, Draw Text & Graphics on Image
SDK that enables programmers to draw rich graphics on created by VB.NET image text annotation can powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:TIFF Image Viewer| What is TIFF
Aldus Corporation in 1986 to provide a rich environment within com, which provides an easy way to convert TIFF file such as Bitmap, Png, Gif, Jpeg, PDF, MS-Word
www.rasteredge.com
Manual (on) Transcription – 3
rd
engl.Edition 
26 
Participant 2, for instance, comes across as dedicated and interested 
due to the repeated use of strongly emphasized syllables. This aspect 
does  not  become  as  clear  in  the  simple  transcript,  whereas  the 
speaker͛s frequent breaks and thus delayed speech are more apparent 
there.  
You should decide how and what to transcribe according to your re-
search  method,  your  research  expectations  and  pragmatic  reasons. 
You should not ͞just start͟ transcribing.  
Ask yourself first:  
For what kind of analysis do I produce my transcript? 
What information should the transcript therefore include? 
Is it important to include emphases? 
Is it important to represent vernacular or dialects? And so on.. 
Clearly defined rules do not only make your transcripts comprehensi-
ble to the scientific community, but also to you yourself as you type-
write and read them later. 
A system for simple transcription 
27 
A system for simple transcription 
Kuckartz et al. provide ͞deliberately simple and quickly attainable tran-
scription rules which considerably ͞smoothen͟ speech and set the fo-
cus on content͟ (2008, p. 27). 
We have applied this system in many extensive research projects, each 
of them involving several transcribers at a time.11 Through the feed-
-
back from transcribers, editors and researchers who have processed 
hundreds of interview hours, we have specified the transcription rules 
and added a few suggestions in order to ensure consistency, and to 
obtain a better basis for the subsequent analysis. 
The system is subdivided into three parts: 
1. Transcription rules 
2. Tips for consistent notation 
3. An example transcript 
11
We presently provide transcription services. We collaborate with 40 transcribers on 
various qualitative research projects, which has further informed the development of the 
transcription system over the past few years.  
Manual (on) Transcription – 3
rd
engl.Edition 
28 
The underlying transcription rules 
1.
Transcribe literally; do not summarize or transcribe phonetically. 
Dialects are to be accurately translated into standard language. 
If there is no suitable translation for a word or expression, the 
dialect is retained.  
2.
Informal  contractions  are  not  to  be  transcribed,  but 
approximated  to  written  standard  language.  E.  g.  ͞gonna͟ 
becomes  ͞going  to͟  in  the  transcript.  Sentence  structure  is 
retained despite possible syntactic errors. 
3.
Discontinuations of words  or sentences as well as stutters  are 
omitted; word doublings are only transcribed if they are used for 
emphasis (͞This is very, very important to me.͟) Half sentences 
are recorded and indicated by a slash /. 
4.
Punctuation is smoothed in favor of legibility. Thus short drops 
of  voice  or  ambiguous  intonations  are preferably  indicated  by 
periods rather than commas. Units of meaning have to remain 
intact. 
5.
Pauses are indicated by suspension marks in parentheses (…). 
6.
Affirmative  utterances  by  the  interviewer,  like  ͞uh-huh,  yes, 
right͟  etc.  are  not  transcribed.  EX EPTION:  monosyllabic 
A system for simple transcription 
29 
answers  are  always  transcribed.  Add  an  interpretation,  e.g. 
͞Mhm (affirmative)͟ or ͞Mhm (negative)͟. 
7.
Words with a special emphasis are CAPITALIZED. 
8.
Every contribution by a speaker receives its own paragraph. In 
between speakers there is a blank line. Short interjections also 
get  their  own  paragraph.  At  a  minimum,  time  stamps  are 
inserted at the end of a paragraph. 
9.
Emotional  non-verbal  utterances  of  all  parties  involved  that 
support or elucidate statements (laughter, sighs) are transcribed 
in brackets. 
10.
Incomprehensible  words  are  indicated  as  follows  (inc.).  For 
unintelligible  passages  indicate  the  reason:  (inc.,  cell  phone 
ringing) or (inc.,  microphone rustling). If  you assume a  certain 
word but are not sure, put the word in brackets with a question 
mark,  e.g.  (Xylomentazoline?).  Generally,  all  inaudible  or 
incomprehensible  passages  are  marked  with  a  time  stamp  if 
there isn͛t one within a minute. 
11.
The  interviewer  is  marked  by  ͞I:͟, the  interviewed  person  by 
͞P:͟ (for participant). If there are several speakers, e.g. in group 
discussions,  a  number  or  a  name  is  added  to  ͞P͟  (e.g.  ͞P1:͟, 
͞Peter:͟). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested