pdf viewer in mvc c# : Converting pdf to plain text control application platform web page html wpf web browser Mastering-EES-Chapter11-part404

Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
11 
The Equations Window functions a lot like a word processor.  You can use the cut (Ctrl+X), 
copy (Ctrl+C), paste (Ctrl+V), and undo (Ctrl-Z) commands just as you would in Microsoft 
Word
®
or other programs that manipulate text.  Equations are typically entered one per line; 
however, multiple equations can be entered on the same line provided that they are separated by 
a semicolon (or a colon if you are using European format): 
y=z-4; x+y=3; x^2-3=z
The mathematical operators and order of operation used in the equations are consistent with 
those used by most any programming language.  For example, the equation: 
a=2^3+3*4+2
will result in a = 22.  Variable names in EES must start with a letter but they can include any 
U.S. keyboard character except ( ) * / + - { } or ;.  EES is case-insensitive; that is, the symbols 
x
and 
X
are interpreted to be the same variable in the Equations Window.  Very long equations can 
be broken into two lines for ease of reading or improved printing by using the ampersand (&).  
Our example doesn't include any long equations, but we could still break the first equation into 
two lines according to: 
x+y& 
=3 
y=z-4 
z=x^2-3
Comments 
It is good practice to annotate your EES code in order to clarify the meaning behind the equation 
set.  Typically each equation is followed by a comment that is ignored by the equation solver 
itself but is visible to the user.  Comments in the Equations Window should be enclosed either in 
curly braces or quotes.  Any line that begins with two forward slashes is also considered a 
comment.  The comments are displayed in blue (by default) in the Equations Window to indicate 
that they are not part of the equation set that will be solved.  Comments that begin with the ! 
character (referred to as comment type 2) are displayed in red by default.  The default colors for 
comments can be changed in the Equations tab of the Preferences dialog (Options menu).   
//this is a set of equations 
x+y=3 
{comment for line 1} 
y=z-4 
"comment for line 2" 
z=x^2-3 
"! this is a type 2 comment" 
//this is a comment
Occasionally it will be useful to temporarily remove an equation or a group of equations from the 
Equations Window.  Of course, you could just delete the equation(s) and then type them back in 
if and when they are needed again.  However, a better solution is to "comment them out".  
Highlight the equation(s) to be removed and then right-click to bring up a pop-up menu, as 
Converting pdf to plain text - Library software component:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to plain text - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
12 
shown in Figure 1-11.  Select Comment {} in order to place curly brackets around the entire 
section of highlighted code, temporarily removing it from the equation set.  To restore the 
equation(s), highlight the commented code, right-click and select Undo Comment {}.   
Figure 1-12: Commenting out the last two equations. 
Active hypertext  can  also be  entered  in  comments  in  the  Equations  Window.    EES  will 
automatically recognize hypertext links that begin with 
http:\\
https:\\
, or 
file:
.  For example, enter: 
"http:\\fchart.com" 
and notice that it becomes a link to that web page.  A summary of the recognized hypertext links 
is provided in Table 1-1. 
Table 1-1: Summary of recognized hypertext links. 
Hypertext link 
Description 
http:\\fchart.com 
Open the default browser and point it at the web page that follows 
http:
https:\\fchart.com 
Open the default browser and point it at the web page that follows 
https:
file:c:\ees32\ees_manual.pdf 
Open the file that follows 
file:
and start the appropriate application. 
\\EES_Solution 
Open the Solution Window and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Format 
Open the Formatted Equations Window and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Plot 
Open the Plot Window and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_PlotN 
Open Plot Window 
N
where 
N
is an integer and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Parametric 
Open the Parametric Table and bring it to the front 
\\EES_Lookup 
Open the Lookup Table and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Array 
Open the Array Table and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Integral 
Open the Integral Table and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Report 
Open the Report Window and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Diagram 
Open the Diagram Window and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Residual 
Open the Residuals Window and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Calculator 
Open the Calculator Window and bring it to the front. 
\\EES_Solve 
Solve the current set of equations. 
\\EES_SolveTable 
Apply the Solve Table command from the Calculate menu. 
\\EES_MinMax 
Apply the Min/Max command from the Calculate menu. 
\\EES_MinMaxTable 
Apply the Min/Max Table command from the Calculate menu. 
Library software component:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET control for batch converting text formats to NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts, sizes
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Able to convert plain text to various fonts, colors and sizes of text content in PDF. Sample code for text to PDF converting in VB.NET programming .
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
13 
Built-In Math Functions 
EES provides many built-in functions.  The built-in math functions provide basic mathematical, 
trigonometric, statistical capability as well as commands to operate on data files and tables.  A 
complete list and description of all built-in math functions is provided in Appendix A.   
The built-in math functions can be conveniently accessed by selecting Function Information 
from the Options menu, which displays the Function Information dialog appearing in Figure 1-
12.  By default, all the built-in math and string functions are initially shown in the list on the left 
side of the dialog.  The list of functions can be reduced by selecting a function classification 
from the list on the right side.  An example of the proper use of the selected function is shown in 
the Ex: edit control at the bottom of the dialog.  The text in the Ex: edit control can be edited in 
the conventional manner.  Clicking the Paste button will paste the contents of this control into 
the Equations Window at the current cursor position. 
Figure 1-13:  Function Information dialog showing math and string functions. 
String Variables 
EES provides both numerical and string variables.  A string variable is identified with a variable 
name that ends with the 
$
character.  The variable name must begin with a letter and consist of 
30 or fewer characters, including the 
$
character.  String variables can be set to string constants, 
which are strings that enclosed with single quote marks. 
A$ = 'carbon dioxide' 
String variables can be used in EES equations anywhere in which character information is 
provided.  For example the name of a fluid provided to a thermophysical property function may 
Library software component:C# Word: How to Extract Text from C# Word in .NET Project
Word text extractor preserves both the plain text as well PDF document, image to pdf files and for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
14 
be a string variable, as shown in Section 4.3.  A string variable may be used to supply the units 
of other variables, as shown in Section 1.5.  String variables may be passed as arguments to 
internal  functions,  procedures,  modules,  and  subprograms  or  to  external  functions  and 
procedures as described in Chapters 3 and 10.  String variables are very useful in the Diagram 
window, as shown in Chapter 15.  String functions are provided to manipulate string variables 
and to convert them to or from numerical values.  A complete list of string functions is provided 
in Appendix B.  String functions can be accessed from the Function Information dialog, as 
shown in Figure 1-12. 
The $TabStops Directive 
Directives are instructions to EES that are usually executed before the equations are compiled 
and solved.  Directive instructions are preceded by the dollar sign (
$
) and provide a powerful 
method for controlling an EES solution.  Chapter 14 discusses the use of directives in detail and 
a complete list of directives is provided in Appendix C.  However, we will make use of various 
directives throughout the text.  The 
$TabStops
directive provides a mechanism for controlling the 
location of the tab stops used in the Equations Window.  The protocol for using the 
$TabStops
directive is shown below:   
$TabStops TabStop1  TabStop 2 ... TabStop5  Units 
where 
TabStop1
TabStop2
, etc. are numerical values corresponding to the desired positions of the 
tabs and 
Units
indicates the units used for the tabs.  The value of 
Units
must either be 
in
(for inch) 
or 
cm
(for centimeter).  The code below sets two tab stops at 1 inch and 2 inch; notice that the 
locations of the comments have shifted to 1 inch, which is consistent with the first tab stop set in 
the 
$TabStops
directive.   
$TabStops 1 2 in 
//this is a set of equations 
x+y=3 
{comment for line 1} 
y=z-4 
"comment for line 2" 
z=x^2-3 
"! this is a type 2 comment" 
Showing Values and Setting Variable Units in the Equations Window 
Selecting a variable in the Equations Window will cause a small hint window to appear just 
below the variable.  The hint window will show the value of the variable, if calculations have 
been completed, and variable units.  The variable can be easily selected by double-clicking the 
left mouse button when the cursor is positioned over the variable.  This capability makes it 
unnecessary to refer to the Solutions window to determine values of EES variables.  After a 
variable has been selected, right-clicking will bring up a pop-up menu that has Variable Info as 
one of the menu items.  Selecting Variable Info will provide a small dialog window in which the 
format and units of the variable can be entered.  This is perhaps the easiest way to enter the units 
of a variable.  However units can also be entered in the Solution Window and in the Variable 
Information dialog, as shown below. 
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
15 
The Status Bar 
The status bar is located at the bottom of the Equations Window, as shown in Figure 1-13. 
Figure 1-14: Status bar. 
Selecting the X at the left side of the status bar deactivates it.  The next panel displays the line 
and character on that line at which the cursor is positioned.  The various values of the current 
settings are displayed in subsequent panels on the status bar, including the word wrap, overwrite, 
and caps lock settings.  Clicking the mouse button with the cursor positioned in any of these 
panels allows the settings to be changed.  The current unit system (discussed in Section 1.5) is 
displayed.   The  Warning panel  controls  whether  or  not  a  window  showing  any warnings 
messages will be automatically displayed after calcualtions are completed.  These warnings can 
be manually displayed by selecting Warnings from the Windows menu. The last two panels 
indicate whether unit checking, and complex algebra are currently activated.   
Equations and Display Preferences 
Many of the characteristics of the Equations Window can be altered using the Preferences dialog 
accessed by selecting Preferences from the Options menu.  Select the Equations tab to bring up 
the dialog shown in Figure 1-14(a), which allows you to change the colors used to indicate the 
two comment types, the format used to display functions, and other display options.  Select the 
Display tab to bring up the dialog shown in Figure 1-14(b), which allows you to change the font 
and size as well as other aspects of the format used for display.  The Preferences dialog has many 
such tabs that can be used control various features of your EES programs.   
(a) 
(b) 
Figure 1-15: (a) Equations and (b) Display pages of the Preferences dialog. 
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
16 
The Formatted Equations Window 
The equations can also  be viewed in an  easy  to read, mathematical  notation  by selecting 
Formatted Equations from the Windows menu.  The result is shown in Figure 1-15.  Notice that, 
by default, the comments enclosed by quotations are shown in the Formatted Equations Window 
while those enclosed by curly brackets are not shown.  All comments can be turned off by right 
clicking in the Formatted Equations Window and de-selecting the Display Comments option 
from the pop-up menu. 
Figure 1-16: Formatted Equations Window. 
The Formatted Equations window is particularly useful for viewing large equations with multiple 
parentheses.  For example, consider the equation: 
(
)
2
1.25 64 3.44
4
4
4
3.44
0.00021
1
D
L
L
f
Re
L
L
+
+
+
+
+
=
+
+
(1-10) 
Equation (1-10) is the correlation provided by Shah and London (1978) for the average friction 
factor associated with developing flow in a round tube.  The symbol Re
D
is the Reynolds number 
and L
+
is the dimensionless length of the tube.  This correlation can be entered in the Equations 
Window as shown below.  Note that Chapter 12 discusses the EES heat transfer library which 
implements this and other useful correlations automatically. 
Re_D=1000 
"Reynolds number" 
L|plus=10 
"dimensionless length" 
f_bar=(4/Re_D)*(3.44/sqrt(L|plus)+(1.25/(4*L|plus)+64/4-3.44/sqrt(L|plus))/(1+0.00021/L|plus^2)) 
"average friction factor" 
sigma=1 
"a Greek symbol" 
The equation for 
f is difficult to read or debug in the word processing format used by the 
Equations Window.  It is much easier to view in the Formatted Equations Window, as shown in 
Figure 1-16. 
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
17 
Figure 1-17: Formatted Equations Window. 
Notice that the symbol 
f_bar
is interpreted as 
f
with an overbar in the Formatted Equations 
Window.  Similarly 
Re_D
is interpreted as 
Re
with a subscript 
D
and 
L|plus
is interpreted as 
L
with a superscript 
+
 Greek symbols are also interpreted correctly; notice that the variable 
sigma
is interpreted as 
σ
.  The formatting options that are available are summarized in Table 1-2.  
Section 1.6 shows how equations in the Formatted Equations Window can be copied in various 
formats in order to facilitate writing reports or papers.  
Table 1-2: Variable display options for Formatted Equations Window. 
Description 
Method 
Example of variable in 
in 
Equations Window 
Result in the Formatted 
ted 
Equations Window 
Overbar 
append 
_bar
to the variable 
ble 
X_bar 
X 
Tilde 
append 
_tilde
to the variable 
ble 
X_tilde 
X
Hat 
append 
_hat
to the variable 
ble 
X_hat 
ˆ
X 
Dot 
append 
_dot
to the variable 
ble 
X_dot 
X
Double dot 
append 
_ddot
to the variable 
able 
X_ddot 
X

Single prime 
append 
_prime
to the variable 
X_prime 
X
Double prime 
append 
_dprime
to the variable 
X_dprime 
X
′′
Subscript 
use the _ to start the subscript 
X_a 
a
 
Superscript 
use the | to start the superscript 
uperscript 
X|a 
a
 
Infinity symbol 
spell out 
infinity
X_infinity 
X
Greek symbol 
spell out the name of the symbol 
delta 
δ
Delta 
The Splitter Bar 
In a large EES program, you may also find it convenient to be working on one section of the 
code while viewing another.  Professional versions of EES provide this capability using the 
splitter bar.  The splitter bar divides the vertical scroll bar into two sections.  The position of the 
splitter bar is indicated by the red rectangle on the vertical scroll bar.  Initially, the splitter bar is 
at its uppermost position, indicating that the vertical scroll bar has only one section.  To see how 
the splitter bar works, select EES Example Problems from the Examples menu and then select 
Psychrometric functions.  Select the EES example named Using psychrometric functions in a 
supermarket model.  This example is a relatively large EES program and it is possible that you 
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
18 
may want to use the splitter bar to work on it.  Select the red rectangle and adjust its position to 
create two sections, as shown in Figure 1-17. 
Figure 1-18: Splitter bar used to create two sections. 
Password Protection 
In the Professional version of EES, it is possible to password protect the Equations Window so 
that only you can edit it.  Right click in the Equations Window and select Protected from the 
resulting pop-up menu. You will be prompted to enter and then re-enter a password, after which 
the background color will change to indicate that the text is now read only.  Any subsequent 
attempt to edit the protected regions of the Equations Window will not be allowed until you 
unprotect the text.  The text can be unprotected by right clicking on it and selecting Protected, at 
which time you must enter the password.  
Key Variables 
The Solution Window in a large EES program will contain many variables.  Variables are listed 
in alphabetical order; however, it may be difficult to quickly and easily identify the small subset 
of variables that are of particular interest.  To focus attention on a particular variable, it is 
possible to highlight its appearance.  For example, open the example file named Dinner.ees 
located in the Userlib\Examples folder within the folder containing the EES application.  You 
can access the example directly by selecting Getting Started with EES from the Examples menu 
at the right of the menu bar and then selecting “Settling the bill”.  Solve the equations by 
pressing F2 and the Solution Window should appear.  Select the variable 
Debbie
in the Solution 
Window and right-click on it.  The Specify Format and Units dialog that appears is shown in 
Figure 1-18. 
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
19 
Figure 1-19: Specify Format and Units dialog. 
The Specify Format and Units dialog allows you to change the formatting that is used to display 
the variable in the Solutions Window.  For example, you can box the variable and change its 
background color.  You can also select a subset of all of the variables in your Solution Window 
and make them key variables.  Highlight the variable of interest and select Key Variable in the 
resulting Specify Format and Units dialog in order to cause a box to appear in which you can 
write some descriptive comments about the variable, as shown in Figure 1-19.  Select OK and 
you will see that a new tab will appear in the Solutions Window allowing access to the Key 
Variables Window.  All of the variables that have been identified as key variables are placed in 
the Key Variable Window together with their associated descriptive comments, as shown in 
Figure 1-20. The position of each line in the Key Variable Window can be changed by pressing 
and holding the mouse button down on the desired line, while moving the mouse to the new 
location. 
Figure 1-20: Key Variable. 
Chapter 1: Introduction to EES 
20 
Figure 1-21: Key Variables Window. 
1.3  Parametric Tables 
Section 1.2 described how to use EES to obtain a single solution to a set of equations.  It is often 
interesting  to run  a parametric study in which the effect of one variable  (the  independent 
variable) on another variable (the dependent variable) is studied.  For example, let's estimate the 
pressure loss incurred by the flow of water through a 45º elbow as a function of the flow rate.  
The inner diameter of the elbow is D = 2 cm and the density of water is 
ρ
= 1000 kg/m
3
.  The 
dimensionless resistance coefficient for this type of elbow is estimated to be K = 0.3.  The 
pressure loss can be estimated according to: 
2
2
u
P K
ρ
∆ =
(1-11) 
where u is the velocity of the water.  The inputs are entered in the Equations Window; note that 
we'll start with V
= 100 liter/min and subsequently vary this value. 
$TabStops 2.5 in 
"Inputs" 
K=0.3 
"K factor for a 45 degree elbow, dimensionless" 
V_dot=100 
"volumetric flow rate, in liter per min" 
D=2  
"inner diameter of elbow, in cm" 
rho=1000  
"density of water, in kg/m^3"  
In  Section  1.5,  we  will  discuss  how  EES  can  help  you  deal  with  unit  assignments  and 
conversions.  For now we'll have to keep track of units manually.  Notice that the units assigned 
to each variable are indicated in the associated comment.  The cross sectional area of the elbow 
is given by: 
2
4
c
D
A
π
=
(1-12) 
A_c=pi#*D^2/4 
"cross-sectional area for flow, in cm^2"
The units of the variable 
A_c
must be cm
2
(because the units of the variable 
D
is cm).  Also, the 
variable 
pi#
is a built-in constant in EES corresponding to the value of 
π
(other built-in constants 
are discussed in Section 1.9).  The velocity of the water is: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested