pdf viewer in mvc c# : Convert pdf to openoffice text document application control cloud windows web page winforms class 2014-nmc-horizon-report-he-EN4-part405

Competency Map
go.nmc.org/capel
The competency map at Capella University helps 
students own their learning by constantly showing 
them where they are in each course, how much is ahead 
of them, and where they need to concentrate their 
efforts to be successful.
Gradecraft
go.nmc.org/grade
The University of Michigan uses Gradecraft, which 
encourages risk-taking and multiple pathways towards 
mastery as learners progress through course material. 
The analytics employed guide students throughout the 
process and inform instructors of their progress.
For Further Reading 
The following articles and resources are recommended 
for those who wish to learn more about learning analytics:
Data Science: The Numbers of Our Lives
go.nmc.org/datasci
(Claire Cain Miller, The New York Times, 11 April 2013.) 
According to a report by McKinsey Global Institute, there 
will be almost a half million jobs in data science in five 
years. Institutions are creating programs to train hybrid 
computer scientist/software engineer statisticians.
Learning to Adapt: A Case for Accelerating Adaptive 
Learning in Higher Education
go.nmc.org/case
(Adam Newman, Peter Stokes, Gates Bryant, Education 
Growth Advisors, 13 March 2013). A white paper funded 
by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation illustrates the 
current adoption of adaptive learning technologies in 
higher education, relevant obstacles, and the solutions 
being explored.  
The Role of Learning Analytics in Improving 
Teaching and Learning (Video)
go.nmc.org/lerana
(George Siemens, Teaching and Learning with 
Technology Symposium, 16 March 2013.) Siemens 
reviews a number of case studies to show that when 
analytics are applied to education in a similar manner 
as companies use them, they can improve teaching and 
learning.
39
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: One Year or Less
already being used by leading institutions to capture 
precise student behaviors in online courses, recording 
not only simple variables such as time spent on a topic, 
but also much more nuanced information that can 
provide evidence of critical thinking, synthesis, and the 
depth of retention of concepts over time. As behavior-
specific data is added to an ever-growing repository of 
student-related information, the analysis of educational 
data is increasingly complex, and many statisticians 
and researchers are working to develop new kinds of 
analytical tools to manage that complexity.  
 
The most visible current example of a wide-scale 
analytics project in higher education is the Predictive 
Analytics Reporting Framework, which is overseen by 
the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education 
(WICHE), and largely funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates 
Foundation. The 16 participating institutions represent 
the public, private, traditional, and progressive spheres 
of education. According to the WICHE website, they have 
compiled over 1,700,000 student records and 8,100,000 
course level records in efforts to better understand 
student loss and student momentum. 
 
Companies such as X-Ray Research are conducting 
research in online discussion groups to determine which 
behavioral variables are the best predictors of student 
performance. The tools reflect the potential of analytics 
to develop early warning systems based on metrics that 
make predictions using linguistic, social, and behavioral 
data. Similarly, studies at universities are proving that 
pedagogies informed by analytics can improve the 
quality of interaction taking place online. At Simon 
Fraser University in British Columbia researchers applied 
analytics to solve an issue that past experiments revealed 
— discussion forums used for online courses were not 
supporting productive engagement or discussion. They 
developed a Visual Discussion Forum in which students 
could visualize the structure and depth of the discussion, 
based on the number of threads extending from their 
posts. Learners in this study were also able to easily 
detect which topics needed more of their attention.
Learning Analytics in Practice
The following links provide examples of learning 
analytics in use in higher education settings:
Big Data in Education
go.nmc.org/bigda
Columbia University professors offer an online course 
for educators through Coursera to learn about the 
strengths and weaknesses of the various methods 
professors are currently using to mine and model the 
increasing amounts of learner data.
Convert pdf to openoffice text document - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
.net extract text from pdf; convert pdf to txt file online
Convert pdf to openoffice text document - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to searchable text; convert pdf to ascii text
nown in industrial circles as rapid prototyping, 
3D printing refers to technologies that 
construct physical objects from three-
dimensional (3D) digital content such as 3D 
modeling software, computer-aided design 
(CAD) tools, computer-aided tomography (CAT), and 
X-ray crystallography. A 3D printer builds a tangible 
model or prototype from the electronic file, one layer at 
a time, through an extrusion-like process using plastics 
and other flexible materials, or an inkjet-like process to 
spray a bonding agent onto a very thin layer of fixable 
powder. The deposits created by the machine can be 
applied very accurately to build an object from the 
bottom up, layer by layer, with resolutions that, even in 
the least expensive machines, are more than sufficient 
to express a large amount of detail. The process 
even accommodates moving parts within the object. 
Using different materials and bonding agents, color 
can be applied, and parts can be rendered in plastic, 
resin, metal, tissue, and even food. This technology is 
commonly used in manufacturing to build prototypes 
of almost any object (scaled to fit the printer, of course) 
that can be conveyed in three dimensions.
Overview
The earliest known examples of 3D printing were seen 
in the mid-1980s at the University of Texas at Austin, 
where selective laser sintering was developed, though 
the equipment was cumbersome and expensive. The 
term 3D printing itself was coined a decade later at 
MIT, when graduate students were experimenting with 
unconventional substances in inkjet printers. Since 3D 
printing appeared in the very first NMC Horizon Report 
in 2004, the technology has helped the U.S. Department 
of Defense to inexpensively create aerospace parts, 
architects create models of buildings, medical 
professionals develop body parts for transplants, and 
much more. In the past several years, there has been 
a lot of experimentation in the consumer space — 
especially within the maker culture, a technologically-
savvy, do-it-yourself community dedicated to advancing 
science, engineering, and other disciplines through the 
exploration of 3D printing and robotics. 
During the process of 3D printing, the user will start 
by designing a model of the desired object using 
specialized software such as CAD. While a variety of 
companies produce CAD software, AutoDesk is the 
acknowledged leader in the development of such tools. 
Once the design is sent to the printer, the materials — 
either plastics, metals, or a variety of other materials 
— are dispensed through a nozzle, and gradually 
deposited to eventually form the entire object. Additive 
manufacturing technologies change the way the layers 
are deposited as some objects call for the material to be 
softened or melted. Selective heat and laser sintering, 
for example require thermoplastics, while electron 
beam melting calls for titanium alloys. In the case of 
laminated object manufacturing, thin layers must be 
cut to shape and then joined together; the technology 
had previously only been found in specialized labs. 
The adoption of 3D printing is also being fueled by 
online applications such as Thingiverse and MeshLab, 
repositories of free, digital designs for physical 
objects where users can download the digital design 
information and create that object themselves. The 
MakerBot is one of several brands of 3D desktop 
printers that allow users to build everything from toys 
to robots, to household furniture and accessories, to 
models of dinosaur skeletons. Relatively affordable 
at under $2,500, the MakerBot was the first 3D printer 
designed for consumer use. Because of the inherent 
ability for users to create something, whether original 
or replicated, 3D printing is an especially appealing 
technology as applied to active and project-based 
learning in higher education. 
Relevance for Teaching, Learning, or 
Creative Inquiry
One of the most significant aspects of 3D printing 
for education is that it enables more authentic 
exploration of objects that may not be readily available 
to universities. For example, anthropology students 
at Miami University can handle and study replicas 
of fragile artifacts, like ancient Egyptian vases, that 
have been scanned and printed at the university’s 3D 
printing lab. Similarly, at the GeoFabLab at Iowa State 
University, geology students and amateur enthusiasts 
can examine 3D printed specimens of rare fossils, 
crystals, and minerals without risk of damaging these 
precious objects. 
NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition
40
3D Printing
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Two to Three Years
K
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
in C#.NET. Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. Export PDF from OpenOffice Spreadsheet data. Create PDF document
extract text from pdf; pdf to text converter
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
conversion. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with embedded fonts. Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Export
convert scanned pdf to editable text; best pdf to text converter for
Center for Bits and Atoms to research and experiment 
with digital fabrication. They have now materialized 
into centers across the globe, housing technology such 
as 3D printers, laser cutters, and programming tools 
that students can use in exploratory environments.
Organ Creation at the University of Wollongong
go.nmc.org/uw3d
Using a 3D bio-plotter, researchers at the University of 
Wollongong in Australia created technology for printing 
living human cells, such as muscles, along with a special 
ink that carries the cells. The hope is that the printer 
materials can eventually be used for patient-specific 
implants and even organ transplants.
For Further Reading 
The following resources are recommended for those 
who wish to learn more about 3D printing:
4D Printing: The New Frontier
go.nmc.org/4dp
(Oliver Marks, ZDNet, 14 March 2013.) Advances in nano 
biotechnology are leading to new materials that can 
be programmed to change their form over time. This 
could spark new innovations including self-repairing 
pants made from biological materials and objects that 
assemble and disassemble depending on temperature.
10 Ways 3D Printers are Advancing Science
go.nmc.org/10ways
(Megan Treacy, Treehugger, 16 April 2013.) 3D printers 
are advancing science, from helping NASA researchers 
studying moon rocks to medical researchers working 
with 3D printed prosthetics for ears and other body 
parts. Specialized 3D printers are being used in labs 
to produce a variety of skin and other tissues that are 
literally “printed” onto an organic lattice.
Lab Equipment Made with 3-D Printers Could Cut 
Costs by 97%
go.nmc.org/reduc
(Paul Basken, The Chronicle of Higher Education, 29 
March 2013.) A new study from Michigan Technological 
University shows how 3D printers can allow a sharp 
improvement in the efficiency and capabilities of 
research laboratories, cutting costs by as much as 
97%. Additionally, 3D-printed parts enable more 
customization to suit individual needs.
41
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Two to Three Years
Some of the most compelling progress of 3D printing 
in higher education comes from institutions that are 
inventing new objects. A team at Harvard University 
and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently 
printed lithium-ion microbatteries that are the size of a 
grain of sand and can supply power to very small devices 
such as medical implants and miniature cameras. In the 
field of medical research, innovation at the microscopic 
level is seeing increasing growth. Researchers at the 
University of Texas at Austin are caging bacteria in 
3D-printed enclosures in order to closely approximate 
actual biological environments for the study of bacterial 
infections. Scientists at the University of Liverpool are 
developing 3D-printable synthetic skin that will closely 
resemble an individual’s age, gender, and ethnicity. 
As 3D printing gains traction in higher education, 
universities are beginning to create dedicated spaces 
to nurture creativity and stimulate intellectual 
inquiry around this emerging technology. Examples 
include North Carolina State University’s Hunt Library 
Makerspace, the 3DLab at the University of Michigan’s 
Art, Architecture, and Engineering Library, and the 
Maker Lab in the Humanities at the University of Victoria 
in British Columbia, Canada. These spaces, equipped 
with the latest 3D scanners, 3D printers, 3D motion 
sensors, and laser cutters, not only enable access to 
tools, but they also encourage collaboration within a 
community of makers and hackers.
3D Printing in Practice
The following links provide examples of 3D printing in 
use that have direct implications for higher education 
settings:
3D Art
go.nmc.org/3dart
Art students are learning the history and applications 
of 3D printed art at Aalto University in Finland. They 
recently collaborated with a local artist collective to 
create sculptural works for an exhibition in the city of 
Hyrynsalmi.
3D Design Studio
go.nmc.org/ude
University of Delaware’s Department of Mechanical 
Engineering opened a design studio with a 3D printer, 
materials repository, machine shop, and a collaboration 
laboratory so students can take design ideas from 
concept to prototype.
Fab Lab
go.nmc.org/fab
Fab Labs began as an outreach project from MIT’s 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
OpenOffice Conversion. • By using C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer, users can perform these conversions: convert ODT to PDF document (.pdf) online, convert
convert pdf file to text; convert pdf to text online
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Except to process PDF, Microsoft Office documents and Supported OpenOffice file formats, CSV file and
convert pdf images to text; convert pdf to text
he games culture has grown to include a 
substantial proportion of the world’s population, 
with the age of the average gamer increasing with 
each passing year. As tablets and smartphones 
have proliferated, desktop and laptop computers, 
television sets, and gaming consoles are no longer the 
only way to connect with other players online, making 
game-play a portable activity that can happen in a 
diverse array of settings. Gameplay has long since 
moved on from solely being recreational and has 
found considerable traction in the military, business 
and industry, and increasingly, education as a useful 
training and motivation tool. While a growing number of 
educational institutions and programs are experimenting 
with game-play, there has also been increased attention 
surrounding gamification — the integration of gaming 
elements, mechanics, and frameworks into non-game 
situations and scenarios. Businesses have embraced 
gamification as a way to design incentive programs 
that engage employees through rewards, leader boards, 
and badges, often with a mobile component. Although 
more nascent than in military or industry settings, the 
gamification of education is gaining support among 
educators who recognize that effectively designed 
games can stimulate large gains in productivity and 
creativity among learners.
Overview
According to the Entertainment Software Association, 
the average age of today’s gamers is 30, with 68% 
of gamers over 18 years old — university age. The 
popularity of digital games has led to rapid development 
in the video game industry over the past decade, 
with considerable advances that have broadened the 
definition of games and how they are played. When 
the gaming industry began to incorporate network 
connectivity into game design, they revolutionized 
game-play by creating a vast virtual arena where users 
from all over the world could connect, interact, and 
compete. The Internet offers gamers the opportunity 
to join massively multiplayer online (MMO) role-
player games, such as “Minecraft,” and to build online 
reputations based on the skills, accomplishments, and 
abilities of their virtual avatars. In the last few years, 
games have converged with natural user interfaces 
to create an experience for players that more closely 
mimics real life. Using consoles such as Microsoft Kinect 
or Nintendo Wii, for example, players interact through 
body movements and hand gestures.
Gamification, or the notion that gaming mechanics can 
be applied to routine activities, has been employed 
successfully by a number of mobile apps and social 
media companies. One of the most popular incarnations 
over the years has been FourSquare, with a reward 
system that encourages people to check into locations 
to accumulate rewards — a notion that has paved 
the way for a host of resources that similarly gamify 
everyday life. Untappd and Tipsi, for example, are apps 
that allow users to document and receive badges for 
each different type of beer and wine they have tried, 
while
Simple.com
is a gamified banking service that 
helps users master their finances. It is not uncommon 
now for major corporations and organizations, including 
the World Bank and IBM, to consult with gaming experts 
to inform the development and design of large-scale 
programs that motivate workers through systems that 
incorporate challenges, level-ups, and rewards. 
While some thought leaders argue that the increasing 
use of game design in the workplace is a short-lived trend 
that yields short-term bursts of productivity, companies 
of all sizes in all sectors are finding that workers respond 
positively to gamified processes. For higher education, 
these game-like environments transform assignments 
into exciting challenges, reward students for dedication 
and efficiency, and offer a space for leaders to naturally 
emerge. Badges, for example, are being increasingly 
used as a rewards system for learners, allowing them, in 
many cases, to publicly display their progress and skill 
mastery in online profiles.
Relevance for Teaching, Learning, or 
Creative Inquiry
Educational gameplay has proven to foster engagement 
in critical thinking, creative problem-solving, and 
teamwork — skills that lead to solutions for complex 
social and environmental dilemmas. This idea is the 
foundation of Jane McGonigal’s work, a recognized game 
designer and researcher who is raising awareness about 
the power of games to change the world. McGonigal 
and other researchers at the Institute for the Future are 
NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition
42
Games and Gamification
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Two to Three Years
T
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
Convert CSV file to PDF (.pdf). Convert CSV file to HTML (.htm, .html). Annotation. Protection. • Create signatures to OpenOffice document.
convert image pdf to text; convert pdf image to text online
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
conversion of pdf image to text; convert pdf picture to text
leaders in the video game industry and the program 
promises to be competitive and industry-driven.
Mentira
go.nmc.org/ment
Mentira, a mobile GPS and augmented reality-based 
game developed at the University of New Mexico, 
develops Spanish language skills as learners interact 
with characters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico 
setting and work through various obstacles to solve a 
murder mystery. 
SICKO
go.nmc.org/sick
The Stanford University School of Medicine’s SICKO is a 
web-based simulation game in which students manage 
three virtual patients simultaneously and must make 
critical decisions in the operating room. 
For Further Reading 
The following articles and resources are recommended 
for those who wish to learn more about gaming and 
gamification:
The Awesome Power of Gamification in Higher 
Education
go.nmc.org/awesome
(Tara E. Buck, EdTech Magazine, 18 October 2013.) At her 
keynote speech at EDUCAUSE 2013, game developer 
Jane McGonigal presented a vision of the future in 
which people’s work and daily lives are transformed into 
gamified scenarios or “extreme learning environments.” 
Gamification Done Right
go.nmc.org/doneright
(Andre Behrens,
The New York Times, 11 June 2013.) The 
author explores the various implications that the term 
gamification carries, and discusses the components 
that make it successful. He points to
Simple.com
as an 
effective and creative example.
Video Game Courses Score Big on College Campuses
go.nmc.org/scorebig
(Yannick Lejacq, NBC News, 12 September 2013.) 
U.S. colleges and universities are now offering more 
coursework and degrees dedicated to the study of 
video games than ever before, with 385 institutions 
now providing either individual courses or full degrees 
in game design.
43
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Two to Three Years
designing online games that foster participation and 
new ways of thinking about systems and sustainability 
in education, health, and urban contexts. The goal is to 
develop engaging platforms that spark curiosity, instill 
a sense of urgency and gravitas, while rewarding users 
in meaningful ways.
Digital simulations are another method being used 
widely to reinforce conceptual applications in mock real 
world scenarios. This is especially evident in business 
schools. At Montclair University School of Business 
in New Jersey, students play an online business 
simulation called GLO-BUS where they run a digital 
camera company and play with actual competitors in 
the global marketplace. The simulated environment 
challenges learners to develop and execute an effective, 
business savvy strategy, and provides the tools to 
address product line breadth, operations, outsourcing, 
pricing, and corporate social responsibility among other 
considerations. Scenarios like this one demonstrate 
the power of games to simulate real world scenes of 
productivity, requiring students to exercise executive 
thinking on weighty situations where their decisions 
make a serious impact.
Gamification is also appearing more in online learning 
environments. Kaplan University, for example, gamified 
their IT degree program after running a successful pilot 
in their Fundamentals of Programming course. Students’ 
grades improved 9% and the number of students who 
failed the course decreased by 16%. Kaplan is using 
gamification software that can be embedded into 
LMS and other web applications. Gamification can 
also incentivize professional development. Deloitte 
developed the Deloitte Leadership Academy, a 
training program that leverages gamification to create 
curriculum-based missions. Learners earn badges for 
completing missions, which they can display on their 
LinkedIn profiles. As gaming continues to dominate 
discussions among educators, some believe it could 
disenchant students if executed poorly. To negate 
this challenge, more universities are partnering with 
companies to conduct research that is relevant to both 
the curriculum and students’ lives. 
Gaming and Gamification in Practice
The following links provide examples of gaming and 
gamification in use in higher education settings:
The Denius-Sams Gaming Academy
go.nmc.org/utgame
The University of Texas at Austin will be offering the 
first video game program in the nation by Fall 2014. 
The Denius-Sams Gaming Academy will be taught by 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document.
batch convert pdf to txt; convert pdf to word to edit text online
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
easy for C# developers to convert and transform style that are included in target PDF document file original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical
convert pdf to text c#; convert pdf to searchable text online
uantified self describes the phenomenon of 
consumers being able to closely track data that 
is relevant to their daily activities through the 
use of technology. The emergence of wearable 
devices on the market such as watches, 
wristbands, and necklaces that are designed to 
automatically collect data are helping people manage 
their fitness, sleep cycles, and eating habits. Mobile apps 
also share a central role in this idea by providing easy-
to-read dashboards for consumers to view and analyze 
their personal metrics. Empowered by these insights, 
many individuals now rely on these technologies to 
improve their lifestyle and health. Today’s apps not only 
track where a person goes, what they do, and how much 
time they spend doing it, but now what their aspirations 
are and when those can be accomplished. Novel devices, 
such as the Memoto, a camera worn around the neck 
that is designed to capture an image every half minute 
are enabling people to track their lives automatically. As 
more people rely on their mobile devices to monitor their 
daily activities, personal data is becoming a larger part 
of everyday life.
Overview
People have always demonstrated interest in learning 
about themselves by tracking and measuring their 
behaviors and activities. Students already spend 
time in formal classroom settings gathering data 
about themselves or research topics. Quantified self 
technologies tap into this interest in the form of mobile 
apps, wearable devices, and cloud-based services that 
make the data collection process much easier. 
Popular incarnations of the quantified self movement 
have materialized in the form of health, fitness, and 
life streaming tools. The Fitbit, for example, is a small 
wristband that tracks wearers’ daily activities, including 
sleep patterns, steps taken, and calories burned. 
Through wireless and automatic syncing between the 
Fitbit and smartphones, tablets, and laptops, users 
can see real-time progress across their devices. The 
Jawbone Up wristband employs similar functionalities, 
allowing wearers to track sleep, movement, and dietary 
information that is automatically populated in the 
accompanying mobile UP app. The experience can 
easily turn into a social one as people can share their 
accomplishments with other users and team up to track 
and achieve specific goals. Other wearables that have 
garnered worldwide attention have deeply integrated 
self-tracking tools, including Google Glass and iWatch, 
but the high prices — and in some cases, the low 
availability — of these devices have some pundits 
concerned that quantified self technologies are a luxury 
for the upper class. More affordable versions developed 
in the next four to five years could accelerate this 
technology trend in educational settings.
These technologies provide individuals greater self-
awareness of their behaviors through self-tracking, as 
well as new ways to think about how to use the data 
collected. Since the introduction of this concept in 
2007, communities have formed around the idea of 
using technology to aid in self-improvement. Through 
meet-ups and online communities, artists, self-help 
seekers, and even university researchers share their 
experiences with the hope to transform themselves 
and the rest of society through an analysis of the data 
they produce and collect. The Quantified Self Institute, 
for example, is an initiative by the Hanze University 
of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands that brings 
international and regional partners together to conduct 
research on different methods of self-tracking. This 
organization is well positioned to lead the quantified 
self movement into higher education institutions with 
recommendations on effective applications.
Relevance for Teaching, Learning, or 
Creative Inquiry
With the growing use of mobile apps and wearable 
technology, individuals are creating an exponentially 
increasing amount of data. The quantified self 
movement is breaking ground by integrating these data 
NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition
44
Quantified Self
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Four to Five Years
Q
Popular incarnations of the 
quantified self movement have 
materialized in the form of health, 
fitness, and life streaming tools.
and fitness in an effort to determine how their data can 
be used to inform better public health.
The Russ-ome Project at The University of Texas
go.nmc.org/brainstu
A neuroscientist and director of the Imaging Research 
Center at The University of Texas at Austin is using a 
headband monitor, a heart monitor, and a survey app 
to track and report his sleep and exercise patterns for 
a year-long study. The information is being stored 
in a database that he will ultimately use for self-
improvement. 
For Further Reading 
The following articles and resources are recommended 
for those who wish to learn more about quantified self:
Gaming the Quantified Self
go.nmc.org/gthet
(Jennifer R. Whitson, Queens University, 2013.) This 
paper explores how digital games inherently facilitate 
surveillance of user activities, fostering the compilation 
of statistics that can be used to monitor individuals 
and surface overall behavioral patterns in gamified 
environments. 
Quantified Self: The Tech-Based Route to a Better 
Life?
go.nmc.org/bbcquant
(Karen Weintraub, BBC Future, 3 January 2013.) The 
Quantified Self Movement is rooted in the need to record 
the details of daily life, and new technologies such as 
wearable trackers and apps have made it effortless for 
people to regularly document their activities. 
Trackers, Measuring the Quantified Self
go.nmc.org/track
(Gopal Sathe, Live Mint, 7 September 2013.) Wearable 
trackers including Fitbit, Nike Fuel, and Jawbone Up 
are helping people monitor their personal data such as 
sleep cycle and step count, and are encouraging people 
to consider personal data as an integral part of their 
routines.
 
45
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Four to Five Years
streams in interesting ways. Self quantifiers, for example, 
can create healthier living plans after monitoring their 
sleep, exercise, diet, and other important patterns. The 
new mobile app Whistle even enables people to do the 
same for their dogs. It is imaginable that if test scores and 
reading habits gleaned from learning analytics could 
be combined with other lifestyle tracking information, 
these large data sets could reveal how environmental 
changes improve learning outcomes. 
Quantified self technology also has the potential to 
shape the future of some industries. In the medical 
field, for instance, doctors are using not only traditional 
medicine but also data that individuals self-collect, 
such as heart rate, blood pressure, and sugar levels. 
Advancements in the field could enable computers to 
search for patterns and help physicians more accurately 
diagnose or anticipate health problems before patients 
step foot into the building. Educators at the moment 
can only hypothesize about a new era of the academic 
quantified self, but interest is strong and growing. 
One of the current barriers for the mainstream adoption 
of this technology revolves around privacy concerns. The 
quantified self movement is about people sharing what 
they learn about themselves for the greater good, but 
there is a vulnerability to exposing personal information 
that will need to be addressed over the next four to five 
years. This could include a cost/benefit analysis about 
what data should be collected, what data should be 
shared, who should be responsible for making those 
decisions, and how to build the most effective and safe 
online communities of practice.
Quantified Self in Practice
The following links provide examples of quantified self 
in use that have direct implications for higher education 
settings:
Fitbit at the University of Tokyo
go.nmc.org/tokyo
Researchers from the University of Tokyo have used 
data from the Fitbit pedometer to detect and measure 
the strength of workplace relationships. The initial 
results reveal that the data generated by this quantified 
self technology can foster the creation of an accurate 
company profile.
Health Data Exploration Project
go.nmc.org/hdexplore
The California Institute for Telecommunications and 
Information Technology, with support from the Robert 
Wood Johnson Foundation, launched a research study 
that is seeking individuals who self-track their health 
s voice recognition and gesture-based 
technologies advance and more recently, 
converge, we are quickly moving away from 
the notion of interacting with our devices via a 
pointer and keyboard. Virtual assistants are a 
credible extension of work being done with natural user 
interfaces (NUIs), and the first examples are already in 
the marketplace. The concept builds on developments 
in interfaces across the spectrum of engineering, 
computer science, and biometrics. The Apple iPhone’s 
Siri and Android’s Jelly Bean are recent mobile-based 
examples, and allow users to control all the functions 
of the phone, participate in lifelike conversations 
with the virtual assistant, and more. A new class of 
smart televisions are among the first devices to make 
comprehensive use of the idea. While crude versions 
of virtual assistants have been around for some time, 
we have yet to achieve the level of interactivity seen 
in Apple’s classic video, Knowledge Navigator. Virtual 
assistants of that caliber and their applications for 
learning are clearly in the long-term horizon, but 
the potential of the technology to add substance to 
informal modes of learning is compelling.
Overview
Virtual assistants employ artificial intelligence and 
natural language processing to provide people with 
support for a wide range of daily activities, such 
as discerning the best driving routes, arranging 
trip itineraries, and organizing email inboxes. The 
latest tablets and smartphones now include virtual 
assistants — perhaps the most recognized of which 
are Apple’s Siri, Android’s Jelly Bean, and Google Now. 
These virtual assistants are integrated into the mobile 
platforms, enabling users to interact more authentically 
with their devices by leveraging a conversational 
interface. Users can simply speak a request to the 
device, and the virtual assistant will respond instantly. 
The most advanced versions of this software actually 
track user preferences and patterns so they can adapt 
over time to be more helpful to the individual. In this 
sense, virtual assistants encourage convenience and 
productivity, making them particularly compelling 
for their potential applications in academic settings, 
though they are four to five years away from being 
widely used in higher education.
The functionality of many contemporary virtual 
assistants is triggered by a combination of three 
technologies: a conversational interface, personal 
context awareness, and service delegation. 
Conversational interfaces rely on voice recognition 
tools that have been enhanced by special algorithms 
and machine learning to decipher meaning. Because 
every person has their own way of speaking, personal 
context awareness helps virtual assistants understand 
specific nuances based on keywords and patterns 
in language. Conversational interfaces and personal 
context awareness enable virtual assistants to engage 
in human-like conversations with users. Finally, service 
delegation allows mobile virtual assistants to access 
and communicate with users’ collections of mobile 
apps. Thanks to this concept, one of the most appealing 
features of virtual assistants is that they are often 
designed to integrate seamlessly with other programs, 
including mapping and recreational services. 
The latest iteration of virtual assistants can be found in 
smart televisions linked with data processing systems 
that allow users to connect to the web. Apple, Samsung, 
and LG have been among the first to market with their 
versions. Users stream video directly from the Internet 
through voice-controlled web widgets and software 
applications. Smart TVs also track users’ viewing 
patterns and program preferences to make tailored 
recommendations. While there are currently few 
concrete applications of smart TVs or virtual assistants 
being used in higher education, the prospect of tools 
that adapt to students’ learning needs and preferences 
makes the technology one worth following closely over 
the next five years. 
Relevance for Teaching, Learning, or 
Creative Inquiry
The technologies that enable virtual assistants are 
advancing at a rapid pace, presenting consumers with 
interfaces that recognize and interpret human speech 
and emotions with impressive accuracy. Students 
are already using virtual assistants in their personal 
lives, yet most institutions have yet to explore this 
technology’s potential outside research settings. The 
University of Cambridge, for example, in partnership 
with the Toshiba Cambridge Research, presented a 
NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition
46
Virtual Assistants
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Four to Five Years
A
M*Modal
go.nmc.org/mmodal
The University of Virginia Health System is using 
M*Modal, a cloud-based speech recognition engine, 
to facilitate the creation, management, and sharing of 
electronic medical records. The goal is for medical staff 
and informatics professionals to quickly and accurately 
capture clinical narratives for improved billing, 
productivity, and patient care.
VAGUE
go.nmc.org/sphinx
Carnegie Mellon University created an open source 
toolkit for speech recognition on Kindle devices called 
VAGUE, which allows users to navigate the reader, 
launch various tools, and prompt more actions by 
writing a new script.
For Further Reading 
The following articles and resources are recommended 
for those who wish to learn more about virtual assistants:
Beyond the GUI: It’s Time for a Conversational User 
Interface
go.nmc.org/cuiwi
(Ron Kaplan, WIRED, 21 March 2013.) Ron Kaplan — a 
linguist, mathematician, and technologist — predicts 
the imminent emergence of the conversational user 
interface, which is based on voice-recognition and 
machine learning technologies.
New Virtual Assistant Anticipates Needs During 
Conversation
go.nmc.org/needs
(Tyler Falk, Smart Planet, 18 January 2013.) The author of 
this post describes the new iPad app called MindMeld, 
which, instead of responding to questions, analyzes 
and understands the content of online conversations in 
order to provide useful information.
Talk to the Phone: Google’s Moto X Virtual Assistant 
Raises Smartphone Bar
go.nmc.org/talkto
(Peter Nowak, CBS News, 13 August 2013.) The author 
provides a personal account of how the virtual assistant 
Google Now aided he and his wife on a trip across the 
northeastern United States.
47
Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Four to Five Years
prototype of a digital talking head named Zoe, which is 
one of the first attempts to put a human-like face on a 
virtual assistant. The research team enlisted the help of 
a British actress to record 7,000 sentences and emotive 
facial expressions, which composed the data set used 
to “train” Zoe’s face. The software is data-light with the 
potential to be personalized with various faces and 
voices.
Virtual assistants are already making an appearance 
in the health sector. In late 2014, intelligent solutions 
company Nuance Communications will launch an 
intelligent virtual assistant named Florence that 
understands clinical language and can take directives 
from doctors as they order medications, labs, and other 
diagnostic procedures. The technology is expected 
to reduce the amount of time a physician spends on 
administrative work, which accounts for 30% of their 
workday according to a survey by Nuance. It also offers 
a glimpse into a future where doctors will be able to 
retrieve and make additions to medical records in real-
time using natural speech with the help of intelligent 
technologies.
Further development in technologies associated with 
virtual assistants such as those that teach computers 
to see, listen, and think like humans do, are progressing 
rapidly and bringing greater accuracy to pattern 
recognition, a capability that is also driving real-time 
translation technologies. Recently, Microsoft’s top 
scientist Richard F. Rashid demonstrated a computer 
program that displayed his words as he spoke. In the 
pauses between each sentence, the software translated 
his speech into written and then spoken Mandarin, 
which was heard in his own voice — a language he 
has never uttered. These scenarios point to a future in 
which virtual assistants will be equipped with more 
advanced capabilities that will help people navigate a 
world where collaboration across borders and overseas 
is increasingly the norm. 
Virtual Assistants in Practice
The following links provide examples of virtual 
assistants in use that have direct implications for higher 
education settings:
BlabDroid
go.nmc.org/blab
MIT Media Lab plans to commercialize BlabDroid, a 
robot that offers similar functionality to other virtual 
assistants by connecting to a smartphone or the cloud 
so it can communicate pertinent information to users, 
including the weather, and post to a social network 
based on voice commands. 
NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition
48
The NMC Horizon Project: 2014 Higher Education Edition 
Expert Panel
Larry Johnson
Co-Principal Investigator
New Media Consortium
United States
Malcolm Brown
Co-Principal Investigator
EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative
United States
Samantha Adams Becker
Lead Writer/Researcher
New Media Consortium
United States
Bryan Alexander
Bryan Alexander Consulting, LLC
United States
Kumiko Aoki
Open University of Japan
Japan
Andrew Barras
Full Sail University
United States
Helga Bechmann
Multimedia Kontor Hamburg 
GmbH
Germany
Michael Berman
CSU Channel Islands
United States
Kyle Bowen
Purdue University
United States
Joseph Cevetello
University of Southern California
United States
Deborah Cooke
University of Oregon
United States
Alisa Cooper
Maricopa Community Colleges
United States
Crista Copp
Loyola Marymount
United States
Eva de Lera
Raising the Floor, International
Spain
Veronica Diaz
EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative
United States
Kyle Dickson
ersity
United States
Barbara Dieu
Lycée Pasteur
Brazil
Allan Gyorke
University of Miami
United States
Tom Haymes
Houston Community College
United States
Don Henderson
Apple, Inc.
United States
 
Richard Holeton
Stanford University
United States
Paul Hollins
JISC CETIS
United Kingdom
Helen Keegan
University of Salford
United Kingdom
Jolie Kennedy
University of Minnesota
United States
Lisa Koster
Conestoga College Institute 
of Technology and Advanced 
Learning
Canada
Vijay Kumar
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology
United States
Michael Lambert
Concordia International School 
of Shanghai
China
Melissa Langdon
University of Notre Dame 
Australia
Australia
Ole Lauridsen
Aarhus University
Denmark
Deborah Lee
Mississippi State University
United States
Holly Ludgate
New Media Consortium
United States
Damian McDonald
University of Leeds
United Kingdom
Rudolf Mumenthaler
University of Applied Sciences, 
HTW Chur
Switzerland
Andrea Nixon
Carleton College
United States
Michelle Pacansky-Brock
Mt. San Jacinto College
United States
Ruben Puentedura
Hippasus
United States
Dolors Reig
Open University of Catalonia
Spain
Jaime Reinoso
Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, 
Cali
Colombia
Jochen Robes
HQ Interaktive Mediensysteme/ 
Weiterbildungsblog
Germany
Jason Rosenblum
St. Edward’s University
United States
Wendy Shapiro
Case Western Reserve University
United States
Ramesh Sharma
Indira Gandhi National Open 
University
India
Bill Shewbridge
University of Maryland, Baltimore 
County
United States
Paul Signorelli
Paul Signorelli & Associates
United States
Cynthia Sistek-Chandler
National University
United States
Kathy Smart
University of North Dakota
United States
David Thomas
University of Colorado Denver
United States
David Wedaman
Brandeis University
United States
Neil Witt
University of Plymouth
United Kingdom
Alan Wolf
University of Wisconsin
United States
Matthew Worwood
University of Connecticut
United States
Jason Zagami
Griffith University
Australia
Tiedao Zhang
Open University of Beijing
China
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested