pdf viewer in mvc c# : Convert pdf to txt format online application Library tool html asp.net wpf online 23HarvJLTech5370-part426

Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
Volume 23, Number 2 Spring 2010 
T
HE 
U
NINTENDED 
C
ONSEQUENCES OF 
U.S.
E
XPORT 
R
ESTRICTIONS ON 
S
OFTWARE AND 
O
NLINE 
S
ERVICES
FOR 
A
MERICAN 
F
OREIGN 
P
OLICY AND 
H
UMAN 
R
IGHTS
Lee Baker* 
T
ABLE OF 
C
ONTENTS
I.
I
NTRODUCTION
.............................................................................. 537 
II.
T
HE 
L
ANDSCAPE OF 
U.S.
T
RADE 
S
ANCTIONS
.............................. 541 
A. Policy Rationales ..................................................................... 541 
B. Regulatory Framework ............................................................ 543 
III.
A
C
RITICAL 
A
NALYSIS OF 
S
ANCTIONS
....................................... 546 
A. Sanctions Are Ineffective and May Have Unintended 
Consequences ........................................................................ 549 
B. Sanctions Impose Suffering on Innocent Citizens of the 
Target Country....................................................................... 551 
IV.
R
EGULATORY 
C
ONFUSION 
P
REVENTS THE 
L
EGAL 
E
XPORT 
OF 
ICT ........................................................................................... 552 
V.
ICT
A
RE 
U
SEFUL 
T
OOLS FOR THE 
P
ROMOTION OF 
H
UMAN 
R
IGHTS
.......................................................................................... 555 
A. Online Organization and SMS — Ukraine’s Orange 
Revolution .............................................................................. 556 
B. Circumvention Tools — Breaching the Great Firewall of 
China ..................................................................................... 558 
C. Social Networks, Twitter, and Modern ICT — Election 
Protests in Moldova and Iran ................................................ 560 
VI.
C
ONCLUSION
.............................................................................. 563 
I.
I
NTRODUCTION
On June 12, 2009, Iran held a presidential election that many be-
lieved would be a close race between Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the 
incumbent, and Mir Hossein Mousavi, a reformist and former prime 
* Harvard Law School, Candidate for J.D., 2011; B.Sc., Queen’s University, 2008. The 
author would like to thank Christopher Bavitz, Ethan Zuckerman, and other members of the 
Berkman Center for Internet & Society for bringing this issue to his attention and describing 
many of the examples of regulatory confusion discussed in Part IV. He would also like to 
thank Joshua Gruenspecht and the student writing team of the Harvard Journal of Law & 
Technology for their insightful comments on early drafts. 
Convert pdf to txt format online - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to openoffice text document; convert scanned pdf to word text
Convert pdf to txt format online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
remove text from pdf; convert pdf to text doc
538  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
minister.
1
The result, however, was a landslide for Ahmadinejad that 
was quickly dismissed as a fraud by both the Iranian opposition and 
members of the Western media.
2
Enraged, opposition supporters took 
to the streets in what has been described as the “biggest anti-
government protests since the 1979 Islamic revolution.”
3
As these 
initial protests subsided and the Guardian Council refused to annul the 
results, Mousavi called on his supporters to continue “legal” protests.
4
Heeding his words, the opposition staged new protests in August,
5
September,
6
November,
7
December,
8
and February.
9
1. See, e.g., Colin Freeman, Iran Election: ‘Unprecedented’ Turnout Boosts Challenge to 
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, D
AILY 
T
ELEGRAPH 
(London), June 12, 2009, 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/iran/5515813/Iran-election-
unprecedented-turnout-boosts-challenge-to-Mahmoud-Ahmadinejad.html; Peter Goodspeed, 
Election Leaves Iran Polarized, N
AT
P
OST
(Toronto), June 13, 2009, 
http://www.nationalpost.com/m/story.html?id=1693833. 
2. See Glenn Kessler & Jon Cohen, Signs of Fraud Abound, but Not Hard Evidence, 
W
ASH
.
P
OST
, June 16, 2009, at A1, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/ 
content/article/2009/06/15/AR2009061503235.html; Maziar Bahari, ‘It’s a Coup d’Etat’, 
N
EWSWEEK
, June 13, 2009, http://www.newsweek.com/id/201956; Colin Freeman, Iran 
Elections: Revolt as Crowds Protest at Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s ‘Rigged’ Victory, D
AILY 
T
ELEGRAPH 
(London), June 13, 2009, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/ 
middleeast/iran/5526721/Iran-elections-revolt-as-crowds-protest-at-Mahmoud-
Ahmadinejads-rigged-victory.html. 
3. Zahra Hosseinian & Hossein Jaseb, Khamenei Vows No Retreat on Iran Election Re-
sult, R
EUTERS
,
June 24, 2009, http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE55F54520090624. 
4. See Damien McElroy, Iran Election: G8 Foreign Ministers Condemn Violence, D
AILY 
T
ELEGRAPH 
(London), June 26, 2009, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/ 
middleeast/iran/5648281/Iran-election-G8-foreign-ministers-condemn-violence.html. 
5. New Opposition Protest in Tehran, BBC
N
EWS
, Aug. 6, 2009, http://news.bbc.co.uk/ 
2/hi/middle_east/8188830.stm (describing protests held as Ahmadinejad was sworn in as 
president). 
6. See Jim Muir, Clashes Show Unresolved Iran Crisis, BBC
N
EWS
,
Sept. 18, 2009, 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8264075.stm (describing protests held on Qud’s 
Day). 
7. See Andrew Lee Butters, In Iran, New Protests, but an Ever Harder Line, T
IME
.
COM
Nov. 4, 2009, http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1934563,00.html (describing 
protests held on thirtieth anniversary of the takeover of the U.S. embassy in Tehran). 
8. See Clashes at Montazeri Ceremony, Iran Opposition Says, BBC
N
EWS
,
Dec. 23, 
2009, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8427806.stm (describing protests held during 
a memorial service for Grand Ayatollah Hoseyn Ali Montazeri); Iran Opposition Figures 
Arrested After Protests, BBC
N
EWS
, Dec. 28, 2009, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/ 
middle_east/8432297.stm (describing protests held during the Day of Ashura); Iran Opposi-
tion Protesters Clash with Security Forces, BBC
N
EWS
,
Dec. 7, 2009, 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8398615.stm (describing protests held on Student 
Day). BBC News has assembled a webpage featuring their most recent reports and analyses 
regarding the “Iran Crisis.”  BBC News, Iran Crisis, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/ 
middle_east/2009/iran/default.stm (last visited May 8, 2010). 
9. See Despite Harsh Threats, Iran Protesters Show Their Strength, C
HRISTIAN 
S
CI
.
M
ONITOR
, Feb. 11, 2010, http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/the-monitors-view/ 
2010/0211/Despite-harsh-threats-Iran-protesters-show-their-strength (describing opposition 
protests held on the thirty-first anniversary of the Iranian revolution). See generally BBC 
News, 
Iran 
Crisis, 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/middle_east/2009/iran/ 
default.stm (last visited May 8, 2010). A timeline of the protests is also available on 
Wikipedia. See Wikipedia, Timeline of the 2009 Iranian Election Protests, 
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Now you can convert text file to PDF document using Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# DocumentConverter.ToDocument(@"C:\input.txt", @"C:\output.pdf
text from pdf; convert pdf to editable text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with If you want to transform and convert PDF document to Jpeg image file format, this article
convert pdf to word and edit text; converting pdf to text
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
539 
These protestors are unique not only in their uncharacteristic 
boldness, but also in the degree to which they have made use of new 
online communications platforms to organize and share information, 
both amongst themselves and with the outside world. Twitter in par-
ticular has emerged as a technological “white knight,” lauded by the 
media as a source of information on the protest movement.
10
It was 
seen as so instrumental to the Iranian protesters that the State Depart-
ment asked the company to delay a network upgrade so that service 
would not be interrupted during waking hours in Tehran.
11
Given the 
significance of the protests, it is perhaps understandable that an awk-
ward fact was overlooked: at the time, providing Twitter to users in 
Iran was illegal.
12
The U.S. is the world leader in unilateral trade sanctions.
13
De-
spite a great deal of scholarship from a wide variety of disciplines 
condemning such measures as ineffective and harmful,
14
the U.S. 
maintains a complex system of sanctions programs.
15
Regulations 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_the_2009_Iranian_election_protests (as of May 8, 
2010, 08:52 GMT). 
10. See, e.g., David Batty, Iran: Twitter Becomes Focal Point of Protests, G
UARDIAN 
N
EWS 
B
LOG
(London), Dec. 28, 2009, http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/blog/2009/ 
dec/28/iran-protests-twitter; Current Twitter Trends: ‘Lose My Number’, ‘Iran Election’, 
I
NDEPENDENT 
(London), Nov. 4, 2009, http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/ 
current-twitter-trends-lose-my-number-iran-election-1814568.html; Iranian Protesters 
Cling to Twitter as Key Lifeline Amid Crackdown, F
OX 
N
EWS
,
June 18, 2009, 
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,527068,00.html.  
11. See Mike Musgrove, Twitter Is a Player in Iran’s Drama, W
ASH
.
P
OST
,
June 17, 
2009, at A10, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/ 
06/16/AR2009061603391.html; Lev Grossman, Iran Protests: Twitter, the Medium of the 
Movement, T
IME
.
COM
, June 17, 2009, http://www.time.com/time/world/article/ 
0,8599,1905125,00.html. 
12. See Prohibited Exportation, Reexportation, Sale or Supply of Goods, Technology, or 
Services to Iran, 31 C.F.R. § 560.204 (2009) (prohibiting “the exportation, reexportation, 
sale, or supply, directly or indirectly, from the United States, or by a United States person, 
wherever located, of any goods, technology, or services to Iran”); Amendments to the Cu-
ban Assets Control Regulations, Sudanese Sanctions Regulations, and Iranian Transactions 
Regulations, 75 Fed. Reg. 10,997, 10,998 (Mar. 10, 2010) (codified at 31 C.F.R. 
§§ 515.578, 538.533, 560.540) (“[T]he exportation of [certain services and software inci-
dent to the exchange of personal communications over the Internet] from the United States 
or by a United States person, wherever located, to Sudan or Iran is prohibited.”); see also 
Danny O’Brien, Benefits Without Borders for Tweeters in Tehran, I
RISH 
T
IMES 
(Dublin), 
June 19, 2009, at 6, available at http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/finance/ 
2009/0619/1224249108131.html (noting that U.S. attorneys specializing in export regula-
tions have recommended that services such as Twitter and Facebook not offer their services 
in countries subject to U.S. sanctions); Posting of Clif Burns to ExportLawBlog, Will the 
Revolution Be Twitterized?, http://www.exportlawblog.com/archives/521 (June 17, 2009, 
11:08 EST). 
13. Sarah H. Cleveland, Norm Internalization and U.S. Economic Sanctions, 26 Y
ALE 
J.
I
NT
L. 1, 4 (2001); see also G
ARY 
C
LYDE 
H
UFBAUER ET AL
.,
E
CONOMIC 
S
ANCTIONS 
R
ECONSIDERED 
17 (3d ed. 2007) (noting that the U.S. deployed sanctions, alone or with 
allies, 109 times since World War I and that the next most prolific employer of sanctions, 
the United Nations, deployed them only twenty times during the same time period).  
14. See infra Part III. 
15. See infra Part II. 
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Description. 1. To Word. Convert PDF to Word DOCX document. 2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image
convert pdf to txt file format; convert pdf to text open source
How to C#: File Format Support
PDF. Write pdf. DPX. Read 48-bit DPX. PGM. TIFF(TrueType Font File). Read all truetype convert to image. TXT(A text format). Convert ANSI-Encoding text format to
convert scanned pdf to editable text; convert pdf to text vb
540  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) in 
the Department of the Treasury targeting Iran, Cuba, and certain areas 
of Sudan are particularly egregious, often effectively prohibiting all 
exports of any goods, technologies, or services.
16
Confronted with the example provided by the protesters’ use of 
U.S.-developed online communications platforms in post-election 
Iran, however, the U.S. government has recognized that prohibiting 
citizens in autocratic regimes from accessing such technology is in-
imical to the foreign policy objectives that animate the U.S. sanctions 
regime. In light of this revelation, the Department of the Treasury has 
recently amended the Cuban, Sudanese, and Iranian sanctions pro-
grams to authorize the export of publicly-available mass market 
online services “incident to the exchange of personal communications 
over the Internet” without a license.
17
While these measures represent a good first step in reforming the 
sanctions programs affecting information and communication tech-
nologies (“ICT”), they do not go far enough. The “Twitter Revolu-
tion” in Iran may have focused government attention on the 
pernicious effects of export controls on ICT in that country and 
spurred the Department of the Treasury to address this issue, but simi-
lar effects may still be present elsewhere due to export controls main-
tained by the Department of Commerce on mass market software.
18
Moreover, these recent OFAC amendments do not authorize the ex-
port of software or services for use in circumventing the Internet cen-
sorship imposed by many autocratic regimes.
19
This Note argues that 
all U.S. sanctions programs should include exceptions for the export 
of software and online services that facilitate communication and in-
formation-exchange or permit circumvention of Internet censorship to 
citizens of sanctioned nations. Furthermore, sanctions regulations 
must be clarified, especially with regard to software containing en-
16. See 31 C.F.R. § 515.201 (2009) (Cuba); 31 C.F.R. §§ 538.204–538.210 (2009) (Su-
dan); 31 C.F.R. § 560.204 (2009) (Iran). Sanctions targeting Cuba are administered by both 
OFAC and the Bureau of Industry and Security in the U.S. Department of Commerce, with 
the former controlling the export of services and the latter controlling the export of goods 
and technologies. See Amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, Sudanese 
Sanctions Regulations, and Iranian Transactions Regulations, 75 Fed. Reg. 10,997, 10,998, 
10,999 (Mar. 10, 2010) (codified at 31 C.F.R. §§ 515.578, 538.533, 560.540). For more 
information on sanctions targeting Cuba, see infra Part III.B. 
17. Amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, Sudanese Sanctions Regula-
tions, and Iranian Transactions Regulations, 75 Fed. Reg. 10,997, 10,998 (Mar. 10, 2010) 
(codified at 31 C.F.R. §§ 515.578, 538.533, 560.540). These amendments also explicitly 
authorize the export of certain free, publicly-available software necessary to enable these 
services to Iran and Sudan. Id. The export of software to Cuba is controlled by the Depart-
ment of Commerce. See infra Part III.B.  
18. See infra note 48 and accompanying text. 
19. See Nate Anderson, US Eases Restrictions on Web Services Exports to Iran, Cuba, 
A
RS 
T
ECHNICA
, Mar. 10, 2010, http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2010/03/ 
us-eases-restrictions-on-web-services-exports-to-iran-cuba.ars. On the benefit of circumven-
tion software for dissidents and human rights activists, see infra Part V.B. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Description. 1. To Word. Convert PDF to Word DOCX document. 2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image
convert pdf to word editable text online; convert pdf to txt file
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Text Extractor SDK; Extract Text Content from
In this online tutorial, we will offer you information on new rectangle(0, 0, 300, 300), @"C:/extract.txt"). extracted text content to other format files, like
convert scanned pdf to text word; change pdf to text file
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
541 
cryption. The complexity of the current regulations and the high pen-
alties for violations disincentivize U.S. companies from offering their 
services to citizens of certain countries even when doing so does not 
violate any export controls.
20
Simplifying the sanctions programs will 
allow U.S. companies to provide their products and services to dissi-
dents, human rights activists, and ordinary citizens without fear of 
liability. 
Part II outlines the policy rationales and regulatory framework for 
the relevant U.S. trade sanctions regulations. Part III briefly reviews 
the literature on trade sanctions, highlighting common criticisms that 
are particularly pertinent to the context of ICT. Part IV describes 
situations where the lack of clarity in U.S. regulations has dissuaded 
companies from providing their services to dissidents, human rights 
groups, and other citizens in countries under limited sanctions. Part V 
describes the benefits of ICT for pro-democracy and human rights 
activists through a series of case studies. Part VI concludes with rec-
ommendations for changes to current sanctions regulations. 
II.
T
HE 
L
ANDSCAPE OF 
U.S.
T
RADE 
S
ANCTIONS
A. Policy Rationales 
Trade sanction programs may be described using two metrics: the 
policies animating them and the particular means by which those poli-
cies are implemented. The policies may be specific and well-defined 
or broad and ambiguous; they may remain constant throughout the 
sanctions episode or change over time to reflect new circumstances 
and the evolving relationship between the sending and target coun-
tries.
21
The U.S. administers a wide variety of sanctions programs guided 
by myriad underlying policy rationales. Such policies have included 
settling expropriation claims;
22
punishing a regime for supporting ter-
rorism, violating human rights, or other wrongdoing;
23
and blocking 
20. See infra Part IV. 
21. See M
ICHAEL 
P.
M
ALLOY
,
U
NITED 
S
TATES 
E
CONOMIC 
S
ANCTIONS
:
T
HEORY AND 
P
RACTICE
343–44 (2001) (discussing the evolving policies underlying U.S. sanctions 
against Vietnam). The policies underlying the sanctions against Cuba have also shifted over 
the past fifty years, from punishment for the expropriation of property held by U.S. citizens 
and companies, to containing communism, to the protection of human rights and aiding a 
transition to democracy. See Alberto R. Coll, Harming Human Rights in the Name of Pro-
moting Them: The Case of the Cuban Embargo, 12 UCLA
J.
I
NT
L.
&
F
OREIGN 
A
FF
. 199, 
202–27 (2007); see also Cuban Democracy Act, 22 U.S.C. § 6002 (2006) (describing the 
policy motivating the Act). For a comprehensive overview of the history of U.S. economic 
sanctions, see M
ALLOY
,
supra, at
31–142. 
22. H
UFBAUER ET AL
.,
supra note 13, at 14. 
23. See Cleveland, supra note 13, at 5 (citing the punishment of human rights violations 
as one purpose behind labor rights sanctions); Harry Wolff, Note, Unilateral Economic 
Sanctions: Necessary Foreign Policy Tool or Ineffective Hindrance on American Busi-
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images C:\input.pdf"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0 ocrPage.Recognize(); ocrPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, @"C:\output
convert pdf to ascii text; convert pdf to text c#
C# TIFF: Use C#.NET Code to Extract Text from TIFF File
Moreover, text content, style, and format of original Tiff image can be retained txt"; // Save ocr result as other documet formats, like txt, pdf, and svg.
convert pdf to .txt file; convert pdf into text file
542  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
the export of sensitive technologies for national security reasons.
24
Sanctions were also employed during the Cold War to curb the spread 
of communism.
25
Although not an explicitly stated goal of sanctions, 
they may also serve an important role in the definition, refinement, 
and internalization of international human rights norms, especially in 
recalcitrant target countries.
26
In the paradigmatic sanctions episode, the sending nation imposes 
sanctions to induce the target nation to curtail behavior that it finds 
objectionable, under the theory that the economic loss engendered by 
these measures will foster discontent among the target population, 
which will then either overthrow the target government or pressure it 
into adopting the changes desired by the sending nation.
27
Sanctions 
may also be implemented to deter non-target nations from pursuing 
policies or behaviors similar to those pursued by the target nation.
28
The extent to which unilateral sanctions may have the desired effect 
on the target nation has been severely criticized, however, especially 
in cases where the target government is authoritarian or the target 
population otherwise lacks the means to challenge its government.
29
There may also be unstated political reasons for the imposition of 
sanctions. Politicians may see the imposition of sanctions as an attrac-
tive and relatively low-cost way to satisfy domestic pressure to “do 
something” in response to objectionable behavior by the target na-
tion.
30
Similarly, sanctions may be used to signal, to both global and 
domestic audiences, the sending nation’s opposition to the target na-
tion’s behaviors or policies.
31
Such political considerations may inter-
act with the policy rationales noted above to shape the final form of 
the sanctions regulations. 
nesses?, 6 H
OUS
.
B
US
.
&
T
AX 
L.J. 329, 339 (2006) (noting that trade sanctions were enacted 
against Libya in response to its support for international terrorism directed at U.S. interests 
in the Middle East). 
24. Philip M. Nichols, Using Sociological Theories of Isomorphism To Evaluate the Pos-
sibility of Regime Change Through Trade Sanctions, 30 U.
P
A
.
J.
I
NT
L. 753, 758–59 
(2009). 
25. Wolff, supra note 23, at 335–37. 
26. See Cleveland, supra note 13, at 6. 
27. Thihan Myo Nyun, Feeling Good or Doing Good: Inefficacy of the U.S. Unilateral 
Sanctions Against the Military Government of Burma/Myanmar, 7 W
ASH
.
U.
G
LOBAL 
S
TUD
.
L.
R
EV
. 455, 467 (2008); see also H
UFBAUER ET AL
.,
supra note 13, at 13–14 (provid-
ing examples of successful and unsuccessful attempts at promoting regime change through 
the use of sanctions). Regime change, brought about through the mechanism described, is 
one of the explicit policy goals of U.S. sanctions against Cuba. See Cuban Liberty and De-
mocratic Solidarity (Libertad) Act of 1996, 22 U.S.C. §§ 6021–91 (2006). 
28. See Adam Smith, A High Price To Pay: The Costs of the U.S. Economic Sanctions 
Policy and the Need for Process Oriented Reform, 4 UCLA
J.
I
NT
L.
&
F
OREIGN 
A
FF
.
325, 
330–31 (2000). 
29. See Myo Nyun, supra note 27, at 467–68. 
30. See id. at 458. 
31. See H
UFBAUER ET AL
.,
supra note 13, at 5–6; M
ALLOY
supra note 21, at 20 (describ-
ing sanctions with “communicative” objectives). 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG or partial text content from target PDF document file text content, and export extracted text with customized format.
convert pdf to text file; change pdf to txt file
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
543 
B. Regulatory Framework 
Table 1: Agencies and Regulations Involved in Export Controls 
BIS 
Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department of 
Commerce; administers the EAR 
EAR 
Export Administration Regulations; export control regu-
lations administered by BIS 
OFAC 
Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Department of the 
Treasury; administers country-specific controls and the 
SDN list 
SDN 
list 
Specially Designated Nationals list; a list of entities with 
whom U.S. entities may not transact, administered by 
OFAC 
The U.S. sanctions regime is a fragmented and complicated sys-
tem. As of 2003, more than five agencies enforced a variety of export 
controls pursuant to over forty statutes.
32
Within the context of ICT, 
however, there are two agencies whose sanctions programs are most 
pertinent: the Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) in the Depart-
ment of Commerce and the Office of Foreign Assets Control 
(“OFAC”) in the Department of the Treasury.
33
BIS and OFAC sanc-
tions are generally administered under the Trading with the Enemy 
Act (“TWEA”) and the International Emergency Economic Powers 
Act,
34
although specific OFAC sanctions have been supplemented 
with additional statutes.
35
BIS administers far-reaching export controls in order to further its 
mission of “[a]dvanc[ing] U.S. national security, foreign policy, and 
32. Christopher F. Corr, The Wall Still Stands! Complying with Export Controls on Tech-
nology Transfers in the Post-Cold War, Post-9/11 Era, 25 H
OUS
.
J.
I
NT
L. 441, 445 
(2003). 
33. For detailed explanations of BIS and OFAC export controls, especially with regard to 
software and technology, see James E. Bartlett III et al., Export Controls and Economic 
Sanctions, 43 I
NT
L
AW
. 311 (2009); Lillian V. Blageff, Overview of U.S. Sanctions and 
Embargoes Programs, Including 2006 Update, I
NT
HR
J.,
Summer 2007; Corr, supra note 
32; and Benjamin H. Flowe, Jr., Exporting Technology and Software, Particularly Encryp-
tion, 910 PLI/C
OMM 
279 (2008).  
34. Blageff, supra note 33, at § II.A. 
35. See, e.g., Cuban Democracy Act, 22 U.S.C. § 6001 et seq. (2006); Cuban Liberty and 
Democratic Solidarity (Libertad) Act, 22 U.S.C. §§ 6021–91 (2006); Darfur Peace and 
Accountability Act of 2006, Pub. L. No. 109-344 (2006); Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 
1996, H.R. 3107, 111th Cong. (2006) (renamed the Iran Sanctions Act in 2006). 
544  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
economic objectives by ensuring an effective export control and treaty 
compliance system and promoting continued U.S. strategic technol-
ogy leadership.”
36
It is responsible for implementing and enforcing 
the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”), a set of relatively 
complex regulations that control the export and re-export of so-called 
“dual-use”
37
commodities, software, and technology by U.S. enti-
ties.
38
Depending on the nature of the product to be exported, the 
country or end-user to which the product is being exported, and the 
product’s intended end-use, BIS authorization may be required prior 
to export.
39
Destination countries are sorted into “country groups” 
under the EAR, with those in group E:1 — currently Iran, Cuba, 
North Korea, Syria, and Sudan — subject to the strictest export re-
strictions.
40
BIS also publishes lists of individuals and entities that 
have been denied export privileges, as well as an unverified list and an 
entity list. The involvement in a transaction of an individual on the 
unverified list constitutes a “Red Flag” requiring further due diligence 
on the part of the exporter, while involvement of a party on the entity 
list may trigger licensing requirements under the EAR.
41
In contrast to the EAR’s wide-ranging export controls, OFAC 
programs are targeted at specific countries, geographic regions, or 
types of goods.
42
Within each of the country-specific sanctions pro-
grams, however, the scope of the controlled activities and restricted 
products is generally much broader than under the EAR. For example, 
the “exportation, reexportation, sale, or supply . . . of any goods, tech-
nology, or services to Iran,” barring certain closely circumscribed ex-
emptions, is prohibited without an OFAC license.
43
OFAC also 
36. Bureau of Industry & Security, U.S. Department of Commerce, BIS Mission State-
ment, http://www.bis.doc.gov/about/mission.htm (last visited May 8, 2010). 
37. 15 C.F.R. § 730.3 (2009) (defining dual-use items as generally items that have both 
civilian and military uses). 
38. Export Administration Regulations, 15 C.F.R. ch. VII, subch. C. 
39. See 15 C.F.R. §§ 744.1–.20 (2009). 
40. See Country Groups, 15 C.F.R. § 740, Supplement No. 1 (2009); Embargoes & Other 
Special Controls, 15 C.F.R. § 746 (2009) (outlining special restrictions against embargoed 
nations). Cuba and Iran are subject to the strictest restrictions, with OFAC and/or BIS au-
thorization required for any export to those countries. See 15 C.F.R. §§ 746.1, 746.2, 746.7 
(2009). 
41. See Bureau of Industry & Security, U.S. Department of Commerce, Lists to Check, 
http://www.bis.doc.gov/complianceandenforcement/liststocheck.htm (last visited May 8, 
2009). 
42. See Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Treasury, Sanctions Program Summaries, 
http://www.treas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/programs (last visited May 8, 2009). 
43. Prohibited Exportation, Reexportation, Sale or Supply of Goods, Technology, or Ser-
vices to Iran, 31 C.F.R. § 560.204 (2009) (emphasis added); Exempt Transactions, 31 
C.F.R. § 560.210 (2009). Similarly broad restrictions are imposed against Cuba and certain 
parts of Sudan. See supra note 16 and accompanying text. With respect to exports to Cuba, 
OFAC has licensed these transactions insofar as they are regulated under the EAR. See infra 
note 46 and accompanying text. OFAC has imposed more targeted sanctions, limited to 
specific types of goods or end-users, against North Korea, Syria, other parts of Sudan, Bela-
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
545 
maintains a list of Specially Designated Nationals (“SDN”), with 
whom U.S. entities may not transact.
44
Given the broad scope of the EAR, it is inevitable that they will 
overlap with OFAC regulations for certain transactions. Items that are 
“exclusively controlled for export or reexport” by OFAC and certain 
other agencies, however, are not subject to the EAR,
45
while OFAC 
automatically licenses transactions “ordinarily incident” to the export 
of U.S.-origin goods to Cuba that are authorized under the EAR.
46
Despite these provisions, BIS has explicitly noted that authorization is 
required from both agencies for exports to certain regions jointly cov-
ered by the EAR and OFAC regulations.
47
Although the EAR contain provisions specifically addressing 
software, most OFAC regulations do not, and neither clearly deline-
ates rules for providers of online services based in the U.S. The EAR 
only apply to certain types of software; so-called “mass market” soft-
ware may be exported without a license to most countries,
48
while 
certain publicly available software is exempt from the EAR entirely.
49
rus, Burma/Myanmar, Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lebanon, and 
Zimbabwe. See Office of Foreign Assets Control, supra note 42. 
44. The SDN list contains “individuals and companies owned or controlled by, or acting 
for or on behalf of, targeted countries” and “individuals, groups, and entities, such as terror-
ists and narcotics traffickers designated under programs that are not country-specific.” Of-
fice of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Treasury, Frequently Asked Questions and Answers, 
“What is an SDN?”, http://www.ustreas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/faq/answer.shtml#17 
(last visited May 8, 2009). The SDN list may be found at 
http://www.treas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/sdn (last visited May 8, 2009). 
45. Items Subject to the EAR, 15 C.F.R. § 734.3(b)(1) (2009). 
46. Transactions Incident to Exportations From the United States and Reexportations of 
100% U.S.-Origin Items to Cuba; Negotiation of Executory Contracts, 31 C.F.R. § 515.533 
(2010); see also Amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, Sudanese Sanctions 
Regulations, and Iranian Transactions Regulations, 75 Fed. Reg. 10,997, 10,999 (Mar. 10, 
2010) (describing the applicability of 31 C.F.R. § 515.533 to the authorization of certain 
software exports to Cuba). 
47. See, e.g., B
UREAU OF 
I
NDUSTRY 
&
S
ECURITY
,
D
EPARTMENT OF 
C
OMMERCE
,
E
XPORTS AND 
R
EEXPORTS TO 
S
UDAN
1 (2003), http://www.bis.doc.gov/ 
policiesandregulations/regionalconsiderations/sudan.pdf (“[E]xporters must seek authoriza-
tion from both OFAC and BIS for the export and reexport of items subject to the Export 
Administration Regulations (EAR).”). But see Iran, 15 C.F.R. § 746.7(a)(2) (2009) (“To 
avoid duplication, exporters or reexporters are not required to seek separate authorization 
from BIS for an export or reexport subject both to the EAR and to OFAC's Iranian Transac-
tions Regulations.”). See generally Embargoes & Special Controls, 15 C.F.R. § 746 (2009) 
(advising exporters to assume that authorization from both OFAC and BIS is required unless 
otherwise specified in the special controls section of the EAR). 
48. Mass market software that is both (a) generally available to the public by being sold 
from stock, without restrictions, and (b) “[d]esigned for installation by the user without 
further substantial support by the supplier” is subject to the EAR, but may be exported 
without a license under License Exception TSU. Technology and Software — Unrestricted 
(TSU), 15 C.F.R. § 740.13(d) (2009); General Technology and Software Notes, 15 C.F.R. 
§ 774 Supplement No. 2 (2009). This license exception is unavailable for exports to Cuba, 
Iran, North Korea, Syria, and Sudan. Country Groups, 15 C.F.R. § 740 Supplement No. 1 
(2009). 
49. Specifically, publicly available software is not subject to the EAR if it has been or 
will be published, arises during or results from fundamental research, is educational, or is 
546  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
In contrast, any software downloaded or purchased by a user on the 
SDN list or in Iran or non-specified areas of Sudan is subject to 
OFAC controls.
50
The export of software and technology that incorpo-
rates encryption is subject to its own complex regulations within the 
EAR, due to the special national security concerns implicated by such 
technology.
51
Most such software and technology is subject to notifi-
cation and prior review by BIS, even if formal authorization is not 
required prior to export.
52
Although services are likely not controlled 
under the EAR,
53
OFAC sanctions apply if the end-user is on the SDN 
list or is in Iran, Cuba, or non-specified areas of Sudan.
54
As of March 
8, 2010, the export of services “incident to the exchange of personal 
communications over the Internet” has been authorized by OFAC to 
citizens of Iran, Sudan, and Cuba, while the export of most free, pub-
licly-available software necessary to enable these services has been 
further authorized to citizens of Iran and Sudan.
55
Penalties for viola-
tions of either the EAR or OFAC sanctions are severe and may result 
in civil or criminal fines as well as the imprisonment of company ex-
ecutives.
56
 
III.
A
C
RITICAL 
A
NALYSIS OF 
S
ANCTIONS
In contrast to the U.S. government’s continued enthusiasm for 
trade sanctions, most commentators have become increasingly critical 
of such measures. To the extent that they support trade sanctions at 
included in certain patent applications. Items Subject to the EAR, 15 C.F.R. § 734.3(b)(3) 
(2009). See generally Questions and Answers — Technology and Software Subject to the 
EAR, 15 C.F.R. § 734 Supplement No. 1 (2009). 
50. See supra notes 43–44 and accompanying text. Certain “Specified Areas” of Sudan 
are exempt from most of the prohibitions administered by OFAC. See Exempt Transactions, 
31 C.F.R. § 538.212(g)(1) (2009). The “Specified Areas” include Southern Sudan, Southern 
Kordofan/Nuba Mountains State, Blue Nile State, Abyei, Darfur, and the Mayo, El Salaam, 
Wad El Bashir, and Soba camps for internally displaced persons. Specified Areas of Sudan, 
31 C.F.R. § 538.320 (2009). 
51. See Flowe, supra note 33, at 308–32. 
52. See 15 C.F.R. §§ 740.17, 742.15(b) (2009). 
53. The EAR regulate only the export of goods, software, and technology. See Items Sub-
ject to the EAR, 15 C.F.R. § 734.3 (2009).  
54. See 31 C.F.R. §§ 515.201(b)(1), 515.311 (2009) (Cuba); Prohibited Exportation and 
Reexportation of Goods, Technology, or Services to Sudan, 31 C.F.R. § 538.205 (2009); 
Prohibited Exportation, Reexportation, Sale or Supply of Goods, Technology, or Services to 
Iran, 31 C.F.R. § 560.204 (2009); supra note 44 and accompanying text (SDN list). 
55. Amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, Sudanese Sanctions Regula-
tions, and Iranian Transactions Regulations, 75 Fed. Reg. 10,997, 10,998 (Mar. 10, 2010) 
(codified at 31 C.F.R. §§ 515.578, 538.533, 560.540). This authorization does not extend to 
transactions where the exporter knows or has reason to know that the services or software 
are intended for prohibited officials of the Government of Cuba or members of the Cuban 
Communist Party, the Government of Sudan, or the Government of Iran. Id. at 10,999–
11,000. The export of software to Cuba is controlled by the EAR. See supra note 46 and 
accompanying text. 
56. See Corr, supra note 32, at 509–14. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested