pdf viewer in mvc c# : Convert pdf to word to edit text application Library tool html asp.net wpf online 23HarvJLTech5371-part427

No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
547 
all, academic commentators and the international community gener-
ally advocate more targeted “smart” sanctions.
57
Unfortunately, a 
number of BIS and OFAC sanctions remain “dumb,” broadly cover-
ing essentially all exports or interactions with specific nations and 
their citizens.
58
While there is some anecdotal evidence suggesting 
that such broad trade sanctions were instrumental in effecting regime 
change in Idi Amin’s Uganda, Somoza’s Nicaragua, and apartheid 
South Africa,
59
one influential study has found that sanctions imposed 
globally between 1914 and 1990 were successful only one-third of the 
time.
60
U.S. unilateral sanctions since 1970 have been even less suc-
cessful, achieving their foreign policy goals in only 13% of cases.
61
Given this poor track record and the substantial negative effects 
of sanctions, discussed infra, it is questionable whether the U.S. 
should maintain its sanctions programs at all. Eliminating the entire 
regime of U.S. sanctions, however, is both unwise and politically in-
feasible. Certain targeted programs, such as OFAC’s limits on the 
proliferation of weapons of mass destruction or the trading of “blood 
diamonds,”
62
are both necessary as implementations of international 
57. See H
UFBAUER ET AL
., supra note 13, at 138–39; see also K
OENRAAD 
V
AN 
B
RABANT
,
O
VERSEAS 
D
EV
.
I
NST
.,
C
AN 
S
ANCTIONS 
B
S
MARTER
?
T
HE 
C
URRENT 
D
EBATE
36 (1998). 
58. OFAC regulations against Iran, Cuba, and non-specified areas of Sudan, and regula-
tions regarding E:1 countries (Iran, Cuba, Sudan, North Korea, and Syria) under the EAR 
are examples of such sanctions. OFAC has made a move toward more targeted sanctions in 
some areas, such as its relaxation of North Korean sanctions in 2000 and 2007, and its tar-
geting of sanctions on Zimbabwe against the Mugabe regime itself. See Foreign Assets 
Control Regulations, 65 Fed. Reg. 38,165 (June 19, 2000) (amending OFAC Foreign Assets 
Control Regulations for North Korea); O
FFICE OF 
F
OREIGN 
A
SSETS 
C
ONTROL
,
U.S.
T
REASURY
,
N
ORTH 
K
OREA
:
W
HAT 
Y
OU 
N
EED 
T
K
NOW 
A
BOUT 
S
ANCTIONS
(2008), 
http://www.treas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/programs/nkorea/nkorea.pdf 
(explaining 
recent changes to OFAC regulations regarding North Korea, including the termination of the 
applicability of the TWEA); O
FFICE OF 
F
OREIGN 
A
SSETS 
C
ONTROL
,
U.S.
T
REASURY
,
Z
IMBABWE
:
W
HAT 
Y
OU 
N
EED 
T
K
NOW 
A
BOUT 
U.S.
S
ANCTIONS
(2005), 
http://www.treas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/programs/zimbabwe/zimb.pdf (explaining 
imposition of comprehensive sanctions on specific entities found to be “undermin[ing] 
democratic institutions and processes in Zimbabwe,” as well as their families and associated 
entities). 
59. See Cleveland, supra note 13, at 5. 
60. Alan Einisman, Ineffectiveness at Its Best: Fighting Terrorism with Economic Sanc-
tions, 9 M
INN
.
J.
G
LOBAL 
T
RADE
299, 312–13 (2000). During this period, the U.S. imposed 
or helped impose 70% of the sanctions, but most of these sanctions were unilateral. Id. at 
313. 
61. Meghan McCurdy, Note, Unilateral Sanctions with a Twist: The Iran and Libya 
Sanctions Act of 1996, 13 A
M
.
U.
I
NT
L.
R
EV
. 397, 434 (1997). 
62. See Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Treasury, Weapons of Mass Destruc-
tion/Non-Proliferation Sanctions, http://www.treas.gov/offices/enforcement/ofac/programs/ 
wmd/wmd.shtml (last visited May 8, 2010); Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Treas-
ury, Rough Diamond Trade Sanctions, http://www.treas.gov/offices/enforcement/ 
ofac/programs/diamonds/diamond.shtml (last visited May 8, 2010). 
Convert pdf to word to edit text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to searchable text; change pdf to txt format
Convert pdf to word to edit text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to searchable text online; convert pdf file to txt
548  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
agreements
63
and good policy. This Note merely argues that overly 
broad sanctions should be more narrowly tailored to avoid their most 
egregious negative effects.
64
Specifically, since export restrictions on 
ICT cause harm to the target population and hinder the efforts of hu-
man rights activists and dissidents, while not significantly impacting 
the target government itself, they should be eliminated. 
Askari et al. have outlined a cogent summary of the major failings 
of sanctions, which is particularly salient for unilateral measures im-
posed by the U.S.: 
1. Sanctions impose such suffering and deprivation 
on innocent citizens of other countries that they can 
end up solidifying the power of authoritarian rulers. 
2. Sanctions can be bypassed through reexport from 
third countries. 
3. Loss of exports to target countries imposes sig-
nificant economic costs on the citizens of sender 
countries through lost output and jobs. 
4. Loss of imports from target countries imposes 
higher costs on businesses in sender countries and af-
fords fewer choices to consumers. 
5. Sanctions can inadvertently inflict damage on 
third countries. 
6. Sanctions rarely cause the target to modify its be-
havior.
65
In the context of the ICT that are most valuable to dissidents and 
human rights activists, many of which are developed by American 
companies and distributed free of charge online, the most relevant 
63. See, e.g., Rough Diamonds Control Regulations, 69 Fed. Reg. 56,936 (Sept. 23, 
2004) (codified at 31 C.F.R. § 592) (describing revisions to the Rough Diamonds Control 
Regulations, which implements the multilateral Kimberley Process Certification Scheme). 
64. The Zimbabwean sanctions, which target only those undermining democracy in that 
country and not the population as a whole, are a model for how regulations may be more 
narrowly tailored. See supra note 58 and accompanying text. Despite this tailoring, the 
Zimbabwean sanctions still have pernicious effects due to their complexity and ambiguity. 
See infra Part IV. As a result, this Note further argues that U.S. sanctions programs must be 
clarified to prevent such effects. 
65. H
OSSEIN 
G.
A
SKARI ET AL
.,
E
CONOMIC 
S
ANCTIONS
:
E
XAMINING 
T
HEIR 
P
HILOSOPHY 
AND 
E
FFICACY
66 (2003). Askari offers a scathing review of U.S. unilateral economic sanc-
tions, finding the philosophy that underpins them to be “flawed in concept and in logic” and 
reflecting a “hubris, naïvete [sic], or disingenuousness (or all three) in U.S. foreign policy.” 
Id. at 67–76. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
convert pdf picture to text; convert scanned pdf to text online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
third-party software, you can hardly edit PDF document Under this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word document
convert pdf to text file using; convert pdf to word text document
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
549 
criticisms involve the lack of efficacy and unintended consequences 
of sanctions and sanctions’ negative effects on the citizens of the tar-
get nation.
66
A. Sanctions Are Ineffective and May Have Unintended Consequences 
It is both simplistic and unrealistic to expect that trade sanctions 
alone will directly induce regime change.
67
Each specific sanctions 
episode is unique, and the success or failure of any given program of 
sanctions is dependent upon a combination of the characteristics of 
the sanctions imposed, the end sought to be achieved, and the geopo-
litical context.
68
Furthermore, there is some doubt as to whether the 
economic effectiveness of sanctions can be accurately measured, and 
the methodology of major efficacy studies has been questioned.
69
De-
spite these caveats, “most contemporary analysts agree that unilateral 
sanctions . . . are ineffective tools in compelling target countries to 
change their policies.”
70
The logic underlying the paradigmatic sanctions episode, in 
which economic hardship induces the target population to force their 
government to change policy, contains major flaws. As described pre-
viously, such sanctions cannot have any effect if the target population 
lacks sufficient power to influence the decision-making of their gov-
ernment.
71
The resilience of the regimes in Burma/Myanmar and Iran 
in the face of major anti-government protests demonstrates that popu-
lar uprisings may be ineffective in promoting regime change. When 
sanctions are imposed unilaterally, third parties can fill the vacuum 
created by the sending nation, becoming “black knights” for the target 
nation.
72
Thus the economic deprivation caused by U.S. sanctions 
against Cuba was initially softened by Soviet aid during the Cold 
66. These two broad categories incorporate most of the Askari’s criticisms of U.S. sanc-
tions. His third criticism is inapposite in the context of ICT, as U.S. technology firms often 
find profit elusive in developing countries. See infra note 112 and accompanying text. Since 
this Note focuses on U.S. export restrictions on ICT, the effects of import restrictions out-
lined in his fourth criticism will not be discussed. Nor is it a particularly strong criticism in 
the context of software and online services, which do not require components sourced from 
sanctioned nations. Askari’s fifth criticism largely addresses extraterritoriality provisions 
present in certain sanctions legislation, and is beyond the scope of this Note. 
67. Cf. Myo Nyun, supra note 27, at 481 (“A blank statement that unilateral sanctions are 
ineffective tools of foreign policy is overly simplistic and often misleading.”). 
68. See id.see also A
SKARI ET AL
.,
supra note 65, at 67. 
69. See Richard W. Parker, The Problem with Scorecards: How (and How Not) To 
Measure the Cost-Effectiveness of Economic Sanctions, 21 M
ICH
.
J.
I
NT
L. 235 (2000) 
(describing methodological flaws in influential studies, such as the one performed by Huf-
bauer et al.). 
70. Myo Nyun, supra note 27, at 465. 
71. See id. at 467. 
72. See H
UFBAUER ET AL
.,
supra note 13, at 8. 
C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft
C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft Word (.docx) File. Empower C# users to easily convert PDF document to Word document.
batch pdf to text; c# convert pdf to text
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. XImage.Raster. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint
.pdf to .txt converter; convert pdf to txt batch
550  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
War, and more recently has been partially offset by highly favorable 
trade agreements with Venezuela and China.
73
Sanctions may be ineffective in another manner, by failing to pre-
vent the target government from accessing controlled goods or rea-
sonable alternatives. As noted above, countries that are not 
participating in the sanctions episode may act as alternative sources of 
sanctioned goods. But even where the sending nation is the only 
source of a particular good or service, a regime will often have access 
to alternative means of achieving its goals. This is particularly true 
with respect to the communications and circumvention technologies 
that are most useful for human rights activists. Many repressive re-
gimes have extensive propaganda networks, and often tightly control 
their domestic mainstream media.
74
Autocratic governments do not 
need Skype, Twitter, social networking sites, or blogs in order to 
broadcast their message. Nor do they require U.S.-developed tools to 
circumvent Internet censorship. These tools, however, are essential to 
dissidents and human rights groups for organizing protests, develop-
ing alternative media environments, and accessing censored informa-
tion.
75
Moreover, sanctions may have unintended effects that undermine 
the very policies that are meant to guide them. The economic havoc 
wreaked by sanctions may retard the emergence of a middle class and 
the development of civil society, both key elements in the transition to 
democracy.
76
They may also have the perverse effect of strengthening 
the sanctioned regime, which may use sanctions to its advantage, ei-
ther to foment nationalist sentiment or to serve as a scapegoat for all 
economic and social hardships suffered by the target population.
77
The response of the military junta in Burma/Myanmar to the Burmese 
Freedom and Democracy Act
78
provides a prime example of these 
unintended consequences: Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi was 
placed under house arrest; her National League for Democracy, which 
had won a 1990 election that was subsequently nullified, was ex-
cluded from national conventions; and a moderate member of the 
junta was removed in favor of a hardliner.
79
The junta also blamed 
73. See C
ARMELO 
M
ESA
-L
AGO
,
C
UBA 
T
RANSITION 
P
ROJECT
,
T
HE 
C
UBAN 
E
CONOMY 
T
ODAY
:
S
ALVATION OR 
D
AMNATION
? 8–13 (2005). 
74. See, e.g., Burma Country Card, Reporters Without Borders, http://en.rsf.org/report-
burma,53.html?annee=2009 (noting that “the two television and radio channels and the 
daily newspapers are under direct control of the military junta” while “[t]he privately-owned 
press is under military censorship”) (last visited May 8, 2010). 
75. See infra Part V. 
76. See Richard N. Haass, Sanctioning Madness, F
OREIGN 
A
FFS
., Nov./Dec. 1997, at 79.  
77. See H
UFBAUER ET AL
.,
supra note 13, at 8 (listing episodes where sanctions unified 
the target country behind their government). 
78. Burmese Freedom & Democracy Act of 2003, Pub. L. No. 108-61, 117 Stat. 864 
(2003). 
79. See Myo Nyun, supra note 27, at 485–86. 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert multiple pages Word to
convert pdf to text; change pdf to text for editing
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
source PDF document file for word processing, presentation extract text content from source PDF document file obtain text information and edit PDF text content
convert pdf to word searchable text; convert pdf to text on
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
551 
U.S. sanctions for economic failures in the country and used them to 
stoke nationalism.
80
Such opportunistic use of a sanctions episode is 
not restricted to the Burmese junta — the Cuban government has also 
used U.S. sanctions as a cover to continue its own repressive policies 
and to sideline domestic activists by portraying them as U.S. lack-
eys.
81
B. Sanctions Impose Suffering on 
Innocent Citizens of the Target Country 
The paradigmatic sanctions episode is intended to cause eco-
nomic loss to the target nation. This invariably imposes hardships on 
innocent civilians living there. While the most readily apparent effect 
of export controls is to prevent members of the target population from 
acquiring essential goods, broad sanctions programs may also have 
severe secondary effects that can exacerbate existing humanitarian 
crises or beget new ones.
82
Even when humanitarian exceptions allow 
the export of essentials such as food, medicine, and other aid items, 
distribution may be impossible due to the unavailability or high cost 
of fuel or the deterioration of public infrastructure, including commu-
nications infrastructure.
83
Economic loss may also harm the target 
population by causing its government to redistribute funds to the mili-
tary and other institutions that support the regime to the detriment of 
public institutions such as health care and education.
84
These human costs of sanctions are demonstrated most clearly by 
the situation in Cuba, which is subject to one of the most comprehen-
sive U.S. sanctions programs. When the Soviet Union fell, Cuba lost 
its primary source of aid and, without access to U.S. exports, plunged 
into a severe food shortage that caused widespread nutritional defi-
ciencies and disease.
85
Although the Cuban sanctions regulations in-
clude limited exemptions for medication and medical supplies, the 
arduous licensing process dissuades U.S. firms from exporting these 
products.
86
Public education also suffers due to U.S. sanctions. Cuban 
schools must pay higher prices to obtain supplies that do not contain 
80. See id. 
81. See Coll, supra note 21, at 253 n.366, 253–54. 
82. See Myo Nyun, supra note 27, at 507–08. 
83. See Smith, supra note 28, at 346–50; see also V
AN 
B
RABANT
,
supra note 57, at 25–
28 (describing the inadequacy of humanitarian exemptions from sanctions regimes to pre-
vent suffering in targeted countries). 
84. See Myo Nyun, supra note 27, at 494–96. 
85. See Coll, supra note 21, 238–41.  
86. See id. at 241–43. In a similar manner, regulatory confusion with regard to export 
controls has led some technology companies to refuse to offer their ICT to foreign nationals 
living in sanctioned countries, even when it would be legal for them to do so. See infra Part 
IV. 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
easy for C# developers to convert and transform style that are included in target PDF document file original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical
.net extract text from pdf; convert pdf photo to text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET convert csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
convert pdf to text document; converting pdf to searchable text format
552  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
any components made in the U.S.
87
Universities unable to access sub-
aquatic fiber-optic cables to connect to the Internet must instead pay 
for a costly satellite connection.
88
Tight visa restrictions prevent Cu-
ban scientists and other academics from attending conferences in the 
U.S., thereby limiting information exchange and scientific coopera-
tion.
89
Despite these hardships endured by the Cuban people, the sanc-
tions programs have failed in their primary goal: to topple the Castro 
regime and promote the transition to a democratic government.
90
Restrictions on the export of ICT are not likely to result in mass 
starvation. But they may still cause harm to citizens in sanctioned 
countries, as demonstrated by the increased cost of Internet access for 
Cuban universities.
91
Given that communications networks built upon 
even rudimentary ICT can bring substantial gains in the field of public 
health, restricting the export of U.S. technology to sanctioned nations 
may even cost lives.
92
Such restrictions may also stifle the develop-
ment of alternative media environments and prevent citizens from 
accessing censored information, thus impoverishing the public’s 
knowledge and increasing the efficacy of government propaganda.
93
Finally, by reducing the ability of human rights activists to communi-
cate effectively with the global community, trade sanctions on ICT 
may exacerbate human rights abuses by removing the risk of global 
opprobrium.
94
IV.
R
EGULATORY 
C
ONFUSION 
P
REVENTS THE
L
EGAL 
E
XPORT OF 
ICT 
While much of the research regarding the operation of U.S. soft-
ware and technology companies in non-democratic countries has fo-
cused on their compliance with requests from those governments to 
censor their offerings or spy on their users,
95
much less has been writ-
87. See Coll, supra note 21, at 244. 
88. See id. at 244–45. 
89. See id. at 245–47. 
90. See Cuban Democracy Act, 22 U.S.C. § 6002 (2006) (describing the policy motivat-
ing the Act). 
91. See supra note 88 and accompanying text. 
92. S
EE 
J
EFFREY 
J
AMES
,
I
NFORMATION 
T
ECHNOLOGY AND 
D
EVELOPMENT
:
A
N
EW 
P
ARADIGM FOR 
D
ELIVERING THE 
I
NTERNET TO 
R
URAL 
A
REAS IN 
D
EVELOPING 
C
OUNTRIES
72–75 (2004) (discussing some benefits of U.S. ICT in the health sector in developing na-
tions). 
93. See infra Part V.A. (discussing the value of alternative media environments for civil 
society and the preservation of political rights); infra Part V.B. (discussing the value of 
circumvention technologies for the same). 
94. Cf. infra notes 116–18 and accompanying text, describing how Zapatista rebels used 
ICT to focus global attention on their military standoff with the Mexican government to 
avoid being quietly wiped out. 
95. For example, in 2008, it was discovered that the Chinese version of Skype was filter-
ing messages based on a government-provided list of banned keywords and monitoring its 
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
553 
ten about their refusal to offer their services in certain countries for 
fear of violating U.S. sanctions regulations. A number of recent epi-
sodes in which risk-averse technology companies have proactively 
refused to transact with users in nations subject to U.S. sanctions, 
even when such activity is perfectly legal, suggest that this problem 
may be disturbingly common. 
In 2009 Bluehost, a major webhosting company, was involved in 
several such incidents. Citing OFAC sanctions, it suspended a number 
of Persian-language blogs in various countries,
96
cut service to sites in 
Zimbabwe,
97
and even shut down the blog of the Washington, D.C. 
chapter of the Belarussian American Association.
98
The disruption of 
service to Zimbabwean blogs provides a particularly salient demon-
stration of how the structure of U.S. sanctions regulations may work 
against their own aims. Zimbabwe is not subject to broad U.S. sanc-
tions; instead, OFAC regulations are targeted at specific individuals 
and entities, including senior officials of Robert Mugabe’s govern-
ment, individuals who have attempted to “undermine Zimbabwe’s 
democratic processes or institutions,” and those who have participated 
in “human rights abuses related to political repression.”
99
Some of the 
blogs that Bluehost forced offline, such as Kubatana, Women of Zim-
babwe Arise, and Island Hospice and Bereavement Service, are run by 
human rights NGOs and activist organizations that are frequent critics 
of the Mugabe government.
100
These communities should be natural 
allies of the U.S. in its attempts to curb human rights abuses and pro-
mote democratic institutions in Zimbabwe; instead, they were silenced 
users’ voice calls. See N
ART 
V
ILLENEUVE
,
I
NFORMATION 
W
ARFARE 
M
ONITOR
,
B
REACHING 
T
RUST
:
A
A
NALYSIS OF 
S
URVEILLANCE AND 
S
ECURITY 
P
RACTICES ON 
C
HINA
TOM-
S
KYPE 
P
LATFORM
(2008), available at http://www.nartv.org/mirror/breachingtrust.pdf; 
S
TEPHANIE 
W
ANG
,
O
PEN
N
ET 
I
NITIATIVE
,
I
NTERNET 
F
ILTERING IN 
C
HINA
15–16 (2009), 
available at http://opennet.net/research/profiles/china; Ben Charny, Chinese Partner Cen-
sors Skype Text Messages, PC
M
AG
., Apr. 20, 2006, http://www.pcmag.com/ 
article2/0,2817,1951637,00.asp. Yahoo! was also the subject of global opprobrium when its 
willingness to provide subscriber information to the Chinese authorities led to the arrest of 
Shi Tao, a journalist who was sentenced to ten years in prison for “divulging state secrets 
abroad.” See Information Supplied by Yahoo! Helped Journalist Shi Tao Get 10 Years in 
Prison
R
EPORTERS 
W
ITHOUT 
B
ORDERS
Sept. 
6, 
2005, 
http://en.rsf.org/spip.php?page=article&id_article=14884. 
96. See Kamangir, Persian Blogs on Bluehost Will be Going Down, 
http://kamangir.net/2009/02/23/persion-blogs-on-bluehost-will-be-going-down/ (Feb. 23, 
2009, 7:04 EST). 
97. See Kubatana.net, Curve Balls and Blue Beards, http://www.kubatanablogs.net/ 
kubatana/?p=1261 (Feb. 17, 2009, 10:28 EST); My Heart’s in Accra, Bluehost Censors 
Zimbabwean Blogger, http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2009/02/13/bluehost-censors- 
zimbabwean-bloggers (Feb. 13, 2009, 17:54 EST). 
98. See Evgeny Morozov, Do-It-Yourself Censorship, N
EWSWEEK
, Mar. 16, 2009, at 10, 
available at http://www.newsweek.com/id/188184. 
99. Exec. Order No. 13,469 § 1(a), 73 Fed. Reg. 43,841 (July 25, 2008). 
100. See Ethan Zuckerman, Intermediary Censorship, in A
CCESS 
C
ONTROLLED
:
T
HE 
S
HAPING OF 
P
OWER
,
R
IGHTS
,
AND 
R
ULE IN 
C
YBERSPACE
74–76 (Ronald Deibert at al. eds., 
2010). 
554  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
as a result of U.S. sanctions. Efforts by the cofounder of Kubatana to 
explain the scope of OFAC regulations to Bluehost and demonstrate 
that the blogs and their operators were not targets of the Zimbabwean 
sanctions fell on deaf ears.
101
Although Bluehost eventually offered to 
reinstate the accounts after the U.S. Treasury Department notified the 
company that the Zimbabwean website operators were not subject to 
sanctions, Kubatana had moved to a new webhosting service in the 
interim.
102
While Bluehost received the lion’s share of public atten-
tion, other providers of webhosting services have also suspended user 
accounts in countries subject to U.S. sanctions.
103
Webhosting service providers are not the only companies that 
have refused service to users based on flawed interpretations of 
OFAC regulations. Last year, the business-oriented social networking 
site LinkedIn began deleting Syrian accounts and prohibiting users in 
Syria, Iran, Cuba, North Korea, and Sudan from registering.
104
Al-
though OFAC regulations prohibit the provision of online services to 
Iran, Cuba, and non-specified areas of Sudan, users in Syria and North 
Korea are not subject to such restrictions.
105
As news of the ban began 
to spread on Twitter and blogs, including prominent sites like the 
Huffington Post, LinkedIn quickly restored access to Syrian users, 
citing “human error [which] led to over compliance with respect to 
export controls.”
106
It is unclear whether access has been restored to 
users in Iran, Cuba, North Korea, or Sudan.
107
Instant messenger cli-
ents have been affected as well, with Microsoft refusing to offer its 
Windows Live Messenger application to users in Iran, Cuba, Syria, 
Sudan, and North Korea, also purportedly to comply with OFAC 
sanctions.
108
101. See Kubatana.net, supra note 97. 
102. See My Heart’s in Accra, supra note 97. 
103. See Morozov, supra note 98. 
104. See Jillian York, LinkedIn Alienates Syrian Users: Why Now?, T
HE 
H
UFFINGTON 
P
OST
,
Apr. 20, 2009, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jillian-york/linkedin-alienates-
syrian_b_188629.html; Daily Clarity, Foreign Bloggers Denied Service by US Host, 
http://mydailyclarity.com/2009/04/3215 (last visited May 8, 2010); Posting of Gaith Saqer 
to ArabCrunch, LinkedIn Kicks Off Syrian Users!, http://arabcrunch.com/2009/04/breaking-
linkedin-kicks-off-syrian-users.html (Apr. 17, 2009, 4:39 EST). 
105. See supra note 54 and accompanying text. 
106. York, supra note 104; My Heart’s in Accra, LinkedIn Briefly Blocks Syria, More 
Confusion Over Trade/Commerce Regulations, http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/ 
2009/04/20/linkedin-briefly-blocks-syria-more-confusion-over-tradecommerce-regulations 
(Apr. 20, 2009, 15:50 EST); see also Posting of Mary Joyce to DigiActive, Why LinkedOut 
Syrians Are LinkedIn Again, http://www.digiactive.org/2009/04/21/why-linkedout-syrians-
are-linkedin-again (Apr. 21, 2009, 19:17 EST). 
107. See Joyce, supra note 106. 
108. See Matthew Sugrue, A License to Chat, T
HE 
H
UFFINGTON 
P
OST
, Oct. 30, 2009, 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-sugrue/a-license-to-chat_b_340443.html;  
US Sanctions Sees Live Messenger Blocked in Syria, ITP.
NET
, May 25, 2009, 
http://www.itp.net/556637-us-sanctions-sees-live-messenger-blocked-in-syria; niacINsight, 
Cutting Off Communication One Messenger at a Time, http://niacblog.wordpress.com/2009/ 
05/27/cutting-off-communication-one-messenger-at-a-time (May 27, 2009, 12:34 EST). 
No. 2] Unintended Consequences of U.S. Export Restrictions 
555 
These episodes are all indicative of a dark reality: “the high costs 
and uncertainty involved in complying with the myriad of confusing 
sanctions regulations can deter companies from engaging in even 
permissible trade with a sanctioned country.”
109
This is particularly 
problematic in the context of ICT since users are increasingly depend-
ent upon intermediaries such as webhosting service providers, blog-
ging platforms, and social networking sites for their ability to speak 
online.
110
And while regulatory uncertainty and companies’ resulting 
risk-averse behavior are not limited to the context of ICT,
111
the lack 
of clear rules regarding software and online services makes ICT a par-
ticularly difficult area.  
Many ICT firms struggle to turn a profit when serving users in 
developing countries.
112
So long as regulatory uncertainties persist, 
these meager returns are insufficient to justify the expense of deter-
mining the legality of any given transaction or the risk of inadver-
tently violating sanctions regulations.
113
Where firms’ reluctance to 
offer their products to users in sanctioned countries is merely a result 
of regulatory ambiguity, clarifying amendments or advisory opinions 
may be sufficient to solve this problem. But where sanctions regula-
tions actually prohibit the export of software or online services, these 
pernicious effects are not so easily addressed. This is particularly un-
fortunate given that ICT are powerful tools for dissidents and human 
rights activists whose objectives are aligned with the policies underly-
ing many U.S. sanctions programs. 
V.
ICT
A
RE 
U
SEFUL 
T
OOLS FOR THE
P
ROMOTION OF 
H
UMAN 
R
IGHTS
ICT have a long history of use by dissidents and human rights ac-
tivists; the Internet itself was used as early as 1987 by human rights 
activists to report on the detention of social activists in Malaysia and 
Singapore.
114
Most early use of ICT by human rights groups was quite 
rudimentary. Student demonstrators during the 1989 protests in 
Tiananmen Square in China relied largely on fax machines to relay 
information about the government’s response to the rest of the world, 
although the Internet played a small role as well.
115
A more controver-
109. Smith, supra note 28, at 340. 
110. See Zuckerman, supra note 100, at 72. 
111. See supra note 86 and accompanying text. 
112. See Brad Stone & Miguel Helft, In Developing Countries, Web Grows Without 
Profit, N.Y.
T
IMES
, Apr. 27, 2009, at B1, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/ 
27/technology/start-ups/27global.html. 
113. See Zuckerman, supra note 100, at 78. 
114. See Loong Wong, The Internet and Social Change in Asia, 13 P
EACE 
R
EV
. 381, 384 
(2001). 
115. See Scott E. Feir, Comment, Regulations Restricting Internet Access: Attempted Re-
pair of Rupture in China’s Great Wall Restraining the Free Exchange of Ideas, 6 P
AC
.
R
IM 
556  
Harvard Journal of Law & Technology 
[Vol. 23 
sial early use of ICT involved the Zapatista movement, a group of 
indigenous peasants that seized seven towns in the southern Mexican 
state of Chiapas in 1994.
116
As the Mexican army moved in to sup-
press the rebels, Zapatista leaders used faxes and e-mails to inform the 
world about their grievances and the unfolding military standoff.
117
NGOs then built a global, online solidarity movement, focusing inter-
national attention on the conflict and pressuring the Mexican govern-
ment to call a cease-fire.
118
Contemporary Internet activists engage in three general types of 
activities: awareness and advocacy; organization and mobilization; 
and action and reaction.
119
In particular, human rights groups have 
turned to ICT as tools for mobilizing and organizing exceptionally 
broad and geographically dispersed constituencies, leveraging such 
technologies’ ability to support sharing, aggregation, and collabora-
tive production.
120
More controversially, some individuals have en-
gaged in “hacktivism,” launching distributed denial of service 
(“DDoS”) attacks, writing computer viruses, and defacing websites to 
support their cause.
121
This Part chronicles the evolving use of ICT by 
dissidents through a number of case studies that demonstrate the criti-
cal value of such technologies and the harm caused by U.S. policies 
restricting their export. 
A. Online Organization and SMS — Ukraine’s Orange Revolution 
The ubiquitous spread of mobile phones equipped with short mes-
sage service (“SMS”) and cameras has enabled a revolutionary change 
in the use of ICT for human rights and development. Without this 
technological shift, and the parallel development of more sophisti-
cated online platforms for publication and organization, the so-called 
L.
&
P
OL
J. 361, 367 (1997); Trina K. Kissel, Note, License To Blog: Internet Regulation 
in the People’s Republic of China, 17 I
ND
.
I
NT
&
C
OMP
.
L.
R
EV
. 229, 231–32 (2007). 
116. See Maria Garrido & Alexander Halavais, Mapping Networks of Support for the Za-
patista Movementin C
YBERACTIVISM
165, 165–66 (Martha McCaughey & Michael D. 
Ayers eds., 2003); Corinna Spencer-Scheurich, A New Model for Globalizing Human Rights 
Struggles via the Internet: Understanding the Chiapas Example, I
NT
L
EGAL 
P
ERSP
.,
Spring 2004, at 22, 22. 
117. See Spencer-Scheurich, supra note 116, at 22. 
118. See id. at 26. 
119. Sandor Vegh, Classifying Forms of Online Activism, in C
YBERACTIVISM
71, 72 
(Martha McCaughey & Michael D. Ayers eds., 2003). 
120. Molly Beutz Land, Networked Activism, 22 H
ARV
.
H
UM
.
R
TS
.
J. 205, 216 (2009). 
121. See Vegh, supra note 119, at 77–81. A denial of service (“DoS”) attack is an attempt 
to make a computer resource such as a website unavailable, often by inundating the machine 
hosting the resource with external communications requests. When this is accomplished by 
sending requests from multiple hosts, this is a distributed DoS (“DDoS”) attack. Wikipedia, 
Denial-of-Service Attack, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ddos (as of May 8, 2010, 22:25 
GMT). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested