Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
3.1.9 Baltimore Truss 
History and Description:  This truss (along with Pennsylvania truss) was the 
product of two of the early eastern trunkline railroads developed during the 1870s for 
heavy locomotives.  The Baltimore truss, specifically, was designed by engineers of the 
Baltimore and Ohio (B & O) Railroad in 1871. 
The truss was adapted for highway use as early as the 1880s, often for spans of 
modest lengths.  When steel replaced wrought iron and rigid, riveted connections 
replaced pins in the early decades of the twentieth century, the Baltimore truss was used 
for longer span highway bridges until the 1920s. 
The Baltimore truss is basically a parallel chord Pratt with sub-divided panels in 
which each diagonal is braced at its middle with sub-diagonals and vertical sub-struts.  
This type is sometimes referred to as a “Petit” truss. The logic leading to subdivided 
panels stems from the need to maintain an economic spacing of floor beams in longer 
span bridges.  As the distance between chords increases, so does the width of panels.  In 
order to maintain optimum slope of diagonals (45 – 60 degrees) and, an economic 
spacing of floor beams, the panels were subdivided at intermediate points between the 
main vertical members.  This increases the number of floor beams but reduces the overall 
cost and weight of the bridge since the whole deck system can be designed with smaller 
members.  Larger members use more metal resulting in an heavier and often more 
expensive bridge.  This is a subtlety of bridge design that is hard to visualize (8, p. 68). 
Significance Assessment: The Baltimore truss is significant for its association 
with the railroad.  Nineteenth century examples of such bridges are considered significant 
within the context of this study, and the earliest examples along the B&O Railroad are 
highly significant.  Highway bridges built using the Baltimore truss are not amongst the 
more common bridge types in this study and are considered significant if they retain their 
character-defining features. Such features include the elements that comprise its form—
basically it is Pratt with parallel top and bottom chords, but with generally wide, sub-
divided panels in which each diagonal is braced at its middle with sub-diagonals and sub-
struts.  The end posts are inclined.  Character defining features include its parallel top and 
bottom chords, verticals and diagonals (including substruts or sub-ties), floor beams, 
stringers, struts, form of connection, and portal features (e.g., struts, bracing). 
Examples of Baltimore Truss 
1. 
Loosveldt Bridge (1888), Sheridan County, NE.  NRHP listed 1992 in 
Highway Bridges in Nebraska MPS. 
2. 
Tippecanoe River Bridge (1890), Fulton County, IN.  NRHP candidate in 
Iron Monuments to Distant Prosperity by James L. Cooper, 1987. 
3. 
Walnut Street Bridge (1890), Dauphin County, PA.  NRHP listed 1972.  
4. 
Colclessor Bridge #SH00-42 (1888), Sheridan County, NE.  NRHP listed 
1992 in Highway Bridges in Nebraska MPS. 
5. 
Post Road Bridge (1905), State Route 7A, Havre De Grace Vicinity, 
Harford County, MD.  HAER MD-44. 
3-32
Change pdf to text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
change pdf to text file; c# pdf to txt
Change pdf to text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
remove text from pdf; c# convert pdf to text file
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
Figures 3-25 and 3-26 present a drawing and an example of a Baltimore truss bridge. 
Figure 3-25.  Elevation drawing of a Baltimore truss bridge. 
Figure 3-26. Post Road Bridge (1905), State Route 7A, Havre de Grace vicinity, 
Harford County, Maryland.  This bridge is an example of the Baltimore 
truss type. 
3-33
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Text: Extract Text from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
convert pdf to text format; convert pdf to searchable text online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. Advanced Visual Studio .NET PDF text extraction control, built in .NET framework 2.0 and compatible with Windows system.
converting image pdf to text; convert pdf file to txt
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
3.1.10 Parker Truss 
History and Description:  On February 22, 1870, Charles H. Parker, a 
mechanical engineer with the National Bridge and Iron Works of Boston, Massachusetts, 
was awarded a patent (#100,185) for what was essentially, according to most bridge 
historians, a Pratt truss with a polygonal or inclined top chord.  Parker, it is claimed, 
recognizing that the depth of truss required at the ends was less than that required at 
mid-span, simply inclined the top chord, thus also progressively shortening the vertical 
and diagonal members from the center to the ends of the truss.  The Parker truss therefore 
uses less metal than a parallel chord Pratt truss of equal length, and the longer the span 
the greater the economy of materials.  Unlike the parallel chord Pratt, however, the 
Parker required different length verticals and diagonals at each panel.  This increased 
fabrication and erection costs.  Because bridge prices were usually driven by the weight 
of the materials used to construct the superstructure, the lighter weight of the polygonal 
chord truss tended to offset the increased labor costs for spans over a certain length. 
According to bridge engineer and historian Victor Darnell, however, the Parker 
design could not claim the curved top chord as a feature because it was already in 
common use.  Even Thomas and Caleb Pratt, who illustrated a curved top chord in their 
truss patent of 1844, could not claim a curved top chord as a feature of their patented 
design.  The Parker patent claimed three improvements over earlier designs.  The first 
claim was that minor changes in bridge lengths could be accommodated by changing the 
slope of the inclined end post or extending it to the top chord to a point behind the first 
vertical web member. Second, the design of the top and bottom connections of the web 
posts to the chords was new.  And third, the casting at the bottom of the end post 
simplified the connection joining the top and bottom chords (10, p. 12).  What set the 
Parker truss aside from earlier designs was not so much the continuously sloping top 
chord, but the use of simple, cast iron connections and the inclined end post.  Yet, the 
Pratt patent also had inclined end posts, although these were placed very near the 
verticals of the end panel and did not function in the same way as in the Parker design. 
In 1998, Darnell could only find one extant bridge that was built according to the 
original design patented in 1870; the Vine Street Bridge (1870) in Northfield, Vermont.  
This bridge has all the characteristics evident in the 1870 patent application: sloping 
wrought iron endposts, continuously curved wrought iron top chord, wrought iron I-beam 
web posts, cast iron web post connections, and a bottom chord that forms a loop around 
the endposts.  The trusses that we now commonly identify as “Parkers” use inclined 
endposts, but generally have inclined top chords composed of straight members, with the 
degree of inclination changing at the panel points.  Virtually all of these bridges are 
constructed of steel. 
In the highly competitive bridge market, the economy of materials directly 
affected profit, and the Parker trusses superseded Pratt trusses for long span bridges after 
the turn of the century, as less materials were needed in their construction. The form was 
adopted by highway departments as standard designs for pony trusses (30 to 60 feet) and 
through trusses (100 to 300 feet). 
3-34
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
converting .pdf to text; changing pdf to text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert image pdf to text; convert pdf to word editable text
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
The camelback is a variation of the Parker truss.  Most camelback trusses are 
essentially Parker trusses with exactly five slopes in the upper chord and end posts. 
Significance Assessment:  A selection of wrought iron Parker pony trusses with 
pinned connections survive from the nineteenth century, but the majority date from the 
twentieth century.  The Parker pony truss was built as late as 1950.  These bridges are 
characterized by rigid riveted connections and steel construction. 
Parker trusses are significant within the context of this study.  At the highest level 
of significance within this type are nineteenth century, pin-connected Parker trusses, as 
the numbers of these bridges are dropping as they are replaced with modern structures.  A 
well-preserved twentieth century Parker truss that exemplifies a standard bridge type of a 
state department of transportation also is significant within the context of this study.  
Examples dating after the first two decades of the twentieth century are substantially less 
significant than the above-discussed examples, possessing low to moderate significance.  
Primary character-defining features include the polygonal top chord; inclined end posts; 
diagonals in each panel; and different length verticals, shortening in length outward from 
the central panel.  Other character-defining features include the floor beams, stringers, 
struts, method of connection and portal features (e.g., struts, bracing) 
Examples of Parker Truss 
1. 
Bridge No. 5721 (1890, 1937), Koochiching County, MN.  NRHP listed 
1998 in Iron & Steel Bridges in Minnesota MPS. 
2. 
Walnut Street Bridge (1891), Chattanooga, Hamilton County, TN.  NRHP 
listed 1990. 
3. 
Rifle Bridge (1909), Garfield County, CO.  NRHP listed 1985 in 
Vehicular Bridges in Colorado Thematic Resource Nomination. 
4. 
Gross State Aid Bridge (1918), Knox County, NE.  NRHP listed 1992 in 
Highway Bridges in Nebraska MPS. 
5. 
Enterprise Bridge (1924-25), spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 
Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, KS. HAER KS-5. 
6. 
Sparkman (Shelby) Street Bridge (1907-09), spanning the Cumberland 
River, Nashville, Davidson County, TN.  HAER TN-38. 
Figures 3-27 through 3-29 include a drawing and examples of the Parker truss. 
Figure 3-27.  Elevation drawing of Parker truss. 
3-35
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
convert pdf to txt batch; convert pdf to txt format online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
convert pdf images to text; convert pdf to text document
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
Figure 3-28. Enterprise Bridge (1924-25), spanning Smoky Hill River on K-43 
Highway, Enterprise, Dickinson County, Kansas.  This structure is an 
example of a Parker truss. 
Figure 3-29. Sparkman (Shelby) Street Bridge (1907-09), spanning the Cumberland 
River, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee.  This span is an example 
of the camelback variation of the Parker truss.  Note the characteristic five 
slopes in the upper chord and end posts. 
3-36
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract
convert pdf photo to text; change pdf to text for editing
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract
convert pdf to searchable text; convert pdf to txt file online
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
3.1.11 Pennsylvania Truss 
History and Description:  The Pennsylvania truss, like the Baltimore truss 
sometimes referred to as a “petit,” was developed by engineers of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad in 1875.  The Pennsylvania truss (along with the Baltimore truss) was the 
product of two of the early eastern trunkline railroads developed during the 1870s for 
heavy locomotives. This truss is similar to the Baltimore truss in that it has sub-divided 
panels, but it also has a polygonal or inclined top chord.   
As with the Baltimore truss, the Pennsylvania truss was originally developed for 
use in relatively long span railroad bridges, but became a common type for shorter span 
lengths.  The truss was adapted for highway use as early as the 1880s.  When steel 
replaced wrought iron and rigid riveted connections replaced pins in the early decades of 
the 20th century, the Pennsylvania truss was used for longer span highway bridges until 
the 1920s. 
Significance Assessment:  The Pennsylvania truss is significant for its 
association with the railroad.  Nineteenth century examples of such bridges are 
considered significant within the context of this study, and the earliest railroad-built 
examples are highly significant.  Highway bridges built using the Pennsylvania truss are 
not amongst the more common bridge types in this study and are considered significant if 
they retain their character-defining features. 
This truss is a form of the Pratt, similar to the Baltimore truss in that it has sub-
divided panels, but unlike the Baltimore truss, it has a polygonal top chord. This heavy 
top chord and the panel configuration, as shown in Figure 3-30, comprise the primary 
character-defining features of this type.  Character-defining features include the top and 
bottom chords, vertical and diagonal members (including sub struts or sub ties), floor 
beams, stringers, struts, method of connection and portal features (e.g., struts, bracing). 
Examples of Pennsylvania Truss 
1. 
Leaf River Bridge (1907), Green County, MS.  NRHP listed 1988 in 
Historic Bridges of Mississippi MPS. 
2. 
Rifle Bridge (1909), Garfield County, CO.  NRHP listed 1985 in 
Vehicular Bridges in Colorado Thematic Resource Nomination. 
3. 
Third Street Bridge (1910), Goodhue County, MN.  NRHP listed 1989 in 
Iron and Steel Bridges in Minnesota MPS. 
4. 
Four Mile Bridge over Big Horn River (1927-28), Hot Springs County, 
WY.  NRHP listed 1984 in Vehicular Truss and Arch Bridges in 
Wyoming MPS. 
5. 
Old Colerain Pennsylvania Through Truss Bridge (1894), spanning Great 
Miami River at County Route 463, Ross vicinity, Hamilton County, OH.  
HAER OH-54. 
6. 
Scioto Pennsylvania Through Truss Bridge (1915), spanning Scioto River 
at State Route 73, Portsmouth, Scioto County, OH.  HAER OH-53. 
3-37
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
Figures 3-30 and 3-31 include a drawing and an example of the Pennsylvania 
truss. 
Figure 3-30.  Elevation drawing of a Pennsylvania truss. 
Figure 3-31. Old Colerain Bridge (1894), spanning Great Miami River at County Route 
463, Hamilton County, Ohio.  Detail of panel configuration, bottom chord, 
floor beams, and stringers of Pennsylvania truss bridge. 
3-38
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
3.1.12 Warren Truss 
History and Description:  The Warren truss is a highly efficient form developed 
by an obscure Belgian engineer named Neville and a British engineer named Francis 
Nash.  The form has only diagonal members connecting the two chords, with no verticals. 
The basic design is based on combining a series of equilateral triangles to form an 
efficient truss in which the diagonals act in compression and tension.  Usually this truss 
type was altered by the addition of verticals or additional alternating diagonals.  The main 
diagonals, endposts, and top or bottom chord members tend to be thick and visually 
prominent.  Verticals or additional diagonals, when present, are much thinner.  As was 
the case with the Pratt truss, the distribution of stress throughout the structure was easily 
analyzed in the Warren truss by mathematical calculation.   
The Warren truss was theoretically a rational design.  Since the structure’s 
diagonals took both tensile and compressive stresses, they were constructed of wrought 
iron, thus introducing all wrought-iron bridge construction to Europe.  In the Warren 
truss, every part of the truss equally bears its share of the stresses, while in the lattice, 
Pratt and other truss forms, stresses in the members vary, hence differently sized 
members. 
As a pin-connected iron truss, this type was never very popular, either as a 
railroad or a highway bridge.  Many steel, field-riveted or bolted Warren pony trusses, 
however, were erected by counties throughout the country beginning in the 1890s, by 
state highway departments in the 1920s and 1930s, and by railroads into the 1930s.  
Warren trusses were also built, occasionally, with polygonal top chords as a through or 
pony truss; with vertical endposts as a pony truss; or as a bedstead pony truss. 
Significance Assessment:  Few Warren trusses survive from the nineteenth 
century, but the form dominated twentieth century bridge design, used in many different 
configurations by highway departments for short span pony trusses and through trusses 
for intermediate spans, from the 1900s to the present. 
The Warren truss is significant within the context of this study if they retain their 
character-defining features, which include parallel top and bottom chords, inclined end 
posts (or vertical end posts for bedsteads), diagonals, floor beams, stringers, method of 
connections, and for through trusses, struts and portal features (e.g., struts, bracing).  
Intact nineteenth century examples are the most significant within this type as they are no 
longer common.  Most significant amongst the twentieth century examples are the 
bridges built by state departments of transportation according to their standardized plans.  
Warren trusses built after the first two decades of the twentieth century are substantially 
less significant than the aforementioned significant examples, possessing low to moderate 
significance. 
3-39
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
Examples of Warren Truss 
1. 
Clear Creek Bridge (1891), Butler County, NE.  NRHP listed 1992 in 
Highway Bridges in Nebraska MPS. 
2. 
Bridge No. 12 (1908), Goodhue County, MN.  NRHP listed 1989 in Iron 
and Steel Bridges in Minnesota MPS. 
3. 
Romness Bridge (1912), Griggs County; ND.  NRHP listed 1997 in 
Historic Roadway Bridges of North Dakota MPS. 
4. 
ERT Bridge over Black’s Fork (1925), Unita County, WY.  NRHP listed 
1985 in Vehicular Truss and Arch Bridges in Wyoming Thematic 
Resource Nomination. 
5. 
Williams River Bridge (1929), Windham County, VT.  NRHP listed 1991 
in Metal, Truss, Masonry and Concrete Bridges in Vermont MPS. 
6. 
Virgin River Warren Truss Bridge, spanning Virgin River at Old Road, 
Hurricane vicinity, Washington County, UT.  HAER UT-76. 
7. 
Boylan Avenue Bridge (1913), Raleigh, Wake County, NC.  HAER NC-
20.   
8. 
Fifficktown Bridge (1910), spanning Little Conemaugh River, South Fork, 
Cambria County, PA.  HAER PA-233. 
9. 
Spavinaw Creek Bridge (1909), Benton County Road 29 spanning 
Spavinaw Creek, Gravette vicinity, Benton County, AR.  HAER AR-29.   
Figures 3-32 through 3-36 show, respectively, a drawing, and examples of the 
through, pony, deck and bedstead Warren trusses. 
Figure 3-32.  Elevation drawing of Warren truss. 
3-40
Chapter 3—Historic Context for Common Historic Bridge Types 
Figure 3-33. Boylan Avenue Bridge (1913), Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina.  
This through Warren truss serves as a grade separation. 
Figure 3-34. Virgin River Warren Truss Bridge, spanning Virgin River at Old Road, 
Hurricane vicinity, Washington County, Utah.  This undated pony Warren 
truss bridge is in Zion National Park.
3-34a.  Oblique view. 
3-34b.  Side panel. 
3-41
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested