Chapter 7:  Fonts, Styles, Sizes and Spacing 
Last printed 8/20/2001 9:40 AM 
Chapte
r
Fonts, Styles, Sizes and Spacing 
I
nt
r
oduction 
This chapter tells you how MathType assigns fonts, styles, sizes, and spacing to 
the characters in equations and how you can change the automatic assignments 
to give your equations a different look. 
Styles 
Each character in a MathType equation is either assigned a specific font and 
character style, or is assigned one of eleven “styles.” MathType’s styles are 
somewhat analogous to text styles in word processing and page layout 
applications. Each one is defined as a combination of a font and character style 
(e.g. Times, bold & italic or Symbol, bold). Styles save you from having to worry 
about fonts and character styles separately, and hence speed up your work and 
help you maintain consistency in your equations. Also, by changing the 
definition of a style, you can quickly change the appearance of all the characters 
that use it. You can change the definitions of any of the styles using the Define 
command on the Style menu. 
T
he P
r
ima
r
y Font 
In most kinds of documents, you will choose a font, character style (bold, italic), 
and point size for the main body of the text in your document. We call this the 
“primary font”. Usually, you will want your equations to be based on the 
primary font — functions like “sin” and “cos” will be in the primary font, as will 
numbers; variables will share the same font, but in italic, and so on. 
The following subsections describe each of MathType’s eleven styles and how 
they are used: 
M
ath 
Math is not a style in the same sense as the other styles, although we tend to refer 
to it that way occasionally in this manual. Rather, it is a mode which causes 
MathType to automatically assign the appropriate style to function names, 
variables, symbols, and numbers as you type. The Math style is discussed further 
below in the section entitled Function Recognition. 
T
ext   
You should use the Text style when you want to enter words rather than 
mathematical formulas. You will normally define your Text style to be the same 
font and character style as your primary font.  
95
Convert scanned pdf to text word - control Library system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert scanned pdf to text word - control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
96
T
he Spaceba
r
M
athType d
i
sab
l
es the 
spacebar when you are 
typ
i
ng math to prevent 
you 
f
rom 
i
nadvertent
l
add
i
ng spaces and 
upsett
i
ng 
M
athType’s 
automat
i
c spac
i
ng. 
However, when you are 
i
n Text sty
l
e, the 
spacebar works aga
i
n.  
Z
oom to Read 
I
talics 
If
you 
fi
nd 
i
t d
iffi
cu
l
t to 
read 
i
ta
li
c characters on 
your screen, use the 
Zoom commands on the 
Vi
ew menu to see your 
work at a 
l
arger sca
l
e. 
When the current style is Text, MathType behaves somewhat like an ordinary 
word processor. However, we do not recommend using MathType to write large 
amounts of text (it isn’t a word processor!); the Text style is provided only to 
make it easier for you to occasionally type a few words that might occur in the 
middle of an equation. 
A few word processors will not allow you to place an equation (or any other 
graphic) within a line of text. If you run into this problem, you may have to 
create the entire line of text, including the equation, in MathType. Use the Text 
style to type the text, and create the equation within it using the mathematical 
styles, as usual. You can then copy the entire line from MathType into your 
document.  
Function   
The Function style is meant to be used for the names of standard mathematical 
functions, like sin, log, etc. You will normally define your Function style to be the 
same font and character style as your primary font. MathType automatically 
recognizes standard mathematical functions, and you can also add your own. 
See the Function Recognition section later in this chapter. 
V
a
r
iable   
The Variable style is used for alphabetic characters representing ordinary 
mathematical variables and constants in your equations. You will normally 
define your Variable style to be the same font as your primary font, but with 
italic character style. 
L
owe
r
-Case G
r
eek    
The Lower-Case Greek style is used for lower-case Greek characters. It is usually 
defined to be the Symbol or Euclid Symbol font with italic character style. 
Uppe
r
-Case G
r
eek 
As you might expect, the Upper-Case Greek style is used for upper-case Greek 
characters. It is usually defined to be the Symbol or Euclid Symbol font, but its 
character style is a matter of personal taste — some people like to have their 
upper-case Greek characters italicized, and some people don’t. 
Symbol    
The Symbol style is used for many mathematical operators, such as + and =, for 
summation and product signs, and for other special characters. In order for 
MathType to work correctly, the Symbol style must be defined to be the Symbol 
font, the Euclid Symbol font, or some other font with exactly the same font 
encoding as Symbol (i.e. the same set of characters in the same positions). 
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF Professional .NET PDF batch conversion control. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 7:  Fonts, Styles, Sizes and Spacing 
Last printed 8/20/2001 9:40 AM 
V
ecto
r
-
M
at
r
ix     
The Vector-Matrix style is used for characters representing vector or matrix 
quantities. It is usually defined to be the same font as the Variable style, but is 
given a bold character style instead of italic. Some people like to use sans-serif 
fonts, such as Arial or Helvetica, to denote vector or matrix quantities. 
Numbe
r
Not too surprisingly, the Number style is used for numbers, i.e. any of the ten 
digits, 0–9. You will probably want it to be the same as the primary font. If you 
are making tables with columns of numbers, you should define your number 
style to be a font in which all the numerals are the same width, so that your 
columns line up properly. Most fonts have this property, even ones like Times, 
whose alphabetic characters have proportional widths, but a few do not. 
Use
r
1 and Use
r
K
eyboa
r
d Sho
r
tcuts 
Conven
i
ent keyboard 
shortcuts are ava
il
ab
l
that change the sty
l
e o
f
the next character you 
type to the User 1 or 
User 2 sty
l
e. For 
examp
l
e, 
if
you ass
i
gn 
Euc
li
M
ath One to 
User 1, you can 
i
nsert 
the character 
L
, by 
typ
i
ng C
TR
L
+U, then 
L
New Functions 
Y
ou can custom
i
ze the 
li
st o
f
f
unct
i
ons 
M
athType recogn
i
zes 
us
i
ng the Funct
i
ons 
Recogn
i
zed command 
on the Pre
f
erences 
menu. 
The User 1 and User 2 styles are provided so that you can set up your own font 
and character style combinations and assign them to characters quickly and 
consistently. These styles may be used for special notation, such as an alternative 
character style for variables, or for assigning some font that contains special 
symbols. If you assign a font to one of these styles, you can insert any character 
from the font into an equation by choosing the User 1 or User 2 command and 
then pressing the key(s) corresponding to the character. This is a good alternative 
to placing special symbols on the toolbars (as described in Chapter 7), when you 
want quick access to a special alphabetic font. For example, you might use Euclid 
Math One for script characters (e.g. 
F
,
L
,
P
) or Euclid Fraktur for “gothic” 
characters (e.g. A, M, X). 
Automatic Style Assignment 
As we mentioned above, MathType will often assign certain styles to certain 
kinds of characters automatically, based on its knowledge of mathematics and 
typesetting conventions. There are two mechanisms that cause this to happen: 
function recognition and character substitution.  
Function Recognition   
When your current style is Math (which will be most of the time), MathType will 
automatically recognize standard mathematical functions, like “sin” and “cos”, 
and display them using the Function style. In addition, MathType will 
automatically insert thin spaces around functions, according to the rules of 
mathematical typesetting. 
Cha
r
acte
r
Substitution 
If your current style is Math, Variable, Function, Vector-Matrix, or Greek, then 
MathType will sometimes substitute different characters in place of the ones you 
97
control Library system:C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images Recognize scanned PDF document and output OCR result to MS C# class source code for ocr text extraction in
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Convert Tiff to Scanned PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Tiff to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
type on your keyboard. One important example of this is the minus sign; 
MathType will insert a real minus sign from your Symbol style, instead of the 
hyphen that most fonts have instead. Minus signs are about twice as long as 
hyphens, so this makes a noticeable difference.  
Several other characters are also replaced by the corresponding ones from your 
Symbol style: examples include parentheses, brackets and braces, and + and = 
signs. This generally improves consistency and results in better-looking 
equations. Finally, whenever you type a numeral, MathType will use the 
Number style.  
On the other hand, if you have explicitly selected a font and character style 
(using the Other Style command), or if your current style is Text, User 1, or 
User 2, then substitution is not performed, so you always get exactly the 
character you ask for, rather than the one that MathType thinks you need. 
Explicit Style Assignments 
For most equation typing tasks, you will use MathType’s Math style, but will 
change to Text style to add an English sentence or phrase. Sometimes you might 
want to explicitly assign either a style or a font and character style to text, 
overriding MathType’s automatic style assignments. You do this in more or less 
the same way as in a word processor — you can either change the current style 
(or font) to the desired one before you begin typing, or you can assign a style to 
selected characters after you type them. In both cases you choose the desired 
style from the Style menu. Of course, there are keyboard shortcuts for all these 
operations. 
Style Changes that Affect the Next 
T
yped Cha
r
acte
r
Escaping 
Af
ter you type a one-
shot shortcut, the Status 
Bar te
ll
s you that you 
have temporar
il
y p
l
aced 
M
athType 
i
n a spec
i
a
l
mode, ready 
f
or you to 
type the character to get 
the correspond
i
ng sty
l
e. 
If
you change your m
i
nd, 
j
ust press E
SC
.   
If you want to set the style of the very next character you type, MathType 
provides a few handy keyboard shortcuts that we call “one-shots”. The big 
advantage to these shortcuts is that you don’t have to switch back to your 
previous style after you type the character — MathType will do it for you! 
K
eyst
r
oke 
Assigns this style to the next cha
r
acte
r
typed 
C
TRL
+G
Greek 
C
TRL
+B  
Vector-Matrix 
C
TRL
+U  
User 1 
C
TRL
+A
LT
+U  
User 2 
98
control Library system:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET But sometimes, we need to extract or fetch text content from source PDF document file
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
OCR text from scanned PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK. Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and component for free download.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 7:  Fonts, Styles, Sizes and Spacing 
Last printed 8/20/2001 9:40 AM 
T
ypesizes 
T
e
r
minology fo
r
Sizes 
Al
though 
M
athType 
attaches a spec
i
a
l
mean
i
ng to the term 
“types
i
zes”, we 
somet
i
mes re
f
er to them 
s
i
mp
l
y as “s
i
zes”. We 
use “types
i
ze” on
l
where needed to avo
i
con
f
us
i
on. 
L
et 
M
ath
T
ype 
M
ake 
Font Size Decisions 
Y
ou can use the Other 
command on the S
i
ze 
menu to exp
li
c
i
t
l
change character s
i
zes. 
But, you w
ill
create more 
cons
i
stent equat
i
ons 
w
i
th 
l
ess e
ff
ort 
if
you 
l
et 
M
athType make most 
f
ont s
i
ze dec
i
s
i
ons. 
Normally, MathType will automatically determine the proper point size to use 
for the characters in your equations as you create them. This is unlike typical 
word processors, where you normally choose a specific point size for your text. 
MathType does this using a system of five “typesizes” (Full, Subscript, Sub-
subscript, Symbol, or Sub-symbol) that it automatically assigns to characters, 
based on their position in the equation. One of the advantages of this scheme is 
that you can change the size of all your subscripts and superscripts, for example, 
by simply assigning a different point size to the Subscript typesize. For more on 
this, see Automatic Size Assignments later in this chapter. Like all good 
software, MathType allows you to override its automatic choices — see Explicit 
Size Assignments later in this chapter. 
Each typesize can be defined either as a specific point size or as a percentage of 
the Full typesize. In MathType’s default settings, only the Full typesize is 
actually set to a specific point size — the others are defined as percentages of 
Full. This way, you can change the overall size of the text in your equation by 
simply changing the Full typesize (using the Define command on the Size menu). 
All the other sizes will adjust in proportion. For most equations, you will want to 
define the Full typesize to be the same point size as the body text of the 
document for which they are intended. 
The following subsections describe each of MathType’s seven typesizes and how 
they are used: 
Full typesize     
Assigned to ordinary characters within most slots. This typesize corresponds to 
the size of text in the body of your word processing document. 
Subsc
r
ipt typesize    
Used for subscripts and superscripts attached to Full typesize characters. Also 
used in limits in integrals, summations, and other templates. 
Sub-subsc
r
ipt typesize    
Used for subscripts and superscripts to Subscript typesize characters or any 
other place a second level of size reduction is required. Also used for limit slots 
of templates inside the limits of other templates. For example, the Sub–subscript 
typesize would be used for a superscript occurring within a limit of integration. 
Symbol typesize  
Used for the oversize symbols in integral, summation, and product templates. 
Sub-symbol typesize    
Used for oversize symbols in Subscript typesize slots. 
99
control Library system:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Professional class. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
Use
r
1 typesize   
A general-purpose typesize to be used for whatever you want. 
Use
r
2 typesize 
A second general-purpose typesize. 
Automatic Size Assignments 
Each slot in a MathType equation has a typesize associated with it. When you 
insert characters into a slot, they are assigned the typesize of that slot. When you 
insert a template into a slot, the typesizes of the new slots are based on the 
typesize of the existing slot. For example, if an integral template is inside a 
Subscript typesize slot, its integrand slot is Subscript typesize, its integral sign is 
Sub-symbol typesize, and its limits are in Sub-subscript typesize. Although you 
may nest templates within templates to many levels, the typesizes automatically 
assigned to slots will never be any smaller than the Sub-subscript typesize, in 
accordance with standard mathematical typesetting rules. 
Explicit Size Assignments 
Faste
r
Size Changes 
M
ake use o
f
the User 1 
and User 2 types
i
zes 
i
nstead o
f
exp
li
c
i
t po
i
nt 
s
i
zes because th
i
a
ll
ows you to change 
the s
i
ze o
f
a
ll
such text 
by s
i
mp
l
y chang
i
ng the 
de
fi
n
i
t
i
on o
f
the 
types
i
ze. 
For most equation typing tasks, you will allow MathType to automatically assign 
typesizes to characters. Sometimes you might want to explicitly assign either a 
typesize or an explicit point size to characters, overriding MathType’s automatic 
typesize assignments. You do this in more or less the same way as in a word 
processor — you can either change the current size to the desired one before you 
begin typing, or you can assign a typesize or point size to selected characters 
after you type them. In both cases you choose the desired typesize from the Size 
menu (using the Other command for an explicit point size). Of course, there are 
keyboard shortcuts for all these operations. 
Spacing 
MathType’s formatting algorithms are controlled by a number of spacing 
dimensions, or measurements. These include subscript depth, numerator height 
in fractions, fraction bar overhang — thirty dimensions in all. You can adjust the 
values of any of these dimensions by using the Define Spacing command on the 
Format menu. This command displays a dialog that lets you scroll through the 
list of dimensions and change the value of any of them. For each dimension, it 
displays a picture illustrating the aspect of equation formatting that it controls. 
100
Chapter 7:  Fonts, Styles, Sizes and Spacing 
Last printed 8/20/2001 9:40 AM 
Units of 
M
easu
r
ement 
When entering new dimension values in MathType’s Define Sizes or Define 
Spacing dialogs, you should understand MathType’s system of units. There are 
four units of measurement available: 
Units 
Abb
r
eviation 
inches 
in 
centimeters 
cm 
points 
pt 
picas 
pi 
It’s often a good idea to specify a dimension as a percentage of your Full 
typesize, because then you won’t need to change it in the event that you change 
typesizes. As an example, suppose your Full typesize is defined as 12 points. If 
you set your Subscript Depth dimension to 25%, then your subscripts will be 
shifted 3 points below the baseline, but if you later change your Full typesize to 
10 points, your subscripts will be shifted down only 2.5 points. 
Equation P
r
efe
r
ences     
The definitions of all the styles, sizes, and spacing used in an equation are 
referred to collectively as “equation preferences”. The equation preferences used 
to create an equation are saved with that equation. Changes you make using the 
Define Styles, Sizes, and Spacing dialogs in one equation will not be reflected in 
equations you have already created. However, if you leave the “Use for new 
equations” box checked in each of these dialogs, MathType saves the equation 
preferences in a special place. The next time you create a new equation, it will 
start off with those preferences. 
There is a more advanced technique, discussed below, that allows you to save 
equation preferences in a file. You can then use this file to set the preferences of 
any equation you create in the future. 
Using P
r
efe
r
ence Files 
MathType’s Preference files are somewhat analogous to style sheets in a word 
processing application. They provide a quick and consistent way to switch 
between various MathType configurations of styles, sizes, and spacing as set 
using the Define Styles, Define Sizes, and Define Spacing dialog boxes. 
101
MathType User Manual 
102
M
ic
r
osoft 
W
o
r
d Use
r
M
athType’s support 
f
or 
Mi
croso
f
t Word a
ll
ows 
you to save 
M
athType’s 
sty
l
es, s
i
zes, and 
spac
i
ng w
i
th a 
document, or a 
document temp
l
ate. For 
Word users, th
i
i
better than us
i
ng 
pre
f
erence 
fil
es. See 
“Us
i
ng 
M
athType w
i
th 
Mi
croso
f
t Word” 
i
Chapter 5. 
L
oading P
r
efe
r
ence 
F
I
les 
Y
ou can a
l
so 
l
oad a 
pre
f
erence 
fil
e by 
dropp
i
ng 
i
ts 
i
con onto a 
M
athType w
i
ndow. 
Doub
l
e-c
li
ck
i
ng a 
pre
f
erence 
fil
e a
l
so 
l
oads the 
fil
e. Both 
methods on
l
y a
ff
ect new 
equat
i
ons, not any open 
M
athType w
i
ndows. 
Facto
r
y Settings 
Y
ou can reset 
j
ust the 
sty
l
es, s
i
zes, or spac
i
ng 
by c
li
ck
i
ng “Factory 
sett
i
ngs” 
i
n the De
fi
ne 
Sty
l
es, S
i
zes, or 
Spac
i
ng d
i
a
l
ogs. 
The ability to quickly change style definitions is the most basic example of the 
use of multiple Preference files. Suppose you generally write equations in Times 
New Roman, but for a particular type of document you want to use Arial 
instead. You can create two Preference files: one in which the Text, Function, 
Variable, Vector-Matrix, and Number styles are defined as Arial (with the 
appropriate character styles), and the other in which these styles are defined as 
Times New Roman. Then, by using the Load Preferences command, you can 
quickly set up the desired style definitions for either type of document by 
choosing the corresponding Preference file.  
Saving and 
L
oading P
r
efe
r
ence Files 
To create a Preference file, first set up the styles, sizes, and spacing as you would 
like to save them. Then, choose Save To File from the Equation Preferences 
submenu of the Preferences menu. A dialog box will appear, allowing you to 
name the file and specify its location. It might be a good idea to save each 
Preference file in the same directory as the documents that use it. Or, you may 
want to use the Preferences folder in the MathType folder. 
To load a Preference file, you can either choose Load Preferences from the 
Equation Preferences submenu of the Preferences menu and use the dialog box 
to locate the desired file, or, if the file is one of the four most recently used, you 
can load it by choosing its name from the bottom of the Preferences menu. When 
you load a Preference file, all the settings it contains will be immediately applied 
to the current MathType window. A dialog box also appears, which lets you 
apply these settings to new equations as well. Remember that this includes 
styles, sizes, and spacing definitions. 
I
nstalled P
r
efe
r
ence Files 
MathType Setup installs a set of preference files that we’ve put together to show 
you how you might make use of this feature. They’re in the Preferences folder 
inside your MathType folder. The names are self-explanatory — 
Times+Symbol 10.eqp sets the primary font to Times New Roman, the 
Math
/
Greek font to Symbol, and Full size to 10 pt. The Euclid-based preference 
files use Euclid as the primary font and Euclid Symbol for the Math
/
Greek font. 
TeXLook.eqp is based on Euclid 10.eqp, but we’ve also adjusted some spacing 
settings to generate equations with a look similar to that of 
T
E
X
Facto
r
y Settings 
Sometimes, especially if you are a new MathType user, you may want to restore 
MathType’s styles, sizes, and spacing to the settings that were in use the first 
time you ran it. You can do this for all of the equation preferences at once by 
choosing Load from Factory Settings from the Equation Preferences submenu of 
the Preferences menu. 
Chapter 8:  Advanced Formatting 
Chapte
r
Advanced Fo
r
matting 
I
nt
r
oduction 
MathType’s automatic formatting will produce good results most of the time. 
However, it’s impossible for MathType to always know what you intend, or 
what an equation means. After all, MathType isn’t a mathematician and hasn’t 
read your entire document! This chapter describes some of the techniques that 
are available for doing more advanced formatting tasks. It also discusses 
MathType’s built-in font and character knowledge and how you can extend it. 
Ove
rr
iding Automatic Spacing 
If you have a current style that is something other than Text, User 1, or User 2, 
the spacebar is disabled in MathType, so that accidentally pressing it will not 
interfere with MathType’s automatic formatting. However, you can still insert 
spaces of various sizes by choosing space symbols from the Symbol Palettes. You 
can also insert spaces using keyboard shortcuts, as follows: 
I
con 
K
eyst
r
oke 
Alte
r
native 
K
eyst
r
oke  Desc
r
iption 
S
HIFT
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,0 
Zero space 
C
TRL
+A
LT
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,1 
One point space 
C
TRL
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,2 
Thin space (sixth of an em) 
C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,3 
Thick space (third of an em) 
None 
C
TRL
+K,4 
Em space (quad) 
Space Sizes 
A
th
i
ck space 
i
s exact
l
tw
i
ce as w
i
de as a th
i
space, so you can eas
il
produce a th
i
ck space 
s
i
mp
l
y by press
i
ng 
C
TR
L
+S
P
A
CE
tw
i
ce. 
Inserting spaces explicitly will override any automatic spacing that may be in 
effect at the location where you insert the spaces. You will get exactly the spacing 
you input explicitly. If you remove the explicit spaces, then the automatic 
formatting will go back into effect. 
In full-size slots, MathType uses thick spaces around relational operators such as
=
and
, and around arithmetic operators such as
+
and
; these spaces are 
not used when the operator is in a reduced-size slot such as a subscript. Thin 
spaces are often used between function abbreviations and their arguments, as in 
=
logsin .
y
x
103
MathType User Manual 
104
Seeing Spaces 
Choose the Show 
All
command on the 
Vi
ew 
menu to see the spaces 
you have p
l
aced 
i
n your 
equat
i
ons (but not the 
ones that 
M
athType 
i
nserted automat
i
ca
ll
y). 
You should manually insert thin spaces between differentials and other symbols, 
as in
.
dydx rdrd
θ
=
MathType thinks that
dy
dx
is d times y times d times x, and 
will not insert the thin space, so you have to insert it yourself. 
You may also have to adjust MathType’s spacing if you like to write open 
intervals in the form
]a,
b[ or
[a,
b[, rather than
(a,
b) or
[a,
b). For example, if 
you type all the [ symbols directly from the keyboard, the spacing in a formula 
like 
[
[
[
[
[
[
=
0,2
0,1
1,2  will not be correct. MathType will perform the spacing 
correctly if you use the 
template, rather than typing the brackets. Similar 
considerations apply to vertical bar symbols representing absolute value: if you 
type the bars as characters from the keyboard, rather than using the 
template, 
then you may have to adjust the spacing yourself. 
Another possible cause of a spacing error is typing an English word that includes 
a function abbreviation while your current style is Math. For example, if you try 
to type the word “single”, MathType will interpret this as the sine of g times l 
times e, and will produce something like “sin gle” or “sin gle”. The latter of these 
two might be acceptable if it were not for the thin space that was inserted. You 
can avoid this type of mistake by choosing Text from the Style menu before you 
begin typing a word. Alternatively, you can correct the situation later by 
selecting the offending word and then choosing the Text command from the 
Style menu. 
Nudging 
MathType’s Nudge commands allow you to exercise fine control over the 
placement of items in an equation. To nudge an item, you select it, and then use 
one of the following commands: 
C
TRL
+
 nudges the selected items to the left by one pixel  
C
TRL
+
 nudges the selected items upward by one pixel 
C
TRL
+
 nudges the selected items to the right by one pixel  
C
TRL
+
 nudges the selected items downward by one pixel 
The selected items are moved in small increments in the indicated direction. The 
size of the increment depends on the current display scale. If you’re viewing 
your equation at 100% scale the increment is 1 pt, 
1
2
pt at 200%, 
1
4
pt at 400%, and 
1
8
pt at 800%. These commands are for fine adjustments only — if you nudge 
things too far, you may have trouble selecting them, and the Show Nesting view 
will produce confusing results. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested