Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
To move a symbol or expression within the toolbar, hold down the A
LT
key and 
drag the item to its new location. You can insert an item between two others by 
dropping it between them. 
10. 
Try this by dragging the 
σ
symbol we added to the Small Bar in Step 3 to the 
Small Tabbed Bar. The choice of where to place an item is entirely up to you; a 
symbol or expression can be placed in any of the bars. 
Now let’s delete the 
σ
from the Small Tabbed Bar. 
11. 
Right-click on the 
σ
and select Delete from the context menu that appears. 
You may also want to delete the other expressions you added to the tabbed bars. 
Deleting 
T
oolba
r
I
tems 
A
nother way to de
l
ete 
an 
i
tem 
i
s to 
AL
T
-drag 
i
f
rom the bar and re
l
ease 
the mouse over an 
i
nva
li
d target, e.g. 
outs
i
de the 
M
athType 
w
i
ndow. 
K
eyboa
r
d Sho
r
tcuts  
K
eyboard shortcuts are 
covered 
i
n more deta
il
i
Tutor
i
a
l
16. 
I
nse
r
t Symbol Dialog 
Us
i
ng th
i
s d
i
a
l
og 
i
covered 
i
n more deta
il
i
Tutor
i
a
l
13. 
You can also change the names of the tabs to suit your particular situation.  
12. 
Double-click on the Statistics tab to open the Tab Properties dialog, where 
you can edit the tab’s name and change its keyboard shortcut. 
If you prefer typing to using the mouse, you may want to use the toolbar’s 
keyboard interface. You can give the keyboard focus to a toolbar component 
using the following keyboard commands: 
Symbol Palette 
F5 
Template Palette 
F6 
Small Bar 
F7 
Large Tabbed Bar 
F8 
Small Tabbed Bar 
F9 
Once a bar has the focus, you can use the left and right arrows to move the 
selection, and E
NTER 
to insert the selected item (or open its corresponding menu). 
The E
SC
key closes a menu, or returns the focus to the equation area. You can 
switch tabs by typing C
TRL
+F10, n where n is the number of the tab to activate. 
For example, typing C
TRL
+F10, 2 activates the second tab. 
Deciding 
W
hat to Place in the 
T
oolba
r
Some symbols and templates are used so frequently that you may not need to 
place them in the toolbar. You probably will have memorized the keyboard 
shortcuts for inserting them, so there’s not much to be gained by having them 
occupy valuable space in the toolbar. Greek symbols in particular fall into this 
category; once you’ve learned that you can insert a 
β
by pressing C
TRL
+G 
followed by b (referred to as C
TRL
+G,B), you probably won’t need to add these 
characters to the toolbar. 
It may make sense, however, to add characters from any special fonts you may 
have to the toolbar. The easiest method is to use the Insert Symbol dialog (choose 
the Insert Symbol command on the Edit menu), which is an extremely powerful 
tool for viewing the characters in a font. You can also A
LT
-drag characters from 
35
Best pdf to text converter - control application system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Best pdf to text converter - control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
this dialog to the toolbar. You can add as many characters from your fonts to the 
toolbar as can fit. Then you can enter these characters at any time into your 
equations, regardless of your current style definitions. 
That does it for Tutorial 5, so choose Select All (C
TRL
+A) from the Edit menu and 
press B
ACKSPACE
or D
ELETE
to clear the window for the next tutorial. 
T
uto
r
ial 6: Spacing and Alignment 
In our next example we introduce some of MathType’s facilities for controlling 
spacing and alignment in equations. We are going to create the following pair of 
equations: 
1
0
1
0
( )
limsup ( )
( ) ( )
limsup ( , )
n
n
n
n
ax dx
a
ax b x dx
ab
φ
ψ
→∞
→∞
Note that these equations are arranged so that their 
signs are vertically aligned, 
and they both contain a “lim sup” construction of a type that we have not used 
before. You can create these equations as follows: 
Expanding 
I
nteg
r
als 
I
ntegra
l
s
i
gns are 
norma
ll
y a constant 
s
i
ze. 
Y
ou can create an 
expand
i
ng 
i
ntegra
l
by 
ho
l
d
i
ng down the S
H
I
FT
key wh
il
e you choose an 
i
ntegra
l
temp
l
ate 
f
rom 
the 
i
ntegra
l
s pa
l
ette. 
Pa
r
entheses 
T
emplate 
Y
ou may pre
f
er to use 
the temp
l
ate 
i
nstead o
f
typ
i
ng ( and ). Us
i
ng the 
temp
l
ate can g
i
ve your 
document a more 
cons
i
stent 
l
ook. The 
temp
l
ate a
l
so 
i
nc
l
udes 
more space around 
i
t, 
so you may not need to 
add the th
i
n space as 
shown here. We’re 
try
i
ng to teach you the 
d
iff
erent ways to create 
equat
i
ons; obv
i
ous
l
y the 
fi
na
l
cho
i
ce 
i
s up to you
!
1. 
Insert a definite integral template by clicking on the
icon or by pressing 
C
TRL
+I, type in the integrand (the large slot), and fill in the
0
and
1
as the limits 
of integration (the two small slots). You probably won’t want the parentheses in 
the integrand to be of the “expanding” variety, so you can just type them from 
the keyboard, rather than using the 
template. Your equation should now look 
like this: 
2. 
To improve the appearance of our equation, we should insert a thin space 
(one sixth of an em) in between the a(x) and the dx in the integrand. MathType 
can not do this automatically, so we provide you with a convenient way of 
manually entering a space of the correct size. The 
palette provides a set of 
five icons representing commonly used spaces, as shown in the following table. 
I
con 
K
eyst
r
oke 
Alt. 
K
eyst
r
oke 
Desc
r
iption 
S
HIFT
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,0 
Zero space 
C
TRL
+A
LT
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,1 
One point space 
C
TRL
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,2 
Thin space (sixth of an em) 
C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+S
PACE
C
TRL
+K,3 
Thick space (third of an em) 
None 
C
TRL
+K,4 
Em space (quad) 
36
Place the insertion point between the “)” and the “d” by clicking there, and insert 
a thin space either by choosing the 
icon (it’s on the right in the top row of the 
palette) or by pressing C
TRL
+S
PACEBAR
control application system:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
37
Show Nesting 
The Show Nest
i
ng 
command on the 
Vi
ew 
menu shows the 
d
iff
erent s
l
ots and can 
he
l
p you avo
i
d mak
i
ng 
m
i
stakes. 
One-Shot Sho
r
tcuts 
The shortcuts that a
ff
ect 
j
ust the next character 
typed are descr
i
bed 
i
more deta
il
i
n Chapter 7. 
3. 
Move the insertion point out of the integrand slot, into the position shown 
below. You must do this for the alignment commands to work properly. Don’t 
create the rest of the equation within the integrand slot. 
4. 
Click on the 
sign in the Small Bar. 
5. 
Now we want to build the “lim sup” structure. We begin by clicking on the 
icon in the 
Palette. This icon represents an underscript template: any 
characters entered in the upper slot will be full size, and those in the lower slot 
will be reduced to “subscript” size. 
6. 
The insertion point is positioned in the upper slot, so you can type in 
limsup. MathType will use your “Function” style (probably a plain style) for 
these characters, and will insert a thin space between the “lim” and the “sup”. 
7. 
Move the insertion point down into the lower slot by clicking in it or by 
pressing the T
AB
key, and enter
n
→∞
. The
and
symbols are very common 
in mathematics, so they’ve been added to MathType’s default Small Bar. They’re 
also available in the Symbol Palettes, of course. Following typesetting 
conventions (as always), MathType will not create any spacing around the 
symbol, since it is in a “subscript,” but you can insert spaces, if you want to. 
8. 
Press T
AB
to move the insertion point out of the lower slot, and type in the 
rest of this first equation. The speedy way to do this is to just type C
TRL
+G f 
C
TRL
+L n T
AB
( a ). If you like the C
TRL
+G shortcut, you may be interested to 
know that there are a few others that work in a similar fashion. If you press 
C
TRL
+U, for example, the next character you type will be assigned the User 1 
style that you have defined with the Define command on the Style menu. In this 
way, you can access any character in any font with just two keystrokes, even if 
it’s not present in the Symbol Palettes. 
9. 
Press the E
NTER
key. This will create a new line directly beneath the first 
equation, so now you have a “pile” consisting of two lines. It should look like 
this: 
control application system:Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Buy Now. Raster XImage.Raster for .NET. Best .NET imaging SDK Buy Now. OCR XImage.OCR for .NET. Scan text from raster images, like jpeg, tiff, scanned pdf.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
PDF Page in C#.NET Class. Best PDF document reader SDK control that can highlight PDF text in Visual C# .NET framework application.
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
38
Selecting a Slot 
Y
ou can doub
l
e-c
li
ck 
i
a s
l
ot to se
l
ect 
i
ts 
contents, or type 
C
TR
L
+S
H
I
FT
+S. 
10. 
To save time, we’re going to create the second equation by modifying a copy 
of the first one. Select the entire first equation by double-clicking somewhere 
near its 
sign, copy it to the clipboard, and then paste it into the new empty slot. 
You should now have two identical copies of the first equation, one directly 
beneath the other. Now just edit the lower copy to produce the second equation. 
To change the 
φ
to a 
ψ
just select the 
φ
and press C
TRL
+G followed by y
11. 
Finally, we’re going to experiment with some different ways of aligning the 
two equations. You can center or right-justify them by using the Align Center 
and Align Right commands on the Format menu. Give this a try, just to see how 
it looks. 
12. 
In fact, you will probably want to align these two equations so that their 
signs are directly above one another. To do this, we choose the Align at = 
command from the Format menu. It will work even though we have 
signs 
rather than = signs. You can align the equations in other ways by using 
alignment symbols. You simply insert an alignment symbol in each equation at 
the two points that you’d like to have aligned. (However, note that alignment 
symbols inserted into template slots will not work.) Placing an alignment symbol 
to the right of each of the two 
signs would give the same results as using the 
Align at = command, for instance. The alignment symbol is represented by the 
icon in the Symbol Palettes — it’s located in the 
palette.  
13. 
You may also want to adjust the line spacing, or leading, i.e. the amount of 
vertical space between the two equations. You can do this by placing the 
insertion point somewhere in the outermost slot of the second equation (not 
within a template), or by selecting the second equation, and choosing the Line 
Spacing command from the Format menu. When you’ve arranged them to your 
liking, the equations are complete.  
Now that we’re done with these equations, it’s time to choose Select All from the 
Edit menu and press B
ACKSPACE
to clear your window for the next tutorial. 
T
uto
r
ial 7: A Simple 
M
at
r
ix 
In our next tutorial, we illustrate MathType’s powerful capabilities for laying out 
matrices. We will construct the following matrix equation: 
11
12
21
22
( ) det(
)
a
a
p
a
a
λ
λ
λ
λ
=
=
I A
The matrix is a fairly simple one, and we’ll be able to create it very easily by 
using a matrix template. If you need more flexible formatting capabilities for 
matrices and tabular layouts, you should use tabs, as illustrated in Tutorial 11. 
1. 
Type the first few terms of the equation, up to the second equals sign. 
MathType will recognize that “det” is an abbreviation for the determinant 
control application system:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET An advanced .NET WPF PDF converter library for converting Export PDF text content to TXT file with original
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
function, and will automatically set it in plain roman type, so you don’t have to 
fiddle with it. The quick way to get a
λ
is to press C
TRL
+G followed by a letter 
(ell). Also, note that the I and the A represent matrices, so we have assigned 
them the Vector-Matrix style, which causes them to appear in bold type. The 
C
TRL
+B shortcut will assign the Vector-Matrix style to the next character, so you 
can press C
TRL
+B followed by I to get the I, and C
TRL
+B followed by A for the A
Alternatively, you can just type all the characters first, and then select them and 
change their styles using the commands on the Style menu. Either way, your 
equation should end up looking like this: 
2. 
Type the second  =  sign and insert a vertical bar template by choosing the 
icon. It’s located in the 
palette. 
3. 
Insert a 2
×
2 matrix template inside the vertical bars by choosing the 
icon 
from the 
palette. Your equation should now look like this: 
4. 
The insertion point will be in the top left slot of the 2
×
2 matrix, so enter the 
expression
λ
– a
11
there. 
D
r
ag and D
r
op 
Y
ou can a
l
so drag the 
term and drop 
i
i
n the 
other s
l
ots. Remember 
to ho
l
d down the C
TR
L
key to copy the term. 
5. 
We’re feeling lazy, so we’re going to create the other entries in the matrix by 
cutting and pasting. Select the
λ
– a
11
by double-clicking on it, copy it to the 
Clipboard, and paste it into the other three slots in the matrix. The result should 
be as shown below; it’s not right, of course, but we’re going to fix it up in a few 
moments. 
39
control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class. Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. XDoc.Windows Viewer. XDoc.Converter. View & Process. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
6. 
Next, we’re going to put a little extra space between the vertical bars and the 
elements of the matrix. This is purely a matter of taste, so you can skip this part if 
you’d prefer to keep your matrix looking the way it does at present. Before we 
enter the spaces, we need to position the insertion point so that it’s inside the 
vertical bars but to the left of and outside the matrix. You can do this by clicking 
somewhere near the position indicated by the arrow pointer in the preceding 
picture. Then just enter one or two thin spaces by pressing C
TRL
+S
PACEBAR
. Do 
the same on the right-hand side of the matrix. If you choose the Show All 
command from the View menu, you’ll be able to see your spaces. They should 
look like this: 
7. 
After the brief digression in Step 6, it’s now time to correct the entries in our 
matrix. First, delete the 
λ
from the upper right slot. The quickest way to do this is 
to place the insertion point to the right of it and press B
ACKSPACE
(or Backspace). 
Do the same with the 
λ
in the lower left slot. Notice that MathType adjusts the 
spacing after the minus signs to reflect the fact that they are now unary operators 
rather than binary operators (negation rather than subtraction).  
8. 
Change all the subscripts in the matrix to their desired values. The “11” in 
the upper left slot is correct already, but we should have “12” in the upper right 
slot, “21” in the lower left, and “22” in the lower right. You can double-click on 
the existing subscripts to select them, and then type the correct values over them, 
just as you would in a word processor. Your equation should now look like this: 
M
odifying a 
M
at
r
ix 
The 
M
atr
i
x submenu on 
the Format menu 
conta
i
ns commands 
f
or 
add
i
ng and de
l
et
i
ng 
rows and co
l
umns. 
9. 
The equation is now essentially complete, although there are a few more 
formatting options that you may want to try out. First, you might want to shift 
the entire matrix down so that its top row is aligned with the rest of the equation. 
To do this, place the insertion point anywhere in the matrix and choose Align at 
Top from the Format menu. Also, it might be nice to right justify the entries in 
each column. To do this, place the insertion point somewhere in the matrix, 
choose the Change Matrix command from the Matrix submenu on the Format 
menu, and click on the button labeled “Right” in the dialog box.  
Finally, if you object to the fact that MathType tightened the spacing after the 
unary minus signs, you can put the spaces back in again, though this would 
mean deviating from standard typesetting conventions. They should be thick 
spaces (one third of an em). The thick space is the middle one in the second row 
40
control application system:C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
of the 
palette. If you prefer to use the keyboard, you can insert a thick 
space by pressing C
TRL
+S
HIFT
+S
PACE
. Alternatively, since a thick space is the 
same width as two thin spaces, you can get the same results by pressing 
C
TRL
+S
PACE
twice. 
If you elected to make all of the modifications suggested in this step, your 
equation should look something like the picture below.  
If you’re going on to the next tutorial, press C
TRL
+A to select all, then press 
B
ACKSPACE
or D
ELETE
to clear your screen. 
T
uto
r
ial 8: Fonts and Styles 
This tutorial provides an introduction to MathType’s system of styles. We will 
demonstrate how to change the fonts in your equations by changing style 
definitions. Using styles will allow you to achieve the formatting you want 
quickly and easily, and enable you to create equations with a consistent 
appearance. See Chapter 7 for more information about styles, fonts and sizes. 
In the following steps, we will create the equation 
{
}
1
2
exp
(
)
u
x
φ
σ
= ⋅
+
 
and experiment with changing the look of the equation by using different style 
definitions. 
1. 
Check that the Status Bar’s Style panel displays “Math”. If it doesn’t, choose 
Math from the Style menu. If the Math style is not chosen, MathType’s automatic 
style assignment will not be in effect, and the rest of this tutorial will not make 
much sense. 
2. 
Create the equation, using the 
template for the fraction and inserting the 
φ
and 
σ 
by choosing them from the lowercase Greek palette, or by using the 
C
TRL
+G shortcut. The “ 
⋅ 
” operator is located on the 
palette. The equation 
should now look like this: 
41
MathType User Manual 
42
Define Styles 
Y
ou can a
l
so open th
i
d
i
a
l
og by doub
l
e-c
li
ck
i
ng 
i
n the Sty
l
e pane
l
o
f
the 
Status Bar. 
T
he 
T
E
X
L
ook  
We’ve 
i
nc
l
uded a 
M
athType pre
f
erence 
fil
e ca
ll
ed Te
XL
ook.eqp 
that conta
i
ns 
f
ont and 
spac
i
ng sett
i
ngs that 
make 
M
athType 
equat
i
ons 
l
ook 
li
ke 
T
E
X
I
t’s 
i
n the Pre
f
erences 
f
o
l
der 
i
ns
i
de your 
M
athType 
f
o
l
der. See 
Chapter 7 
f
or more 
deta
il
s on us
i
ng 
pre
f
erence 
fil
es. 
3. 
From the Style menu, choose Define. If necessary, click on the Simple button 
to display the dialog shown below. 
Change the “Primary font” to Euclid, change the “Greek and math fonts” to 
Euclid Symbol and Euclid Extra, as shown in the dialog above, and then click 
Apply. On screen, your equation will now look like this: 
and if printed will look like this: 
{
}
1
2
exp
(
)
u
x
φ
σ
=
+y
The Euclid fonts supplied with MathType are based on the Computer Modern 
fonts typically used with 
T
E
X
, so they give your documents a 
T
E
X
-like 
appearance that you might prefer for some types of work. Another benefit of the 
Euclid fonts is that their regular and Greek characters have a consistent size, 
whereas Times and Symbol are somewhat mismatched. Of course, if you use the 
Euclid fonts in your equations, you will probably want to use Euclid as the 
primary body font in your word processing document, too.  
3. 
Open the Define Styles dialog, and click on “Factory settings” to return to 
using the Times and Symbol fonts. 
4. 
Click on the Advanced button to display a more extensive form of the 
Define Styles dialog. This is shown below: 
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
TI
The changes you make 
i
n th
i
s d
i
a
l
og app
l
y to 
the current equat
i
on. 
Check “Use 
f
or new 
equat
i
ons” to use the 
sett
i
ngs 
f
or new 
equat
i
ons as we
ll
M
o
r
e About Styles 
The sub
j
ect o
f
M
athType’s sty
l
es 
i
covered 
i
n more deta
il
i
Chapter 7. 
The names of the eleven styles are listed in the dialog box, together with the font 
and character style assigned to each. The equation you have just created uses the 
Function, Variable, L.C. Greek, Number, and Symbol styles. The letters “exp” are 
recognized as the abbreviation for the exponential function, and are assigned the 
Function style; ux, and y are treated as variables and assigned the Variable 
style; 
φ
and 
σ
, being lowercase Greek letters, are assigned the L.C. (lowercase) 
Greek style, and the numbers in the fraction use the Number style. The symbols 
=, 
, (, ), and + use the Symbol style. (The angle brackets and fraction bar are 
internal to MathType and do not use a style.) These styles are applied 
automatically as you create the equation, because you are using the Math style 
mode. This automatic style assignment is the advantage you gain by using the 
Math style mode when creating equations. 
We’re going to change some of the styles so you understand how they affect an 
equation’s appearance. Normally you wouldn’t work this way, you’d change 
fonts using the Simple version of this dialog. 
5. 
Choose a new font for the Function style. The style is probably defined as 
Times or Times New Roman. Press on the arrow next to the font name in the 
Function row and choose a different font. You will want to choose a font that 
looks noticeably different from Times, so that the effect of the change will be 
obvious. A good choice would be a sans serif font such as Arial. 
43
MathType User Manual 
6. 
Choose the OK button. Your equation will be redisplayed using the new 
Function style definition. Your equation should now look like this: 
The function abbreviation, exp, is displayed using the new font. Of course, you 
probably wouldn’t want your equation to look like this — we’re simply 
demonstrating the effect of changing the Function style definition. 
The Variable style definition is used for all ordinary alphabetic characters except 
for the ones in function abbreviations. In the current equation, this includes ux
and y. Very often, according to convention, the only difference you want 
between the Variable and Function styles is for the Variable style to be defined as 
italic. Let’s redefine the Variable style so that it’s consistent with the new 
Function style definition. 
Choosing Fonts 
A
f
ast way to se
l
ect a 
f
ont 
i
s to c
li
ck 
i
n the 
li
st 
and then type the 
fi
rst 
l
etter o
f
the name. 
Y
ou 
can a
l
so use the scro
ll
bar 
i
n the 
li
st to move 
around qu
i
ck
l
y. 
7. 
Again, choose Define from the Style menu. In the Define Styles dialog box, 
press on the arrow next to font name in the Variable row, and choose the same 
font assigned to the Function style. Check that the italic character style is checked 
for Variable, but not for Function. 
Let’s also change the Number style so that it uses the same font as Function and 
Variable. You will find that this makes the equation look better. Finally, turn off 
the italic character style for the L.C. Greek style by removing the check in the 
Character Style column. Lowercase Greek letters are usually italicized, but let’s 
experiment with this. Note that for the two Greek styles and the Symbol style 
you can only assign fonts with the same encoding (arrangement of characters) as 
the Symbol font. This typically restricts your choice to the Symbol font, the 
Euclid Symbol font, or some other similar font. 
8. 
Choose the OK button. Your equation will be redisplayed using the new 
style definitions. If you are using the fonts we’ve recommended, the equation 
should now look like this: 
The “variables” ux, and y, and the numbers in the fraction
1
2
now use the new 
font definitions, and the lower-case Greek letters 
φ
and 
σ
are no longer italicized. 
You may want to use style definitions such as these for equations in a document 
in which the text is written in Arial or Tahoma. When printed, the equation will 
look like this: 
{
}
=φ⋅
σ +
1
2
exp
(
)
u
x y  
To reset the style definitions, open the Define Styles dialog and click “Factory 
settings”. 
44
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested