Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
9. 
Next, click on the 
tab well, and then click on the Ruler just to the left of 
the previous tab stop. This should produce the following results: 
You can now change the formatting easily by just dragging the tab stops around 
on the Ruler. 
10. 
Next, we’re going to align the two decimal points. To prepare for this, first 
remove the 
tab by dragging it downwards away from the Ruler and then 
releasing the mouse button. Next, click on the 
tab well, and then click on the 
Ruler at around the one inch mark to set a decimal tab stop. Your equation 
should end up looking like this: 
That’s it for this tutorial, so delete your equation to be ready for the next tutorial. 
T
uto
r
ial 13: 
I
nse
r
ting Unusual Symbols 
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to use MathType's Insert Symbol dialog to locate 
and use symbols that are not readily available in the built-in palettes. Suppose, 
for example, that you are going to be writing a document about some newly-
invented operations on sets that are analogous to conventional union and 
intersection. You will want to find symbols to represent your new set operations, 
and it would be nice if these were similar to the conventional 
and 
symbols. 
Your first attempt might be to use bold versions of the conventional symbols to 
represent your new operations, like this: 
A
B
A
B
=
A
B
A
B
=
Unfortunately, the bold symbols look too much like the regular ones, so we'll try 
to find a better solution. 
1. 
Create the equations as shown above.  
55
Convert pdf scanned image to text - control software system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf scanned image to text - control software system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
2. 
From MathType’s Edit menu, choose Insert Symbol. The following dialog 
will appear: 
This dialog is somewhat similar to the one in Microsoft Word, and to the 
Windows Character Map accessory, which you may already know how to use.  
Getting Detailed 
H
elp 
To get deta
il
ed 
i
n
f
ormat
i
on about the 
I
nsert Symbo
l
d
i
a
l
og, 
c
li
ck on the He
l
p button 
near 
i
ts upper r
i
ght-hand 
corner. 
You can use the Insert Symbol dialog to browse all the fonts available on your 
computer, and investigate MathType’s knowledge of them. Specifically, you can: 
• Insert a specific character or mathematical symbol into your equation. 
• Add a frequently used symbol to the toolbar. 
• Add a keyboard shortcut for a frequently used symbol. 
• Find a symbol by matching words in its description. 
3.
The first place to look for usable symbols is the Symbol font, so select 
Symbol from the list of fonts near the top of the Insert Symbol dialog. A quick 
way to locate a font is to click on the list and then type the first letter or two of 
the font’s name. Once the desired font is selected you can scroll through the large 
grid of characters in the center of the dialog, looking for likely prospects. 
56
control software system:C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET convert image to PDF NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images C#.NET PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Convert TIFF to PDF in C#.NET Overview. page or multi-page TIFF file to scanned PDF document using C# are searching for both single and batch image and document
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
57
L
a
r
ge
r
Symbol Display 
To en
l
arge the 
characters 
i
n the 
I
nsert 
Symbo
l
d
i
a
l
og, choose 
Workspace Pre
f
erences 
f
rom 
M
athType's 
Pre
f
erences menu, and 
set Too
l
bar s
i
ze to 
M
ed
i
um or 
L
arge. 
Choosing Fonts 
A
qu
i
ck way 
i
s to c
li
ck 
i
the 
li
st and then type the 
fi
rst 
l
etter o
f
the name. 
Y
ou can a
l
so use the 
scro
ll
bar 
i
n the 
li
st to 
move around qu
i
ck
l
y. 
K
eyboa
r
d Sho
r
tcuts 
The 
I
nsert Symbo
l
d
i
a
l
og a
ll
ows you to 
ass
i
gn a keyboard 
shortcut to any 
character 
i
n any 
f
ont. 
4.
You might also look in the Euclid Symbol and Wingdings fonts. Note that 
the Insert Symbol dialog tells you that Symbol and Euclid Symbol have the same 
"encoding" (arrangement of characters). So, if you don’t find the characters you 
need in one of these two fonts, you won’t find them in the other, either. 
5.
The Insert Symbol dialog actually provides a more intelligent way to search 
for the characters you need, rather just browsing through fonts. In the View by 
field, choose Description. Click on the New Search button, type the word union
and choose OK. The grid of characters will now show you several union-like 
symbols. 
6.
In the Insert Symbol dialog, uncheck “Show one of each” to see all the 
characters on your computer that MathType knows about, and which have the 
word "union" in their names. Depending on which fonts you have installed, 
there may be a few dozen such characters. If you are overwhelmed by the vast 
array of characters shown, click on “Show one of each” to reduce the number. 
This causes the dialog to display only one character (from the first font that 
contains it) for each description matched by the search criteria. 
7.
Click on a few of the promising-looking union characters, to see what 
MathType can tell you about them. Among other things, MathType will give you 
a description of the character, the font in which it was found, and the 
corresponding keystroke. 
8.
One of the characters you should see is a double union symbol 
!
from the 
Euclid Math Two font. Let's assume that we want to use this, provided we can 
find a corresponding symbol for intersection. 
9.
Using the techniques outlined above, search for symbols with "intersection" 
in their names. You should find a double intersection symbol 
"
, again in the 
Euclid Math Two font. 
10.
In the “View by” list choose Font, and select Euclid Math Two from the list 
of fonts near the top of the Insert Symbol dialog. Scroll down to the bottom of the 
character grid until you see the 
!
and 
"
symbols. Nearby in the character grid, 
you will see the square-shaped union and intersection symbols, 
#
and 
$
. Our 
search did not find these because their names are derived from the Unicode 
standard, which calls them "square cup" and "square cap" respectively. 
11.
You can click on Insert to insert symbols directly from the Insert Symbol 
dialog. However, if you're going to be using them repeatedly, you'll want to 
place them on one of MathType's bars for easier access. Press (and hold down) 
the A
LT
key and drag the 
!
character from the grid in the Insert Symbol dialog to 
the Small Bar. Then do the same for the 
"
symbol. See Tutorial 5 for more 
information about working with MathType's toolbars. 
control software system:C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
Get BasePage and Convert it to Extract Text from Scanned PDF. In addition to raster image files, text extraction from PDF is also supported by our OCR toolkit
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
12.
Edit your equations to use the new symbols: 
A
B
A
B
=
!
A
B
A
B
=
"
MathType knows all about the Euclid Math Two font, so it realizes that the 
!
and 
"
symbols are binary operators, just like 
and 
, and it puts the correct 
spacing around them automatically. If you use characters from more obscure 
fonts, you'll have to take a few extra steps to get this automatic spacing to work. 
To learn more about MathType's knowledge of fonts, and how you can extend it, 
see Chapter 8. 
T
uto
r
ial 14: C
r
eating 
W
eb Pages with 
M
ic
r
osoft 
W
o
r
The Export to MathPage command provides the easiest way to convert Microsoft 
Word documents containing equations into Web pages. It’s based on Word’s 
Save as Web Page command, but solves the problems this command has 
handling equations. Chapter 6 contains more details on the background behind 
this process; this tutorial will show you how easy it is to produce great-looking 
technical Web pages. 
1.
Open Microsoft Word and create a new document containing the following: 
We know that an equation of the form 
=
+
+
2
y
ax
bx
c
has two roots, 
but the roots are not always distinct. Take, for example, the equation 
(1.1) 
(
)(
)
=
+
+
=
+
+
2
4
4
2
2
y
x
x
x
x
.
From equation (1.1), we can see that 
=−
=
2 when  0.
x
y
Create the equations using the MathType commands Insert Inline Equation and 
Insert Right-Numbered Display Equation. Create the reference using the Insert 
Equation Reference command. Refer to Tutorial 6 if you don’t remember how to 
align the two lines of the display equation. 
58
control software system:C# TWAIN - TWAIN Scanning in C# Overview
to the application where you can view, convert, process, annotate Easy to save scanned image to PC local file in the file in C#.NET project, like PDF and TIFF.
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:C# PDF - Acquire or Save PDF Image to File
with the process of scanning from device and convert the images new REImage(bmp); } // form a PDF document using image collection scanned PDFDocument doc
www.rasteredge.com
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
59
Save As 
W
eb Page vs. 
Expo
r
ting 
Word’s Save as Web 
Page command saves 
the current document as 
a Web page and keeps 
i
t open 
f
or ed
i
t
i
ng. 
Y
ou 
have a document that 
can be v
i
ewed 
i
n a Web 
browser and opened 
i
Word. 
M
athPage expo
r
ts a 
Web page, wh
i
ch means 
that you end up w
i
th two 
documents; the or
i
g
i
na
l
Word document, and the 
Web page 
i
tse
lf
(wh
i
ch 
i
s not ed
i
tab
l
i
n Word). 
Discove
r
ing 
M
ath
Z
oom 
Y
ou may want to add a 
note to your Web s
i
te 
exp
l
a
i
n
i
ng how 
M
athZoom works so that 
your aud
i
ence w
ill
know 
to c
li
ck on the equat
i
ons 
to zoom them. 
2.
Save the Word document, naming it MathPageTutorial.doc. Then choose the 
Export to MathPage command on Word’s MathType menu (you can also click on 
the 
button on the MathType toolbar). The following dialog will appear: 
You’ll see the Title has already been filled in with the document’s Title property. 
You can modify this if you wish; the text will be displayed in the browser 
window’s title bar, and saved in the Word document’s Title property. 
3.
Make sure the other settings in the dialog are as shown above. If you and 
your audience aren’t using Internet Explorer 5 or newer, click the “All browsers” 
radio button. 
4.
Click OK. You’ll notice some activity on the screen, and a progress dialog 
that indicates the status of the exporting process. It shouldn’t take more than a 
few seconds for a small document like this. 
Your default browser will open, displaying a page which should look almost 
identical to your original Word document. If it didn’t open, or you didn’t have 
this option checked, start your browser and open the file you just generated 
(most browsers have an Open command for this purpose).  
5.
In your browser, notice how the inline equations are perfectly aligned with 
the surrounding text. Now let’s try the MathZoom feature. Move the mouse 
pointer over one of the equations and click. You’ll see a magnified version of the 
equation appear. This allows you to clearly see small items such as subscripts, 
superscripts and embellishments, even when the text is small. You can zoom in 
on as many equations as you like. Click again on an equation to revert back to its 
normal size. You can close all zoomed equations by holding down the S
HIFT
key 
and clicking in one of the zoomed equations. 
control software system:VB.NET TWAIN: Render and Convert TWAIN Acquired Image to Other
PDF, image PDF and image plus text PDF documents), single gif, bmp & png and vector image - svg It can render and convert scanned image into any TWAIN-compatible
www.rasteredge.com
control software system:VB.NET PDF - Acquire or Save PDF Image to File
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write
www.rasteredge.com
MathType User Manual 
This feature is controlled by the MathZoom checkbox in the MathPage dialog. 
You may want to disable it for documents where the zoom feature isn’t useful, 
for example when the equations are already large. Also, documents containing a 
large number (>100) of equations may download slightly faster with MathZoom 
turned off. Otherwise, we suggest you always leave MathZoom on. 
6.
Print the Web page using the browser’s Print command. Notice how nicely 
the equations appear, and that they match the quality of the document’s text. 
Even though MathPage is using GIF images the equations print with laser-
printer quality. 
Copying Equations 
The ab
ili
ty to drag an 
equat
i
on to 
M
athType 
can be very use
f
u
l
, but 
you cannot use 
i
t to 
mod
if
y the Web page
!
M
athPage generates 
mu
l
t
i
p
l
e vers
i
ons o
f
each equat
i
on, and 
you’d have to ed
i
t a
ll
o
f
them 
i
dent
i
ca
ll
f
or th
i
to work. To mod
if
y the 
equat
i
ons you shou
l
ed
i
t the or
i
g
i
na
l
Word 
document and run the 
M
athPage command 
aga
i
n. 
Expo
r
t to 
M
athPage 
The eas
i
est way to 
create techn
i
ca
l
Web 
pages 
i
s to use 
M
athType’s Export to 
M
athPage command 
i
Word. See Tutor
i
a
l
14 
and Chapter 6 
f
or more 
i
n
f
ormat
i
on. 
7.
If you’re using Internet Explorer, click and drag one of the equations to a 
MathType window. A new MathType window opens containing the equation. 
This great feature means that you and people who view your pages can make 
use of the equations without having to re-create them. 
You’ll see that the equation number and reference display properly too. Equation 
number references also act as hyperlinks to the equation number they reference, 
although you’ll need a larger document to see this in action. 
If you want to experiment some more, you can modify the Word document and 
run the Export to MathPage command again. Although it’s possible to directly 
edit the Web page, we strongly recommend that you perform your editing in 
Word. The generated Web page contains a lot of script blocks and if they’re 
incorrectly modified the page may not display properly in a browser. Try adding 
some more equations to the text, and perhaps some equation number references. 
You could also try adding a table to see how it appears in a Web page; in general 
tables should be used for alignment and layout rather than using tabs. 
For more information about MathPage see Chapter 6 of this manual, MathType’s 
online help and the MathType Web site at www.dessci.com
T
uto
r
ial 15: C
r
eating 
W
eb Pages with G
I
F Files 
This tutorial teaches you another way to create Web pages containing equations. 
This approach should be used when converting a Word document into a Web 
page using MathPage is not appropriate. It involves creating GIF equation files 
and inserting them into your pages. As MathType can output GIF files, it is an 
excellent tool this purpose. MathType will even generate the HTML (HyperText 
Markup Language — the basic language of the Web) needed to link your Web 
page to the newly generated MathType GIF file. MathType-generated GIF files 
have several advantages over GIF files produced in other ways: 
• They can be anti-aliased to produce better-looking smoothed edges. 
• They are small (typically being monochrome), allowing for faster downloads. 
• They can be edited at a later date in MathType. 
60
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
• People can save the GIF file from the Web page, open it with MathType and 
then place it into other documents in any of MathType’s supported formats 
including WMF, EPS, 
A
T
E
X
L
, MathML (and PICT on Macintosh computers). 
I
nse
r
ting a G
I
F File 
I
nto a Document 
Adobe Ac
r
obat 
A
nother approach 
f
or 
creat
i
ng Web 
documents 
i
s to use 
A
dobe 
A
crobat’s PDF 
fil
f
ormat. Chapter 5 
conta
i
ns 
i
n
f
ormat
i
on 
about th
i
s approach. 
Automatic File 
Numbe
r
ing 
If
you are creat
i
ng 
l
ots o
f
equat
i
on 
fil
es 
M
athType 
can number them 
f
or 
you. Chapter 5 conta
i
ns 
more deta
il
s. 
Backg
r
ound Colo
r
The Web and G
I
Pre
f
erences d
i
a
l
og 
l
ets 
you contro
l
the 
background co
l
or o
f
the 
equat
i
on, 
i
nc
l
ud
i
ng 
mak
i
ng 
i
t transparent. 
Setting G
I
F Resolution 
Y
ou can set the 
reso
l
ut
i
on o
f
G
I
fil
es 
i
the Web and G
I
Pre
f
erences d
i
a
l
og. 
1. 
Run MathType and your HTML editing program. 
2. 
In MathType, choose the Web and GIF Preferences command from the 
Preferences menu. This dialog contains options for setting the GIF file’s 
resolution (dots per inch), the image’s background, and the HTML code to 
generate when the GIF file is saved. For now, check the “Copy HTML
/
Text to 
clipboard on GIF file save” item. 
3. 
Create a simple equation in MathType and choose Save As on the File 
Menu. 
4.
Select GIF File Format, type in the file name you desire, and save the 
equation in the same folder as your HTML document. MathType will generate 
HTML code for this equation and copy it to the clipboard. 
5.
Bring your HTML document to the front. 
6.
Place the insertion point where you want the equation to be inserted. If you 
are using a text editor you can paste the HTML into your document. If you are 
using a WYSIWYG HTML editor you will have to use its method for inserting 
plain HTML code (look for an “Insert HTML” or “View Source” command). 
7.
Save your HTML document and open it in your Web browser. You will see 
the equation embedded in your Web page. 
You can anti-alias MathType equations to improve their appearance in Web 
pages. This technique smoothes their edges and makes them look less jagged. 
8.
Switch back to MathType, open the Web and GIF Preferences dialog, check 
“Smooth edges (anti-aliasing)” and then close the dialog.  
9.
Save the MathType equation, then switch back to your browser and refresh 
the current page. You’ll see the appearance of the equation change. Anti-aliasing 
works better for some equations than others (in general it’s better on large 
equations than small ones).  
The default HTML code generated by MathType includes the GIF filename and 
its dimensions, and is sufficient for most cases. You can modify this code in the 
Web and GIF Preferences dialog; consult this dialog’s Help for more details. 
Saving an equation as a screen-resolution GIF image provides for fast 
downloads, but it will not print with laser-printer quality. For better printing, 
create the GIF at a higher resolution, at the cost of increased download time. For 
most uses 300 dpi is sufficient; higher resolutions aren’t noticeably better unless 
you’re printing on a very high-resolution device. 
61
MathType User Manual 
To use a high-resolution GIF, first generate it at a lower resolution, either 96 or 
120 dpi. Paste the HTML that MathType generates into your document, this 
contains the appropriate screen size for the equation in the browser. Now re-save 
the same file, using the same name but at a higher resolution. When displayed 
on the screen the browser will scale down the GIF. When printed, it will use the 
full resolution of the GIF. The screen display may not be as clean as the original 
low-resolution GIF, as the scaling can introduce jagged edges. You may need to 
experiment with a few different resolutions. 
Getting an equation to align with the baseline of the surrounding text can be an 
art unto itself. It typically involves using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and 
manual formatting. As standards evolve and Web browsers constantly change, 
it’s difficult to recommend a solution that works in all situations. MathML is a 
new standard for expressing math in Web pages. MathType can generate 
MathML — see Tutorial 17 and Chapter 6 for more details. Check the MathType 
Web site at www.dessci.com for our latest recommendations on this subject. 
T
uto
r
ial 16: Customizing the 
K
eyboa
r
W
atch the Status Ba
r
A
s you move the mouse 
over 
i
tems 
i
n the 
pa
l
ettes, 
M
athType’s 
status bar d
i
sp
l
ays a 
br
i
e
f
descr
i
pt
i
on o
f
the 
current 
i
tem, 
i
nc
l
ud
i
ng 
i
ts keyboard shortcut 
if
one has been de
fi
ned.  
MathType has built-in keyboard shortcuts for many of its commands, and the 
most commonly used symbols and templates. However, you can change any of 
MathType’s shortcuts, and you can also assign your own shortcuts for any items 
you place on the toolbar. See MathType’s online help for a complete list of the 
built-in shortcuts. 
We’ll start by defining a shortcut for a template that doesn’t already have one. 
1.
Let’s assume that you have to create several equations that include the 
template (open brackets). MathType does not define a shortcut for this template. 
To assign one, first choose the Customize Keyboard command on the Preferences 
menu. 
2.
The Customize Keyboard dialog will appear. The panel titled Command: 
contains a hierarchical list of all the MathType commands that can be assigned 
keyboard shortcuts. We want to assign one to a toolbar item, so click on the + 
next to the Toolbar Commands category. An indented list will appear 
underneath Toolbar Commands. Click on the + next to Templates in this list, and 
then on the + next to Fence Templates. 
3.
Select the Open Brackets item (you may have to scroll the list down a little 
for this item to appear). The template 
will appear in the panel next to the 
description so you can confirm you’ve selected the correct template. 
4.
Click in the edit box labeled “Enter new shortcut key(s)”. 
5.
Type C
TRL
+T, followed by [. Notice that a message appears below the box 
indicating that this shortcut is already assigned to the Left Bracket command. If 
62
Chapter 4:  Tutorials 
we were to assign this combination to the Open Brackets template, it would be 
removed from the Left Bracket command. When assigning new shortcuts always 
check that you don’t accidentally overwrite an existing shortcut.  
M
ultiple Sho
r
tcuts 
Y
ou can ass
i
gn more 
than one shortcut 
f
or the 
same command 
if
you 
des
i
re. 
Customize 
K
eyboa
r
The Custom
i
ze 
K
eyboard d
i
a
l
og 
l
ets you 
reset a command’s 
shortcut to 
i
ts de
f
au
l
sett
i
ng by se
l
ect
i
ng 
i
and c
li
ck
i
ng Reset 
Se
l
ect
i
on. C
li
ck Reset 
All
to reset every 
command’s shortcuts 
back to the
i
r or
i
g
i
na
l
sett
i
ngs. 
6.
Press backspace once, and then type A
LT
+[. This time there’s no current 
assignment. Now click the Assign button, and you’ll see the shortcut appear in 
the Current Keys list, as well as being appended to the Open Brackets item in the 
list of commands. 
7.
Click Close to close the dialog, then type C
TRL
+T followed by A
LT
+[. You’ll 
see the 
template appear in the equation window. 
As there are so many commands available in MathType, both one-key and two-
key shortcuts are supported. MathType defines shortcuts for many templates 
using the form C
TRL
+T followed by another character, which is why we used this 
particular combination. Of course, you’re free to define your own schemes as 
you see fit.  
Assigning a Sho
r
tcut to a 
T
oolba
r
Exp
r
ession 
8.
Make sure the Small Tabbed Bar is visible and click on the Algebra tab. 
We’re going to assign a shortcut to the
2expression, which should be the last 
item in the bar unless you’ve modified the contents. 
9.
Right-click on the item and choose the Properties command from the context 
menu that appears. In the Expression Properties dialog that opens you’ll see the 
same keyboard shortcut items we saw in the Customize Keyboard dialog. 
10. 
Enter the shortcut A
LT
+R for this expression and close the dialog. 
11. 
Type A
LT
+R, and
2will be inserted into the equation window. 
We could have assigned a shortcut for this expression using the Customize 
Keyboard dialog, but locating the command would have involved clicking on 
Toolbar Commands, Tabs, Tab 1, Small Bar, Expression 14. Right-clicking 
directly on the expression is a lot faster! 
T
uto
r
ial 17: 
W
o
r
king with T
E
X
A
T
E
X
L
&
M
ath
ML
This tutorial teaches you how to convert MathType equations into textual 
markup languages, such as 
T
E
X
A
T
E
X
L
, and MathML. Our main focus will be on 
A
T
E
X
L
, but techniques for other languages are very similar. 
In creating your 
A
T
E
X
L
document, we assume you will be running MathType at 
the same time as your usual 
T
E
X
system. 
Suppose you want to create the following paragraph in your 
A
T
E
X
L
document: 
In the quadratic formula 
63
MathType User Manual 
2
4
2
b
b
a
x
a
− ±
=
c
c
the discriminant
b
is the most important term  
2
−4a
The steps are as follows: 
1.
Type In the quadratic formula in your text editor. 
2.
Run MathType by choosing it from your Start menu. 
3.
From MathType’s Preferences menu, choose Translators. In the dialog that 
appears, set the options as shown below, and then choose OK. 
4.
Create the quadratic formula in MathType. 
5.
From MathType’s Edit menu, choose Select All and then Copy. 
6.
Switch back to your text editor, and choose Paste. This will insert the 
following text into your document: 
\[ 
x = \frac{{ - b\pm \sqrt {b^{2} - 4ac} }}{{2a}} 
\] 
If you are familiar with 
A
T
E
X
L
, you will recognize this as the 
A
T
E
X
L
source code 
for the quadratic formula. 
7.
Continue typing the discriminant, and then switch back to MathType. 
8.
Create the discriminant term 
.  
2
4
b
a
c
64
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested