pdf.js mvc example : Convert pdf file to txt file software control cloud windows web page asp.net class 430236060-part605

Creating  
Effective Teaching  
and Learning 
Environments
FirsT rEsuLTs From TALis
T e e a a c c h h i n n g  A A n n d  L L e a a r r n n i n n g  I I n n t t e e r n n a a t t i i o n n a a l  S S u u r r v v e y
Convert pdf file to txt file - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert scanned pdf to text word; changing pdf to text
Convert pdf file to txt file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to txt batch; convert pdf file to text document
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
convert pdf to openoffice text document; convert pdf scanned image to text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
convert pdf to text document; convert pdf to searchable text
Creating  
Effective Teaching and 
Learning Environments
First results From tAlis
Teaching And Learning International Survey
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
convert pdf to text doc; best pdf to text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
pdf image to text; convert pdf file to txt file
ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION
AND DEVELOPMENT
The OECD is a unique forum where the governments of 30 democracies work together to 
address the economic, social and environmental challenges of globalisation. The OECD is also at 
the forefront of efforts to understand and to help governments respond to new developments 
and concerns, such as corporate governance, the information economy and the challenges of an 
ageing population. The Organisation provides a setting where governments can compare policy 
experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practice and work to co-ordinate 
domestic and international policies.
The OECD member countries are: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, 
Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, 
Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, 
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Commission of 
the European Communities takes part in the work of the OECD. 
OECD Publishing disseminates widely the results of the Organisation’s statistics gathering and 
research on economic, social and environmental issues, as well as the conventions, guidelines and 
standards agreed by its members.
Cover illustration:
© Mike Kemp/Rubberball Productions/Getty Images
© Laurence Mouton/PhotoAlto Agency RF Collections/Inmagine ltb.
Corrigenda to OECD publications may be found on line at: www.oecd.org/publishing/corrigenda.
© OECD 2009
You can copy, download or print OECD content for your own use, and you can include excerpts from OECD publications, databases and multimedia 
products in your own documents, presentations, blogs, websites and teaching materials, provided that suitable acknowledgment of OECD as source 
and copyright owner is given. All requests for public or commercial use and translation rights should be submitted to rights@oecd.org. Requests for 
permission to photocopy portions of this material for public or commercial use shall be addressed directly to the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) 
at info@copyright.com or the Centre français d’exploitation du droit de copie (CFC) at contact@cfcopies.com.
This work is published on the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD. The 
opinions expressed and arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official 
views of the Organisation or of the governments of its member countries.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
convert pdf to plain text; convert pdf to openoffice text
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
message can be copied and pasted to PDF file by keeping NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
convert scanned pdf to text; convert pdf to txt format
3
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Foreword
The challenges facing education systems and teachers continue to intensify. In modern knowledge-based 
economies, where the demand for high-level skills will continue to grow substantially, the task in many countries 
is to transform traditional models of schooling, which have been effective at distinguishing those who are more 
academically talented from those who are less so, into customised learning systems that identify and develop 
the talents of all students. This will require the creation of “knowledge-rich”, evidence-based education systems, 
in which school leaders and teachers act as a professional community with the authority to act, the necessary 
information to do so wisely, and the access to effective support systems to assist them in implementing change.
The OECD’s Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) provides insights into how education systems 
are responding by providing the first internationally comparative perspective on the conditions of teaching 
and learning. TALIS draws on the OECD’s 2005 review of teacher policy, which identified important gaps in 
international data, and aims to help countries review and develop policies to make the teaching profession 
more attractive and more effective. TALIS is conceptualised as a programme of surveys, with successive 
rounds designed to address policy-relevant issues chosen by countries. 
With a focus in this initial round on lower secondary education in both the public and private sectors, TALIS 
examines important aspects of teachers’ professional development; teacher beliefs, attitudes and practices; 
teacher appraisal and feedback; and school leadership in the 23 participating countries. 
The results from TALIS suggest that, in many countries, education is still far from being a knowledge industry in the 
sense that its own practices are not yet being transformed by knowledge about the efficacy of those practices. The 
23 countries that have taken part in TALIS illustrate the growing interest in the lessons that might be learned from 
teacher policies and practices employed elsewhere. TALIS provides a first, groundbreaking instrument to allow 
countries to see their own teaching profession in the light of what other countries show can be achieved. Naturally, 
policy solutions should not simply be copies of other educational systems or experiences, but comparative analysis 
can provide an understanding of the policy drivers that contribute to successful teacher policies and help to situate 
and configure these policy drivers in the respective national contexts. 
TALIS is a collaborative effort by member countries of the OECD and partner countries within the TALIS 
organisational framework. In addition, collaboration and support from the European Commission has helped 
TALIS address important information needs of the Commission in its monitoring of progress towards the 
Lisbon 2010 goals. 
The report was produced by the Indicators and Analysis Division of the OECD Directorate for Education. 
The project has been led by Michael Davidson, who with Ben Jensen, co-ordinated the drafting and 
analysis for the report. The principal authors of the analytical chapters were: Michael Davidson (Chapter 3), 
Ben Jensen (Chapters 2, 5 and 7), Eckhard Klieme and Svenja Vieluf (Chapter 4), and David Baker (Chapter 6). 
Additional advice as well as analytical and editorial support was provided by Etienne Albiser, Tracey Burns, 
Ralph Carstens, Eric Charbonnier, Pedro Lenin García de León, Corinne Heckmann, Donald Hirsch, 
Miyako Ikeda, Maciej Jakubowski, David Kaplan, Juan Leon, Plamen Mirazchiyski, Soojin Park, Leslie Rutkowski, 
Andreas Schleicher, Diana Toledo Figueroa, Fons van de Vijver, Elisabeth Villoutreix and Jean Yip. Administrative 
support was provided by Isabelle Moulherat.
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Except to process PDF, Microsoft Office documents and such as OpenOffice document, CSV file and TXT
convert pdf file to text file; batch pdf to text
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
Load Text file from computer, stream and byte array. Conversion. • Convert ODT to PDF document (.pdf). • Convert ODS to PDF document (.pdf).
change pdf to text; convert pdf to txt format online
FOrEwOrD
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
The TALIS questionnaires were developed by an Instrument Development Expert Group (IDEG), led by the 
OECD Secretariat and comprising David Baker, Aletta Grisay, Eckhard Klieme and Jaap Scheerens. The 
administration of the survey and the preparation of the data underlying the report were managed by the 
Data Processing and Research Centre of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational 
Achievement (IEA), the appointed international contractor, together with its consortium members Statistics 
Canada and the IEA Secretariat. Dirk Hastedt and Steffen Knoll acted as co-directors of the consortium. 
The development of the report was steered by the TALIS Board of Participating Countries, which is chaired by 
Anne-Berit Kavli (Norway). Annex A3 of the report lists the members of the various TALIS bodies as well as 
the individual experts and consultants who have contributed to this report and to TALIS in general.
Barbara Ischinger
Director for Education, OECD
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Table of Contents
Foreword
3
readers Guide
15
Chapter 1  IntroductIon
........................
17
Overview of TALIS
18
Origins and aims of TALIS
19
Design of the TALIS survey
19
Population surveyed and sampling options
20
Choosing the policy focus of the first round of TALIS
20
Developing TALIS
.....................................................
21
Interpretation of the results
................................
22
Organisation of the report
22
Chapter 2A ProfIle of the teAcher PoPulAtIon And the SchoolS In whIch they work
...............
25 
Introduction
..................................................................
26
A profile of lower secondary education teachers
26 
Demographic profile of teachers
.......
26
Teachers’ educational attainment
.....
28
Teachers’ job experience and contractual status
29
A profile of the schools in which teachers work
31
School sector
..................................................
31
School size
31
School resources
32
School admission policies
34 
School autonomy
36 
School climate
39 
Chapter 3 the ProfeSSIonAl develoPment of teAcherS
47 
Highlights
48 
Introduction
..................................................................
49 
Chapter outline
51 
Level and intensity of participation in professional development
52 
Participation rates
52
Intensity of participation
53
Are there trade-offs between participation and intensity?
53
How much variation is there in the intensity of participation?
54
How does participation vary by teacher and school characteristics?
55
Types of professional development
57
Unsatisfied demand and development needs
59
What are the areas of greatest development need?
60 
Overall index of professional development need
62 
TablE Of COnTEnTs
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Support received by teachers for professional development
64
Compulsory professional development
64 
Financial support
.........................................
65 
Salary supplements
66 
Scheduled time
..............................................
66
What is the relation between support received and levels of participation?
................................................................
66
Induction and mentoring
........................
70
Barriers that prevent meeting demand
.......
72
No suitable development
72
Conflict with work schedule
73
Too expensive
.................................................
73
Other barriers
.................................................
73
Impact of professional development
74
How does perceived impact relate to participation?
75 
Conclusions and implications for policy and practice
76 
How much does the amount and profile of teachers’ professional development vary 
within and among countries?
..............
76 
How well are teachers’ professional development needs being met?
77 
How best should unsatisfied demand for professional development be addressed?
..............................................
78 
Further analysis of teachers’ professional development
79
Additional material
79 
Chapter 4 teAchIng PrActIceS, teAcherS’ BelIefS And AttItudeS
87 
Highlights
88
Introduction
..................................................................
89
Theoretical background and analytical framework
89 
Chapter outline
92
Beliefs about the nature of teaching and learning
92 
Country differences in profiles of beliefs about instruction
94 
Correlations between direct transmission and constructivist beliefs
95 
Variance distribution across levels
96 
Classroom teaching practice
97 
Country differences in profiles of classroom teaching practices
97 
Domain specificity of profiles of instructional practices
99 
Variance distribution across levels
100
Teacher’s professional activities: co-operation among staff
101
Country differences in profiles of co-operation among staff
101
Variance distribution across levels
103
Classroom environment
103 
Country differences in classroom environment
104
Variance distribution across levels
107
School-level environment: school climate
108 
Country differences in teacher-student relations
108 
Variance distribution across levels
110
Job-related attitudes: self-efficacy and job satisfaction
111 
Country differences in self-efficacy and job satisfaction
111
Variance distribution across levels
111
TablE Of COnTEnTs
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Understanding teachers’ professionalism: first steps in linking the school context and teachers’  
beliefs and practices to teachers’ perceived efficacy and the quality of the learning environment
........................
113 
Significance of context and background variables
113 
Effects of professional development activities
116 
Effects of beliefs on instructional practices 
118 
Effects of instructional practices on classroom disciplinary climate
118 
Effects of teachers’ co-operation on teacher-student relations
119
Determinants of teacher job satisfaction
119 
Conclusions and implications for policy and practice 
120
Teachers generally support modern constructivist beliefs about instruction, but there is scope  
for strengthening this support
120 
Teachers need to use a wider range of instructional strategies and techniques
.......................................................
121
There is scope to improve teacher effectiveness by extending teacher co-operation and linking  
this to an improved school climate
122 
Support of teachers’ classroom management techniques and a positive attitude towards the job
.............
122
Additional material
123 
Chapter 5 School evAluAtIon, teAcher APPrAISAl And feedBAck And the ImPAct  
on SchoolS And teAcherS
....................
137
Highlights
138
Introduction
...............................................................
139 
Framework for evaluating education in schools: data collected in TALIS
....................................................................
139 
Data collected in TALIS
140
Nature and impact of school evaluations
142 
Frequency of school evaluations
....
142 
Focus of school evaluations
...............
144 
Influence of school evaluations
......
147 
Publication of information on school evaluations 
148 
Form of teacher appraisal and feedback 
149 
Frequency of appraisal and feedback
149 
Focus of appraisal and feedback 
151 
Teaching in a multicultural setting and teaching students with special learning needs
.....................................
153 
Outcomes of feedback and appraisal of teachers
154 
Impact of teacher appraisal and feedback
158 
Teachers’ perceptions of the fairness of appraisal and feedback
158 
Impact of appraisal and feedback on teaching and teachers’ work
159
Teacher appraisal and feedback and school development
161 
Links across the framework for evaluating education in schools
163 
Conclusions and implications for policy and practice
169 
Teacher appraisal and feedback has a positive impact on teachers
169
School evaluation and teacher appraisal and feedback are relatively rare in a number of education 
systems, and do not always have consequences for teachers
169
Teachers reported that they would receive little, if any, recognition for improving their teaching,  
as teacher effectiveness is not linked to the recognition and rewards they receive
..............................................
170
School evaluations can be structured so that they and teacher appraisal and feedback lead to 
developments in particular aspects of school education
171
Additional material
172
TablE Of COnTEnTs
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Chapter  leAdIng to leArn: School leAderShIP And mAnAgement StyleS 
..............................................
189 
Highlights
190 
Introduction
...............................................................
191 
From bureaucratic administrator to leader for learning
191 
Goals of the TALIS survey of principals
192 
Chapter outline
193 
Salient dimensions of secondary school management behaviour of school principals
..................................................
193 
Management behaviour
193 
Management styles and school leadership
195 
Management styles and decision making 
196 
Management styles and characteristics of principals and schools
197 
Management styles and characteristics of evaluations of school performance
........................................................
198
Aspects of teachers’ work and school management
198 
Beliefs about the nature of teaching and learning
199 
Classroom practices of teachers
200 
Teachers’ professional activities
......
200 
Teachers’ classroom environment and school climate for learning
200 
Teachers’ attitudes towards their job
200
Teacher appraisal and feedback and school management
201 
Learning outcomes, teachers’ practices and professional development as appraisal criteria
........................
201 
Objectives of the appraisal
202 
Feedback and consequences of the appraisal
202 
Teachers’ professional development
202 
Conclusions and implications for policy and practice
203 
New trends in school leadership are evident to varying degrees in countries’ educational systems
........
203 
While neither leadership style is consistently associated with teachers’ beliefs and practices,  
management of effective instruction in schools 
204
Additional material
205
Chapter 7 key fActorS In develoPIng effectIve leArnIng envIronmentS: clASSroom 
dIScIPlInAry clImAte And teAcherS’ Self-effIcAcy
219 
Highlights
220 
Introduction and conceptual framework
221 
Analytical model
.......................................
221
A focus on self-efficacy and classroom disciplinary climate
222
Estimations of classroom disciplinary climate and teachers’ reported self-efficacy
..............................................
223
Modelling strategy: country-by-country analysis
224
Descriptive statistics for teachers’ reported self-efficacy
225
Descriptive statistics for classroom environment
226
Teachers’ characteristics and classroom disciplinary climate and teachers’ self-efficacy
.............................................
227
Teachers’ professional development and classroom disciplinary climate and teachers’ self-efficacy
..................
229
Teaching prhers’ self-efficacy
.........
231
Teaching practices, beliefs and attitudes and classroom disciplinary climate
..........................................................
231
Teaching practices, beliefs and attitudes and teachers’ self-efficacy
233
Teacher appraisal and feedback and classroom disciplinary climate and teachers’ self-efficacy
............................
234
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested