pdf.js mvc example : Convert pdf to searchable text Library application component asp.net html .net mvc 4302360612-part609

119
T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
chapter 4
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
learning goals and check student understanding also report a better learning atmosphere in the classroom, less 
noise and fewer distractions. Clarity and structure seem to help maintain students’ attention and a positive 
disciplinary climate; conversely, a poor climate might restrict the use of effective teaching practices. Net 
effects of student-oriented teaching practices are also significant in eleven countries. These practices, such as 
individualised tasks, student co-determination of the lesson and group work, also seem either to help to create 
a positive learning environment or to be used more often in classes with a good classroom climate. Enhanced 
activities were not expected to be associated with the classroom climate, and in fact significant net effects are 
only found for six countries, five of these being negative. 
Chapter 7 will take a more extensive look at the factors that are associated with the disciplinary climate of the 
classroom, including aspects from the other chapters of the report alongside the indices of teaching practices 
that have been considered in this chapter. This will show, for instance, how teaching practices relate to the 
classroom disciplinary climate once a wider range of variables are taken into account. 
effects of teachers’ co-operation on teacher-student relations
Associations between co-operation by teachers and teacher-student relations were examined, but only at the 
teacher level. The issue was whether individual teachers who participate in more co-operative professional 
activities involving other teachers also have a more positive perception of teacher-student relations than teachers 
who participate less frequently in such activities. Results are presented in Table 4.11.
Table 4.11 shows that, across countries, teachers who co-operate more often with other teachers also have a 
more positive view of teacher-student relations at their school. However, if the two measures of participation 
in co-operative activities are introduced jointly as predictors of perceived teacher-student relations, only the 
effects of exchange and co-ordination for teaching are positive and significant across participating countries, 
when controlling for a variety of teacher background and school context variables. This is in line with theoretical 
expectations, because exchange and co-ordination for teaching is closer to classroom interactions with students 
than professional collaboration, which is more related to teachers’ individual development as professionals. 
Both kinds of judgements about the quality of relationships within a school – co-operation among staff and 
teacher-student relations – can be seen as important aspects of a general school quality that are shown to be 
interrelated, suggesting that they may also be addressed jointly in school development programmes. 
determinants of teachers’ job satisfaction
As a final step in connecting the conditions and possible consequences of teachers’ beliefs and practices, 
the focus turns to the extreme right of the model set out in Figure 4.1. Here, the analysis seeks to understand 
how teachers’ job satisfaction is related to teachers’ beliefs about instruction, their practices and professional 
activities, and climate factors. These are used as predictors at both the individual and school levels. As in all 
other regressions reported in this chapter, individual level background variables were controlled for. A similar 
analysis of the effects on self-efficacy, the other indicator at the far right of the theoretical model outlined in 
Figure 4.1, will be examined in Chapter 7.
Tables 4.12 and 4.13 show that teachers’ perceptions of the classroom and school climate and their self-efficacy 
seem to be the most important predictors of job satisfaction. Teachers reporting higher self-efficacy also report 
higher job satisfaction. Significant and comparably strong net effects are found across all countries, even though 
teacher background variables, teachers’ professional practices and the perception of the learning environment 
are controlled for. Moreover, across all countries, teachers who perceive their classes as having a positive 
disciplinary climate also feel more satisfied with their job than teachers who evaluate the classroom climate 
less positively. Even controlling for this factor, in a majority of countries, the second factor of school climate, 
Convert pdf to searchable text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert image pdf to text pdf; c# extract text from pdf
Convert pdf to searchable text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
best pdf to text converter for; convert pdf to word and edit text
chapter 4 T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
120
© OECD 2009
namely teacher-student relations, has a significant (net) effect at the individual level. In other words, when 
teachers view the relations between teachers and students more positively, their job satisfaction is greater. 
However, at the school level, net effects of classroom climate and teacher-student relations are only significant 
in a few countries (Table 4.13). This indicates that the climate at the school level does not have an additional 
effect on job satisfaction. It is not the more objective aggregate measure of climate that affects teachers’ job 
satisfaction; instead, it seems that within each school teachers who get along well with their colleagues and 
students are also more satisfied with their job. Thus, the association seems to be mainly based on individuals’ 
perceptions and evaluative processes.
In a majority of countries teachers’ beliefs and classroom teaching practices are unrelated to job satisfaction, 
when all other variables are controlled for. Neither strong followers of constructivism nor those that hold a direct 
transmission view are more satisfied with their jobs. Job satisfaction seems neither to be affected by nor to influence 
the frequency with which structuring and student-oriented practices and enhanced activities are used. 
conclusIons and ImplIcatIons for polIcy and practIce 
Figure 4.1 illustrates the variety of teacher beliefs, attitudes and practices measured by TALIS. The postulated 
relations of these constructs with the perceived quality of the learning environment and teachers’ job satisfaction 
are by and large found across countries, confirming their relevance for teachers and schooling. An important 
policy issue is therefore, how to further facilitate these aspects of teachers’ effectiveness. TALIS provides some 
suggestions.
teachers generally support modern constructivist beliefs about instruction, but there 
is scope for strengthening this support
Key results:
 Teachers across countries are more likely to express support for a “constructivist” view of teaching with the 
teacher as facilitator than to regard the teacher as a direct transmitter of knowledge (Figure 4.2).
 This is most true in northwest Europe, Scandinavia, Australia and Korea. It is least true in Italy and Malaysia, 
where the level of teachers’ support for the two views is much closer. 
Discussion
Throughout the world educationalists and teacher instructors promote constructivist views about instruction. 
While most teachers agree, their preferences, influenced by individual characteristics, vary greatly within each 
country and school. If policy seeks to support constructivist positions, a promising strategy might be to enhance 
the systematic construction of knowledge about teaching and instruction in teachers’ initial education and 
professional development. Interventions may be especially important for experienced teachers and for those 
who teach subjects other than mathematics. 
Special attention is needed in countries in which many teachers who express support for a constructivist view, 
which may be perceived as being in style and thus socially desirable, also accept a direct transmission view. 
Especially in Brazil, Korea, Malaysia and Mexico, where the two views are correlated, it may help to raise 
awareness of the difference between these positions in the course of teacher education. It is, therefore, a good 
sign – even though the correlations are rather weak – that professional development is positively associated 
with constructivist beliefs and negatively with direct transmission beliefs across countries. 
A further argument in favour of enhancing constructivist beliefs is that they are found to be associated with more 
varied instructional practices. This is important as TALIS results show that modern student-oriented practices 
and enhanced activities, which offer students specific learning opportunities which facilitate both cognitive and 
non-cognitive outcomes, are generally less often used than structuring practices. 
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
convert pdf to text online; convert pdf into text
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
more companies are trying to convert printed business on artificial intelligence to extract text from documents will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT
convert pdf to editable text online; convert image pdf to text
121
T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
chapter 4
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
It would, however, be wrong simply to introduce constructivism. Teachers need to be convinced that they can 
be successful in communicating deep content and in involving students in cognitively demanding activities, 
thereby following constructivist principles, while maintaining a positive disciplinary climate and providing 
student-oriented support. None of the basic dimensions of educational quality can be dispensed with. Fostering 
constructivist beliefs and enhanced activities is an important goal for professional development, but care should 
be taken to emphasise broad teaching practices, including structured teaching and self-regulatory learning. 
Depending on cultural traditions, and also on the stages of the learning process, various approaches should 
be applied to suit the circumstances. An example is starting a lesson with more direct teaching and gradually 
creating more open learning situations (fading), while working in a more structured way with weaker students. 
teachers need to use a wider range of instructional strategies and techniques
Key results
 Of the three teaching practices identified in TALIS, teachers were most likely to adopt structuring of lessons, 
followed by student-oriented practices and finally enhanced learning activities such as project work. This 
order applies in every country (Figure 4.4).
 In the humanities and the more practical and creative subjects, enhanced activities are more frequent than 
average, and in mathematics, structuring is the most common practice (Figure 4.5).
Discussion
The aspect which most differentiates teaching styles in different countries is the use of a variety of enhanced 
learning activities – the least common of the three instructional approaches identified by TALIS. In particular 
in countries where these activities are relatively less frequently used, it seems advisable to help teachers of all 
subjects, but especially those teaching mathematics and science, to acquire and implement a wider variety of 
modern instructional strategies.
Results concerning the frequency of different teaching practices also emphasise the importance of maintaining 
a broad curriculum, so that in subjects where enhanced activities are more common, students experience 
greater participation, autonomy and responsibility.
All three of these practices have been shown to play an important role in successful teaching and learning, and 
each deserves support. TALIS shows that structuring and student-oriented practices tend to be associated with 
a pleasant, orderly classroom climate, which in turn tends to go together with teacher self-efficacy and job 
satisfaction.
Professional development might be one way to boost teachers’ use of student-oriented practices and enhanced 
activities. This applies particularly to development activities involving stable professional relationships with 
other teachers, such as networks for teacher development and mentoring.
In many participating countries, teachers tend to adapt their instructional practices to the overall characteristics 
of their students. Enhanced activities are more often used in classes with students with higher average ability. 
In classes with a high proportion of students with a migration background or a minority status – as indicated 
by a first language other than the language of instruction – more student-oriented practices are used. Such 
adaptation may be encouraged, as it helps provide students with appropriate levels of cognitive challenge 
and supportive practices. However, to work towards equality of learning opportunities, teacher education and 
professional development need to find new ways of expanding the use of enhanced activities for all students, 
independent of their ability. For example, peer learning and peer tutoring can improve learning outcomes, 
especially for students with learning difficulties (Topping, 2005).
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
convert pdf into text; converting .pdf to text
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage One is that compared with HTML file, PDF file (a not be easily edited), is less searchable for search
change pdf to text; convert image pdf to text
chapter 4 T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
122
© OECD 2009
TALIS results also show that across countries fewer student-oriented practices are used in larger classes. This 
suggests that larger class sizes limit the possibility to be responsive to each individual student. 
there is scope to improve teachers’ effectiveness by extending teacher co-operation 
and linking this to an improved school climate
Key results
 Teacher co-operation more often takes the form of exchanging and co-ordinating ideas and information than 
direct professional collaboration such as team teaching (Figure 4.7). 
 Teachers who attend more professional development, especially in a co-operative context, are more likely 
to be involved in co-operative teaching (Table 4.8).
 Female teachers and experienced teachers engage in such collaboration most frequently (Table 4.3).
Discussion
Research has shown teacher co-operation to be an important engine of change and quality development 
in schools. However, the more reflective and intense professional collaboration, which most enhances 
modernisation and professionalism, is the less common form of co-operation. This creates a clear case for 
extending such activities, although they can be very time-consuming. It might therefore be helpful to provide 
teachers with some scheduled time or salary supplement to encourage them to engage in them. It may also 
be worth focusing such incentives on men and young professionals who participate least in co-operative 
teaching.
TALIS shows that teachers who exchange ideas and information and co-ordinate their practices with other 
teachers also report more positive teacher-student relations at their school. Thus, it may be reasonable to 
encourage teachers’ co-operation in conjunction with improving teacher-student relations, as these are two 
sides of a positive school culture. Positive teacher-student relations are not only a significant predictor of student 
achievement, they are also closely related to teachers’ job satisfaction – at least at the individual teacher 
level. This result emphasises the role of teachers’ positive evaluations of the school environment for effective 
education and teacher well-being. Efforts to improve school climate are particularly important in larger public 
schools attended by students with low average ability, since all these factors are associated with a poorer school 
climate. 
support of teachers’ classroom management techniques and a positive attitude towards 
the job
Key results
 One teacher in four in most countries loses at least 30% of the lesson time, and some lose more than half, 
in disruptions and administrative tasks (Figure 4.10). 
 This is closely associated with classroom disciplinary climate, which varies more among individual teachers 
than among schools (Figures 4.11, 4.12).
Discussion
Several studies have shown that the classroom disciplinary climate affects student learning and achievement. 
TALIS supports this view by showing that disciplinary issues in the classroom limit the amount of students’ 
learning opportunities. The classroom climate is also associated with individual teachers’ job satisfaction.
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
library also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to
convert pdf picture to text; extract text from pdf
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications. C#.NET PDF Document Drawing Application.
convert pdf photo to text; convert pdf to rich text format online
123
T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
chapter 4
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Thus a positive learning environment is not only important for students, as is often emphasised, but also 
for teachers. Across all participating countries it therefore seems advisable to work on enhancing teachers’ 
classroom management techniques. The results suggest that in most schools at least some teachers need extra 
support, through interventions that consider teachers’ individual characteristics and competences and the 
features of individual classes. The same holds true for policies aiming at enhancing teacher self-efficacy beliefs 
and job satisfaction, as these variables were also shown to be strongly influenced by teachers’ individual 
characteristics.
addItIonal materIal
The following additional material relevant to this chapter is available on line at:  
1
 2
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607814526732
Table 4.3a Results of multiple regressions, examining net effects of teacher characteristics on teachers’ beliefs, 
attitudes and practices and the learning environment (2007-08)
Table 4.4a Results of multiple regressions, examining net effects of classroom context on teaching practices 
(2007-08)
Table 4.5a Results of multiple multi-level regressions, examining net effects of school context variables on 
teacher-student relations at the school level (2007-08)
Table 4.6a Results of multiple regressions, examining net effects of professional development on teachers’ 
beliefs about instruction (2007-08)
Table 4.7a Results of multiple regressions, examining net effects of professional development on teaching 
practices (2007-08)
Table 4.8a Net effects of professional development on teacher co-operation (2007-08)
Table 4.9a Results of multiple regressions examining net effects of teachers’ beliefs about instruction on 
teaching practices (2007-08)
Table 4.10a Results of multiple regressions examining net effects of classroom teaching practices on classroom 
disciplinary climate (2007-08)
Table 4.11a Net effects of teacher co-operation on teacher-student relations (2007-08)
Table 4.12a Results of multiple multi-level regressions examining teacher-level net effects of teachers’ beliefs 
about instruction, classroom teaching practices, the learning environment, and self-efficacy on 
teachers’ job satisfaction (2007-08)
Table 4.13a Results of multiple multi-level regressions, examining school-level net effects of classroom 
disciplinary climate and teacher-student relations on teachers’ job satisfaction (2007-08)
Table 4.14 Country mean and standard deviation of, and correlation between, ipsative scores for “direct 
transmission beliefs on learning and instruction” and “constructivist beliefs on learning and 
instruction”(2007-08)
Table 4.15 Country mean and standard deviation of ipsative scores for “structuring practices”, “student-
oriented practices” and “enhanced activities”(2007-08)
Table 4.16 Subject mean and standard deviation of ipsative scores for “structuring practices”, “student oriented 
practices” and “enhanced activities”(2007-08)
Table 4.17 Country mean and standard deviation of ipsative scores for “exchange and co-ordination for 
teaching” and “professional collaboration”(2007-08)
Table 4.18 Teachers’ time spent on actual teaching and learning, administrative tasks, and keeping order in the 
classroom in the average lesson (2007-08)
Table 4.19 Index of teacher-student relations and teacher job satisfaction (2007-08)
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
convert pdf scanned image to text; convert pdf to rich text format
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
c# convert pdf to text file; converting pdf to text
chapter 4 T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
124
© OECD 2009
N
otes
1. The target class was defined as the first ISCED level 2 class that the teacher (typically) teaches after 11 a.m. on Tuesdays.
2. Professional development might also sensitise teachers to differences between instructional practices. Therefore the significant 
effects of networks for professional development and mentoring might not be indicative of a higher frequency of the different 
practices, but rather of a higher awareness of own use of instructional strategies. But as teachers’ instructional strategies are likely to 
be intentional and goal-oriented, this interpretation seems unlikely.
125
T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
chapter 4
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Table 4.2
Correlation between time on task1 and  
classroom disciplinary climate (2007-08)
Teachers of lower secondary education
Correlation coefficient (r
xy
)
(S.E.)
Australia
0.63
(0.019)
Austria
0.56
(0.014)
Belgium (Fl.)
0.54
(0.018)
Brazil
0.31
(0.022)
Bulgaria
0.50
(0.021)
Denmark
0.57
(0.024)
Estonia
0.62
(0.017)
Hungary
0.61
(0.020)
Iceland
0.48
(0.029)
Ireland
0.65
(0.015)
Italy
0.46
(0.018)
Korea
0.21
(0.018)
Lithuania
0.35
(0.018)
Malaysia
0.36
(0.024)
Malta
0.58
(0.026)
Mexico
0.20
(0.027)
Norway
0.56
(0.018)
Poland
0.46
(0.024)
Portugal
0.59
(0.016)
Slovak Republic
0.49
(0.020)
Slovenia
0.51
(0.019)
Spain
0.61
(0.014)
Turkey
0.41
(0.029)
Statistically significant at the 5% level.
1. Percentage of classroom time spent on teaching and learning.
Source: OECD, TALIS Database.
1
 2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607814526732
Table 4.1
Correlation between direct transmission and 
constructivist beliefs about teaching (2007-08)
Teachers of lower secondary education
Correlation coefficient (r
xy
)
Australia
-0.08
Austria
-0.24
Belgium (Fl.)
0.17
Brazil
0.65
Bulgaria
0.67
Denmark
0.14
Estonia
0.03
Hungary
0.29
Iceland
-0.18
Ireland
0.20
Italy
0.44
Korea
0.67
Lithuania
0.37
Malaysia
0.98
Malta
0.28
Mexico
0.74
Norway
0.14
Poland
0.31
Portugal
0.35
Slovak Republic
0.41
Slovenia
0.39
Spain
0.39
Turkey
0.79
Statistically significant at the 5% level.
Source: OECD, TALIS Database.
1
 2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607814526732
Table 4.3
Relationship between teacher characteristics and teachers’ beliefs, attitudes and practices  
and the learning environment (2007-08)
Significant variables in the multiple regressions of teachers’ characteristics with teachers’ beliefs, attitudes and practices  
and the learning environment, teachers of lower secondary education
Example: In more than half of the TALIS countries, female teachers are less likely than male teachers to hold direct transmission beliefs about teaching, 
controlling for variables listed.
Predicted variables
Predictor variables:
Female
Teacher of  
Mathematics/ 
Science
Teacher of 
Humanities
Years of experience  
as a teacher
Highest level  
of qualification1
Direct transmission beliefs about teaching
Constructivist beliefs about teaching
+
Structuring teaching practices
+
+
+
+
Student-oriented teaching practices
+
+
Enhanced activities
Exchange and co-ordination for teaching
+
+
Professional collaboration
+
+
Classroom disciplinary climate
+
+
Teacher-student relations
Self-efficacy
+
Job satisfaction
Note: Positive relationships that are significant in more than half of the countries are indicated by a “+”, while negative relationships that are significant in more than 
half of the countries are indicated by a ““. Otherwise the cells are left blank. Significance was tested at the 5% level.
1. ISCED 5A Master degree or higher compared with lower-level qualifications.
Source: OECD, TALIS Database.
1
 2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607814526732
chapter 4 T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
126
© OECD 2009
Table 4.4
Relationship between classroom context and teaching practices (2007-08)1 
Significant variables in the multiple regressions of aspects of classroom context with indices for teaching practice,  
teachers of lower secondary education2
Example:  In Australia, teachers are likely to use structuring teaching practices to a greater degree in classes with higher percentages of students 
with a mother tongue different from the language of instruction, allowing for teacher background characteristics.
Structuring  
teaching practices
Student-oriented  
teaching practices
Enhanced activities
Dependent on:
Dependent on:
Dependent on:
Class size
Average ability 
of students  
in the class3
Students with  
a mother 
tongue  
different from 
the language  
of instruction4
Class size
Average ability 
of students  
in the class3
Students with  
a mother 
tongue  
different from 
the language  
of instruction4
Class size
Average ability 
of students  
in the class3
Students with  
a mother 
tongue  
different from 
the language  
of instruction4
Australia
+
+
+
Austria
+
Belgium (Fl.)
+
+
Brazil
+
+
+
+
+
+
Bulgaria
+
+
+
+
+
Denmark
+
Estonia
+
+
+
+
Hungary
+
+
Iceland
+
Ireland
Italy
+
Korea
+
+
+
+
+
+
Lithuania
+
+
+
+
+
Malaysia
+
+
+
Malta
Mexico
+
+
+
+
+
Norway
Poland
+
+
+
+
+
+
Portugal
+
+
Slovak Republic
+
+
+
+
+
Slovenia
+
+
+
Spain
Turkey
5
+
5
+
5
1. Controlling for teacher gender, years of experience, highest level of education and subject taught in the target class.
2. Variables where a significant positive relationship was found are indicated by a “+” while those where a significant negative relationship was found are shown 
with a “”. Cells are blank where no significant relationship was found. Significance was tested at the 5% level.
3. Average ability estimated by the teacher relative to students of the same grade/year level generally. 
4. “Less than 10%” or “10% or more”.
5. In T
Source: OECD, TALIS Database.
1
 2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607814526732
127
T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
chapter 4
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Table 4.5
Relationship between school context and teacher-student relations (2007-08)
Significant variables in the multiple multi-level regressions of school context variables and  
the teacher-student relations index at the school level, teachers of lower secondary education2
Example: In Australia, teachers working in private schools report better teacher-student relations than in public schools, after controlling for 
other variables.
Teacher-student relations
Dependent on:
Private school
City location  
of school
School size  
(Total pupil enrolment)
Social background  
of students5
Average ability  
of students:  
school level6
Australia
+
+
Austria
+
+
Belgium (Fl.)
+
+
Brazil
+
+
Bulgaria
3
+
Denmark
+
+
Estonia
3
+
+
Hungary
+
+
+
Iceland
3
4
+
Ireland
+
Italy
3
+
Korea
Lithuania
3
Malaysia
3
+
Malta
4
Mexico
+
Norway
3
Poland
3
+
Portugal
+
+
Slovak Republic
+
Slovenia
3
Spain
+
+
Turkey
+
+
1. Controlling for teacher gender, years of experience, level of education and subject taught in the target class.
2. Variables where a significant positive relationship was found are indicated by a “+” while those where a significant negative relationship was found are shown 
with a “”. Cells are blank where no significant relationship was found. Significance was tested at the 5% level.
3. Less than 10% of teachers report to work in a private school.
4. Less than 10% of the schools are in cities or large cities.
5. Based on teachers’ estimation of the education level of students’ parents aggregated to the school level.
6. Teachers’ estimation of the average ability of students in their class relative to students of the same grade/year level generally, aggregated to the school level. 
Source: OECD, TALIS Database.
1
 2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607814526732
chapter 4 T
eaching
P
racTices
, T
eachers
’ B
eliefs
and
a
TTiTudes
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
128
© OECD 2009
Table 4.6
Relationship between teachers’ professional development activities  
and their teaching beliefs about instruction (2007-08)1 
Significant variables in the multiple regressions of aspects of teachers’ professional development with indices  
for teachers’ teaching beliefs about instruction, teachers of lower secondary education2
Example: In Australia, teachers held direct transmission beliefs about instruction less strongly, the more days of professional development they 
had taken part in.
Direct transmission beliefs about instruction
Constructivist beliefs about instruction
Dependent on:
Dependent on:
Days  
of professional 
development 
taken by  
the teacher
Participation 
in workshops/ 
courses
Participation  
in networks
Participation 
in mentoring 
activities
Days of 
professional 
development 
taken by the 
teacher
Participation 
in workshops/ 
courses
Participation  
in networks
Participation 
in mentoring 
activities
Australia
+
+
Austria
+
+
Belgium (Fl.)
Brazil
Bulgaria
+
Denmark
Estonia
+
+
+
Hungary
+
+
Iceland
+
+
Ireland
Italy
+
+
+
+
Korea
+
+
+
Lithuania
+
+
Malaysia
Malta
Mexico
+
Norway
Poland
+
Portugal
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
+
Spain
+
+
+
Turkey
1. Controlling for teacher gender, years of experience, level of education and subject taught in the target class.
2. Variables where a significant positive relationship was found are indicated by a “+” while those where a significant negative relationship was found are shown 
with a “”. Cells are blank where no significant relationship was found. Significance was tested at the 5% level.
Source: OECD, TALIS Database.
1
 2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607814526732
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested