pdf.js mvc example : Convert pdf to txt format Library SDK class asp.net wpf .net ajax 4302360615-part612

149
S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
chapter 5
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Decisions to publish this information should not be viewed as necessarily imposed top-down. Schools 
themselves may also publish school results either at the national or local level if they find this will help their 
school. They may believe that it can lead to school improvements, or they may desire to share information with 
the local community. Some private schools may be required to publish information on their schools as part of 
a network of private schools.  
Table 5.2a shows that just over half of teachers in TALIS countries worked in schools whose school principal 
reported that the results of their school evaluations were published. This result does not differentiate between 
external evaluations and school self-evaluations. There were large discrepancies in the extent to which this 
information was published across countries. In Poland and Turkey, less than 20% of teachers worked in schools 
whose school principal reported that this information was published, whereas in Denmark over 80% of teachers 
worked in such schools. Of greater importance from a policy perspective are the clear discrepancies within 
countries. Except in federal countries, where differences between states or regions are to be expected, a national 
policy to publish this information should affect most, if not all, of the country’s schools. Except for a few 
countries, such as Denmark, this was clearly not the case. Therefore, individual schools, local communities, or 
municipalities must make these decisions. The publication of information on school evaluations in tables that 
compare schools is uncommon except in Brazil, Denmark and Mexico. This also suggests that the publication of 
information is decided by individual schools, which lack data for other schools to make comparative tables. 
There may be some misunderstanding about the extent of Government involvement in the publication of 
comparative tables. School principals were asked if these tables were compiled by Governments. Positive 
responses were received in countries with no Government policy in this area. However, comparative tables 
have sometimes been published in the media, and the information has become widely known. Hence, even 
in the absence of Government policy, the ability of the media to make these comparisons may have led school 
principals to assume Government involvement. This is potentially an important lesson for Governments regarding 
the information they make publicly available and their efforts to control the use of this information. 
Form oF teAcher ApprAISAL And FeedbAck 
This section focuses on the form of teacher appraisal and feedback. It concentrates initially on the frequency of 
appraisal and feedback and whether it is internally or externally provided. The criteria for teacher appraisal and 
feedback are the same as those discussed for school evaluations and include information on student outcomes, 
direct appraisals of teaching, feedback from stakeholders, professional development, and a variety of teaching 
and school activities. It therefore provides information not only on the focus of teacher appraisal and feedback 
within schools but also on the links with school evaluations. 
Frequency of appraisal and feedback
Frequency of teachers’ appraisal and feedback is a starting point for analysis of these issues. It provides a measure 
of the extent to which this plays a role in teachers’ development and in communication among colleagues 
within schools. It may also provide an indication of the extent to which teachers’ co-operation and collective 
responsibility for students’ education are present in schools. Importantly, it identifies teachers who received no 
appraisal or feedback about their work as teachers. Insofar as appraisal and feedback are considered beneficial 
for teachers and the education students receive, this is an important indicator for understanding more about 
teachers’ careers, their development and ways to raise school effectiveness. 
Data were obtained on the appraisal and feedback teachers received in their school. Table 5.3 shows that a 
distinction was made between the frequency of appraisal and feedback and its source: the school principal; 
other teachers or members of the school management team; or an external (to the school) individual or body. 
Convert pdf to txt format - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf file to txt file; convert pdf to text doc
Convert pdf to txt format - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to text document; convert pdf to word text document
chapter 5 S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
150
© OECD 2009
Appraisal and feedback were received more often from within the school than from an external source. Just over 
half of teachers had not received any appraisal or feedback from an external source (e.g.a school inspector). 
In fact, over three-quarters of teachers in Norway and Portugal did not receive appraisal or feedback from an 
external agent. In Italy, external teacher appraisal and feedback is virtually non-existent. These three countries 
also have a large proportion of teachers working in schools whose school principal reported that they had not 
received an external school evaluation in the previous five years (Table 5.1).  
Thirteen per cent of teachers in TALIS countries did not receive any feedback or appraisal of their work in 
their school (Figure 5.3). Clearly, the evaluative element of these teachers’ work was minimal in these cases. 
As Table 5.3 shows, a substantial proportion of teachers received no appraisal or feedback from any source 
in some countries, including Ireland (26%), Italy (55%), Portugal (26%) and Spain (46%). Teachers in these 
countries with relatively weak evaluation frameworks are not receiving the potential benefits of appraisal and 
feedback. Moreover, teacher appraisal and feedback can be an effective policy lever for developing specific 
aspects of education targeted by policy makers and administrators. 
Teachers were asked about the appraisal and feedback they had received in their school. However, as some 
teachers were new to their school, they may not have been there long enough to receive the normal appraisal 
and feedback, or conversely, they may receive substantial appraisal and feedback because they are new. Of 
the teachers who received no appraisal or feedback, just under one-quarter were in their first year and 37% 
were in their first two years at the school (Source: OECD, TALISDatabase.). In comparison, the TALIS average 
is 12 and 11% of teachers in their first and second year, respectively. However, the relationship between the 
frequency of teachers’ appraisal and feedback and the number of years of teaching at the school is not linear. 
1
 2
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607856444110
Figure 5.3
Teachers who received no appraisal or feedback
and teachers in schools that had no school evaluation in the previous five years (2007-08)
%
Italy
Spain
Portugal
Ireland
Brazil
Iceland
Norway
Austria
Australia
Belgium (Fl.)
Malta
Turkey
Mexico
Denmark
Poland
Korea
Slovenia
Hungary
Estonia
Slovak Republic
Lithuania
Malaysia
Bulgaria
Cave received no appraisal or feedback.
Source: OECD, Tables 5.1 and 5.3.
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
No appraisal or feedback
No school evaluation
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Now you can convert text file to PDF document using Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# DocumentConverter.ToDocument(@"C:\input.txt", @"C:\output.pdf
convert pdf into text file; convert pdf to word for editing text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout. C#.NET PDF to Jpeg Conversion. If you want to transform and convert PDF document to Jpeg image file format, this
convert pdf to txt; change pdf to text file
151
S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
chapter 5
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Teachers in their first two years were more likely either to have received no appraisal and feedback or to have 
received very frequent appraisal and feedback (more than once per month). Policy makers and administrators 
wishing to encourage more appraisal and feedback for teachers new to a school may wish to encourage or 
implement effective school mentoring and induction programmes (Rockoff, 2008). In Mexico and Malta, 
teachers in their first two years at a school are significantly more likely to have more appraisal and feedback 
in schools with formal induction processes. For example, among teachers in Mexico who had received no 
appraisal or feedback in their school, 72% were in schools that had no formal induction process; over half of all 
Mexican teachers work in schools without a formal induction process. However, across TALIS countries, there 
is no quantitatively important relationship between the frequency of appraisal and feedback for teachers in 
their first two years at a school and the presence of a mentoring programme (Source: OECD, TALISDatabase.). 
This indicates that mentoring programmes may need to be adapted if their purpose is to provide more appraisal 
and feedback to new teachers. Mentoring programmes may of course have objectives unrelated to consistent 
teacher appraisal and feedback, but this goes against the general impression of the nature and purpose of 
mentoring and induction programmes (OECD, 2005: Ingersoll & Smith, 2004; Serpell, 2000). 
As Figure 5.3 indicates, teachers working in schools that had no school evaluations over the previous five years 
were less likely to receive appraisal or feedback. For example, in Korea, in schools that had not conducted or 
participated in a school evaluation during the previous five years, 18% of teachers had also never received any 
appraisal or feedback at that school. Only 7% of teachers had not if the school had conducted or been subject 
to an evaluation (Source: OECD, TALISDatabase.). This offers further evidence that school evaluations can be 
an essential component of an evaluative framework which can foster and potentially shape teacher appraisal 
and feedback. Policy makers may also be able to alter the framework and requirements of school evaluations to 
better shape the appraisal and feedback received by teachers. 
Focus of appraisal and feedback 
Policy makers and administrators attempting to shape and develop the evaluation of school education would 
naturally consider the focus of teacher appraisal and feedback important in terms of providing incentives 
and shaping teachers’ actions within schools. TALIS obtained information from teachers on the importance 
of 17 items in the appraisal and feedback they had received at their school. These are the same as those 
discussed for school evaluations and include: various student performance measures; feedback from parents 
and students; teaching practices and requirements; teachers’ knowledge and understanding of their main subject 
field and instructional practices; relations with students; findings from direct appraisals of classroom teaching; 
professional development; and, teachers’ handling of student discipline and behaviour problems. Given the 
relatively even spread across countries in the importance given to each item, it is interesting to again analyse 
differences within countries. Therefore, the discussion below focuses on differences within each country so 
that a high focus on particular criteria in, for example, Austria is discussed relative to the importance placed on 
other items in Austria rather than on its importance in other countries. This also helps take into account national 
differences in the social desirability of responses.  
Given the importance of these aspects of school education, it is not surprising that most were considered to 
be of fairly high importance. As Table 5.4 shows, the areas considered by most teachers to be of moderate or 
high importance were relations between teachers and students; knowledge and understanding of instructional 
practices; classroom management; and knowledge and understanding of teachers’ main instructional fields 
(approximately 80% on average for each of these items across TALIS countries). In comparison, substantially 
fewer teachers reported that teaching students with special needs, the retention and pass rates of students and 
teaching in a multicultural setting were of moderate or high importance in their appraisal and feedback. Yet, 
even with their comparably lower rating (57, 56 and 45%, respectively), a number of teachers participating in 
appraisal and feedback still reported that these had moderate or high importance in the appraisal and feedback 
they received. The importance of selected items is illustrated in Figure 5.4.
How to C#: File Format Support
PDF. Write pdf. DPX. Read 48-bit DPX. PGM. TIFF(TrueType Font File). Read all truetype convert to image. TXT(A text format). Convert ANSI-Encoding text format to
convert pdf to text online no email; pdf to text
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Name. Description. 1. To Word. Convert PDF to Word DOCX document. 2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4.
convert pdf to rich text; convert pdf to text format
chapter 5 S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
152
© OECD 2009
Certain elements of teaching and teachers’ work in the classroom were understandably considered important 
elements of appraisal and feedback. In fact, across TALIS countries, the quality of teachers’ relations with 
students was the most important item as measured by the percentage of teachers who considered it to have 
moderate or high importance. This is an important finding as it emphasises the importance accorded to teacher-
student relations in school education and also because of the relatively lesser importance given to feedback 
from students (on average across TALIS countries, 73% of teachers rated it as of high or moderate importance 
in their appraisal and feedback).While teacher-student relations were considered to be of prime importance 
across TALIS countries, measurement of these relations in teachers’ appraisal and feedback did not depend 
entirely on student opinion and feedback. It is therefore assumed that other methods were used to determine the 
state of these relations. Another area of relatively high importance in assessing teaching and teachers’ work is 
direct appraisal of classroom teaching. This is a clear and visible element of a system of appraisal and feedback 
within schools and of moderate or high importance in the appraisals and feedback of, on average, just under 
three-quarters of teachers. It was in the top three rated criteria (measured by the percentage of teachers rating 
it as of moderate or high importance in their teacher appraisal and feedback) in Austria, Belgium (Fl.) and the 
Slovak Republic. Yet, it was the second lowest rated criteria in Portugal. 
Countries vary substantially in the emphasis on student outcomes in teachers’ appraisal and feedback. Three 
aspects were considered: student test scores; students’ retention and pass rates; and other student learning 
outcomes. On average across TALIS countries, the retention and pass rates of students was the second lowest 
rated criteria in teacher appraisal and feedback and was the lowest rated criteria in Austria and Italy. Student test 
scores were also not given a high priority in teacher appraisal and feedback in a number of TALIS countries. It 
was one of the three lowest rated criteria in Denmark, Hungary and Italy. There are often substantial differences 
in the importance placed upon these three measures of student outcomes within countries: for example, in 
Denmark student test scores and the retention and pass rates of students were considered to be of moderate or 
high importance by just over one-quarter of teachers but other student learning outcomes were of considerably 
more importance to teacher appraisal and feedback with just fewer than half of Danish teachers reporting it to 
be of moderate or high importance. Feedback from stakeholders (e.g.students and parents) can be useful for 
teachers and for those responsible for appraising teachers but was rated relatively lowly on average across TALIS 
countries. Student feedback on the education they receive was the second highest rated criteria in Iceland and 
Portugal but was the lowest rated criteria in Spain. Feedback from parents was one of the lowest three rated 
criteria in Belgium (Fl.), Brazil, Bulgaria, Mexico and Turkey. 
Given the importance of professional development in some education systems it is important to clarify the role of 
appraisal and feedback not only in identifying development needs but also in assessing the impact of professional 
development on the work of teachers within schools. It is clear that while it is of moderate or high importance in the 
appraisal and feedback of the majority of teachers across TALIS countries, it was not in the five highest rated criteria 
of any TALIS country. Moreover, it was one of the lowest three rated criteria in teacher appraisal and feedback 
in Australia, Austria, Hungary, Ireland, Malta, the Slovak Republic and Spain. A broader view of professional 
development activities encompasses non-formal activities and the learning that takes place when working with 
peers and colleagues. Teachers’ work with the school principal and colleagues in their school had moderate or high 
importance in the appraisal and feedback of a large percentage of teachers across TALIS countries. It was one of the 
top three highest rated criteria in Belgium (Fl.), Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Portugal.  
Given teachers’ roles in schools and their positions as educators, it is perhaps not surprising that for over 
three-quarters of teachers their knowledge and understanding of their main subject fields and of instructional 
practices in these fields was of moderate or high importance in the appraisal and feedback they receive. This was 
considered one of the most important items in teachers’ appraisal and feedback across TALIS countries. Knowledge 
and understanding of their main subject fields was one of the two most important criteria in Australia, Brazil, 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Name. Description. 1. To Word. Convert PDF to Word DOCX document. 2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4.
change pdf to txt format; convert pdf to .txt file
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Text Extractor SDK; Extract Text Content from
extract.txt"). VB.NET TIFF Text Extractor SDK FAQs. Q: I want to extract text information from source TIFF file and output extracted text content to other format
convert pdf to editable text; convert pdf to text online
153
S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
chapter 5
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Bulgaria, Hungary, Lithuania, Malaysia and Mexico. Similarly, knowledge and understanding of instructional 
practices in their main subject fields was one of the two most important criteria for teacher appraisal and 
feedback in Estonia, Hungary, Malaysia, Mexico, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia. 
Other issues concerning classroom teaching are student discipline and classroom management practices. Both 
were of importance in teachers’ appraisal and feedback. Teachers’ classroom management was the highest 
rated criteria in teacher appraisal and feedback in Bulgaria, Korea and Turkey. Student discipline was the highest 
rated criteria in Poland and Spain. 
1
 2
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607856444110
Figure 5.4
Criteria for teacher appraisal and feedback (2007-08)
%
Malaysia
Bulgaria
Poland
Mexico
Brazil
Slovak Republic
Turkey
Estonia
Ireland
Spain
Korea
TALIS Average
Portugal
Lithuania
Italy
Slovenia
Malta
Hungary
Belgium (Fl.)
Australia
Norway
Austria
Iceland
Denmark
Percentage of teachers of lower secondary education who reported that these criteria were considered with high or moderate importance
in the appraisal and/or feedback they received.
Countries are ranked in descending order of the importance of student test scores in teacher appraisal and feedback.
Source: OECD, Table 5.4.
Student test scores
Innovative teaching practices
Professional development undertaken by the teacher
Teaching of students with special learning needs
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images C:\input.pdf"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0 ocrPage.Recognize(); ocrPage.SaveTo(MIMEType.TXT, @"C:\output
convert pdf to ascii text; convert scanned pdf to text online
C# TIFF: Use C#.NET Code to Extract Text from TIFF File
Moreover, text content, style, and format of original Tiff image can be retained txt"; // Save ocr result as other documet formats, like txt, pdf, and svg.
convert scanned pdf to editable text; .net extract text from pdf
chapter 5 S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
154
© OECD 2009
This may be a concern for policy makers in countries where the policy emphasis on these issues is not matched 
by their importance in the system of teacher appraisal and feedback. However, if teachers do not consider 
teaching in a multicultural setting or teaching students with special learning needs to be important, a problem 
may not exist. To better understand this issue, analysis focused on:
 The importance accorded to these issues in teachers’ appraisal and feedback.
 The extent of teachers’ professional development needs in these areas. 
 The linguistic background reported in teachers’ classrooms.
Teaching in a multicultural setting and teaching students with special learning needs were reported by teachers 
to be given relatively less importance in their appraisal and feedback. For teachers who do not teach students 
with these needs or backgrounds or who consider this not important to their teaching or their development as 
teachers, this is to be expected. However, although these areas received little emphasis in appraisal and feedback, 
reports on teachers’ professional development needs show that a substantial proportion had development needs 
in these areas. This is a particularly worrying finding if teachers’ appraisal and feedback is considered important 
to their continuing development. It suggests that their needs are not being met in a potentially important area. 
Analysis of teachers’ reports of the linguistic background of students also shows that this is not an issue of these 
teachers teaching in front of homogenous classes. If this had been the case, it would be understandable that the 
appraisal and feedback teachers received did not focus on either teaching in a multi-cultural setting or teaching 
students with special learning needs.  
Chapter 3 in fact indicates that many teachers had professional development needs in these areas. Across 
TALIS countries, three-quarters of teachers had moderate or high development needs for teaching students 
with special learning needs and 47% for teaching in a multicultural setting. Of these teachers, 22% did not 
receive any appraisal or feedback and therefore did not receive any professional development in these areas as 
a result of these activities. This was particularly apparent in Italy, where 53% of teachers with moderate or high 
development needs in these areas had not received any appraisal or feedback, and in Spain (45%).  
Among teachers with moderate or high development needs in these areas and who received some appraisal or 
feedback, little or no consideration was often given to these areas. Just over one-third (35%) of teachers with 
moderate or high needs for teaching students with special learning needs received appraisal or feedback which 
gave little or no importance to this area. This was particularly apparent in Australia, Denmark and Malta where 
it was the case for 56% of these teachers. For teaching students in a multicultural setting, 32% of teachers with 
moderate or high development needs received appraisal or feedback which gave little or no importance to this 
issue. In a number of countries, the mismatch between teachers’ development needs and the focus of appraisal 
and feedback was more pronounced. Over half of teachers in Australia (53%), Denmark (61%), Iceland (69%), 
Ireland (58%), Korea (58%), Malta (65%), Norway (70%) and Slovenia (58%) who reported moderate or high 
development needs for teaching in a multicultural setting received appraisal or feedback that gave little or no 
importance to this aspect of teaching (Source: OECD, TALISDatabase.). It should be noted when interpreting 
the data that the proportion of teachers with these needs varies in these countries. In addition, there is no 
substantial difference in the reported linguistic diversity of teachers’ classes for teachers with moderate or high 
development needs for teaching in a multicultural setting and teachers overall.   
outcomeS oF ApprAISAL And FeedbAck oF teAcherS 
The following discussion of the outcomes of teacher appraisal and feedback focuses upon relatively direct 
outcomes, including monetary rewards and career advancement, teachers’ development needs, and a variety 
of non-monetary rewards. Additional aspects discussed are the actions taken by school principals when specific 
weaknesses are identified. Seven specific outcomes that reward and/or affect teachers and their work were 
C#: How to Extract Text from Adobe PDF Document Using OCR Library
to load a program with an incorrect format", please check pageZone.SaveTo(MIMEType. TXT, @"C:\output.txt"); Recognize Scanned PDF and Output OCR Result to PDF
batch convert pdf to txt; .pdf to .txt converter
155
S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
chapter 5
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
identified as possibly stemming from teacher appraisal and feedback: a change in salary; a financial bonus 
or another kind of monetary reward; opportunities for professional development; a change in the likelihood 
of career advancement; public recognition from the school principal and other colleagues; changes in work 
responsibilities that makes teachers’ jobs more attractive; and a role in school development initiatives. These are 
presented in Table 5.5 which shows the percentage of teachers reporting changes in these outcomes following 
appraisal or feedback. In interpreting the data it should be kept in mind that the percentages only represent 
teachers who received appraisal or feedback in their school. 
The data suggest that teachers’ appraisal and feedback have relatively minor direct outcomes. In most TALIS 
countries, appraisal and feedback have little financial impact and are not linked to career advancement. On 
average across TALIS countries, 9% of teachers reported that appraisal or feedback had a moderate or large 
impact upon their salary and fewer than 11% reported that it had an impact on a financial bonus or another 
kind of monetary reward. However, there are stronger links to teacher salaries in a few countries. In Bulgaria 
(26%), Malaysia (33%), and the Slovak Republic (20%), between one-fifth and one-third of teachers indicate 
that appraisal and feedback led to a moderate or a large change in their salary. Similarly, teachers in Bulgaria, 
Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Malaysia, Poland, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia were more likely to report a 
link between appraisal and feedback and a bonus or other monetary reward (Table 5.5). Broadly speaking, it 
may be said that linking appraisal and feedback to teachers’ monetary compensation was considerably more 
common in central and eastern European TALIS countries than in other TALIS countries. 
Direct monetary impacts, such as bonuses, may be coupled with longer-term monetary outcomes through 
career advancement. Again, most teachers reported that appraisal and feedback led to a small or no change 
in their likelihood for career advancement. This indicates a strictly structured career path with little or no 
relationship to teachers’ appraisal and feedback. Exceptions are found in Brazil, Malaysia, Mexico, Poland, 
the Slovak Republic and Slovenia. It is interesting that countries in which more teachers reported direct 
monetary impacts generally also reported a greater impact upon career advancement. However, in Bulgaria 
and Estonia tight promotion and career structures may prevent any effect on career advancement but direct 
financial rewards are possible. A number of countries that report low levels of direct monetary outcomes report 
a somewhat greater likelihood of an impact on career advancement. Teachers in Australia, Brazil, Ireland, 
Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey report greater likelihood of an impact on career 
advancement than of direct monetary outcomes; in this case any monetary consequence would be of a long-
term nature. That said, as shown in Table 5.5, the proportion of teachers in a number of countries reporting a 
moderate or large impact upon career advancement is still relatively low (16%).  
A far more common outcome of teachers’ appraisal and feedback is some form of public recognition either 
from the school principal or from teachers’ colleagues. Thirty-six per cent of teachers said that their appraisal 
and feedback had led to a moderate or large change in the recognition they received from their school 
principal and/or colleagues within the school (Table 5.5). Public recognition is a clear incentive and a non-
monetary outcome which highlights the role of teacher appraisal and feedback in rewarding quality teaching. 
Unfortunately, while it was more common than monetary outcomes, recognition was still not very frequent 
and clearly in many TALIS countries there are weak links between appraisal and feedback and both monetary 
and non-monetary outcomes. 
A key feature of systems of appraisal and feedback is to provide a mechanism for assessing and improving the 
performance of staff. A number of development mechanisms can result from identifying specific needs, creating 
development opportunities within and beyond the school, and rewarding teachers for enhanced performance 
(OECD, 2005). Teachers reported on three development outcomes from teacher appraisal and feedback: 
opportunities for professional development, changes in work responsibilities that make their job more attractive; 
chapter 5 S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
156
© OECD 2009
and obtaining a role in school development initiatives. On average across TALIS countries, just fewer than one-
quarter of teachers reported that appraisal and feedback led to a moderate or a large change in their opportunities 
for professional development. The largest proportions were in Bulgaria (42%), Estonia (36%), Lithuania (42%), 
Malaysia (51%), Poland (38%) and Slovenia (36%). Slightly more teachers reported an impact on changes in their 
work responsibilities and 30% on their role in school development initiatives (Table 5.5). 
An important issue is whether teacher appraisal and feedback mechanisms can assume a developmental 
role or should be viewed more strictly in terms of rewarding performance. Such outcomes are not mutually 
exclusive, as a reward linked to teacher appraisal and feedback does not preclude development outcomes. In 
fact, a greater percentage of teachers report a moderate or strong link between their appraisal and feedback and 
changes in work responsibilities that make their jobs more attractive in Brazil, Lithuania, Malaysia and Mexico, 
where teachers’ remuneration is also more likely to be linked to appraisal and feedback. Few teachers report a 
strong link in Australia, Austria, Belgium (Fl.), Denmark, Ireland, Malta, Norway and Spain (Table 5.5). For these 
countries, teacher appraisal and feedback may be a rather benign activity, and, in Austria, Denmark, Ireland and 
Spain was also reflected in low rates of school evaluations (Figure 5.5 and Table 5.1). 
1
2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/607856444110
Figure 5.5
Impact of teacher appraisal and feedback (2007-08)
%
Malaysia
Lithuania
Bulgaria
Poland
Slovenia
Estonia
Slovak Republic
Brazil
Mexico
Denmark
TALIS Average
Hungary
Norway
Iceland
Italy
Korea
Australia
Ireland
Spain
Turkey
Portugal
Austria
Malta
Belgium (Fl.)
Percentage of teachers of lower secondary education who reported that the appraisal and/or feedback they received led to a moderate
or large change in these aspects of their work and careers.
Countries are ranked in descending order of changes in teachers' opportunities for professional development activities.
Source: OECD, Table 5.5.
Opportunities for professional development activities
Public recognition from the principal and/or colleagues
Changes in work responsibilites that make the job more attractive
A change in the likelihood of career advancement
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Actions following the identification of weaknesses in teacher appraisal
An essential aspect of any form of appraisal or feedback is the identification of strengths and weaknesses and taking 
steps to build on the former and correct the latter. Information was collected from school principals on actions 
taken when weaknesses are identified as a result of teachers’ appraisal. Data collected focused on the extent of 
communication with the teacher; whether it is used to establish a development or training plan for the teacher; the 
relationship with a broader evaluation framework; and whether there is a financial impact for teachers. 
157
S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
chapter 5
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
The information collected in an appraisal of teachers’ work can serve a number of purposes. It can be discussed 
with the teacher to communicate a judgement about their work and performance, it can be communicated to 
other bodies or institutions outside of the school, or it can be kept by the school principal to inform his/her own 
judgements. Informing external institutions may be part of regulatory requirements concerning the appraisal 
of teachers’ work or of a broader regulatory structure concerning teachers’ careers and their work. External 
communication may also indicate a more bureaucratic structure or top-down management practices than 
communication to the teacher. 
As Table 5.6 shows, most school principals reported the outcome of teacher appraisals to the teacher, with 
62% of teachers working in schools whose school principal reported that they always report the outcome 
of an appraisal that identifies weaknesses to the teacher (and a further 26% of teachers work in schools 
where the school principal reported doing so most of the time). This was the case in Australia (75% of 
teachers worked in schools whose school principal reported doing this all of the time), Austria (81%), 
Belgium (Fl.) (75%), Bulgaria (81%), Estonia (76%), Hungary (82%), Poland (96%) and the Slovak Republic 
(76%). However, some countries do not communicate the results of appraisals to teachers. For example, 32% 
of teachers in Korea worked in schools whose school principal reported that they never report the outcome 
to the teacher. In Turkey just fewer than one-quarter of teachers worked in schools whose school principal 
reported that they either never or only sometimes reported the outcome to the teacher. This may indicate poor 
communication between school principals and teachers. In most cases teacher appraisals (and the results) 
remain within the school. Across TALIS countries, nearly 90% of teachers worked in schools whose school 
principal reported that they never (51%) or only sometimes (37%) report underperformance to another body 
for action. Such reporting procedures are more common in Austria (21% of teachers’ school principals report 
underperformance to another body to take action most of the time or always), Brazil (27%), and Malta (21%). 
It is particularly common in Mexico, where 47% of teachers worked in schools whose school principal said 
they report underperforming teachers to another body most of the time or always.
In a number of countries, using appraisal and feedback to establish a development or training plan for teachers 
to address weaknesses in their teaching is less common than simply reporting these identified weaknesses to 
the teacher (Table 5.6). This indicates that teacher appraisal is either not linked to professional development or 
that professional development is not common (either may be a concern if teachers’ professional development 
is considered useful). Up to one-quarter of teachers worked in schools whose school principal reported that 
they never establish a development plan if an appraisal identifies weaknesses in Austria (23%), Estonia (11%), 
Hungary (12%), Ireland (19%), Korea (17%), Norway (20%), Poland (11%), Portugal (14%), the Slovak Republic 
(13%) Slovenia (16%) and Spain (22%) (Table 5.6). The use of teacher appraisal and feedback for professional 
development appears to be prevalent in certain countries. In Australia (58%) and Mexico (35%) at least one-
third of teachers had school principals who reported that they always establish a development plan. Moreover, 
in some countries it is common to discuss measures to remedy weaknesses with teachers: over three-quarters 
of teachers in Hungary (81%), Lithuania (76%) and Poland (83%) worked in schools whose school principal 
reported that they always discussed these measures with the teachers concerned.
It is clear that for the vast majority of teachers, the results of appraisal and feedback are not used to impose 
material sanctions. On average across TALIS countries over 85% of teachers worked in schools whose 
school principal reported that a material sanction is never imposed when a teacher appraisal identifies 
a weakness. However, a greater percentage of teachers in Estonia (24%), Hungary (38%), Poland (28%) 
and the Slovak Republic (87%) work in schools where the school principal reported that this happened 
at least sometimes. While still not a common practice in these countries, this indicates a framework that 
links appraisal and feedback to salaries and financial rewards. It may also indicate a stronger link between 
appraisal and feedback and teachers’ careers. 
chapter 5 S
chool
E
valuation
, t
EachEr
a
ppraiSal
and
F
EEdback
and
thE
i
mpact
on
S
choolS
and
t
EachErS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
158
© OECD 2009
ImpAct oF teAcher ApprAISAL And FeedbAck   
The impact of appraisal and feedback is complementary to the direct outcomes discussed above but here the 
focus is on less tangible impacts, such as teachers’ job satisfaction, effect on their teaching, and broader school 
development. To better illustrate these issues, the discussion begins with teachers’ perception of the nature of 
their appraisal and feedback.
As Table 5.7 shows, on average across TALIS countries, teachers who received appraisal and feedback had a 
positive view of the process and its connection to their work and their careers. Overall, teachers considered 
the appraisal and feedback they received to be a fair assessment of their work and to have a positive impact 
upon their job satisfaction and, to a lesser degree, job security (Table 5.7a). This is an important finding given 
the negative connotations that may be associated with the introduction of a teacher appraisal system. TALIS 
provides, for the first time, international data from representative samples of countries that show that systems of 
appraisal and feedback have a positive impact on teachers. 
Feelings of insecurity, fear and reduced appreciation of work can occur when a new or enhanced appraisal 
system is introduced in an organisation (Saunders, 2000). An emphasis on accountability can be assumed in 
some instances to imply strict and potentially punitive measures and thus have a negative impact upon teachers, 
their appreciation of their jobs and work as teachers (O’Day, 2002). In some respects, this appears to have 
been expected in some education systems that introduced new systems of teacher appraisal and accountability 
(Bethell, 2005). The results presented here do not show that a system of teacher appraisal and feedback will have 
a negative impact upon teachers. Specific systems can have negative impacts and considerable research has 
been conducted into the negative consequences of systems that misalign incentives and rewards (Lazear, 2000). 
A wide range of systems in TALIS countries emphasise different outcomes and different aspects of teachers’ 
work. Yet, the great majority of teachers in these varied systems consider the appraisal and feedback they 
receive to be beneficial to their work as teachers, to be fair, and to increase both job satisfaction and, to a lesser 
degree, job security. In fact, given the benefits of systems of appraisal and feedback, the greatest concern may 
be in countries that lack such systems. Moreover, it appears that very few systems fully exploit the potential 
positive benefits of systems of teacher appraisal and feedback and provide teachers with these benefits.  
teachers’ perceptions of the fairness of appraisal and feedback
Teachers’ perceptions of the appraisal and feedback they receive is likely to be shaped by the degree to which 
they consider it a fair and just assessment of their work. It may be assumed that teachers who do not consider 
their appraisal and feedback a fair assessment of their work would also have a negative view of other aspects of 
its impact and role within their school. Impressions of fairness are also linked to indicators of the extent to which 
the outcomes and incentives of an appraisal and feedback system are properly aligned with teachers’ work, 
what they consider to be important in their teaching, and the school’s organisational objectives. For example, if 
teachers are appraised and receive feedback on a particularly narrow set of criteria or on a particular outcome 
measure which they feel does not fully or fairly reflect their work, a measure of the fairness of the system should 
highlight this problem.   
Table 5.7 shows that 63% of teachers agreed and 20% strongly agreed that the appraisal and feedback they 
received was a fair assessment of their work. However, there were notable perceptions of a lack of fairness in 
some countries. A substantial proportion of teachers either strongly disagreed or disagreed that the appraisal and 
feedback was fair in Korea (9% strongly disagreed and 38% disagreed), and Turkey (12 and 23%, respectively). 
As detailed in Table 5.7a, very few teachers reported a negative impact upon their job security. In fact, 34% 
considered that it led to either a small or large increase in job security. In addition, over half reported either a 
small or large increase in their job satisfaction. Appraisal and feedback may therefore be considered to have a 
positive impact on aspects of teachers’ careers. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested