pdf.js mvc example : C# convert pdf to text file SDK control service wpf azure winforms dnn 4302360619-part616

Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
189
© OECD 2009
Leading to Learn:  
School Leadership  
and Management Styles 
C
hapter
6
190 Highlights
191 Introduction
193 Salient dimensions of secondary school management 
behaviour of school principals
198 Aspects of teachers’ work and school management
201 Teacher appraisal and feedback and school management
203
Conclusions and implications for policy and practice
C# convert pdf to text file - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
.net extract text from pdf; converting .pdf to text
C# convert pdf to text file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to word text online; batch pdf to text
chapter 6 L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
190
© OECD 2009
Highlights
 Some principals in every country have adopted the “instructional leadership” 
styles which are central to today’s paradigm of effective school leadership. 
 However, the prevalence of such practices varies greatly by country and they are 
much more in evidence in some countries such as Brazil, Poland and Slovenia 
than they are in others, such as Estonia and Spain. 
 Across TALIS countries, a significant number of principals employ both instructional 
and administrative leadership styles.
 Greater autonomy for the school principal in decision making about schools is 
not related to either management style. 
 In more than half of the TALIS countries, schools with more pronounced 
instructional leadership tend to link teacher appraisals with teachers’ participation 
in professional development. Also in many TALIS countries, schools whose 
principals are instructional leaders are more likely to take account of innovative 
teaching practices in the appraisal of teachers.
 In almost three-quarters of TALIS countries, principals who adopt an instructional 
leadership style tend to develop professional development programmes for 
instructionally weak teachers.
 In more than one quarter of TALIS countries, teachers whose school principal 
adopts a more pronounced instructional leadership style are more likely to 
engage in collaborative activities with their colleagues.
 In contrast, variations in principals’ use of an administrative leadership style are 
unrelated to classroom practices, pedagogical beliefs and attitudes, or to the 
amount of professional development teachers receive.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
convert pdf to .txt file; c# read text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
In the following example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
c# convert pdf to text; convert image pdf to text pdf
191
L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
chapter 6
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
IntroductIon
Teachers teach and work in schools that are usually administered by managers, often known as principals or 
headmasters. School administration is itself often part of larger administration units. The conditions of teachers’ 
working life are influenced by the administration and leadership provided by principals, and it is widely 
assumed that school leadership directly influences the effectiveness of teachers and the achievement outcomes 
of students (e.g.Hallinger and Murphy, 1986; OECD, 2001; Pont, Nusche and Moorman, 2008). 
In OECD countries as elsewhere in the world, school leaders face challenges due to rising expectations for 
schools and schooling in a century characterised by technological innovation, migration and globalisation. As 
countries aim to transform their educational systems to prepare all young people with the knowledge and skills 
needed in this changing world, the roles of school leaders and related expectations have changed radically. 
They are no longer expected merely to be good managers; effective school leadership is increasingly viewed as 
key to large-scale education reform and to improved educational outcomes.
Since at least 2001, with its series of reports, WhatWorksinInnovationinEducation,produced by the Centre for 
Educational Research and Innovation, the OECD has recognised the significant challenges faced by principals 
and school managers in member countries (OECD, 2001). As countries increasingly turn to improving education 
to address an ever more complex world, many governments give school leadership more responsibility for 
implementing and managing significantly more demanding education programmes. Globalisation and 
widespread immigration mean that children, youth and their families represent an increasingly challenging 
clientele for schools in many countries. Also, the standards to which schools must perform and the accountability 
required of management raise expectations regarding school leadership to an unprecedented level. 
A recent OECD report, ImprovingSchoolLeadership, summarises the changing landscape of schools and their 
management over recent decades (Pont, Nusche and Moorman, 2008, p. 6):
Inthisnewenvironment,schoolsandschoolingarebeinggivenaneverbiggerjobtodo.Greater
decentralisationinmanycountriesisbeingcoupledwithmoreschoolautonomy,moreaccountability
forschoolandstudentresults,andabetteruseoftheknowledgebaseofeducationandpedagogical
processes.Itisalsobeingcoupledwithbroaderresponsibilityforcontributingtoandsupportingthe
schools’localcommunities,otherschoolsandotherpublicservices.
This report argues that to meet the educational needs of the 21st century the principals in primary and secondary 
schools must play a more dynamic role and become far more than an administrator of top-down rules and 
regulations. Schools and their governing structures must let school leaders lead in a systematic fashion and 
hools. 
These recommendations flow from a field of education that has recently experienced a fundamental change in 
its philosophy of administration and even in its conception of schools as organisations. A significant research 
literature also indicates that what the public and other stakeholders of schools want as learning outcomes for 
students can only be achieved if school leadership is adapted to a new model (Pont, Nusche and Moorman, 
2008). These changes are directly relevant to the working lives, professional development, instructional 
practices, pedagogical beliefs and attitudes and the appraisal and feedback of secondary school teachers, all of 
which were measured in the TALIS survey.
From bureaucratic administrator to leader for learning
Changes in school administration over recent decades are part of a larger trend in the management of public 
service organisations that can be characterised as the decline of older public administrative models and the rise 
of a new public management (NPM) model. The ideas and research findings behind the NPM model in public 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform The HTML document file, converted by C#.NET PDF style that are included in target PDF document file
convert pdf images to text; converting pdf to plain text
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by number of pages.
convert pdf to word text document; best pdf to text
chapter 6 L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
192
© OECD 2009
services – flatter management structures, market-like mechanisms, decentralisation, customer orientation 
and evidence-based improvement of services – have significantly changed the approach to organisational 
management (e.g.Barzelay, 2001; Jones, Schedler and Wade 1997; Sahlin-Andersson, 2000; Schedler and 
Proeller, 2000). The effectiveness of these changes is still debated in education research and policy circles, but 
it is clear that these ideas, and the debate surrounding them, have changed the terms of management.
Perhaps the most salient change in attitudes about school management created by the NPM trend is the centring of 
the principal’s activity and behaviour on what is referred to as “instructional leadership” (Wiseman, 2002, 2004a). 
The term “instructional leader” has been explicitly promoted for principals since the beginning of the effective 
schools movement around 1980 in the United States (Blumberg and Greenfield, 1980; Bossert etal., 1981) and 
continues to lead ideas about how principals will meet the educational challenges of the new century (e.g. Heck, 
Larsen and Marcoulides, 1990; Duke, 1987; Kleine-Kracht, 1993; Boyd, 1996; Hallinger and Murphy, 1986; 
Lemahieu, Roy and Foss, 1997; Reitzug, 1997; Blase and Blase, 1998; Fullan, 2000). 
During the 1980s, the educational research and policy communities specifically encouraged principals to 
emphasise activities that would enhance or benefit classroom instruction and learning (e.g. National Commission 
on Excellence in Education, 1983). Increasingly, this means that as managers of organisations whose formal or 
official functions are instruction and learning, principals are responsible and accountable for school outputs 
such as student achievement. In particular, proponents of instructional leadership suggest that principals are 
the most effective of all potential instructional leaders because they are situated within the school context, 
unlike upper-level administrators in ministries. A package of reforms being developed by a number of OECD 
countries includes recommendations for greater professionalisation and specialty training for school managers 
ont, Nusche and Moorman, 2008). 
Along with the emphasis on accountability, the decentralisation of school management and the devolution of 
educational control have increased throughout much of the world (Baker and LeTendre, 2005). Less centralised 
control has meant more responsibility for a broader range of aspects of school management at the school level. For 
better or worse, this trend translates into a more complex school governance environment in many countries.
These ideas and the associated research on school leadership have led to reforms of the principal’s role in 
many countries, from an emphasis on administration in terms of the school’s compliance with bureaucratic 
procedures to an expanded role which combines administration with instructional leadership (OECD, 2001; 
Pont, Nusche and Moorman, 2008). This expanded role focuses strongly on the principal’s management of the 
school’s teachers and their teaching. 
Goals of the tALIS survey of principals
In each TALIS country, schools and schooling have specific characteristics. School management is shaped by 
these characteristics, which potentially influence every aspect of a teacher’s job and professional development. 
At the same time, there are global trends towards similarity in schooling and its management across countries 
(Baker and LeTendre, 2005). For the first time, the TALIS survey of principals provides rich information on the 
management behaviour and style of principals in secondary schools in 23 countries on four continents. The 
questionnaire was designed to answer three broad questions:
 In an era of accountability and devolution of authority in education, what are the salient dimensions of the 
management behaviour and style of secondary school principals?
 To what degree have recent trends in school leadership penetrated countries’ educational systems? 
 How are school leadership styles associated with the management of teachers, across the three main areas 
of TALIS: i) teachers’ professional development; ii) teachers’ practices, beliefs and attitudes; and iii) teachers’ 
appraisal and feedback?
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
convert pdf to openoffice text; convert pdf to txt file format
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
convert pdf to ascii text; convert pdf to txt batch
193
L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
chapter 6
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
chapter outline
The chapter begins with a description of school management behaviour based on the reports of the principals 
of schools providing lower secondary education in TALIS countries. It describes this behaviour on the basis 
of five indices (or dimensions) of management derived from a statistical analysis of principals’ responses, 
which are then summarised as two main management styles – instructional leadership and administrative 
leadership – on the basis of which principals are compared. The two styles are not mutually exclusive and 
in fact the TALIS data demonstrate that a number of principals use both styles to a considerable degree. The 
section concludes by analysing these management styles according to the characteristics of schools and of the 
principals themselves.
The chapter then examines the relation between management styles and five aspects of teachers’ work 
taken from Chapter 4: i) beliefs about the nature of teaching and learning; ii) teachers’ classroom practices; 
iii) teachers’ professional activities; iv) teachers’ classroom environment and school climate; and v) teachers’ 
attitudes towards their job.
The next two sections examine, in turn, the links between school management and teachers’ appraisal and 
feedback, the theme of Chapter 5, and the links with teachers’ professional development, the theme of Chapter 3. 
The final section summarises these findings and draws implications for school management.
SALIent dImenSIonS oF SecondAry SchooL mAnAGement behAvIour oF SchooL 
prIncIpALS 
The questionnaire for school principals was constructed with the aid of experts on school administration and 
organisational reform and research. Various instruments were adopted for assessing the managerial behaviour 
of secondary school principals and new items were also developed. The final questionnaire included 35 items 
on the management behaviour of principals. Using techniques of modern item response modelling and factor 
analysis (described in the TALISTechnicalReport [forthcoming]), five indices of management behaviour were 
constructed from the responses of 4 665 school principals in the 23 countries. These indices and the specific 
survey questions on which they are based are displayed in Table 6.1.
As with the indices in Chapter 4, analysis was conducted to test for cross-cultural consistency of the five indices 
of management behaviour (See Annex A1.1 and the TALISTechnicalReport). As this analysis indicated that 
countries’ mean scores on these indices may not be directly comparable, analysis in this chapter focuses more 
on broad comparisons against the international means. Nevertheless, care in interpretation is necessary. The 
analysis therefore focuses more on the pattern of cross-cultural differences than on specific country-by-country 
comparisons of the index scores.
management behaviour
1. Management for school goals – explicit management via the school’s goals and curriculum 
development
Principals scoring high on this index frequently take actions to manage schooling operations in accordance 
with the school’s goals, with direct emphasis on ensuring that teachers’ instruction in classrooms aims to 
achieve these goals. These principals also tend to use student performance levels and examination results to 
set goals and promote curricular developments. They endeavour to ensure clarity within the school about 
the responsibility for co-ordinating the curriculum. Principals scoring high on this index also report that they 
frequently make sure that teachers’ professional development activities are aligned with school goals and 
curricular objectives. 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF page deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction. Remarkably, all those C#.NET PDF document page
convert pdf to text document; convert pdf to rich text format
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as
pdf to text converter; changing pdf to text
chapter 6 L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
194
© OECD 2009
As Table 6.2 shows, there is considerable variation as principals in Hungary, Poland and Slovenia are notably 
above the TALIS mean, while those in Austria, Denmark, Italy and Spain, among others, are notably below. On 
average, principals in 10 countries are significantly above the TALIS average on this index, while 10 countries 
are below it. Also on average, principals in Estonia, Lithuania and Mexico are at the TALIS mean.
2. Instructional management – actions to improve teachers’ instruction
Principals scoring high on this index frequently work with teachers to improve weaknesses and address 
pedagogical problems, and also to solve problems with teachers when there are challenges to learning in a 
particular classroom. Also, they often inform teachers about possibilities to update their curricular knowledge 
and instructional skills. Finally, these principals report being vigilant about disruptive student behaviour in 
classrooms. In general, principals scoring high on this index spend significant amounts of their managerial time 
in attempting to improve classroom instruction.
On average, principals in 10 countries, including Brazil, Denmark and Malta, are above the TALIS mean and 
10, including Estonia, Malaysia and the Slovak Republic, are below it (Table 6.2).
3. Direct supervision of instruction in the school – actions to directly supervise teachers’ instruction 
and learning outcomes
Principals who score high on this index frequently use direct observation of teachers’ pedagogical practices and 
also make frequent suggestions to teachers on how to improve instruction in classrooms. These principals also 
frequently monitor students’ academic efforts and work.
There is again considerable variation among countries on this index (Table 6.2). On average in 11 countries, 
including Brazil, Poland and Slovenia, principals undertake more direct supervision of instruction than the 
TALIS average. Another 11 countries, including Denmark, Ireland and Portugal, are below the TALIS average; 
only Australia is at the TALIS average.
4. Accountable management – managing accountability to shareholders and others
Principals scoring high on this index see their role as making the school accountable internally and to 
stakeholders outside the school. Their role is to ensure that ministry-approved instructional approaches are 
explained to new teachers and that all teachers are held accountable for improving their teaching skills. These 
principals also focus on conhool.
On average, principals in 10 countries, most markedly in Bulgaria, Malaysia and Norway, are above the TALIS 
mean on this index and 10 are below (Table 6.2). 
5. Bureaucratic management – management actions mostly aimed at bureaucratic procedures
Principals scoring high on this index report that it is important for them to ensure that everyone in the school 
follows the official rules. They see their role as being significantly involved in dealing with problems in the 
scheduling of teachers and courses and in ensuring adequate administrative procedures and reporting to higher 
authorities. Thool.
The pattern across countries on this index is slightly different (Table 6.2). In just eight countries, including 
Bulgaria, Malaysia and Turkey, principals score above the TALIS average, in five countries they are at the TALIS 
average, and in ten they are below it. On average, principals in Australia, Denmark and Iceland are among the 
least involved with this type of management.
195
L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
chapter 6
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
management styles and school leadership
The five behavioral indices cover a significant range of principals’ management actions. To further summarise 
their behaviour, two management styles – instructionalleadershipand administrativeleadership– were 
defined (Figure 6.1). They characterise more comprehensively principals’ approach to their leadership 
approach. 
Principals scoring high for the first management style are significantly involved in what is referred to in the 
research literature on school management as an instructionalleadershipstyle. This index was derived by 
averaging the indices for the first three management behaviours, managementforschoolgoals, instructional
management and directsupervisionof instructionintheschool.
The second management style can be best referred to as an administrativeleadershipstyle and was derived 
by averaging the indices for the management behaviours accountablemanagement and bureaucratic
management. This style of management focuses on administrative tasks, enforcing rules and procedures, and 
accountability. 
Figure 6.1
Composition of the indices for instructional and administrative leadership 
1
 2
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/608025205225
Source: OECD, TALISDatabase.
Management-school goals index 
Explicit management via the school’s 
goals and curriculum development
Instructional management index 
Actions to improve teachers’  
instruction
Direct supervision of instruction  
in the school index 
Actions to directly supervise teachers’ 
instructional learning outcomes
accountable management index 
Managing accountability to 
stakeholders and others
Bureaucratic management index 
Management actions mostly aimed  
at bureaucratic procedures
administrative leadership style
Instructional leadership style
chapter 6 L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
196
© OECD 2009
The two styles are not necessarily mutually exclusive, even though they are sometimes portrayed as such in the 
research literature on school leadership (e.g.Hallinger and Murphy, 1986). This point is reinforced by the idea 
of an evolution of school leadership and a move from competent administration to school management which 
includes an emphasis on instructional leadership and a stronger focus on student learning. Also, as the results 
below indicate, a number of principals use both styles to a considerable degree. So while these styles help to 
capture the underlying approaches that principals take to their job, particularly concerning teachers, they need 
not be mutually exclusive in practice.
The recent OECD report, ImprovingSchoolLeadership, recommends that effective school management 
generally comes from engagement in instructional leadership (Pont, Nusche and Moorman, 2008). At the same 
time, effective leadership also involves administrative accountability and a workable bureaucracy. The question 
that arises is the extent to which these two management styles have been embraced by the TALIS countries’ 
school leadership. Three notable findings address this question.
First, as Table 6.3 indicates, while some principals in each TALIS country adopt an instructional leadership style, 
there is significant variation in its use across TALIS countries. In other words, the ideas and behaviour related to 
instructional management are evident to varying degrees in all TALIS countries, at least according to principals’ 
self-reports. Even the countries with the lowest average use of instructional leadership, such as Austria, Estonia 
and Spain, have principals that focus on this style of management.
Second, the TALIS countries fall into two roughly equal groups in terms of the emphasis on instructional leadership. 
In 10 countries, including Brazil, Poland and Slovenia, principals on average engage in an instructional leadership 
style above the overall TALIS average. Principals in the 13 other TALIS countries are less involved in this management 
style than the overall average.
Third, it is interesting that in countries in which principals are on average more involved in instructional 
leadership, they do not neglect administrative leadership. Obviously the principal’s task in most schools in 
most countries involves actions and priorities from both management styles, and individual principals may be 
high on one and low on the other, or high on both, or low on both. In practice each of the two styles involves 
activities and priorities that can be helpful in managing schools. The TALIS results show in fact that a significant 
group of principals employs both styles, as shown by the positive association between them: about one-fifth of 
the difference among principals in each style is related (r= .44, p<.0001). 
To demonstrate this, Figure 6.2 plots the TALIS countries’ means on the two management styles. Seven countries 
fall into the upper right quadrant where on average principals are highly involved in both instructional and 
administrative leadership. At the other end in the lower left quadrant are nine countries where on average 
principals are only moderately involved in both management styles. Malta and Poland are the only two countries 
in which principals are on average more involved in instructional than in administrative leadership, while the 
opposite applies in Ireland, Malaysia and Norway. Lastly, in three countries principals are on average at the 
OECD average for administrative leadership, but in two of these, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia, they are 
more involved in instructional leadership while in Portugal they are less involved in instructional leadership.
management styles and decision making 
Pont, Nusche and Moorman (2008) also considers that effective instructional leadership in schools requires 
some degree of administrative autonomy in decision making about key components of inputs to the instructional 
process. The TALIS questionnaire asked principals about the degree to which they had significant input into 
decisions about teachers, instruction, school resources and curriculum. While there is interesting variation 
across countries, decision-making autonomy is unrelated to either management style, as is clear from the 
distribution of countries with greater principal involvement in decision making (gray points in Figure 6.2) and 
those with lower involvement (blue points in Figure 6.2).
197
L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
chapter 6
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Figure 6.2
School principals according to their management styles (2007-08)
Bulgaria
Score on instructional leadership index
Score on administrative leadership index
Countries in gray have a higher than average principal involvement in decision making, while countries in blue have a lower than average
involvement.
Source: OECD, TALIS Database.
Lower score in instructional
leadership and higher score
in administrative leadership
Higher score in instructional
leadership and higher score
in administrative leadership
Lower score in instructional
leadership and lower score
in administrative leadership
Higher score in instructional
leadership and lower score
in administrative leadership
Turkey
Mexico
Italy
Brazil
Slovenia
Poland
Hungary
Malta
Slovak Republic
Lithuania
Korea
Belgium (Fl.)
Australia
Iceland
Estonia
Denmark
Spain
Portugal
Austria
Ireland
Norway
Malaysia
TALIS Average
TALIS Average
2.0
1.6
1.2
0.8
0.4
0
-0.4
-0.8
-1.2
-1.6
-2.0
-2.0
-1.6
-1.2
-0.8
-0.4
0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
2.0
1
 2
 http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/608025205225
Management styles and characteristics of principals and schools
Are management styles of principals related to their qualities as professionals and to the characteristics of the 
schools they administer? Research on leadership of formal organisations in general, and in schools specifically, 
finds contrasting evidence on this question (e.g.Wiseman, 2004a, 2004b). Some research suggests that the 
professional characteristics of leaders and the qualities of the organisations they lead help determine their 
management styles, while an equally sizable research literature suggests the opposite. The TALIS questionnaire 
asked principals a series of questions about their professional standing and about the qualities of their school. 
These associations are summarised in Tables 6.12 and 6.13.
chapter 6 L
eading
to
L
earn
: S
chooL
L
eaderShip
and
M
anageMent
S
tyLeS
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
198
© OECD 2009
The results presented in this section and the section following, are generated from a series of statistical regression 
analyses which examine the relation between a number of predictor (or independent) variables and a predicted 
(or dependent) variable (see Annex A1.4 for technical details and specifications of the variables). Tables 6.4 to 
6.13 highlight the variables that were statistically significant in these regressions, with a plus sign indicating 
a significant positive relationship and a minus sign indicating a significant negative relationship. Where no 
significant relationship was found, the cell in the table is left blank. Tables containing the regression coefficients 
are available on the TALIS website.
Interestingly, the TALIS results find little association between characteristics of principals and either their 
management behaviours or overall styles. By and large the associations are more evident in the instructional 
leadership style than in the administrative leadership style, and no one characteristic is consistently associated 
with either management style across all TALIS countries. As shown in the first sections of Table 6.12 and 6.13, 
neither the principals’ educational level nor the number of years they have been principals is consistently related 
to their position on either the management behaviour indices or the style indices. For each of these variables there 
is positive relation with the style of leadership in a handful of countries but a negative one in a handful of others. 
The same is true for the public or private school sector, the size of the school’s community, and the student/teacher 
ratio. Nevertheless, one trend is evident: in Belgium (Fl.), Estonia, Hungary, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, Spain and 
Turkey, female principals tend to use an instructional leadership style more than male principals. 
management styles and characteristics of evaluations of school performance
Are management styles of principals related to the characteristics of evaluations of the school’s performance 
and principals’ beliefs about instruction? In many countries school reforms to improve teachers’ instruction and 
student learning focus on the idea of aligning school management with clear indicators of instructional practice 
and student outcomes. The TALIS questionnaire asked the sampled principals about the characteristics of their 
school’s evaluation, including the degree to which there are both internal and external evaluations, which 
indicators of the school’s performance are important in evaluations, and the extent to which the outcome of 
the school evaluation influence the appraisal of the school management or of teachers. These associations are 
summarised in the third sections of Tables 6.12 and 6.13.
In eight countries – Belgium (Fl.), Bulgaria, Estonia, Korea, Mexico, Norway, Portugal and Turkey – principals in 
schools in which indicators of teachers’ innovative teaching practices are important to the evaluations tend to 
take an instructional leadership style of management. 
There are also some mixed patterns. For example, in Australia, Austria, Belgium (Fl.), Brazil, Korea, Malta 
and Norway, principals have a more pronounced instructional leadership style in schools where internal 
(self-evaluation) evaluations are more frequent, but the opposite is true in Denmark, Lithuania, Malaysia 
and Spain. Similar, but weaker, associations are found between the characteristics of school evaluations and 
principals who adopt an administrative leadership style.
One clear trend concerns the relation between principals’ beliefs about approaches to teaching and their 
leadership style. Instructional leadership is used in nine countries in which principals have a more constructivist 
belief about instruction. In countries in which principals believe that the task of teaching is to support students 
in their active construction of knowledge, they are also more likely to demonstrate instructional leadership. 
However, in 14 countries there is a similarly positive association between more administrative leadership and 
constructivist beliefs about instruction.
ASpectS oF teAcherS’ work And SchooL mAnAGement
This section examines the relation between the management styles of principals and five aspects of teachers’ 
work described in Chapter 4.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested