pdf.js mvc example : C# extract text from pdf control Library platform web page .net winforms web browser 4302360623-part621

229
c
lassroom
D
isciplinary
c
limate
anD
t
eachers
’ s
elF
-e
FFicacy
chapter 7
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
with specific learning needs (OECD, 2005). If these concerns were evident in teachers’ reports of classroom 
disciplinary climate and self-efficacy, then there would be significant differences between the results of the gross 
and net (which controls for socio-economic background characteristics) models estimated for each country. 
However, the results presented in Table 7.4 show little evidence of this. In most countries, the significance of 
teachers’ education did not change between the estimated gross and net models. 
Teachers’ reports of student ability is the most significant socio-economic background variable associated 
with both classroom disciplinary climate teachers’ and reported self-efficacy. It is significant across all TALIS 
countries, with lower/higher levels of reported student ability associated in the final net models estimated 
for each country with poorer/better classroom disciplinary climate. Student ability is significantly positively 
related to teachers’ reported self-efficacy in all countries but Ireland, Malaysia, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia 
and Turkey. Teachers’ reports of parental education levels are also significant for classroom disciplinary 
climate but in fewer countries. Classrooms with students with more highly qualified parents are significantly 
associated with a positive classroom disciplinary climate in 12 TALIS countries, even when controlling for 
student ability and the other factors included in the final net models estimated for each country (Tables 7.10 
and 7.11 available on line).
Box 7.1 
Classroom disciplinary climate, teachers’ reported self-efficacy  
and the stability of employment
The length and stability of employment appear to be significantly and positively related to teachers’ 
reported self-efficacy and to classroom disciplinary climate. Teachers with relatively less experience 
and with less stability in their contractual status were less likely to be teaching classes with a positive 
classroom disciplinary climate and to report high levels of self-efficacy in their success with students. 
 Teachers teaching classes with more positive classroom disciplinary climate are those with more 
experience (significant in 18 TALIS countries), employed on a permanent contract (11 TALIS countries) 
and on a full-time basis (5 TALIS countries).
 Teachers who are significantly more likely to report higher levels of reported self-efficacy are 
employed on a permanent contract (significant in 7 TALIS countries), employed on a full-time basis 
(6 TALIS countries), and have had more experience working as a teacher (5 countries).
Note: All of the results are from the final net models estimated for each country unless otherwise specified. 
teachers’ professIonal development and classroom dIscIplInary clImate 
and teachers’ self-effIcacy
This section presents the first extensions of the regression analyses into the main analytical themes of the 
previous chapters through the inclusion of the thematic blocs in the modelling. It begins with the inclusion of 
variables representing teachers’ professional development, thus building on Chapter 3. As detailed in Table 7.1, 
the bloc of variables measuring aspects of teachers’ professional development in the estimation include:
 Number of days of professional development in the 18 months prior to the survey.
 School providing formal induction process for teachers.
 School providing mentor for new teachers.
C# extract text from pdf - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to plain text; convert pdf to text file
C# extract text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
change pdf to txt file; batch pdf to text
chapter 7 K
ey
F
actors
in
D
eveloping
e
FFective
l
earning
e
nvironments
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
230
© OECD 2009
Table 7.5 presents the variables in this bloc that are statistically significant in the gross, net and final net models 
estimated for each country. The table also illustrates the direction of the coefficients for the variables that are 
statistically significant for each country.
The amount of professional development undertaken by teachers is significantly associated with classroom 
disciplinary climate in the net models estimated for five countries. In Australia, Korea, Portugal, the Slovak 
Republic and Slovenia, an increase in the number of days of teachers’ professional development is associated 
with an improved classroom disciplinary climate net of the background characteristics discussed previously 
(i.e. in the net models for each country). However, only in Australia is the relationship significant in the final 
net models. The amount of professional development was significantly associated with teachers’ self-efficacy 
in 11 TALIS countries (Table 7.5a). Teachers who undertook more days of professional development were more 
likely to report increased self-efficacy in Denmark, Estonia, Iceland, Italy, Korea, Lithuania, Malaysia, Malta, 
Mexico, Portugal and Slovenia in the final net models (Table 7.5a). Chapter 4 shows that teachers who engage 
in professional development tend to use specific teaching practices more often. This may also translate into 
greater teacher self-efficacy, although the TALIS data do not allow for identifying causal links. 
In Hungary, the number of days of teachers’ professional development is significant in the gross but not the net 
model (Table 7.5). In other words, the greater the amount of professional development undertaken by teachers 
in Hungary, the greater the likelihood of teaching with a positive classroom disciplinary climate. However, this 
relationship is not statistically significant once background characteristics are included (the net model). This 
indicates that the amount of professional development undertaken by Hungarian teachers is related to either 
their personal background characteristics or to the socio-economic background characteristics of the schools 
in which they teach. 
Two further aspects of teachers’ professional development are also included in the modelling. Induction and 
mentoring policies and practices have grown in importance in a number of countries in recent years, with the 
introduction of methods to assist new teachers and to improve learning and support to teachers within schools 
(OECD, 2005). Chapter 3 reveals that over two-thirds of teachers work in schools with a formal induction 
process for teachers new to the school. Moreover, three-quarters of teachers work in schools with a mentoring 
programme or policy for new teachers (Table 3.6).
Box 7.2 
Professional development and classroom disciplinary climate  
and teachers’ reported self-efficacy
 The amount of professional development undertaken by teachers is significantly related to teachers’ 
reported self-efficacy in just under half of TALIS countries. It is significantly related to classroom 
disciplinary climate in only one TALIS country. 
− The more days of professional development undertaken by teachers the greater the likelihood of 
higher reported levels of self-efficacy in 11 TALIS countries.
 Teachers working in schools with either mentoring or induction programmes are, in general, not 
significantly more or less likely to report higher levels of self-efficacy or classroom disciplinary climate.
Note: All of the results are from the final net models estimated for each country unless otherwise specified. 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
convert pdf to editable text; convert .pdf to text
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
if you are a Visual C# .NET programmer, you can go to this Visual C# tutorial for PDF text extraction in .NET project. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB
.pdf to .txt converter; convert pdf image to text
231
c
lassroom
D
isciplinary
c
limate
anD
t
eachers
’ s
elF
-e
FFicacy
chapter 7
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
In terms of the association with classroom disciplinary climate, these programmes are not as significant as 
the number of days of professional development undertaken by teachers. The effects of these policies are only 
significant in a few TALIS countries and the associations are often negative, indicating that these programmes 
exist in schools with a relatively poorer classroom disciplinary climate. The practice of induction and mentoring 
programmes in schools also does not have a significant association with teachers’ reported self-efficacy with 
significant relationships found only in Bulgaria and Estonia (Table 7.5a). 
teachIng practIces, belIefs and attItudes and classroom dIscIplInary clImate 
and teachers’ self-effIcacy
The next thematic bloc of variables to be included in the estimates of classroom disciplinary climate and 
teachers’ self-efficacy concerns the characteristics of teachers’ teaching practices, beliefs and attitudes which 
are discussed in Chapter 4. This bloc of independent variables includes:
 Index of direct transmission beliefs about instruction.
 Index of constructivist beliefs about instruction.
 Index of classroom teaching practice: structuring.
 Index of classroom teaching practice: student-oriented.
 Index of classroom teaching practice: enhanced activities.
 Index of professional collaboration.
 Index of exchange and co-ordination for teaching.
 Index of teacher-student relations.
The modelling presented here builds upon that of Chapter 4, which, while narrower in focus than the modelling 
in this chapter, also analyses aspects of classroom disciplinary climate and self-efficacy. However, there are 
slight differences due to the scope of the variables included and the methods of estimating the models (see 
Annex A1.4 for further details). Given the greater scope of the objectives of the modelling in this chapter, more 
variables are included and missing values are imputed to ensure adequate sample size. These changes are 
made to reflect differences in the scope and purpose of the modelling while ensuring that accurate measures 
are maintained. 
Table 7.6 presents the variables in this bloc that were statistically significant in the gross, net and final net 
models estimated for each country. The table also illustrates the direction of the coefficients for the variables 
that are statistically significant for each country.
teaching practices, beliefs and attitudes and classroom disciplinary climate
As discussed in Chapter 4, two indices are constructed to measure teachers’ beliefs: direct transmission and 
constructivist beliefs about instruction. Both are significantly associated with classroom disciplinary climate in 
a number of countries but often with opposing effects. In Hungary, Italy, Korea, Poland and Slovenia, teachers 
with stronger constructivist beliefs about instruction are more likely to teach classes with a positive classroom 
disciplinary climate in the final net models estimated for each of these countries. Given the positive association 
between classroom disciplinary climate and constructivist beliefs about instruction, it is particularly interesting 
that direct transmission beliefs about instruction are found to have a negative association with classroom 
disciplinary climate in nine countries in the net models. Teachers with stronger beliefs about the importance of 
the direct transmission style of instruction are more likely to be teaching in classrooms with a poorer classroom 
disciplinary climate. In the final net models estimated for each country, direct transmission beliefs are significantly 
associated with a negative classroom disciplinary climate in Belgium (Fl.), Korea, Norway, Poland, Portugal, 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
convert pdf to word to edit text; convert pdf file to text online
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
convert pdf to editable text online; convert scanned pdf to word text
chapter 7 K
ey
F
actors
in
D
eveloping
e
FFective
l
earning
e
nvironments
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
232
© OECD 2009
Slovenia and Spain. This is particularly important for policy makers, school principals, teachers and other 
stakeholders in Korea, Poland and Slovenia, where the positive association between constructivist beliefs and 
classroom disciplinary climate and the negative association with direct transmission beliefs are both significant. 
Teachers’ reports of teacher-student relations are significantly positively associated with classroom disciplinary 
climate in every TALIS country except Malta in the final net models estimated for each country. 
Four indices are developed to measure the practices teachers reported using in the classroom. As discussed in 
Chapter 4, these indices measure different aspects of teaching practices and complement the analysis of teachers’ 
beliefs presented above. Teaching practices emphasising structured classes and learning programmes for students 
are positively associated with classroom disciplinary climate in the final net models estimated for 11 TALIS 
countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium (Fl.), Bulgaria, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Korea, Mexico, Portugal, and Spain). 
In contrast, in Malaysia, teachers who reported greater use of these teaching practices are more likely to teach 
classes with a poorer classroom disciplinary climate. Again, care must be taken when interpreting this relationship 
especially in terms of causality. Teachers in Malaysia may utilise more structured techniques in their classrooms 
that already had a poor classroom disciplinary climate; or, alternatively, structured techniques may have created a 
poorer classroom disciplinary climate. TALIS does not provide evidence in support of either interpretation.
Student-oriented teaching practices are significantly associated with classroom disciplinary climate in Austria, 
Brazil, Estonia, Lithuania, Malaysia, Poland, Slovenia and Turkey in the final net models estimated for each 
country (Table 7.6). Teachers in these countries who reported a greater emphasis on student-oriented teaching 
practices are significantly more likely to have classes with a more positive classroom disciplinary climate. In 
Denmark and Ireland a significant relationship is also found in the gross models (but not the net models) but 
in these countries the association is negative. In other words, teachers are more likely to teach classes with a 
poor classroom disciplinary climate if they favour student-oriented teaching practices. This indicates that these 
teaching practices in these countries are significantly associated with various background characteristics but to 
differing degrees. Extending this analysis, teaching practices engaging students in enhanced activities are also 
significantly associated with classroom disciplinary climate in four countries. The relationship was negative in 
Austria, Belgium (Fl.), Lithuania and Malaysia in the final net models estimated for these countries. 
These findings build on the results in Chapter 4 which present regressions estimating classroom climate with a 
narrower set of independent variables (Table 4.10). As mentioned, an additional three sets of independent variables 
are included in the regression results presented in this chapter. These comprise: a broader set of teacher and school 
background variables; variables from other analytical blocs that measure characteristics discussed in Chapters 3, 
5 and 6; and the inclusion of multiple variables measuring teachers’ beliefs and practices. This chapter’s results 
confirm that the strength of these relationships with classroom disciplinary climate are not particularly affected by 
the inclusion of additional independent variables. Characteristics such as school leadership styles, the level and 
type of appraisal and feedback, and other teaching beliefs and practices do not appear to significantly affect the 
relationships between these teaching practices and classroom disciplinary climate. Again, this draws attention to 
the individual nature of teaching practices and the fact that variations in such practices are largely due to individual 
rather than school-level factors. In addition, the greater significance of the association between structured teaching 
practices and classroom disciplinary climate as compared to student-oriented and enhanced activities teaching 
practices still holds in estimates that include a broader set of independent variables and, perhaps of most interest, 
even when controlling for differences in teachers’ beliefs about instruction. 
Two measures of teachers’ co-operation are developed in the TALIS analysis and discussed in Chapter 4: teachers’ 
professional collaboration and the level of exchange and co-ordination for teaching. Neither of these measures 
is significantly associated with classroom disciplinary climate to the same extent as teachers’ beliefs and 
practices. Teachers’ professional collaboration is significantly positively associated with classroom disciplinary 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. C#.NET Project DLLs: Insert Text Content to PDF.
convert pdf to .txt file; convert pdf to text doc
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in C#.NET project.
change pdf to text file; converting pdf to text
233
c
lassroom
D
isciplinary
c
limate
anD
t
eachers
’ s
elF
-e
FFicacy
chapter 7
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
climate in Bulgaria, Italy and Spain and negatively associated with classroom disciplinary climate in Austria and 
Malaysia in the final net models. The level of exchange and co-ordination for teaching is significantly related to 
classroom disciplinary climate in Austria, Malaysia and Mexico in the final net models (Table 7.6). 
teaching practices, beliefs and attitudes and teachers’ self-efficacy 
Both direct transmission beliefs and constructivist beliefs about instruction are significantly associated with 
classroom disciplinary climate in some TALIS countries. Teachers with stronger constructivist beliefs about 
instruction are also significantly more likely to have higher levels of self-efficacy in all countries except Brazil, 
Bulgaria, Malaysia and Mexico in the final net models. Direct transmission beliefs about instruction are also 
significantly positively associated with self-efficacy in all countries except Australia, Estonia, Hungary, Iceland, 
Malaysia and Malta in the final net models (Table 7.6a). This reflects results presented in Chapter 4 indicating that 
the strength of teachers’ beliefs about effective instruction are related to their self-efficacy. Previous research adds 
further support to this finding. Workers who have been successful with particular working methods have been 
found to show a stronger relationship between such methods and their perceived self-efficacy (Bandura, 1989). 
A number of classroom practices that are significantly related to classroom disciplinary climate also have a significant 
relationship with teachers’ reported self-efficacy. Structured teaching practices are positively significantly related 
to teachers’ reported self-efficacy in 11 TALIS countries in the final net models. Teachers in Australia, Austria, 
Belgium (Fl.), Iceland, Ireland, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Norway, Portugal and Spain who reported emphasising 
structured teaching practices in their classroom have higher levels of reported self-efficacy (Table 7.6a). In Poland 
this relationship is significant but negative so that teachers were less likely to report higher levels of self-efficacy if 
they reported using structured practices in their classrooms. Student-oriented teaching practices have a significant 
positive relationship with teachers’ reported self-efficacy in Austria, Estonia, Hungary, Korea, Lithuania, Portugal, 
the Slovak Republic, Slovenia and Turkey in the final net models. It should also be noted that, as shown in Chapter 
4, there is a significant relationship in most TALIS countries between student-oriented teaching practices and 
constructivist beliefs about instruction (Table 4.9). This relationship may reduce the significance of that between 
student-oriented practices and self-efficacy found here given the finding about the significance of constructivist 
beliefs about instruction in estimations of teachers’ reported self-efficacy. 
Extending the analysis to teachers’ reports of classroom practices that involve engaging students in enhanced 
activities, as in the case of the findings on the relationship with classroom disciplinary climate, there is a significant 
relationship with self-efficacy in fewer TALIS countries than for other teaching practices. In Ireland, Italy and Poland 
teachers who reported engaging their students in enhanced activities in the classroom were more likely to report 
greater levels of self-efficacy. However, in Austria a greater reported use of enhanced activities in the classroom is 
associated with a decrease in teachers’ reported levels of self-efficacy in the final net model (Table 7.6a). 
The two measures of teachers’ co-operation used in this analysis are an index of teachers’ professional 
collaboration and an index of exchange and co-ordination for teaching. The former is significantly associated 
with teachers’ reported self-efficacy in ten TALIS countries in the final net models. The more teachers in Austria, 
Belgium (Fl.), Bulgaria, Estonia, Hungary, Iceland, Korea, Poland, Portugal and Spain engaged in professional 
collaboration, the greater their reported levels of self-efficacy. This is also true for Malaysia and Norway for 
teachers’ levels of exchange and co-ordination for teaching in the final net models (Table 7.6a). 
Teachers’ reports about teacher-student relations in their schools is the only measure of teacher practices and 
beliefs that is found to have a statistically significant relationship with teachers’ reported self-efficacy in all 
TALIS countries in the final net models (Table 7.6a). This is also found when modelling the relationship with 
classroom disciplinary climate (except for Malta), a further sign of the importance of teacher-student relations 
in school education. 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
converting pdf to editable text; convert pdf to rich text format online
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
pdf to text converter; convert image pdf to text pdf
chapter 7 K
ey
F
actors
in
D
eveloping
e
FFective
l
earning
e
nvironments
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
234
© OECD 2009
teacher appraIsal and feedback and classroom dIscIplInary clImate and 
teachers’ self-effIcacy
The next bloc of variables considered in the analysis includes aspects of school evaluations and teacher appraisal 
and feedback which are the focus of Chapter 5. A number of issues discussed in Chapter 5 can be considered 
important in school education and in the careers and working lives of teachers. They include the frequency and 
criteria of school evaluations, the potential impact of such evaluations, the frequency and criteria of teacher 
appraisal and feedback, the outcomes and impact of such appraisal and feedback, and various issues relating 
to the structure of school evaluation that affect teachers and their careers.
Box 7.3 
Disciplinary climate and teachers’ reported self-efficacy  
and teaching practices and beliefs
 Stronger beliefs about instruction are related to stronger self-efficacy regardless of the type of beliefs. 
Teachers with stronger constructivist beliefs about instruction are significantly more likely to report 
higher levels of self-efficacy in all TALIS countries except Brazil, Bulgaria, Malaysia and Mexico. 
Moreover, direct transmission beliefs about instruction are significantly positively associated with 
self-efficacy in all TALIS countries except Australia, Estonia, Hungary, Iceland, Malaysia and Malta.
 Beliefs about instruction have opposing relationships with classroom disciplinary climate in some 
countries. Teachers with stronger constructivist beliefs are more likely to teach classes with a positive 
classroom disciplinary climate in 5 TALIS countries. However, direct transmission beliefs about 
instruction are found to have a negative association with classroom disciplinary climate in 7 TALIS 
countries. 
− This is particularly important for policy makers, school principals, teachers and other stakeholders 
in Korea, Poland and Slovenia where the positive association between constructivist beliefs and 
classroom disciplinary climate and the negative association with direct transmission beliefs are 
both significant. 
 Teachers’ reports of teacher-student relations is the only variable measuring teachers’ beliefs and 
classroom practices that is significantly positively associated with classroom disciplinary climate 
(except in Malta) and with teachers’ reported self-efficacy in every TALIS country.
 A number of teaching practices are significantly related to classroom disciplinary climate and teachers’ 
self-efficacy:
− Teaching practices emphasising structured classes and learning programmes for students are 
positively associated with classroom disciplinary climate in 11 TALIS countries and with teachers’ 
reported self-efficacy in 11 TALIS countries.
− Student-oriented teaching practices are significantly positively associated with classroom disciplinary 
climate in eight countries and with teachers’ reported self-efficacy in 9 TALIS countries.
− Teachers’ professional collaboration is significantly positively associated with teachers’ reported 
self-efficacy in ten countries but with classroom disciplinary climate in only 3 TALIS countries.
Note: All of the results are from the final net models estimated for each country unless otherwise specified. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
convert pdf to text file online; convert pdf to text open source
235
c
lassroom
D
isciplinary
c
limate
anD
t
eachers
’ s
elF
-e
FFicacy
chapter 7
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
Given the breadth of the analysis in Chapter 5 and the restrictions of the modelling, only a subset of variables 
are included in the bloc of variables depicting school evaluations and teacher appraisal and feedback. The 
independent variables included in the modelling are:
 Did not have a school evaluation within the previous 5 years. 
 Importance of aspect for school evaluations: student test scores.
 School evaluation published. 
 Did not receive teacher appraisal or feedback from any source at this school.
 Importance in teacher appraisal and feedback: student test scores. 
 Importance in teacher appraisal and feedback: innovative teaching practices. 
 Importance in teacher appraisal and feedback: professional development the teacher has undertaken. 
 Impact of teacher appraisal and feedback: a change in salary. 
 Impact of teacher appraisal and feedback: opportunities for professional development activities. 
 Impact of teacher appraisal and feedback: public recognition from the principal and/or your colleagues. 
 Impact of teacher appraisal and feedback: changes in the teacher's work responsibilities that make the job 
more attractive. 
 Whether teachers believe that the most effective teachers in their school receive the greatest monetary or 
non-monetary rewards.
In the same manner as for previous blocs, the bloc of variables concerned with school evaluation and teacher 
appraisal and feedback are included in gross, net and final net models estimating both classroom disciplinary 
climate and teachers’ reported self-efficacy. Table 7.7 presents the variables in this bloc that are statistically 
significant in the gross, net and final net models estimated for each country. The table also illustrates the 
direction of the coefficients for the variables that are statistically significant for each country. 
Two sets of estimations were carried out for the analysis of variables of teacher appraisal and feedback. The 
first estimates the impact of having a school evaluation and teacher appraisal and feedback, and the second 
estimates the impact of various important aspects and outcomes of school evaluation and teachers’ appraisal 
and feedback. The variables measuring the important aspects and outcomes of school evaluation and teacher 
appraisal and feedback are only reported by teachers in schools where such activities took place. For this 
reason, these variables are modelled separately. The results of both sets of estimations are discussed below. 
Three variables measuring important aspects of school evaluations of interest for policy makers and stakeholders 
are included in the modelling. The first identifies whether a school had undergone either an external or a self-
evaluation within the last five years. The second measures the importance of student test scores in the school 
evaluation and thus indicates the role of student outcomes in the evaluations of schools. The third concerns 
whether or not the results of such an evaluation were published. 
School evaluations are found to have little significant impact on classroom disciplinary climate. No significant 
relationship is found in any TALIS country between classroom disciplinary climate or teacher self-efficacy and 
whether or not a school had either an external or self-evaluation within the last five years in the final net models 
estimated for each country (Table 7.7a). This is also the case for the emphasis on student test scores in school 
evaluations and the publication of information on school evaluations. This is a contentious issue in a number of 
countries but does not show a significant positive or negative relationship with classroom disciplinary climate 
in any TALIS country. 
chapter 7 K
ey
F
actors
in
D
eveloping
e
FFective
l
earning
e
nvironments
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
236
© OECD 2009
The lack of significant findings in these relationships does not necessarily mean that the findings themselves 
are of little importance. These variables are included in the modelling as they are important policy malleable 
aspects of the evaluative framework of school education. In some countries, the publication of school 
evaluation results and a strong emphasis on student outcomes in evaluating schools have been contentious 
practices or policy issues. The finding that these factors are not significantly associated with classroom 
disciplinary climate may be important for policy makers or administrators considering such policy issues, 
particularly if, for example, the impact on classroom disciplinary climate is considered a reason for either 
supporting or opposing such moves. 
In Brazil, Denmark, Portugal and the Slovak Republic the practice of teacher appraisal and feedback is 
significantly associated with classroom disciplinary climate. Teachers in these countries who had received 
some appraisal and feedback on their work as teachers in their school were significantly more likely to teach 
classes with a positive classroom disciplinary climate (Table 7.7). However, this was not significant in the final 
net models estimated for these countries. It therefore appears that in these countries, the emphasis on various 
criteria in appraisal and feedback discussed below (which is, by definition, correlated with whether or not 
teachers receive appraisal or feedback) had a stronger impact upon classroom disciplinary climate than simply 
whether that appraisal and feedback existed in the first place. In 11 countries a significant relationship is found 
between teachers who received appraisal and feedback and their reported self-efficacy. Teachers in Australia, 
Belgium (Fl.), Brazil, Bulgaria, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Portugal and Spain reported higher levels of 
self-efficacy if they had received appraisal and feedback on their work as teachers in their school in the net 
models (Table 7.7a). However, these relationships are not significant in the final net models estimated for each 
country. This may be because of the association between the receipt or not of appraisals and feedback and 
distinct aspects and impacts or outcomes of that appraisal and feedback that are also included as independent 
variables in the estimations
Three criteria used in teacher appraisal and feedback are included in the analysis to assess whether these are 
associated with classroom disciplinary climate and teacher self-efficacy. An emphasis on student test scores, 
innovative teaching practices and teacher professional development are considered in the analysis. Of these, 
teacher appraisal and feedback emphasising innovative teaching practices is found to have a significant impact 
in the more TALIS countries (Table 7.7 and Table 7.7a). An emphasis on innovative teaching practices in the 
appraisal and feedback that teachers received about their work is significantly associated with classroom 
disciplinary climate in seven TALIS countries in the net models estimated for each country (Table 7.7). Teachers 
in Brazil, Hungary, Lithuania, Mexico, Portugal, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia who received appraisal and 
feedback emphasising innovative teaching practices were more likely to report teaching classes with a more 
positive classroom disciplinary climate. However, once variables from other analytical blocs are included in 
the final net models, they are significantly associated with classroom disciplinary climate only in Lithuania, 
Portugal, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia. Teacher appraisal and feedback that emphasised innovative teaching 
practices is significantly associated with increased teacher self-efficacy in 11 TALIS countries in the net models 
(Table 7.7a). It is clear however, that this is also correlated with other analytical variables as it is only significant 
in the final net models estimated for Brazil, Iceland and Portugal. The link between an emphasis on innovative 
teaching practices and self-efficacy is an important finding in its own right. But it is also important considering 
the discussion in Chapter 5 shows that teachers report receiving little or no recognition for being innovative 
in their work. This may need to be addressed to better encourage innovative teaching practices and possibly 
thereby encourage greater teacher self-efficacy. 
An important element of Chapter 5 concerns the linkages between teachers’ professional development and teacher 
appraisal and feedback. The discussion emphasised the extent to which teacher appraisal and feedback is used to 
identify and then plan teachers’ professional development activities. Once teachers have completed professional 
237
c
lassroom
D
isciplinary
c
limate
anD
t
eachers
’ s
elF
-e
FFicacy
chapter 7
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
© OECD 2009
development, the impact and value of that professional development, and the changes resulting from it, can 
be incorporated into teachers’ appraisal and feedback. The emphasis on teachers’ professional development is 
positively associated with classroom disciplinary climate in the net models for Italy and Korea (Table 7.7). In 
addition, in the net models for Austria, Ireland, Korea, Lithuania, Mexico and Slovenia, teachers who received 
appraisal and feedback which emphasised the professional development they had undertaken reported greater 
levels of self-efficacy (Table 7.7a). However, this was not significant in the final net models for these countries. 
Teacher appraisal and feedback which emphasised student test scores was positively associated with classroom 
disciplinary climate only in Denmark and was negatively associated with teachers’ self-efficacy in Estonia. 
The impact and outcomes of teacher appraisal and feedback provide an indication of the role it plays in teachers’ 
careers and their working lives. Four specific outcomes were identified and included in the estimations of 
classroom disciplinary climate and self-efficacy: whether a teacher had received a change in salary following 
appraisal and feedback; opportunities for professional development; public recognition from the school principal 
or school colleagues; and changes in work responsibilities that make a teacher’s job more attractive. Of these, 
public recognition is significantly associated with classroom disciplinary climate and teachers’ reported self-
efficacy in the greatest number of TALIS countries (Table 7.7a). 
A positive classroom disciplinary climate is more likely to exist for teachers who receive public recognition 
from their school principal or other colleagues in their school. In the net models estimated for each country, this 
relationship is significant in Australia, Belgium (Fl.), Brazil, Bulgaria, Estonia, Korea and Slovenia (Table 7.7). 
However, in the final net models these relationships are not significant in Australia and Slovenia; this points 
to correlation with variables from other analytical blocs. Associations between teachers’ reported self-efficacy 
and public recognition from the school principal or school colleagues are significant in 11 countries in the final 
net models. Teachers in Austria, Belgium (Fl.), Estonia, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Korea, Lithuania, Malta, Norway 
and Spain are significantly more likely to report greater levels of self-efficacy if they received public recognition 
from the school principal or school colleagues as a consequence of the appraisal and feedback they received 
about their work (Table 7.7a). Public recognition was the most frequent outcome following teacher appraisal 
and feedback (Table 5.5) so it is important that it is found to have an impact. It indicates that if the outcomes of 
appraisal and feedback are strengthened then it may have a greater impact upon teachers and their self-efficacy. 
Public recognition, while being the most frequent outcome, was only an outcome of appraisal and feedback to 
a moderate or large degree for 36% of teachers so there is scope to strengthen these links. Moreover, only 9% 
or teachers reported a moderate or large change in salary and only 16% reported a moderate or large change 
in career opportunities following appraisal and feedback (Table 5.5). Given that stronger outcomes of appraisal 
and feedback can have an impact on teacher self-efficacy, this may be an additional argument for strengthening 
the outcomes of teacher appraisal and feedback. 
Changes in work responsibilities that make teachers’ jobs more attractive have a significant relationship with 
teachers’ reported self-efficacy in Brazil, Bulgaria, Estonia, Portugal and Slovenia in the final net models 
(Table 7.7a). Significant relationships between these variables may indicate that teacher appraisal and feedback 
plays a proactive and important role in school development and the organisation of teaching in schools. It 
may be that effective schools appraise teachers’ work and fashion their teaching responsibilities to best utilise 
the aspects of teachers’ skills and abilities that are identified in the appraisal of their work. A change in work 
responsibilities as a result of teacher appraisal and feedback is not significantly associated with classroom 
disciplinary climate in the final net models for any TALIS country (Table 7.7).
Chapter 5 reports that the majority of teachers do not work in schools where they believe the most effective 
teachers receive the greatest recognition. Similarly, approximately three-quarters of teachers reported that they 
would receive no recognition for increasing either the effectiveness or level of innovation in their teaching. 
chapter 7 K
ey
F
actors
in
D
eveloping
e
FFective
l
earning
e
nvironments
Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS – ISBN 978-92-64-05605-3
238
© OECD 2009
A similar proportion of teachers disagreed with the statement that the most effective teachers in their school 
receive the greatest monetary or non-monetary rewards. It is important therefore that, even given a relatively 
small number of teachers in a number of countries agreeing with this statement, it has a significant and positive 
impact upon teachers’ self-efficacy in the net models in Brazil, Iceland, Italy, Korea, Malaysia, Portugal, Spain, 
and Turkey. However, this was only significant in the final net models in Brazil (Table 7.7a). 
Box 7.4 
Classroom disciplinary climate and teachers’ reported self-efficacy  
and teachers’ appraisal and feedback
 Teachers who received no appraisal and feedback were less likely to have higher levels of reported 
self-efficacy. Yet, this relationship was not significant in the final models indicating that it is related 
with other factors. There are no significant findings linking classroom disciplinary climate or teachers’ 
self-efficacy with whether or not teachers worked in schools that had conducted school evaluations.
 Teacher appraisal and feedback that focuses on innovative teaching practices was more likely to be 
related to higher levels of self-efficacy in 3 TALIS countries and of classroom disciplinary climate in 
4 TALIS countries. This is potentially important given that the majority of teachers reported that they 
received little or no recognition for being innovative in their work and that it was significant in a 
greater number of countries in the bloc models estimated for each country.
 Teachers who received public recognition from the school principal or their colleagues as a 
consequence of their appraisal and feedback were more likely to have higher levels of classroom 
disciplinary climate in 5 TALIS countries and reported self-efficacy in 11 TALIS countries. 
 Changes in work responsibilities that make teachers’ jobs more attractive are found to have a significant 
positive relationship with teachers’ reported self-efficacy in 5 TALIS countries. This may indicate that 
teacher appraisal and feedback plays a proactive and important role in school development and 
the organisation of teaching in schools. It may be that effective schools appraise teachers’ work and 
fashion their teaching responsibilities to make the best use of the skills and abilities identified in the 
appraisal of teachers’ work.
Note: All of the results are from the final net models estimated for each country unless otherwise specified. 
school leadershIp and classroom dIscIplInary clImate and teachers’  
self-effIcacy
A final analytical bloc of variables is added to analyse the association between classroom disciplinary climate 
and teachers’ reported self-efficacy and the specific school leadership styles discussed in Chapter 6. This bloc 
of school leadership variables includes:
 School leadership index: Management-school goals. 
 School leadership index: Instructional management.
 School leadership index: Direct supervision of instruction in the school.
 School leadership index: Accountable management.
 School leadership index: Bureaucratic management.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested