how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to word editable text application control tool html web page .net online MDM_Part2_English0-part654

UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC COMMISSION FOR EUROPE 
Making Data Meaningful 
Part 2: 
A guide to presenting statistics 
UNITED NATIONS 
Geneva, 2009 
Convert pdf to word editable text - application control tool:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to word editable text - application control tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
NOTE 
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply 
the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations 
concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or 
concerning the delimitation of its frontier or boundaries. 
ECE/CES/STAT/NONE/2009/3 
application control tool:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page
www.rasteredge.com
iii 
Table of Contents 
……………………………… 
Introduction ...................................................................................................v
1. Getting the message across ........................................................................ 1
2. Visualization of statistics ............................................................................. 7
3. Tables ..................................................................................................... 12
4. Charts ..................................................................................................... 17
5. Maps ....................................................................................................... 30
6. Emerging visualization techniques ............................................................... 41
7. Accessibility issues .................................................................................... 46
8. References and further reading ................................................................... 51
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic control to export Word from multiple PDF files in Create editable Word file online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
framework. Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
The Word document file created by RasterEdge C# Word document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
Introduction 
The Making Data Meaningful guides have been prepared within the framework of 
the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Work Sessions on the 
Communication and Dissemination of Statistics
1
, under the programme of work of 
the Conference of European Statisticians
2
These guides are intended as a practical tool to help managers, statisticians and 
media relations officers in statistical organizations, particularly those organizations 
that are in the process of developing their communication strategies. The guides 
provide advice on the use of text, tables, charts, maps and other devices to bring 
statistics  to life  for non-statisticians.  They  contain suggestions, guidelines and 
examples - but not strict rules or rigid templates. 
An  effective data  release  uses  a  combination  of  text,  tables  and  graphics  to 
maximize its strength in conveying  various types of information. Making Data 
Meaningful Part 1: A guide to writing stories about numbers (issued in 2006) 
focused on the use of effective writing techniques. Making Data Meaningful Part 2: 
A guide to presenting statistics aims to help readers find the best way to get their 
message across to non-specialists, using the most suitable set of tools and skills 
now available from a dazzling array of communication methods. 
This guide recognizes that there are many practical and cultural differences among 
statistical organizations and that approaches may vary from country to country. 
A group of experts in the communication and dissemination of statistics prepared 
this guide. They are (in alphabetical order): 
Petteri Baer, UNECE 
Colleen Blessing, United States Energy Information Administration 
Eileen Capponi, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
Jerôme Cukier, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
Kerrie Duff, Australian Bureau of Statistics 
John Flanders, Statistics Canada 
Colleen Flannery, United States Census Bureau 
Jessica Gardner, UNECE 
Martine Grenier, Statistics Canada 
Armin Grossenbacher, Swiss Federal Statistical Office 
David Marder, United Kingdom Office for National Statistics 
Kenneth Meyer, United States Census Bureau 
Terri Mitton, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
Eric St. John, Statistics Canada 
Thomas Schulz, Swiss Federal Statistical Office 
Anne-Christine Wanders, UNECE 
The contributions of Martin Lachance (Statistics Canada), Andrew Mair (Australian 
Bureau of Statistics), Alan Smith (United Kingdom Office for National Statistics), 
Christina O’Shaughnessy and Steven Vale (UNECE) are greatly appreciated. 
1 Information about the UNECE Work Sessions on the Communication and Dissemination of Statistics are 
available from the UNECE website at http://www.unece.org/stats/archive/04.05.e.htm
2
Information about the Conference of European Statisticians is available from the UNECE website at 
http://www.unece.org/stats/archive/act.00.e.htm
application control tool:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
file created by RasterEdge C# Word document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics Create Word From PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
1. Getting the message across 
1.1  The written word 
News releases are often the vehicle through which your statistical organization 
communicates key findings of its  statistical  and  analytical  programmes to the 
intended audience, which is most probably the general public. The text is the 
principal  vehicle  for  explaining  the  findings,  outlining  trends  and  providing 
contextual information. 
In this chapter, we will provide many suggestions for preparing an “effective” news 
release or other document, such as a report or an analytical article. 
What makes a news release, report or analytical article effective? Perhaps the best 
explanation comes from the first Making Data Meaningful guide, Part 1: A guide to 
writing stories about numbers, which provides an initial set of recommendations for 
getting your message across. An effective news release is one that: 
tells a story about the data; 
has relevance for the public and answers the question “Why should my 
audience want to read about this?”; 
catches the reader's attention quickly with a headline or image; 
is easily understood, interesting and often entertaining; 
encourages others, including the media, to use statistics appropriately to 
add impact to what they are communicating. 
Here are some tips to help you get started on your text. 
1.2  Target audience: your first decision 
The first important decision you must make is to pinpoint an audience: who are you 
writing for? Quite simply, the audience is in the driver's seat. By and large, what 
the audience wants is what you should be giving them. You have to listen to your 
audiences to find and select the right narratives, language, and visual and graphic 
devices that will capture their attention. 
The choice of an audience is more complex these days because of the Internet. 
Most statistical  organizations  have a  mandate to  communicate to  the  general 
public, who are non-specialized, fairly well-educated laypeople. In the days of 
printed news releases, the principal target audience was likely to be the media, on 
which organizations relied to transmit key findings to the public. 
Nowadays, however, statistical organizations have developed a significant direct 
readership  through  their  websites,  e-mail  and  other  forms  of  Internet-based 
distribution. This means that they are communicating with a host of audiences 
simultaneously:  the  public,  data  users,  bankers,  financial  analysts,  university 
professors, students and so on, each with their own data requirements. 
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics 
The communications world is constantly evolving. Successful commercial media 
know this and constantly monitor - often in real time - which of their stories get the 
most attention. They then target their resources to create richer content by using 
devices such as video, additional photos or more analysis to encourage greater 
interaction with each audience. 
In any case, the message here is that before throwing precious resources into any 
method of communication - new or established - it is important to decide first who 
your audiences or stakeholders are, what it is they want from you and how they 
want it. 
Should  you  wish  to  address  several  audiences,  you  must  select  the  most 
appropriate method to reach each of them, by transmitting your message through 
appropriate channels and using appropriate communication techniques. 
Often though, lack of time and resources mean that it is not possible to reach all of 
your audiences all of the time. You have a choice: you can prioritize or, if you want 
to reach the widest audience, you can find the clearest common ground. 
This is what many statistical organizations do. They target the general public, but 
make a concerted effort to reach this audience by using journalists as a kind of 
'conduit'. The intended audience is the public, but journalists are the means of 
communicating with that audience. Experts and specialists also benefit from this 
approach. Often, the simple clear techniques used to reach a wide audience are 
warmly welcomed by even the most specialized audience. 
1.3  Understand the context in which you are communicating 
Statistical communication does not occur in isolation. Therefore, it is important that 
you understand the context in which you are communicating. The way in which 
audiences  consume  media  is  constantly  changing.  There  are  also  distinct 
differences between generations, in their technical abilities and understanding of 
statistics. 
When planning statistical communication, you should keep in mind four particular 
trends in online media consumption, which represent both opportunities and risks:  
1.
The World Wide Web is increasingly becoming a medium for entertainment. 
Any message that is not presented in an interesting way risks not engaging 
with younger audiences. 
2.
Society  has  developed  a  “snack  culture”  in  relation  to  information 
consumption. Audiences increasingly want smaller snippets of information 
that can be consumed quickly. 
3.
Audiences using the Internet tend to “satisfice”: they find a vaguely relevant 
piece of information and stop there, rather than look further for the most 
relevant piece of information. 
4.
In addressing different audiences and presentation styles, try not to exclude 
important audiences in the process of making your statistical communication 
more entertaining or easier to consume. 
So what can you do to make the best use of the Internet? You must use the most 
appropriate tools of language, structure and presentation to get your  message 
across. The following sections will illustrate how. 
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
1.4  Narrative: telling the story 
First and foremost, find a story 
For data to be meaningful to a general audience, it is important to find meaning in 
the numbers. The word “story” often alarms  people in the  statistical/scientific 
world, because it has overtones of fiction or embellishment that might lead to 
misinterpretation of the  data.  This  view  might  be  justified  if  analysts  do  not 
approach the data with care and respect. 
However, the alternative, i.e. avoiding a story, may be far worse. People often 
distrust statistics and feel they are misleading, because they cannot understand the 
data. This occurs because we, the people who produce data, fail to make them 
relevant and explain them in terms that people can understand. Without a story 
line, a release becomes just a simple description of numbers. 
A statistical story must be based on sufficient knowledge of the data and the 
phenomenon under study. Otherwise, it may be interesting, but in fact all wrong. 
When preparing a statistical story, you must also remember the Fundamental 
Principles of Official Statistics
3
1.
Impartiality; 
2.
Professionalism; 
3.
Metadata; 
4.
Comment on erroneous interpretation; 
5.
Diverse sources; 
6.
Confidentiality; 
7.
Transparency; 
8.
National coordination; 
9.
International standards; 
10.
International cooperation. 
It  is  vital  that  statistical  organizations  remain  impartial  and  ensure  the 
confidentiality of respondents and small sub-populations. 
Your text should place the most important and significant findings in the context of 
short- and longer-term trends. It should explore relationships, causes and effects, 
to the extent that they can be supported by evidence. It should show readers the 
significance of the most current information. 
Write in journalistic style 
Use the writing style adopted by journalists: the “inverted pyramid”. Present the 
most important facts first, followed by subsidiary points in decreasing order of 
importance. Readers lose interest quickly, so the most critical information must be 
at the beginning of the text. 
3 These principles were adopted by the United Nations Statistical Commission in 1994. They are 
described in detail on the UNECE website at http://www.unece.org/stats/archive/docs.fp.e.htm
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics 
Avoid starting your text with methodology and ending it with a conclusion. You can 
put key points regarding methodology in a note to readers - the less complex the 
explanation of methodology, the better. The conclusion should become your lead or 
opening paragraph. 
The lead is the most important element of your text. It should tell a story about the 
data. It summarizes the story line concisely, clearly and simply, and sets the story 
in context. It should concentrate on one message or theme and contain a minimum 
of data. 
GOOD EXAMPLE of a lead paragraph: 
Net profits of non-financial companies in the Netherlands amounted to 19 billion 
euros in the second quarter of 2008. This is the lowest level for three years. Profits 
were 11 percent lower than in the second quarter of 2007. The drop in net profits is 
the result of two main factors: higher interest costs - the companies paid more net 
interest - and lower profits of foreign subsidiaries. 
Source: Statistics Netherlands 
Do not burden the reader with too many numbers in the body of the text and use 
only  key  rounded  figures.  Less  important  numbers  should  be  relegated  to 
accompanying tables. Use the text to present analysis, trends and context, not to 
repeat values in the tables. 
Pay attention to structure 
Structure your text so that each component makes sense on its own and also 
contributes to the overall story you are telling. Subheadings are an effective tool for 
strengthening the organization of a release. They break it into manageable and 
meaningful sections. 
A concise subheading summarizes the main finding in the subsection. It may be 
more engaging and understandable when it contains a verb.  
GOOD EXAMPLES of subheadings: 
“Inventory levels ease slightly” 
“Growth in energy products leads the rise in imports” 
For Internet-based communications, each subsection should make sense on its 
own, which means that terms should be spelled out and sources should be noted. 
Search engines tend to drive users to deep links within websites, rather than to the 
home page or other gateways you have created to channel visitors to their desired 
destinations. 
Your messages should also be layered so they cater to the different information 
needs of your audiences. Start each subsection with a topic sentence that states 
clearly the main finding in the subsection. You can elaborate on this finding in 
subsequent paragraphs. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested