how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf table to text software application cloud windows html winforms class MDM_Part2_English2-part656

Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
15 
When producing a series of tables for a publication or a website, you should use the 
same layout in all tables. Consider how much information needs to be provided in 
table  titles  (what  is  obvious  and  what  is  not)  and  be  consistent  in  the  use  of 
abbreviations. 
3.4  The use of rounding and decimals
Many non-statistical users find it difficult to see the difference between numbers 
when  three  or  more  digits  vary.  You  can  help  them  by  rounding  the  values 
presented in your tables. Rounding can also be used when the data do not have a 
high degree of accuracy. In some cases, only rounded data are reliable and should 
therefore be  displayed in tables. You should, however,  take care not to lose too 
much information when rounding your data. 
GOOD EXAMPLE BAD EXAMPLE 
1 320 000 
1 670 000 
1 830 000 
1324567 
1673985 
1829456 
In the example above, the rounded numbers on the left are easier to understand 
and  memorize  than  the  exact  numbers  on  the  right.  The  use  of  a  space  as  a 
thousand separator is also illustrated in this example. 
If you need to display values with varying numbers of decimal places, you should 
align them on the decimal point, not on the right. In the example below, the values 
on the left are easier to read than those on the right. This example also shows that 
it is much better to display the same number of decimal places in all values. 
GOOD EXAMPLE BAD EXAMPLE 
93.2 
1045.0 
385.6 
93.2 
1045 
385.63 
Numeric  values  should  be  right  justified.  Using  the  same  example,  notice  how 
difficult it is to read the values when the numbers are justified to the left margin as 
shown below. 
GOOD EXAMPLE BAD EXAMPLE 
93.2 
1045.0 
385.6 
93.2 
1045.0 
385.6 
3.5  Example of how to improve a table 
To illustrate the effectiveness of the guidelines presented in section 3.3, we show 
below an example of a bad table and how it can easily be improved. 
BAD EXAMPLE 
Final energy consumption by sector  - Percentages 
1980
1985
1990
1995
2000
2002
2003
Transport
27.81
27.92
28.24
31.12
36.82
39.48
39.13
Residential
31.11
33.91
30.41
27.61
24.33
23.71
23.97
Industry
31.47
27.21
23.86
22.11
21.41
19.53
18.78
Agriculture
n/a
n/a
3.51
3.7
3.11
2.91
2.82
Services
9.61
10.96
13.98
15.46
14.33
14.37
15.3
Total
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
Convert pdf table to text - software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf table to text - software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics 
16 
What is wrong in the table above? 
We do not know which geographic area the data refer to. 
The data source is not identified. 
The values are centered rather than right-aligned. 
The  values  should  not  be  displayed  with  two  decimal  places  (too  much 
information). 
The  total  values  should  have  the  same  number  of decimal  places  as  the 
other values. 
The abbreviation “n/a” is not explained. 
The grey shading and the lines of the same size between each row and each 
column do not help to understand the different data presented in the table. 
The table is unnecessarily spread across the width of the page. 
GOOD EXAMPLE
Share of total energy consumption, by sector (in percent)
Ireland, 1980-2003
1980
1985
1990
2000
1995
2002
2003
Transport
27.8
27.9
28.2
31.1
36.8
39.5
39.1
Residential
31.1
33.9
30.4
27.6
24.3
23.7
24.0
Industry
31.5
27.2
23.9
22.1
21.4
19.5
18.8
Agriculture
n/a
1
n/a
1
3.5
3.7
3.1
2.9
2.8
Services
9.6
11.0
14.0
15.5
14.4
14.4
15.3
Total
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1
Data on energy consumption for the agricultural sector was not collected until 1990.
Source: Department of Public Enterprise, Ireland
How has the table been improved? 
All the information needed to understand the data is provided in the title and 
subtitle.
The data source is identified. 
All values are right-aligned and displayed with one decimal place.
The abbreviation “n/a” is explained in the footnote.
Only the lines that separate the different components of the table (header, 
data, footnote and source) are displayed and the unhelpful shading has been 
removed. 
The table is not wider than needed to display all the headings and data. 
software application cloud:C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Processing in C#.NET. Provide C# Users with Variety of Methods to Setup and Modify Table in Word Document. Overview. Create Table in Word.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET
C# Word - Table Row Processing in C#.NET. How to Set and Modify Table Rows in Word Document with C#.NET Solutions. Overview. Create and Add Rows in Table.
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
17 
4. Charts 
4.1  Why use charts? 
Statistics can often be better understood when they are presented in a chart than in 
a table. A chart is a visual representation of statistical data, in which the data are 
represented by symbols such as bars or lines. It is a very effective visual tool, as it 
displays data quickly and easily, facilitates comparison and can reveal trends and 
relationships within the data. 
A chart generally takes the form of a one- or two-dimensional figure, such as a bar 
chart or a line chart. Although there are three-dimensional charts available, they 
are usually considered too complex to be easily understood. 
Charts  can  be  used  to  illustrate  patterns  in  a  large  amount  of  data  or  to 
communicate a  key  finding  or  message. You should consider  using charts if you 
want to show: 
Comparison: How much? Which item is bigger or smaller? 
Changes over time: How does a variable evolve? 
Frequency  distribution:  How  are  the  items  distributed?  What  are  the 
differences? 
Correlation: Are two variables linked? 
Relative share of a whole: How does one item compare to the total? 
In this chapter, we examine the most common types of charts and give guidelines 
to producing good charts. 
4.2  Checklist for designing a good chart 
If you decide that a chart is the most appropriate way to present your data, then no 
matter what type of chart you use, you need to keep the following three guidelines 
in mind: 
1.
Define your target audience: What do they know about the issue? 
2.
Determine the message you want to communicate: What do the data 
show? Is there more than one message? 
3.
Determine the nature of your message: Do you want to compare items, 
show time trends or analyze relationships in your data? 
A good chart: 
grabs the reader’s attention; 
presents the information simply, clearly and accurately; 
does not mislead; 
displays the data in a concentrated way (e.g. one line chart instead 
of many pie charts); 
facilitates data comparison and highlights trends and differences; 
illustrates messages, themes or storylines in the accompanying text. 
software application cloud:C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET
you may need to create some text content or nest table in Word document, the following demo code will show you how to create a text paragraph in table cell.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:How to C#: Convert PDF, Excel, PPT to Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics 
18 
4.3  When it may not be appropriate to use charts 
A chart is not always the most appropriate tool to present statistical information. 
Sometimes  a  text  and/or  data  table  may  provide  a  better  explanation  to  your 
audience and save you considerable time and effort. 
You should reconsider using charts when your data: 
are very dispersed; 
have too few values; 
have too many values; 
show little or no variation. 
BAD EXAMPLE of a line chart 
Number of students taking English as a second language 
at West High School, by first language spoken, 1987 to 2002 
Source: Statistics Canada, Learning Resources: Using graphs
5
You should avoid anything resembling the line chart above. The data are far too 
numerous and whatever storylines  the analyst hoped to  illustrate are lost in the 
jungle of lines. 
5 http://www.statcan.gc.ca/edu/power-pouvoir/ch9/using-utilisation/5214829-eng.htm 
software application cloud:C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET
conversion library can help developers convert multi-page converted by RasterEdge Word to PDF converter toolkit and maintains the original text style (including
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
19 
4.4  Selecting the appropriate type of chart 
Knowing what type of charts to use with what type of information is crucial. Some 
charts are more appropriate than others, depending on the nature of the data. In 
this section, we provide guidelines for the most common types of charts: bar charts 
and population pyramids, line charts, pie charts and scatter plots. 
Bar charts 
A bar chart is the simplest type of chart to draw and read. It is used to compare 
frequencies or values for different categories or groups. 
GOOD EXAMPLE of a bar chart 
Female ambassadors in 2006
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
Ukraine
United Kingdom
Italy
Luxembourg
Spain
Israel
Croatia
Cyprus
Georgia
Netherlands
Lithuania
Slovenia
Estonia
Latvia
Finland
Germany
Percent of total number of ambassadors
Source: UNECE Statistical Database
The  bars  can  be  either  vertically  or  horizontally  oriented.  In  the  horizontal 
orientation, the text is easier to read, as in the example above. It is also easier to 
compare the different values when the bars are ordered by size from smallest to 
largest, rather than displayed arbitrarily. 
The bars should be much wider than the gaps between them. The gaps should not 
exceed 40% of the bar width. 
A stacked bar chart can be used to show and compare segments of totals. Caution 
should be exercised when using this type of chart. It can be difficult to analyze and 
compare, if there are too many items in each stack or if many items are fairly close 
in size. 
software application cloud:How to C#: Overview of Using XDoc.Word
and convert Word document to/from supported document (PDF and ODT). Empower to navigate word document content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text search
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
a run and text in paragraph IRun run = paragraph.CreateARun(); run.CreateText("Header"); //MORE TODO: // // doc.Save(@""). Create and Add Table to Footer &
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics 
20 
GOOD EXAMPLE of a stacked bar chart 
Gender split of teachers in Ireland, 2005-2006
85
62
38
15
38
62
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
Primary
Secondary
Tertiary
Type of educational institutions
%
Men
Women
Source: UNECE Statistical Database
A population pyramid is a combination of two horizontal bar charts, representing 
the age structure of the female and male population of a country or region. Men are 
conventionally  shown  on  the  left  and  women  on  the  right.  When  you  want  to 
compare  different  population  pyramids,  it  is  usually  better  to  represent  the 
percentage of men and women in the total population, rather than their number. 
GOOD EXAMPLE of a population pyramid 
Source: Statistics Canada6 
6 http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/061026/figure.htm 
software application cloud:Convert ODT to Word
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Footnote & Endnote Processing. Table Row Processing. Table Cell Processing. Annotate Word.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# Word - Footnote & Endnote Processing in C#.NET
paragraph.CreateARun(); //Create text for run run.CreateText("Paragrah for footnote and endnote"); //Just Show how to create a footnote and create table for it
www.rasteredge.com
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
21 
For  most  European  countries,  population  pyramids  do  not  take  the  shape  of  a 
pyramid any more, but they remain a very effective way of displaying a great deal 
of information  on the age  and  sex  structure  of populations, even more so when 
they are “animated”, i.e. moving through time. 
Line charts 
A  line  chart  is  an  effective  tool  for  visualizing  trends  in  data  over  time  and  is 
therefore the most appropriate type of chart for  time series. You can  adjust the 
chart parameters to better communicate your message, but you should be careful 
not to distort the data. This issue is discussed and illustrated in section 4.6. 
GOOD EXAMPLE of a line chart 
Unemployment rate, 1990-2008
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
1990
1992
1994
1996
1998
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
%
Source: UNECE  Statistical Database
Spain
France
Portugal
Pie charts 
A pie chart can be used to show the percentage distribution of one variable, but 
only a small number of categories can be displayed, usually not more than six. The 
use of this type of chart is not recommended by many statisticians, as it can be 
difficult to compare the different segments of the pie and, even more, to compare 
data across different pie charts. To overcome this problem, the segments can be 
labeled with their actual values. In some cases, the category names can also be 
written as labels on the chart, so that the legend is not necessary. Segments are 
usually  best  presented  in  order  from  smallest  to  largest  segments,  rather  than 
interspersing small and large segments. 
In most cases, other types of charts (e.g. bar charts) are more appropriate, but pie 
charts should not be completely ruled out, as they are effective to  visualize  the 
relative importance of one category in the total. Pie charts can be well suited to 
provide an overview of a situation, such as in the example below. 
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics 
22 
7%
16%
77%
Services
Industry
Agriculture
Underweight prevalence (%)
GOOD EXAMPLE of a pie chart 
Employment by major sectors in Latvia, 2007  
Scatter plots 
A scatter plot is used to show the relationship between two variables. It is the most 
accurate way to display correlations, as illustrated in the example below. However, 
some analysts prefer to use bar charts, as scatter plots can be difficult to interpret. 
GOOD EXAMPLE of a scatter plot 
Under-five mortality and underweight prevalence 
in Sub-Saharan African countries, 2003 
Source: Jamison et al. (2006) Disease and Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa, 2
nd
edition, Washington D.C., 
The World Bank
7
7 http://www.dcp2.org/file/66/Disease and Mortality in SSA.pdf 
12%
40%
47%
Agriculture
Industry
Services
MEN 
WOMEN 
Source: UNECE Statistical Database 
Under-five mortality (per 1 000 live births) 
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics
23 
Experimenting with different types of charts 
Which  type  of  chart  should  you  use?  You  have  to  make  that  decision.  A  good 
practice  is  to  experiment  with  different  types  of  charts  to  select  the  most 
appropriate tool to communicate your message. 
Below are two different ways to graph the same data. Which one is clearer? 
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Can you tell which segment on the pie chart is the biggest one? Some readers tend 
to find it more difficult to compare angles than  bars or lines.  On  the pie  chart, 
segments 1 and 4 look practically the same, while the difference in their relative 
size is immediately clear on the bar chart. 
4.5  What makes an effective chart 
Chart components 
The different chart components compete with each other for the reader's attention. 
The more features you include, the harder it becomes to see your point. 
Chart components fall into three categories: 
1.
Data components that represent the data: bars, lines, areas or points. 
2.
Support components that assist in understanding the data: title, legend, 
data labels, gridlines, footnotes and data source. 
3.
Decorative features that are not related to the data. 
Data components alone are never self-sufficient. To ensure correct understanding 
of your charts, you need to include the following support components: 
The chart title should give a clear idea of what the chart is about. It has to 
be short and concise. You can have two types of titles: 
o
An informative title provides all the information needed to understand 
the  data.  It  should  answer  the  three  questions  “what”,  “where”  and 
“when”. 
o
A descriptive title is a caption that highlights the main pattern or trend 
displayed in the chart. It states in a few words the story that the chart 
illustrates. 
Making Data Meaningful Part 2: A guide to presenting statistics 
24 
The axis labels should identify the values displayed in the chart. The labels 
are displayed horizontally on both axes. 
The  axis  titles should  identify  the  unit of  measure  of  the data  (e.g. “in 
thousands”, “%”, “age (in years)” or “$”). You do not need to include an axis 
title when the unit of measure is obvious (e.g. “years” for time series). 
Gridlines  can  be  added  in  bar  and  line  charts  to  help  users  read  and 
compare the values of the data. 
The legend and data labels should identify the symbols, patterns or colors 
used to represent the data in the chart. The legend should not be displayed 
when  only  one  series  of  values  is  represented  in  the  chart.  Whenever 
possible, you should use data labels rather than a legend. Data labels are 
displayed on or next to the data components (bars, areas, lines) to facilitate 
their identification and understanding. 
 footnote  may  be  used  to  provide  definitions  or  methodological 
information. 
The data source should be identified at the bottom of the chart. 
It’s all about the data 
To  maximize  the  efficiency  of  a  chart,  data  should  take  centre  stage.  Support 
components should: 
Only be present if relevant. Title axes, legend and data  labels may be 
essential for the correct understanding of your chart or may not be needed 
at all, depending on the nature of your data. 
Be  subtle.  Use  lighter  lines  for  axes  and  gridlines  than  for  data 
components. Decorative feature should not distract the reader’s attention. 
BAD EXAMPLE 
GOOD EXAMPLE 
My busy chart
10
25
15
0
10
20
30
A
B
C
Series1
My clearer chart
10
15
25
0
10
20
30
A
B
C
All components have maximum impact. The 
result is a busy chart, difficult to read, even 
though it shows only three values. 
This  chart  is much  easier  to  read.  Minimal 
use of support components ensures that data 
take centre stage. 
Data components can also conflict with each other. The more variables and values 
you want to display, the more difficult it is to present the data clearly. An effective 
chart has a clear, visual message. If a chart tries to do too much, it becomes a 
puzzle that requires too much work to understand. In the worst case, it is just plain 
misleading. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested