how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to .txt file SDK application service wpf windows azure dnn measuring_and_managing_shareholder_value_creation0-part677

Statements on Management Accounting
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MAN AGEMENT
CREDITS
TITLE
This statement was approved for issuance as a
Statement  on  Management  Accounting  by  the
Management Accounting Committee (MAC) of the
Institute of Management Accountants (IMA). IMA appre-
ciates the collaborative efforts of The Society of
Management Accountants of Canada (SMAC) and the
work of Dr. Howard Armitage, CMA, of University of
Waterloo,and Vijay Jog,of Carelton University,who draft-
ed the manuscript.
Prior to his becoming a member of MAC,Randolf Holst,
CMA,was a SMAC staff manager and,in that capacity,
supervised and monitored the project,which was brought
to conclusion by SMAC staff manager Elizabeth Bluemke.
MAC member Thomas E. Huff served on the focus group
that provided significant assistance in shaping the final
document. IMA thanks the aforementioned individuals
and  members  of  the  Management  Accounting
Committee for their contributions to this effort.
Measuring and Managing
Shareholder Value Creation
Published by
Institute of Management Accountants
10 Paragon Drive
Montvale,NJ 07645-1760
www.imanet.org
Copyright © 1997 
Institute of Management Accountants
All rights reserved
Convert pdf to .txt file - SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to .txt file - SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Statements on Management Accounting
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MAN AGEMENT
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Measuring and Managing 
Shareholder Value Creation
I. Rationale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
II. Scope  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
III. Defining Shareholder-Value and Wealth
Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
IV. Determinants of Shareholder-Value 
Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
V. The Role of the Management 
Accountant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
VI. Techniques for Measuring Shareholder 
Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Value-Creation Measures  . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Economic Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
The Equity Spread . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Implied Value  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Cash Flow Return on Investment  . . . . . .12
Wealth-Creation Measures . . . . . . . . . .14
Total Shareholder Return . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Annual Economic Return . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Hybrid Value/Wealth-Creation Measures 16
Market Value Added  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
VII. Additional Issues Related to Shareholder-
Value-Creation Measurement . . . . . . . . .18
Stock Price  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Uncontrollable Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Linkage Between Value- and Wealth-
Creation Measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
VIII.Managing for Shareholder Value . . . . . . .19
Ensuring Senior Management 
Commitment and Support . . . . . . . . . . .20
Creating a VBM Transition Team . . . . . .21
Aligning Incentives to Enable Change . .23
lX. Organizational and Management
Accounting Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
X. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Appendix A: Sample Calculations for Shareholder-
Value-Creation Measures
Appendix B: From Earnings to Operating
Performance to Value Creation
Bibliography
Exhibits
Exhibit 1: Corporate Objectives and 
Value Drivers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Exhibit 2: Examples of Shareholder-
Value-Creation Strategies . . . . . . . .4
Exhibit 3: Comparing Traditional and Value-
Based Income Statements . . . . . . .8
Exhibit 4: Rate of Return on Net 
Assets (RONA)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Exhibit 5: Financial Drivers of Total 
Shareholder Return (TSR)  . . . . . .15
Exhibit 6: Comparison of Shareholder-
Value-Creation Measures . . . . . . .17
SDK application service:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. It's easy to be integrated into your C# program and convert PDF to .txt file with original PDF layout.
www.rasteredge.com
I. RATIONALE
More than ever,corporate executives are under
increasing pressure to demonstrate on a regular
basis that they are creating shareholder value.
This pressure has led to an emergence of a 
variety of measures that claim to quantify value-
creating performance.
Why  is  creating  shareholder  value  suddenly
becoming a credo in corporate boardrooms?
There are many reasons for this renewed emphasis
on measuring and managing shareholder value,
prominent among which are the following:
Capital  markets  are  becoming  increasingly
global. Investors can readily shift investments
to higher yielding,often foreign,opportunities.
Corporate governance is shifting,with owners
now demanding accountability from corporate
executives. Manifestations of the increased
assertiveness  of  shareholders  include  the
necessity for executives to justify their com-
pensation levels, and well-publicized lists of
underperforming  companies  and  overpaid
executives.
Executives are concerned with self-preserva-
tion.  Well-publicized  hostile takeovers have
served notice to all levels of management that
weak financial performance is unacceptable
and may precipitate a fight for corporate control.
This potential loss of control has motivated
many  executives  to  better  understand  the
importance of measuring and managing share-
holder expectations.
There is also considerable dissatisfaction with
existing accounting-based earnings and return
measures. Evidence is mounting that accounting
measures such as earnings per share (EPS) and
profit or growth in earnings do not take into
account the cost of the investment required to
run the business. Similarly,return-based meas-
ures,such as return on assets,often motivate
managers  to  make  short-term  dysfunctional 
decisions  that  encourage  underinvestment.
Furthermore,neither earnings nor return measures
appear to  correlate  well  with  actual  market 
values of companies.
II. SCOPE
This Statement compares and contrasts various
measures that claim to quantify management’s
shareholder-value-creation abilities and describes
the issues and challenges faced in order to
implement  an  operating  paradigm  resulting 
from  these  measures—value-based  manage-
ment  (hereafter referred to as VBM1).
This Statement applies to all firms,private and
public, large and small, whose managers are
interested in creating value for their shareholders/
owners. It will help management accountants and
others to:
understand  the  fundamental  concepts  of
shareholder-value creation;
link  value  creation  to  shareholder-wealth 
maximization;
unravel financial and operational drivers that
can lead to improved performance and thereby
improve shareholder-value creation;
understand the differences among a variety of
measures that assess management perfor-
mance within the context of shareholder-value
creation and wealth maximization;
appreciate the organizational and management
accounting challenges in implementing VBM to
improve shareholder-value creation; and
broaden shareholder and management awareness
of the importance of shareholder-value creation.
1
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
1 VBM is an approach to management whereby the 
company’s overall aspirations,analytical techniques,and man-
agement processes are aligned to help the company 
maximize its value by focusing management decision making
on the key drivers of shareholder value.
SDK application service:VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free .NET library for creating PDF from TXT in both C# C#.NET class source code for creating PDF document from Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
www.rasteredge.com
The Statement recognizes that several philoso-
phies exist with respect to how organizations
perceive  the  process  of  shareholder-value 
creation. The approach taken here places the
shareholder at the focal point of all economic
activity within the firm, with maximizing share-
holder value as the objective of the organization.
This does not mean that,in its quest to create
shareholder  value, other  stakeholders, such 
as  employees, customers, suppliers, or the 
community, are  ignored.  Quite  the  contrary.
Value-creating firms take decisions that maintain
 proper  balance  between  the  competing 
interests of all stakeholders.
Nevertheless, the shareholder is  the  central
stakeholder. Placing the shareholder at the focal
point of business activity is simply recognizing
the fact that firms that do not satisfy shareholder
requirements increase their risk of capital flight,
higher interest rates,pressure from the board of
directors, takeovers, and  lower  productivity.
Organizations that create long-term shareholder
value simultaneously create relatively greater
value for all stakeholders. Thus, value-creating
organizations appear to operate with the following
objective function in mind: Maximize shareholder
wealth subject to satisfying remaining stakeholder
requirements.
III. DEFINING SHAREHOLDER-VALUE
AND-WEALTH CREATION
From the economist’s viewpoint,value is created
when  management  generates  revenues  over 
and above the economic costs to generate these 
revenues.  Costs  come  from  four  sources:
employee wages and benefits; material,supplies,
and economic depreciation of physical assets;
taxes; and the opportunity cost of using the 
capital.
2
Under this value-based view,value is only created
when revenues exceed all costs including a 
capital charge. This value accrues mostly to
shareholders  because  they  are  the  residual 
owners of the firm.
Shareholders expect management to generate
value over and above the costs of resources con-
sumed,includingthe cost of using capital. If sup-
pliers of capital do not receive a fair return to
compensate them for the risk they are taking,
they will withdraw their capital in search of better
returns,since value will be lost. A company that
is destroying value will always struggle to attract
further capital to finance expansion,since it will
be hamstrung by a share price that stands at a
discount to the underlying value of its assets
and by higher interest rates on debt or bank
loans demanded by creditors.
Wealthcreation refers to changes in the wealth of
shareholders  on  a  periodic  (annual)  basis.
Applicable to exchange-listed firms, changes in
shareholder  wealth are  inferred  mostly  from
changes in stock prices,dividends paid,and equity
raised during the period. Since stock prices reflect
investor expectations about future cash flows,
creating wealth for shareholders requires that the
firm undertake investment decisions that have a
positive net present value (NPV).
Although used interchangeably,there is a subtle
difference between  value  creation and wealth 
creation. The  value  perspective  is based  on 
measuring value directly from accounting-based
information with some adjustments, while the
wealth perspective relies mainly on stock market
information. For a publicly traded firm these two
concepts  are  identical  when  (i) management 
provides  all  pertinent  information  to  capital 
markets, and (ii) the markets believe and have
confidence in management.
2
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
2 Opportunity cost is often referred to as the cost of capital.
It is an opportunity cost because it represents a foregone
return on an alternative investment opportunity of equal risk.
SDK application service:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
are allowed to view PDF on VB.NET project, annotate PDF document with various notes and shapes, convert PDF to Word document, Tiff image, TXT file and other
www.rasteredge.com
IV. DETERMINANTS OF SHARE-
HOLDER-VALUE CREATION
To create value,management must have a deep
understanding of the performance variables that
drive the value of the business. Called key-value
drivers,there are two reasons why such an under-
standing  is  essential.  First, the organization 
cannot act directly on value. It has to act on things
it can influence,such as customer satisfaction,
cost, capital expenditures, and so on. Second,
it is through these drivers of value that senior
management learns to understand the rest of the
organization and to establish a dialogue about
what it expects to be accomplished.
A value driver is any variable that significantly
affects the value of the organization. To be useful,
however,value drivers need to be organized so
that management can identify which have the
greatest impact on value and assign responsibility
for their performance to individuals who can help
the organization meet its targets.
Exhibit 1 shows the linkage between corporate
objectives and four categories of value drivers.
Intangibles
Operating
Investment
Financial
3
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
Creating Shareholder Value
(Shareholder Return)
(Dividends, Capital Gains)
Cash Flow from
Operations 
Cost of 
Capital
Cost of Equity
Cost of Debt
Capital
Structure
Financial
Investment
Operating
Intangibles
Management
Decisions
Value
Drivers
Valuation
Components
Corporate
Objective
Working Capital
Fixed Capital
Sales Growth
Profit Margin
Income Tax Rate
Amount
Growth Rate
Duration
EXHIBIT 1. CORPORATE OBJECTIVES AND VALUE DRIVERS 
Source: Adapted from Rappaport 1986
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
www.rasteredge.com
In the exhibit,the objective of management is to
provide consistent and positive shareholder value.
Positive shareholder value results from improving
cash flow from operations and minimizing the
cost of capital by making optimal capital structure
decisions. The cash flow from operations is
determined by the value drivers and is affected
by operational and investment decisions taken
by management.
Exhibit 2 shows the implications of this frame-
work for value-creating strategies as they relate
to the financial and operational value drivers.
The second column shows the value drivers and
the third column shows the various underlying
strategies that positively influence these drivers.
3
4
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
patent barriers to entry, niche markets,
innovative products, etc. 
scale economies, captive access to raw
materials, higher efficiencies in processes
(production, distribution, services) and 
labor utilization, effective tax planning, etc.
efficient asset acquisition and 
maintenance, spin-offs, higher utilization
rates of fixed assets, efficient working
capital management, divesture of negative-
value-creating assets, etc. 
consistent and superior operating
performance compared to competitors,
long-term contracts, project financing, etc. 
achieving and maintaining a capital
structure that minimizes the overall costs, 
optimizes tax benefits, etc. 
reducing surprises (volatility of earnings),
designing niche instruments, etc.
consistent value creation
higher revenues and
growth
To Achieve
Value Drivers
Strategic Requirements
lower costs and 
income taxes
reduction in capital 
expenditure
An increase in cash 
flow from operations
A reduction in capital 
charge
reduced business
risk
optimize capital 
structure
reduced cost of debt
reduced cost of 
equity
EXHIBIT 2. EXAMPLES OF SHAREHOLDER-VALUE-CREATION STRATEGIES 
3 It should be noted that reducing (and measuring the 
reduction of) the cost of capital is indeed a very difficult 
task and management should focus more on increasing 
operating cash flows than on reducing the cost of capital.
There are many examples of firms employing one
or many of these strategies to create shareholder
value. The 3M Company does it by continuously
introducing new products; Corel does it by bringing
quality products to market very quickly, usually
with more functionality and at a cheaper price
than its competitors; Sony does it by introducing
high-quality products to the market for which 
consumers are willing to pay a higher price. Each
organization  uses  its  respective  competitive
advantages to dominate their product markets,
so that as long as their operations and capital
continue to be managed effectively,incremental
shareholder  value  will  be created.  In reality,
successfulfirms employ a combination of these
strategies to achieve competitive advantages,
which in turn create value for their shareholders.
However,not every strategy,although well-intended
and even well-executed, results in shareholder-
value creation. For example,it may not be sufficient
to simply introduce new and innovative products
at an attractive price. Although this may result in
increased  market  share  and  high  revenue
growth, unless there is sufficient competitive
advantage to permit these new revenues to
exceed the required additional investment and
expense, value  may  actually  be  destroyed.
Similarly,not all total quality management (TQM)
and customer satisfaction programs are success-
fulin creating value. As has been shown by the
examples of the Wallace Corporation and Florida
Power & Light, winning the Baldrige or Deming
award does not automatically place the company’s
management in the shareholder hall of fame.4
Quite clearly none of these strategies is likely to 
successfully increase shareholder value unless
it is implemented in an area of a sustainable
competitive advantage.
The linkage between strategy and value creation
can be summarized by two simple laws of value
creation. The first law is that management must
create value for shareholders. The second law 
is that all other stakeholders should also be 
satisfied in a way that contributes to shareholder
value. The company’s ability to continue to attract
capital by providing incremental value to share-
holders is exactly what will allow it to continue 
to provide attractive products to its customers,
attractive employment to its staff,and opportuni-
ties for its suppliers.
If a company can offer attractive and challenging
work to  its staff, in a  healthy and positive 
environment, perhaps it can lower the cost of
compensation. If customers are always served
better but at no incremental cost,market share
can be protected. These attributes also create
competitive advantage, which in turn is a pre-
requisite for creating shareholder value.
The key is to understand and manage the inter-
relationships among what customers are willing
to purchase, what employees perceive to be
appropriate rewards,and,ultimately,what share-
holders view as delivered value. The success of
VBM hinges on management’s ability to balance
the  sometimes  conflicting  notions  of  value
between the three principal partners: customers,
employees,and shareholders.
V. THE ROLE OF THE 
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANT
Management accountants have,for years,been
concerned with financial drivers like profit margins,
capital utilization, and financing structures. This
specific knowledge,plus the broadening of man-
5
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
4 The Wallace Corporation won the Baldrige award for outstand-
ing quality in 1989. In 1991,it declared bankruptcy. Florida
Power & Light won the even more prestigious Deming award in
the early 1990s and was only saved from the same fate when
it realized that the costs of its quality efforts vastly exceeded
the benefits shareholders were receiving from them.
agement accounting responsibilities that has
been taking place in the last decade,mean that
management accountants play an important role
inthe planning,implementation,and measurement
of shareholder-value creation. While the degree
of involvement will vary,seven focal points seem
particularly pertinent.
Assessing the Potential of VBM – Management
accountants can assess whether their organi-
zations can successfully implement a VBM
approach. Characteristics that lead to a positive
environment include: a senior management
commitment to maximizing shareholder value
(a value-creation mind-set), a dissatisfaction
with accounting-based measures, a desire to
align performance objectives and value, and
an interest in creating stronger links between
pay and performance.
Communicating  the  Fundamentals  of
Shareholder-Value  Creation  – Management
accountants fill an important role in educating
personnel on what VBM is,the strategies that
lead to value creation,the key drivers of value,
the measures of value,and how an individual’s
work can support a VBM initiative.
Measuring Shareholder Value – Once particular
shareholder-value-creation  measures  have
been selected, the management accountant
considers  which  adjustments  to  traditional
income statement reporting formats may be
necessary to make value-based calculations.
Adjustments such as deferred taxes,goodwill
amortization, research  and  development
expenditures, and  unusual  loses or  gains
cause value-based measures to differ from
accounting-based statements.
Linking  Value  Measures  to  Financial  and
Operational Drivers –Management accountants
play an important role in helping operations
personnel develop measures that are linked
to,and promote,shareholder value. The task
of the management accountant is to focus
these measures so that everyone in the organ-
ization is pointing in the same value-enhancing
direction.
Assisting in Designing Performance Measurement
Systems – Management accountants have an
important role to play in designing,explaining,
and maintaining the performance measure-
ment systems necessary to provide the right
value-creating signals to management. This is
a critical area because in many organizations
traditional performance measurement systems
may reward dysfunctional behavior — behavior
that leads to value destruction.
Assisting in Setting Value-based Compensation
Plans – Increasingly, boards of directors and
shareholders are requiring that compensation
(particularly of senior managers and officers)
be linked to value-based measures. Management
accountants can provide valuableadvice on the
development and implications (what-if scenar-
ios)  of  various  value-based  compensation
strategies that may be under consideration.
Assisting  in  Evaluating  Value-creating
Strategies  – Management accountants  are
being called upon more often not only to 
measure  outcomes, but also to use their
expertise  to  evaluate  new  and  existing 
initiatives. By understanding the components
that lead to value improvement,management
accountants are in the position to determine
whether new and existing projects lead to 
positive NPV.
VI.TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING
SHAREHOLDER VALUE
The measures available to management and
shareholders to gauge a firm’s value-creation
performance can be separated into three broad
categories. The first category includes those
appraisals which rely mainly on the financial
statements produced by the firm,but require an
6
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
estimation of the cost of capital and a variety of
other adjustments to traditional income state-
ments and balance sheets to reflect operating
cash flows and an appropriate capital base—
these can be termed value-creation measures.
The  second  category  of  measures  includes
those that rely exclusively on stock market data
and, thus, are mainly applicable to exchange-
listed  companies.  These  can  be  termed 
wealth-creation measures—they concentrate on
the impact on shareholder wealth and use that
as an indirect measure of annual (or periodic)
performance. The third set of measures are
hybrid  value/wealth-creation measures  and
require  both  financial  statement  and  stock 
market data.
5
Company differences in financial sophistication,
internal  reporting  capabilities, and  business
characteristics create a need for tailored value-
measurement approaches. The techniques differ
along a number of dimensions,including:
the simplicity/accuracy trade-off implied in each;
management’s  ability  to  understand  and 
control the measures; and
the complexity required for implementation.
The respective merits of these techniques have 
provoked a debate over and above discussion of
shareholder value generally. None of the alterna-
tives is perfect; even the most sophisticated fuel
debate.
Value-Creation Measures
Value-creation measures require some rewriting
of the financial statements to undo any adjust-
ments made by the firm to  satisfy external
reporting requirements for generally accepted
accounting principles and to bring the reported
earnings closer to cash flows. Exhibit 3 compares
the  traditional  income  statement  and  value-
based formats.
The traditional income statement provides no
indication as to whether the earnings generated
by the firm’s met investor expectations based on
the firms business risk and leverage risk. It 
simply provides an earnings number, popularly
called the bottom line. Typically, if the bottom
line is positive,the firm is said to have done well.
Yet,firms that show a positive bottom line in a
traditional sense may in fact have destroyed
value. For example,a large Canadian integrated
oil and gas firm showed a bottom line earnings
of  $514  million  according  to  its  published 
financial statements. However, its value-based
view indicates that it destroyed $492 million 
of economic value. Similarly,an analysis of 639
Canadian firms in the nonfinancial sector in
1994  shows that they  earned  $18.8 billion 
(traditional  earnings)  in  total;  however, the 
economic value amounted to minus$6.2 billion.
6
7
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
5 Value cannot be short term,but other measures can be.
Earnings per share (EPS) or return on equity (ROE) are 
usually used in a myopic way by overly concentrating on the
impact of accounting earnings. Furthermore,earnings tend to
focus mainly on managing the income statement and places
low weight on the actual amount and timing of cash flows.
Sufficient evidence exists to indicate that not only are these
measures theoretically inadequate, but, more importantly,
there is an increasing body of empirical evidence that shows
that these measures have little relation to share prices 
or market value of the firm. (See Armitage and Jog,1996.) 
All standard textbooks in corporate finance describe the 
theoretical inadequacies of these measures; empirical 
evidence is now available in the standard material of many
consulting firms.
6  Internal  Document. 1995.  Ottawa, ON:  Corporate
Renaissance Group. (August)
The value-based view explicitly recognizes the
capital charge associated with the use of capital.
The bottom line under this format is,therefore,
quite different from that under the traditional
view. A positive bottom line—economic value—
signifies  a  superior performance  because  it
accounts for all four types of costs (see page 2)
including that associated with capital.7
The value-based income statement concentrates
on the operating performance of the firm by
focusing  on  cash  flow  from  operations  and
accounts for interest expense through capital
charge calculations. Thus,it adjusts taxes as if
the firm were all equity financed. This view is
consistent with the free-cash-flow
10
view.
8
BUSIN ESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
less: 
Cost of Goods Sold 
less: 
Cost of Goods Sold
equals:  Gross Profit 
equals:  Gross Profit
less: 
Depreciation, Sales &
less:
Depreciation, Sales &
Administration, and Other 
Administration, and Other
equals:  Profit Before Interest and Taxes 
equals:  Profit Before Interest and Taxes
(PBIT) 
(PBIT)
less:  
Interest 
less: 
Adjusted Taxes
equals:  Profit before Taxes 
equals: Net Operating Profit After Taxes
(NOPAT)
less: 
Taxes 
less: 
Capital Charge
9
equals:  Net Income 
equals:  Economic Value Added
Revenues
Traditional Income Statement
Revenues
Value-Based Income Statement
8
EXHIBIT 3. COMPARING TRADITIONAL AND VALUE-BASED INCOME STATEMENTS 
7 It is noteworthy that current auditing or regulatory require-
ments do not require a firm to produce such a value-based
view when,in fact,it is a more accurate assessment of firm
performance. Also,rarely in an annual report can one find a
value for the capital charge or a number for cost of equity and
cost of capital.
8 This is a very simple view of the firm's income statement. For
the time being,the issues of economic depreciation and the
variety of adjustments required to both income statement and
balance sheet to arrive at value-based NOPAT are ignored. See
Appendix B for a discussion on these specific adjustments.
9 Capital charge equals weighted average cost of capital
(WACC) times invested capital or capital base. This represents
the opportunity cost for using the funds provided by sharehold-
ers and debt holders. In other words,it is the amount of prof-
it investors require to compensate them for the riskiness of
the business,given the amount of capital invested.WACC rep-
resents weighted average cost of after-tax debt costsand esti-
mated cost of equity weighted by their proportional impor-
tance. Invested capital equals net fixed assets plus net work-
ing capital, representing the total investment made by 
the firm's shareholders and bond holders. (See any standard
corporate finance textbook for a detailed example of how to
calculate WACC. The detailed discussion of WACC is beyond
the scope of this Statement.)
10. Free-cash flow is a company's true operating cash flow.
It is the total net after-tax cash flow generated by the company
and is available to all providers of the company's capital,both
creditors and shareholders.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested