B) The Equity Spread
To calculate the equity spread requires that net
income (instead of NOPAT) be compared to the
cost of equity. Using the value of equity capital
(instead of capital employed),another measure of
value creation can be calculated. Mathematically,
the equity spread is expressed as:
equity value creation = 
(return on equity % - cost of equity %) * equity capital
C) Implied Value
The implied value measure requires that fore-
casts about the future be made by creating pro-
forma income statements and balance sheets
over a reasonable time period. Since, the inter-
nal  forecasts  are  unavailable, the  following
assumptions, based on historical performance,
are used to  create a simple forecast for XYZ
Company.
29
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Calculation of Equity Spread and Equity-Value Creation
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995
Net Income 
   132   
1,453  
1,511
2,677  
1,824 
Opening Owner’s Equity 
$24,188 
24,320  
25,724  
27,261  
29,506 
Return On Equity (ROE) 
0.5%   
6.0%  
5.9%  
9.8%  
6.2%
Opening Cost of Equity
12.0%
12.0%
12.0%
12.0%
12.0%
Equity Spread 
(11.5)%   
(6.0)%  
(6.1)%  
(2.2)%  
(5.8)% 
Equity Capital 
24,188
24,320
25,724
27,261
29,506
Equity-Value Creation 
$(2,782)
(1,459)
(1,569)
(600)   (1,711)
________
______
______
_______
_______
Step 1: Assumptions Used for Pro-Formas
• Revenue Growth = 12% for each year
• Cost of Sales = 96.7% of revenue (which is identical to the value for 1995
• Depreciation = 9% of fixed assets
• Interest Expense = 7% of (bank loans + long-term debt (LTD))
• Income Tax Rate = 39%
• Cash = 0
• Accounts Receivable = 12% of revenue in current year
• Inventory = 11.3% of revenue in current year
• Other Current Assets = $950
• Net Fixed Assets = Growing at 7% per year
• Bank Loans = Includes all excess financing requirements, except in 1999 when equity is raised
• Accounts Payable = 5.1% of cost of goods sold
• Current Portion of LTD = 5.9% of the previous year’s LTD
• Other Current Liabilities = 0.5% of cost of sales
• Long-Term Debt = LTD in previous year - current portion LTD current year
• Deferred Credit = 1.8% of cost of sales
• Common Stock = Increase common stock to $10,000 in 1999
• Retained Earnings = Retained earnings in previous year + retained profit in current year
• Dividend Payout Rate = 20%
• Long-Term Debt in 1995 = $34,451
Convert pdf file to text online - SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to text online - SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
30
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Step 2: Forcast of Income
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000
Revenue 
$261,545  292,930   328,082   367,451   411,546 
Cost of Sales 
252,914  283,263   317,255
355,325   397,965
Gross Profit 
8,631   
9,667  
10,827  
12,126  
13,581 
Depreciation
2,016
2,157
2,308
2,470
2,643
Profit Before Interest and Tax 
6,615 
7,510  
8,519  
9,656  
10,938
Interest
2,244
2,541
2,864
2,975
3,350
Profit Before Tax 
4,371   
4,969  
5,655
6,681
7,588 
Income Taxes 
1,705 
1,938  
2,205  
2,606  
2,959
Earnings Available to Shareholders
2,666
3,031
3,450 
4,075
4,629
________
______  _______   ________ ________
Dividends 
533  
606  
690 
815 
926 
Retained Profit 
$  2,133
2,425 
2,760
3,260 
3,703
________
______   _______
________ ________
Step 3: Forcast of Assets
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000
Current Assets
Cash & Equivalents 
$  
  
 
 
 
Accounts Receivable 
31,385 
35,152   37,370  
44,094  
49,386
Inventory 
29,555   
33,101   37,073  
41,522  
46,505 
Other Current Assets 
950
950
950
950
950
Total Current Assets 
61,890 
69,203   77,393  
86,566
96,841 
Net Fixed Assets 
24,401 
23,969
25,647
27,442
29,363
Total Assets 
$84,291
93,172  103,040
114,008  126,204
________
______   _______
________ ________
SDK Library service:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your PDF file into
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
This  forecast can be  used to calculate future
NOPAT and capital employed.
31
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Step 4: Forcast of Liabilities & Owner’s Equity
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000
Current Liabilities
Bank Loans 
$25,095 
29,742  
34,745  
36,689  
42,393
Accounts Payable 
12,899 
14,446  
16,180  
18,122  
20,296
Current Portion of LTD 
436   
411  
387
364  
342 
Other Current Liabilities 
1,265 
1,416  
1,586  
1,777  
1,990
Total Current Debt 
39,695
46,015
52,898
56,952
65,021
Non-Current Liabilities
Long-Term Debt 
6,962   
6,551  
6,164
5,800
5,458
Deferred Credit 
4,552
5,099
5,711
6,396
7,163
Total Non-Current Liabilities
11,514
11,650
11,875
12,196
12,621
Total Liabilities 
51,209   
57,665
64,773  
69,148
77,642 
Common Stock 
6,668   
6,668  
6,668  
10,000  
10,000
Retained Earnings
26,414
28,839
31,599
34,860
38,562
Total Equity 
33,082
35,507    38,267  
44,860  
48,562 
Total Liab & Owner’s Equity 
$84,291
93,172  103,040
114,008  126,204
________
______   _______
________ ________
Step 5: Forcast of NOPAT
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000
Revenue 
$261,545  292,930   328,082   367,451   411,546 
Cost of Sales 
252,914  283,263  317,255  355,325  397,965
Gross Profit 
8,631   
9,667   10,827  
12,126  
13,581
Depreciation
2,016
2,157
2,308
2,470
2,643
Profit Before Interest and Tax 
6,615 
7,510  
8,519  
9,656  
10,938 
Income Taxes 
2,580 
2,929  
3,322
3,766  
4,266
Net Operating Profit After Tax 
$   4,035
4,581
5,197
5,890
6,672
__ ___ _ _
___  ___   ___  ___
__ _____
_ ______
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
www.rasteredge.com
These statements can now be used to calculate
the free-cash flow.
Step 8: Calculation of Continuing 
(or Residual or Terminal) Value
Since the forecasts are made up to a certain
time period (in this example,for five years to the
year 2000), -a forecast of value of the firm at
year 2000 needs to be estimated. In this illustra-
tive example,it is assumed that all future invest-
ments beyond the forecast period will earn exact-
ly the cost of capital on the capital employed at
the end of the forecast period and will continue
at the same rate forever. Therefore, the value for
the firm at year 2000 is simply a discounted
value of the perpetual NOPAT after 2000. This
NOPAT is calculated as the return on opening
capital, in the final year of the forecast (in this
example the year 2000), multiplied by closing
capital. More specifically,
Perpetual NOPAT =
return on opening capital employed
2000
* closing capital 
employed
2000
The  NOPAT  for  year  2000  is  $6,672  and  the
Return  on Capital  Employed  for 2000 is 7.1%
($6,672 divided by the opening period's capital of
$94,109). Since the value of capital at the end of
2000 is $103,918,the perpetual NOPAT for 2001
is estimated to be $7,367. This value of NOPAT is
then discounted at the WACC of 9% as a perpetu-
ity providing a value of $81,859 as the firm value
at year 2000. The implied market value of the firm
at the end of year 1995 can be estimated by cal-
culating the present value of all future cash flows:
32
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Step 6: Forcast of Capital Employed
Capital Employed
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000
Net Working Capital 
$47,726 
53,341   59,627  
66,667  
74,555 
Net Fixed Assets 
22,401   
23,969   25,647  
27,442  
29,363
Capital Employed 
$70,127
77,310
85,274
94,109  103,918
_______
______   ______
______ ________
Step 7: Forcast of Free-Cash Flow
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000
NOPAT 
$4,035   
4,581  
5,197  
5,890  
6,672 
Investment 
4,727
7,184
7,964
8,836
9,807
Free-Cash Flow 
$(692)
(2,603)
(2,767)
(2,946)
(3,135)
______
______
______
_______
_______
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
The calculations show that, based on the fore-
casts, the  implied market  value of the firm is
$44.115 million and the corresponding implied
value of equity (after subtracting debt of $34,451
million) is $9,664 million. Similar calculations can
be  conducted  for  each  year  and  changes  in
implied market value of equity can be considered
as a measure of value creation. These calcula-
tions will require estimations for cash flows and
NOPAT beyond year 2000. Although not shown
here, the  methodology  for  calculations  will  be
identical to that shown above.
D) Cash Flow Return On Investment (CFROI)
To calculate the CFROI, the real value of capital
employed at the beginning of the period must be
estimated (i.e., inflation is taken into account).
This example assumes that the real value of cap-
ital employed at the end of 1995 is $79,339. To
calculate the CFROI for each period,the real free-
cash flow,the real capital employed,and the real
WACC for each period are estimated.
It is assumed that the cash flow for 1995 is in
real dollar terms and therefore needs no adjust-
ment. In addition, this real gross cash flow is
expected to be constant for each of the remain-
ing years in the life of the assets invested at the
end of 1995 ($79,339). The more uncertain the
future cash flows of a company, the more heavi-
ly they need to be discounted. It is also assumed
the life of the assets will be 10 years and,at the
end of the period, $44,464 of net working capi-
tal  will  be  released.  All  these  simplifying
assumptions require estimation,which highlights
the  complexity of  this approach.  Under these
assumptions, the performance of the company
using the IRR formula, where 'R' represents the
CFROI can be calculated.
In this case, the CFROI is approximately 2.9%.
This value must be compared to the real cost of
capital for XYZ, which is estimated to be 7.2% at
the beginning of 1995. Thus, the CFROI spread
for 1995 is equal to (4.3)%.
33
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Step 9: Calculation of Implied Market and Equity Value of the Firm
1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000 
2001
Perpetual NOPAT from Year 2001 
$7,367   
Residual Value at Year 2000 
81,859
Free-Cash Flow 
(692)  (2,603)  (2,767)  (2,946)  (3,135)
Present Value of Free-Cash Flow
(635)  (2,191)  (2,137)  (2,087)  (2,038) 
Present Value of Residual Value 
53,203 
Implied Market Value 
44,115
Existing Debt Value 
34,451
Implied Equity Value 
$   9,664 
__ ___ _  _
Calculation of CFROI Spread
Real Gross Cash Flow
NOPAT (1995) 
$3,586 
Depreciation
1,879
Real Gross Cash Flow 
$5,465
_  _ _  _
5, 465
(1 + R)
5, 465
(1 + R)
2
5, 465
(1 + R)
3
5, 465
(1 + R)
4
5, 465
(1 + R)
5
5, 465
(1 + R)
6
5, 465
(1 + R)
7
5, 465
(1 + R)
8
5, 465
(1 + R)
9
5, 465
(1 + R)
10
5, 465
(1 + R)
11
CFROI(R) = $79,339
SDK Library service:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
SharePoint. C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
As can  be  seen, these  calculations are  highly
dependent  upon  subjective  assumptions  about
the real value of capital and real free-cash flows.
Thus,these numbers can only be used as an illus-
tration of the calculation methodology; no faith in
actual numbers is warranted.
E) Total Shareholder Return (TSR)
The annual TSR is calculated as the change in
price  plus  any  dividends  by  the  initial  price.
Mathematically, TSR can be expressed as:
TSR = (Price
t+1
+ dividends
t+1
- Price
t
)/Price
t
F) Annual Economic Return (AER)
Calculation of AER requires accounting for divi-
dends paid as well as new equity raised during the
year. It also requires an estimate of the opportuni-
ty cost of funds. Ideally, this opportunity cost is
the cost of equity. AER is calculated as a return by
the firm after  adjusting for  dividends  paid and
external  dividends  paid  and  external  capital 
raised. Mathematically,AER can be expressed as:
AER = ((MV - ER’ + Div’)/MV
t
) -1
Where ER' and Div' represents value of external
equity  raised  and  dividends  paid  during  these
years invested at the investor's opportunity cost,
and MV
t+1
and MV
t
represent the market value of
firm's equity at years t+1 and year t,compounded
at the t-bill rate,respectively. The investor's oppor-
tunity cost of capital is the corresponding cost of
equity for that firm. If this return is positive, then
management has created investor wealth,since it
has done better than what the investors could
have done on their own.29 In this sense, this is a
cash-in, cash-out  return  provided  by  corporate
management accounting for opportunity cost.
For simplicity,the following example assumes that
the opportunity cost is 5% (comparable to invest-
ing in T bills) for each of the years in the study and
assumes that any dividends paid or external equity
raised took place in the middle of the year.
34
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
29  This is equivalent to the time-weighted return methodology
used in evaluating pension fund performance. Annual economic
return is, in essence, nothing but the rate of return that the
investor could have earned by starting the portfolio at the market
value of equity, receiving periodic dividends, and providing to
management any additional equity funds required for investment.
Calculation of AER
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995
Opportunity Cost % 
 
5
Stock Price 
1.375  
1.20 
1.10 
0.98 
0.93 
0.74 
Number of Shares 
10,616  
10,616 
10,616 
12,116 
12,153 
12,466
Market Value of Equity 
14,597  
12,739 
11,678 
11,874 
11,302 
9,225
Adj. Market Value of Equity (using 5%) 
15,327  
13,376 
12,262 
12,468 
11,867 
9,686
Equity Raised 
N/A  
129 
578 
102 
120
Adjusted Equity Raised (using 5%) 
N/A
132 
592 
105 
123
Dividends 
N/A  
178 
552 
534 
501
Adjusted Dividends (using 5%) 
N/A
182 
566 
547 
514
AER 
N/A  (16.9)%  (12.3)% 
(3.4)% 
(5.8)%  (19.0)%
G) Market Value Added (MVA)
This  measure  is  calculated  by  comparing  the
market value of capital (equity) with the adjusted
value of capital (equity). In this case, both num-
bers are identical because the market value of
debt is assumed to be the same as the book
value of debt. If that is not the case,a separate
set of calculations is required to calculate MVA.
Note that the method requires that the value of
capital  (equity)  invested is  properly  estimated
with all the necessary adjustments for a variety 
of accounting treatments made to the traditional
balance  sheet. A change  in  these measures,
which represents the dollar value of wealth cre-
ation performance, in year t, can be written as:
(MVA
t
) = MVA
t
-MVA
t-1
The standardized MVA values are calculated by
dividing MVA in year by the adjusted equity value
at year t-1, or:
Standardized MVAt = (MVA
t
- MVA
t-1
) / Adjusted equity
t-1
35
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Calculation of MVA and Standardized MVA  
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995
Adjusted Equity Value (AEV) 
$24,188  
24,320 
25,724 
27,261 
29,509 
30,949
Market Value of Equity 
14,597  
12,739 
11,678 
11,874 
11,302 
9,225
MVA 
(9,591)     (11,581)  (14,046)  (15,387)  (18,204)  (21,724)
Change in MVA 
 $(1,990) 
(2,465)  (1,341) 
(2,817) 
(3,520)
Standardized MVA
MVA
t
÷ AEV
t-1 
(8.2)%  (10.1)% 
(5.2)%  (10.3)%  (11.9)%
APPENDIX B
FROM EARNINGS  TO OPERATING 
PERFORMANCE TO VALUE 
CREATION
The main purpose of this appendix is to provide
examples of adjustments that are required to
ensure that reported numbers based on tradi-
tional  accounting  statements  reflect  the  true
underlying picture of the firm's economic value-
creation  performance.  The  final  selection  of
adjustments would vary from firm to firm. As
noted earlier, the operating principle should be
that of "materiality."
Ensuring that the measurement of value creation
is  adequately  calculated  requires  two  sets  of
adjustments. The first set of adjustments ensures
that the reported earnings reflect the true opera-
tional performance of the entity and that the asset
base reflects the total cumulative capital invested
in the firm by its shareholders and bondholders.
The second  set  of  adjustments are  required if
some  expenses, from  an  accounting  point  of
view,are, in reality, investments from a value per-
spective. The following examples provide the fla-
vor of the common adjustments under these two
sets of adjustments.
Adjusting Reported Earnings and Assets to
Represent Operating Cash Flows and Assets
Value  creation  measures  require  that  correct
estimates of operating performance and assets
are  used  in  their  calculations.  This  requires
adjustments  to  reported  numbers  in  income
statements  and  balance  sheets  prepared
according  to  traditional  accounting  principles.
This is especially important when a variety of
reserves are established, a variety of write-offs
are  taken, and  many  noncash  expenses  are
taken  while  deriving  reported  earnings  and
assets. In the presence of such entries,the use
of reported earnings and asset numbers as prox-
ies for operational  performance  may be quite
misleading.  Table  1  shows  some  common
accounting entries and their effect on the report-
ed earnings and asset base.
36
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Increase in Bad Debt Reserves 
Lower 
Higher
Amortization of Goodwill 
Lower 
Lower
Write-offs of Assets 
Lower 
Lower
Increase in Deferred Taxes 
Higher 
Higher
Examples of
Accounting Entries
Effect on
Reported Earnings
Effect on Reported Asset
(or capital) Base
Table 1
Many such nonoperating items are often included
in earnings to reflect a variety of specific situa-
tions faced by the firm. Clearly,to ensure that the
value-creation-performance  measure  is  properly
calculated, these  entries  require  reversal.  For
example, reported goodwill arises because the
amount  paid by an acquiring firm over the fair
value  of  an  acquired  firm  under  the  purchase
method is higher than the reported asset base of
the acquired firm. Since the management decided
to pay a higher price (and used shareholder capi-
tal), value-creation  measures  require  that  any
amortization of goodwill amortization is reversed
with appropriate tax adjustments. Similarly, while
estimating the economic value of the asset base,
all cumulative goodwill expenses are added back
to the reported asset base. In all such cases,
appropriate adjustment is required to ensure that
reported earnings and asset base reflect the true
operating performance and asset base.
Adjusting to Reflect Economic 
Value and Assets
In  addition  to  ensuring  that  operating  perfor-
mance and asset base are correctly estimated,
there is also a question of deciding which items
are truly expenses and which can be, at least
partially, considered  as  investments  for  the
future. This is especially important if managers
are to take decisions based on long-term vision
and investments and are compensated accord-
ingly. Table 2 shows some common expenses
that require adjustments to create a value-based
view of the entity.
For example, R&D is normally undertaken as an
investment to design and develop future prod-
ucts or services. Common accounting practice is
to expense all R&D in the year that it occurs.
However, a value-creation perspective may treat
only a portion of R&D expense as an expense in
that  year.  Thus, the  value-based  "earnings"
would be higher than those reported, as would
be the value of the resultant asset base. For
example,if R&D is expected to have a life of four
years, then the value-based adjustment requires
that only 25% be expensed in the first year and
the remaining 75% be added to the asset base.
In each of the remaining three years, 25% of the
R&D would be expensed with a corresponding
reduction in asset base. Similarly,training is nor-
mally undertaken  so that  employees  can  add
value to the firm in the future. As a result, train-
ing  can  be  considered  an  investment  in  the
future and treated in the same manner as R&D.
37
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Research and development expense 
Increase 
Increase
Training 
Increase 
Increase
Reported depreciation lower (higher)
than economic depreciation 
Increase (decrease) 
Increase (decrease)
Examples of Value Entries
Effect on Reported
Earnings or Operational
Cash Flows
Effect on Reported 
or Operational Asset
(or capital) Base
Table 2
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Argyris, Chris, and  Robert  Kaplan.  1994.
Implementing new knowledge: The case of
activity-based costing. Accounting Horizons
(September): 83-105.
Armitage, Howard, and  Vijay  Jog.  1996.
Economic  value  creation:  What  every 
management accountant should know. CMA
magazine (October): 21-24.
Balkom, John, and Roger Brossy. Getting execu-
tives to create value: A cautionary tale about
EVA. Chicago, IL: Sibson and Company, Inc.
Internal document.
Bernard, Victor  L.  1995.  The  Feltham-Ohlson
framework:  implications  for  empiricists.
Contemporary Accounting Research(Spring).
Buzzell, Robert, and  Bradley  T.  Gale.  1996. 
The PIMS Principle. New York, NY: The Free
Press.
Copeland, Tom, Tim  Koller, and  Jack  Murrin.
1996. Valuation, 2nd ed. New York,NY: John
Wiley & Sons Inc.
Cooper, R., R. Kaplan, L. Maisel, E. Morrissey,
and R. Oehm. 1994. Implementing Activity-
Based Management: Moving from Analysis
to  Action. Montvale, NJ:  Institute  of
Management Accountants.
Dixit A.K., and R.S. Pindyck. 1994. Investment
Under Uncertainty. Princeton, NJ: Princeton
University Press.
Duck, Jeanie. 1993. Managing change: The art
of  balancing.  Harvard  Business  Review
(November-December): 109-118.
Executive Compensation Reports.1992. Vol. 12,
8 (August 25).
Feltham,G., and J. Ohison. 1995. Valuation and
clean  surplus  accounting  for  operating 
and  financial  activities.  Contemporary
Accounting  Research. Vol.  11, 2  (Spring):
689-731.
Frankel R., and C.M.C. Lee. 1996. Accounting
Valuation, Market  Expectations, and  the
Book-to-Market Effect.Working paper,School
of  Business  Administration, University  of
Michigan. (January).
Ibbotson  and  Associates.  Stock, Bonds, Bills
and Inflation. Chicago, IL: Yearbooks.
Institute  of  Management  Accountants.  1986.
Measuring Entity Performance. Statement on
Management Accounting 4D. Montvale, NJ:
Institute of Management Accountants.
———.  1994a.  Developing  Comprehensive
Performance  Indicators. Statement  on
Management Accounting 4U. Montvale, NJ:
Institute of Management Accountants.
———. 
1994b.  Managing  Cross-Functional
Teams. Statement  on  Management
Accounting  5C.  Montvale, NJ:  Institute  of
Management Accountants.
Jog, Vijay, and  Paul  Halpern.  1996.  Keeping
score.  Canadian  Investment  Review (Fall):
21-26.
Kohn,Alfie. 1993. Why incentive systems cannot
work. Harvard  Business  Review (October):
54-63.
38
BU S I N E S S   P E R F O R M A N C E   M A N A G E M E N T
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested