21
delivery to the ultimate consumer and is ready for consumption without further
preparation”.
NB – Although the Regulations exempt certain meat products or ingredients
from the QUID requirements (either because of the way in which they are
sold, or the type of product), retailers are free to provide QUID declarations for
any ingredient on a voluntary basis, if they wish to do so.  Where a declaration
is given voluntarily, it must still be provided in line with the rules described
below.
2.
How will QUID declarations work in practice?
The MPSFPR contained requirements for minimum meat content declaration,
which required to be labelled with the total meat content.  This requirement
has been replaced by QUID.  This is very much a change of emphasis.  The
declaration is now linked with the quantification of ingredients  rather than
total meat content.
A QUID declaration informs the consumer of the quantity (i.e., usually the
weight) of the relevant ingredient that has been used to make the food.  This
is usually expressed as a percentage of the weight of the final food.  Now that
meat ingredients are included  within the  scope  of  QUID,  meat  should be
treated just like any other ingredient when providing QUID declarations.
The one exception to this rule is that the actual quantity declared will need to
be  determined  according  to  the  new  definition  of  meat.    Where  a  meat
ingredient contains excess fat or connective tissue, that excess may not count
towards the QUID declaration.  This has the effect that the quantity of meat on
which the QUID is based may be less than the weight of the meat ingredient
actually used to make the product.
The following paragraphs discuss two issues:
(a)  How to decide which ingredients should have a QUID declaration,
and in what form the ingredient will be described and quantified.
(paragraphs 3 and 5)
(b)  How to determine the actual quantity (i.e., the percentage) that will
be declared (paragraphs 6 to 14).
3.  What types of ingredients will need to be QUIDed?
This section explains general rules of QUID and the situation may be
different for loose foods.  See paragraph 4 on page 23
Convert pdf to text file using - SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text file using - SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
22
The FLR require that a QUID declaration is provided for an ingredient that
appears in the name of the food, or is usually associated with that food by the
consumer.
“. . . appears in the name of the food”
For example:
Name of the food:
QUID required for:
Beef Burger
Beef
Pork and Leek Sausage
Pork, Leek
Steak and Kidney Pie
Steak (or beef), Kidney
Sweet and Sour Chicken with Rice and
Cashew Nuts
Chicken, Cashew nuts
Liver pate
Liver
“. . . is usually associated with that food”
There may be instances where the meat ingredients of a product are not
mentioned in the name of the food.  This will often be where the product is
described with a traditional or customary name.   Where a food is described
using a customary name alone (and no additional descriptive name) a useful
guide for deciding which ingredients should be QUIDed is to consider what an
appropriate descriptive name for the food might be.
Again, it is important to remember that the QUID relates not to the meat
content  as  such,  but  to  the characterising ingredient.    This  may  be
particularly important with some traditional products that are based on offals
and parts of the animal other than muscle meat.
Name of the food: Possible descriptive name:
QUID required for:
Shepherd’s pie
minced lamb with carrot and onion in
gravy, topped with mashed potato.
(minced) lamb, potato
Cornish Pastie
Pastie filled with diced beef, potato,
carrot and swede
Beef
Toad in the Hole
sausages in batter pudding
Sausages
Foie Gras Pate
Goose liver pate
Goose liver
some exceptions . . .
SDK control API:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Instead, using this C#.NET PDF text extracting library package, you can easily extract all or partial text content from target PDF document file, edit selected
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
'Please have a quick test by using the following example code for text extraction from PDF file in VB.NET program. ' Open a document.
www.rasteredge.com
23
There may be instances where an “ingredient” is mentioned in the name of
the food, but has not been used in its manufacture.  In these cases, a QUID
will of course not be required.  A good example (although not a meat product)
is a “cream cracker” which contains no cream.  Similarly, a “beef tomato”
contains no beef.
This exception will also apply to products such as “chicken flavour crisps”
where the chicken flavour is derived from one or more ingredients that are not
chicken.
4.
QUID rules specific to meat products sold loose
This paragraph relates to food sold loose.  Loose means non-prepacked or
“pre-packed for direct sale”.  The phrase “pre-packed for direct sale” means:
“prepacked by a retailer for sale by him or her on the premises where the food
is packed or from a vehicle or stall used by him or her”.
QUID declarations will be required for meat products sold by retail outlets in
this way, (i.e., supermarkets, butchers, bakers, delicatessens etc.)  However,
QUID declarations will only need to be provided for ingredients that are “meat”
within the meaning of the definition – for example:
Product
QUID required for:
QUID not required for:
Chicken and Mushroom Pie
Chicken
Mushroom
Steak and Kidney Pie
Steak (beef)
Kidney
Chicken and Ham Pie
Chicken
Ham
Corned Beef Pastie
-
Corned Beef
NB – This table applies only to foods sold loose, but regardless of how
the ingredients are QUIDed, products must still meet any necessary
minimum meat content (i.e. compositional) requirements
In addition, foods listed in Schedule 4 of the Regulations do not need to carry
any QUID declaration when sold loose, namely:
§
sandwiches, filled rolls and similar products
§
pizzas and similar topped products
§
soup, broth and gravy
§
ready to eat individual portions assembled from two or more ingredients
(e.g., salads that are made up from a self-service counter, or to order by
serving staff)
NB  -  These  foods will  need  to  carry  QUID  declaration  if  they  are  sold
prepacked.
SDK control API:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file using RasterEdge XDoc.PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page using VB.NET code efficiently.
www.rasteredge.com
24
5.
How should the ingredient be described and quantified?
In most cases, a food will be labelled with a list of ingredients.  The QUID
declaration should therefore relate to the ingredient in the form in which it is
described in the list of ingredients.
Where a food does not have a list of ingredients (e.g., foods sold loose and
not pre-packed) the QUID declaration will appear alongside the name of the
food (whether this appears on a ticket or notice etc, or on the food itself) in a
form such as “contains x% pork” or “x% pork”.  The QUID declaration should
therefore relate to the ingredient in the form in which it is described in this
declaration.  There is no need to QUID excess fat or connective tissue in this
context.
In general therefore, where an ingredient is described as simply meat from the
named  species  (e.g.,  “beef”,  “lamb”,  “pork”,  “chicken”  etc)  the  QUID
declaration will be based on the new definition of meat.  Therefore any excess
fat or connective tissue present in the ingredient cannot count towards the
QUID declaration.  It is possible therefore that the actual amount of meat
declared is less than the weight of the meat ingredients
However, there will also be instances where the new definition will not apply –
because  of  the  nature  of  the  meat  ingredient,  or  the  way  in  which  that
ingredient is described.  These will fall into four areas – as described below:
It is important to note that the minimum meat content required by the reserved
descriptions will continue to apply in terms of meat according to the EU
definition, regardless of how the ingredients are described or QUIDed
.
(i) Animal-derived ingredients not covered by the definition of meat
Many parts of the carcase not covered by the new definition are commonly
used in traditional meat products.  Some examples include kidney in pies;
liver and tongue in patés and sausages; oxtail in soups; and feet and head
meat in products such as brawn and potted head.  In addition, ingredients
such  as  MRM,  head  meat  and  heart  are  often  used  in  processed  meat
products.  The definition of head meat excludes masseter.
These  ingredients  must  be  declared  separately  in  the  product’s  list  of
ingredients.  The ingredient in question must be described specifically, and
not by a generic name such as “offal”.  The species source must also be
declared:  e.g.,  “beef  heart”,  “pig’s  kidney”,  “lamb’s  liver”,  “Mechanically
Recovered Chicken”, “pork head meat”, etc.
SDK control API:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
In the following example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Using our VB.NET PDF Document Conversion Library, developers can easily convert PDF document to TIFF image file in VB.NET programming.
www.rasteredge.com
25
(NB – none of these ingredients may count towards the meat content for the
purposes of complying with the minimum meat content requirements of the
reserved descriptions – however where a product is described as “tongue
sausage” or “liver sausage” or similar, no minimum required meat content
requirements apply).
(ii) “Specific cuts”
Manufacturers may choose not to use generic names such as “beef”, “lamb”,
“pork” etc, but instead to describe a meat ingredient according to the specific
cut of meat used.  Some examples might be “chicken breast”, “beef brisket”,
“loin of lamb”.  Where ingredients are described in this way, the European
definition will not apply.
The name used to describe a “specific cut” must be specific, familiar and
understood by consumers.   The FLR require that a name used to describe
an ingredient must be a name that could be used to describe that ingredient
were it being sold as a food in its own right.  As a general rule therefore, the
name used to describe a “specific cut” may be considered acceptable where
that name is also used to describe that meat ingredient when sold as fresh
meat (e.g., in butchers’ shops and similar outlets).
In addition, the European Commission recommended that Member States use
CLITRAVI’s  (Liaison  Centre  for  the  Meat  Processing  Industry  in  the  EU)
guidance  as  a  basis  for  national  guidance.  Therefore  in  line  with  this
recommendation, the Agency recommends that where “specific cuts” are used
to describe meat ingredients in comminuted meat products such as sausages
and burgers then the maximum limits on fat and connective tissue in the meat
definition apply.
Where  a  QUID declaration  is provided  in  relation to a  “specific  cut”,  the
declaration must be based only on the meat that is from that declared cut
(e.g., the declared quantity of “chicken breast” must not include any meat that
is not breast meat).  In addition, the declared quantity must not include any
skin  or  other  tissue  that  is  not  attached  to  the  muscle  meat.  (See  also
paragraph 13 below relating to “bone-in” cuts).
(iii) Dried or cooked meat ingredients
Where the meat ingredient is described in the list of ingredients (or declaration
where  there  is  no  list  of  ingredients)  as  having  been  cooked  e.g.,  “fried
chicken”, “roast pork” etc., the limits for fat and connective tissue will not
SDK control API:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Convert smooth lines to curves. If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C# Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF VB.NET PDF to JPEG converting component can help developers convert standard PDF file to high
www.rasteredge.com
26
apply.  The QUID declaration will therefore be based on the weight of the
cooked ingredient at the time of its use in the recipe.
Manufacturers may if they wish base the QUID for such ingredients on the
weight of the raw equivalent, provided that the basis of the declaration is
made clear to the consumer.  Where a “raw equivalent” is declared, and the
meat is described using a generic description (“pork”, “beef”, “chicken” etc)
the limits for fat and connective tissue will apply.
It is possible that a product may contain cooked and uncooked meat from the
same species.  In which case, the manufacturer may choose either to QUID
the cooked and uncooked meat separately, or to provide a single QUID for the
all the meat ingredients of the same species, based on the raw equivalent.
The MPR define “cooked” as it relates to whole meat products as: ”subjected
to a process of cooking throughout the whole food so that the food is sold for
consumption without further cooking”.  This definition is also useful in defining
what  constitutes  a  “cooked”  ingredient.    An  ingredient  should  only  be
described as cooked (and QUIDed on that basis) if it has been thoroughly
cooked and could be consumed without further cooking.  This would therefore
exclude ingredients that have been merely flash fried, lightly seared etc., from
being described as “cooked”, and QUIDed on that basis.
(iv) Compound ingredients
A compound ingredient is a food used as an ingredient, that is itself made up
of a number of ingredients.  Some examples would be “sausage”, “ham” and
“bacon”.    A  compound  ingredient  will  usually  be  an  ingredient  that  the
consumer would recognise as a food in its own right, and which would also be
sold on its own.
A QUID for the compound ingredient will be required where it is referred to in
the name  of the  food (e.g.,  “chicken and ham pie”, “bacon sandwich”) or
where it is usually associated with that food (e.g., sausage in “toad in the
hole”).
The QUID declaration should relate to the ingredient as described (either in
the ingredients list or point of sale declaration).  For example, in the case of
“chicken and ham pie” and “pepperoni pizza”, the QUID declaration should be
based on the weight of the ham and pepperoni respectively, at their time of
use in the recipe.  It is not necessary to quantify the meat itself, either as a
percentage of the compound ingredient, or of the total product.
27
There  may  also  be  instances  where  the  meat  ingredient  is  described
generically in the name of the food, but is declared as a compound ingredient
in the list of ingredients.  A QUID based on a compound ingredient will of
course be greater than a QUID based on the meat content of  the whole
product.  Care must therefore be taken to ensure that providing a QUID on
this basis does not mis-represent the true composition of the food.
6.  How is the QUID declaration calculated?
The QUID declaration  informs  the  consumer of the quantity of ingredient
used, as a proportion of the final weight of the product.  The QUID declaration
is therefore calculated as follows:
declarable weight of ingoing
ingredient
QUID (%) =
weight of
finished product
x 100
NB – the “declarable weight” means the quantity of the ingoing ingredient that
may be counted towards the QUID declaration.  This will not necessarily be
the same as the actual weight of the ingoing ingredient – because where the
QUID is provided on the basis  of the new definition, any excess fat and
connective tissue may not be counted towards the QUID.
7. “weight of finished product”
In  this  context,  the  “weight  of  finished  product”  means  the  weight  of  the
product when sold.  This will not necessarily be the same as the combined
weight of all the ingredients.  Cooked products for example will often lose
moisture in the cooking process – resulting in the final product weighing less
than the sum of the ingredients.
8.  “the ingoing ingredient”
As discussed in paragraphs 5 and 6 above, the QUID declaration must relate
to the ingredient as described in the list of ingredients, and this in turn must be
linked to the way that ingredient is named in the name of the food.  The
following diagram shows how the “ingoing weight” is determined, depending
on the type of ingredient to which the QUID declaration relates – which will be
either:
(a)  an animal-derived ingredient not included in the definition – (e.g.,
“liver”, “kidney”, “tongue” – see also paragraph 5(i) above)
28
(b)  a “specific cut” – (e.g., “chicken breast”, “pork belly”, “sirloin steak” –
see also paragraph 5(ii) above)
(c)  a cooked or processed meat ingredient – (e.g., “fried chicken”, “roast
pork”, “smoked [pork]” – see also paragraph 5(iii) above)
(d)  a compound ingredient – (e.g., “sausage”, “ham”, “bacon” – see also
paragraph 5(iv) above)
or
(e) “meat” within the meaning of the definition – (e.g., “beef”,
“lamb”, “chicken”).
29
9.
How is the “declarable weight” determined?
* Annex B, paragraph 1 below tells you how to find out if you have excess fat
and connective tissue.
(e) “meat” within the  meaning
of the definition.
The “declared weight” is simply
the weight of the ingredient at
the  time  at  which  it  was
incorporated into the food.
The  QUID  declaration  is
simply:
declared weight
weight of finished product
x 100
You  do  not  need  to  use  the
calculations in Annex B
Do  any  of  the  meat
ingredients  contain  excess
fat or connective tissue?*
NO
The “declared weight” will be the weight of the meat ingredients minus any excess
fat and / or connective tissue.  (This is because excess fat and connective tissue
cannot  be  counted as  “meat”  towards  the  QUID  declaration).    The  “declared
weight” will therefore be less than the total weight of the meat ingredients
The calculations at Annex B enable you to determine how much excess fat
and  connective  tissue  you  have,  and  therefore  how  much  of  the  meat
ingredients can be counted towards the “declared weight”.
YES
(d) A compound ingredient
(b) A “specific cut”
(c) A processed, dried or cooked
meat ingredient
(a) An animal-derived ingredient
not included in the definition
30
10.
How should the QUID declaration be presented?
In most cases, the QUID declaration will be expressed as a percentage.  The
declaration must appear on the labelling either in or next to the name of the
food, or in the list of ingredients in connection with the ingredient in question.
In the case of meat products sold non-prepacked, or prepacked for direct sale
the QUID declaration should appear either on a label attached to the food, or
on a ticket or notice that is readily discernible by an intending purchaser at the
place where he or she chooses the food.  (This could include point of sale
ticketing, posters etc.)
11.   What if the QUID declaration is more than 100%?
Regulation 19(4) of the FLR  provides for situations where, because a food
has lost moisture as a result of treatment, the quantity of an ingoing ingredient
is  greater  than  the  weight  of  the  finished  product  (i.e.,  where  a  QUID
declaration  would  be  greater  than  100%).    In  such  cases,  the  QUID
declaration must indicate the weight of ingredient used to prepare 100g of
finished product.
One  example  of  such  a  product  is  the  food  covered  by  the  reserved
description for corned beef, which is produced by pre-cooking beef (which
loses fat and moisture) then sterilising the product. This in effect produces a
concentrated meat product.
The reserved description requires that corned meat  has a meat content of
120%.   Therefore an example of a suitable QUID declaration for corned beef
would be as follows:
Corned beef: - Made with 120g of beef per 100g of finished product
12.  The list of ingredients – Description of excess fat and connective
tissue
The FLR require (with certain exceptions) all foods sold pre-packed to be
labelled  with  a  list  of  ingredients.    The  ingredients  must  be  listed  in
descending order of weight at the time of their use in the food.  Where a meat
ingredient contains excess fat and connective tissue, this must be declared
separately in the product’s list of ingredients.  Where the product does not
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested