how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to text file using software Library project winforms .net asp.net UWP meatguidance6-part690

61
If excess collagen (%) is ££ 0, then there is no excess collagen or connective tissue; go
to step 4.  See also note for calculation 6 below.
3. 
Convert excess collagen into excess connective tissue
excess connective tissue (%) = excess collagen (%) X [conversion factor]
4. 
Calculate allowed fat content
· Where excess collagen > 0
limit for fat (%) X (100 – excess CT – percentage of fat in total meat)
allowed fat content (%) =
(100 –  limit for fat (%) )
· Where excess collagen ££ 0
limit for fat (%) X (100 – percentage of fat in total meat)
allowed fat content (%) =
(100 –  limit for fat (%) )
5. 
Calculate excess fat
excess fat (%) = percentage of fat in total meat – allowed fat content
If excess fat (%) ££ then there is no excess fat.  See also note for calculation 6 below.
6. 
Calculate declarable meat
declarable meat (%) = 100 – excess fat – excess connective tissue
NB – values for “excess fat” or “excess connective tissue” should only be included in
calculation  6,  where  there  is  actually  an  excess  of  fat  or  connective  tissue  (as
appropriate) in the product.  If the value for excess fat or excess connective tissue are
< 0, you should not include those values in calculation 6.
7.
Calculate QUID declaration
The ‘declarable meat’ represents the percentage of the total meat on which the QUID
declaration may be based.
total meat
QUID declaration (%) = declarable meat x
total weight of product
Convert pdf to text file using - software Library project:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text file using - software Library project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
62
NB: - The percentages for excess connective tissue and excess fat calculated above
represent the percentage of the total meat that is in excess of the statutory limits.  Where
excess  connective  tissue  or  fat  is  declared  in  a  product’s  list  of  ingredients,  it  will  be
necessary to calculate this excess as a percentage of total product weight – as follows
total meat
percentage excess = excess [CT or fat] x
total weight of product
software Library project:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Instead, using this C#.NET PDF text extracting library package, you can easily extract all or partial text content from target PDF document file, edit selected
www.rasteredge.com
software Library project:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
'Please have a quick test by using the following example code for text extraction from PDF file in VB.NET program. ' Open a document.
www.rasteredge.com
63
ANNEX F
THE RESERVED DESCRIPTIONS – COMPOSITIONAL REQUIREMENTS
Column 1
Column 2
Column 3
Name of Food
Meat or Cured Meat Content Requirements
Additional Requirements
The  food  shall  contain  not  less  than  the
indicated percentage of meat, where the meat
ingredient consists of the following:
Meat or, as
the case may
be, cured
meat from
pigs only
Meat or, as the
case may be,
cured meat
from birds
only, rabbits
only, or a
combination of
birds and
rabbits only
Meat or, as
the case may
be, cured
meat from
other species
or other
mixtures of
meat
1. Burger – whether or not forming part of
another  word,  but  excluding  any  name
falling  within  items  2  or  3  of  this
Schedule.
67%
55%
62%
1. Where the name “hamburger” is used, the meat used in the
preparation of the food must be beef, pork or a mixture of
both.
2. Where either of the names “burger” or “economy burger” is
qualified by the name of a type of cured meat, the food must
contain  a percentage of meat  of the type from which  the
named type of cured meat is prepared at least equal to the
minimum required meat content for that food.
3. Where  any  of  the  names  “burger”,  “economy  burger”  or
“hamburger” is qualified by the name of a type of meat, the
food must contain a percentage of that named meat at least
equal to the minimum required meat content for that food.
software Library project:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF files to form a new PDF file using RasterEdge XDoc.PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library project:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page using VB.NET code efficiently.
www.rasteredge.com
64
Column 1
Column 2
Column 3
Name of Food
Meat or Cured Meat Content Requirements
Additional Requirements
4.
Where any of the names “burger”, “economy burger” or
“hamburger” are used to refer to a compound ingredient
consisting of a meat mixture and other ingredients, such as a
bread roll, these requirements shall apply only to the meat
mixture, as if the meat mixture were the meat product in the
labelling or advertising of which the name was used as the
name of the food.
2. Economy  Burger – whether or not
“burger” forms part of another word.
50%
41%
47%
3. Hamburger – whether or not forming part
of another word.
67%
Not applicable
62%
4. Chopped X, there being inserted in place
of “X” the name “meat” or “cured meat” or
the name of a type of meat or cured
meat, whether or not there is also
included the name of a type of meat
75%
62%
70%
No additional requirement
5. Corned X, there being inserted in place
of “X” the name “meat” or the name of a
type of meat, unless qualified by words
which include the name of a food other
than meat
120%
120%
120%
1.
The food shall consist wholly of meat that has been corned.
2.
Where the name of the food includes the name of a type of
meat, the meat used in the preparation of the food shall be
wholly of the named type.
3.
The total fat content of the food shall not exceed 15%.
6. Luncheon meat
Luncheon X, there being inserted in
place of “X” the name of a type of meat or
cured meat
67%
55%
62%
No additional requirement
software Library project:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
In the following example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Using our VB.NET PDF Document Conversion Library, developers can easily convert PDF document to TIFF image file in VB.NET programming.
www.rasteredge.com
65
Column 1
Column 2
Column 3
Name of Food
Meat or Cured Meat Content Requirements
Additional Requirements
7. Meat pie
Meat pudding
The name pie or pudding qualified by
the name of a type of meat or cured meat
unless  qualified also by  the  name of  a
food other than meat or cured meat
Melton Mowbray pie
Game pie
Based  on the  weight  of the ingredients
when the food is uncooked
But if the food weighs –
not more than 200 g. and not less than
100 g.
less than 100 g.
12.5%
11%
10%
12.5%
11%
10%
12.5%
11%
10%
1. Where the name “Melton Mowbray pie” is used, the meat
used in the preparation of the food must be meat from pigs
only.
8. Scottish pie or
Scotch pie
Based  on the  weight  of the ingredients
when the food is uncooked
10%
10%
10%
No additional requirement
software Library project:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Convert smooth lines to curves. If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C# Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
www.rasteredge.com
software Library project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF VB.NET PDF to JPEG converting component can help developers convert standard PDF file to high
www.rasteredge.com
66
Column 1
Column 2
Column 3
Name of Food
Meat or Cured Meat Content Requirements
Additional Requirements
9. The name pie or pudding” qualified by
the words “meat” or “cured meat” or by
the name of a type of meat or cured meat
and also qualified by the name of a food
other than meat or cured meat –
Where  the 
former  (meat–related)
qualification precedes the latter
Where  the  latter  (non–meat–related)
qualification precedes the former
Based on the weight of the ingredients
when the food is uncooked
7%
6%
7%
6%
7%
6%
No additional requirement
10.  Pasty or Pastie
Bridie
Sausage roll
Based  on the  weight  of the ingredients
when the food is uncooked
6%
6%
6%
No additional requirement
11. Sausage (excluding the name “sausage”
when  qualified  by  the  words  “liver”  or
“tongue”  or  both), link, chipolata or
sausage meat.
Where the name is qualified by the name
“pork” but not by the name of any other
type of meat
In all other cases
42%
32%
Not applicable
26%
Not
applicable
30%
No additional requirement
Note : The meat or cured meat content requirements specified in this Schedule are calculated by weight. In relation to items 1 to 6 and11 they are based,
subject to regulation 4(2)(a)(ii), on the weight of the food concerned as it is labelled or, as the case may be, advertised.
67
ANNEX G
VALIDATION  OF  METHODS  FOR  THE  CALCULATION  OF  MEAT
CONTENTS
Executive Summary
1.  The  purpose  of  the  exercise  was  to  test  the  validity  of  the  method  for  meat  content
calculation included in the Agency’s Guidance Notes on the Labelling and Composition of
Meat Products  (see Annex G2 below).  The exercise was not an enforcement exercise, nor
was  it  intended  to  check  the  products’  compliance  with  either  current  or  forthcoming
legislation.
2.  In order to enable smaller businesses to calculate meat content (taking into account limits
for fat and connective tissue laid down by the new EU definition of meat) it is necessary to
develop a method that is not reliant on chemical analysis of ingredients.  Fat content can be
estimated using the visual lean method.  Although visual lean estimates are subjective, the
technique is used successfully in commerce to distinguish between similar products from
single sources.  It is not possible however to make a visual estimate of the connective tissue
content of meat cuts.  Therefore the use of agreed typical values for identified meat cuts is
proposed as a practical alternative to chemical analysis.   The Guidelines therefore propose
a method on this basis (described throughout this report as the “FSA Method”).
3.  The range  of meat  ingredients used by  the  meat  processing industry  is large and  the
descriptions of them are often inconsistent.  This suggests that a table of typical values may
not  be  universally  applicable.    The  effectiveness  of  the  “FSA  Method”  was  therefore
assessed, by comparing the results obtained using the FSA method; the calculation method
proposed  by  CLITRAVI;  and  an  apparent  meat  content  calculated  with  the  use  of
appropriate nitrogen factors.
4.  The  14  commercially  available  meat  products  sampled  were  taken  from  normal
manufacturing processes in 10 factories throughout England and Scotland.   Manufacturers
also provided recipe details for each product. Products and manufacturers were chosen to
give the widest range of raw materials with both large and small scale production.
Conclusions and Recommendations
5.  The FSA method will, with careful application, provide an effective basis for the calculation
of meat content by businesses.
6.  Additions to the table of typical values will be required; in particular for jowl and  masseter.
Typical values for fat need to be added for cooked rind, dehydrated rind, and diaphragm.
68
7.  Where there are significant differences between the results obtained using typical values
(i.e., FSA method) and those obtained using analytical results (i.e., CLITRAVI and nitrogen
factors)  the  principal  reason  for  these  differences  is  that  the  assumed  fat  content  is
overestimated.  This overestimation does not arise because the data in the table of typical
values is inaccurate.  Rather the overestimation seems to arise because the VL contents
stated in the recipe do not match the ingredients actually used. Therefore, when data is
extracted from the table (and assigned to a particular ingredient in the recipe in order to
carry out the calculation) this data is not in fact representative of the ingredient being used.
8.  It will now be important therefore to estimate VL content as accurately as possible.  Although
the VL technique has been in common use for many years, accuracy of estimation has not
generally  been  necessary.    This  is  because  producers  have  not  generally  needed  to
consider the fat content when determining meat content, because of the more generous
limits for fat implied by the previous provisions. References to VL have been used more as a
means of describing the cut for purchasing purposes.
9.  Both the FSA and CLITRAVI method require full recipe details if they are to be used with
confidence in all cases (i.e., details not only of any non-meat protein in the product, but also
the relative quantities of the meat ingredients).  Therefore neither of these methods will be
fully effective to underpin enforcement checks on a final product basis alone.  Enforcement
bodies will still need therefore to use nitrogen factors to calculate meat content, and in some
cases will also require recipe information.
10. When using the FSA method, producers will need to provide a QUID declaration that takes
into account the  variabilities not only  of the production process, but also  of the ingoing
ingredients.  In some instances, this variability was found to be significant.
Acknowledgements
11. The exercise was funded by the Food Standards Agency. The Agency is very grateful to the
British  Meat  Manufacturers  Association  for  their  assistance  in  setting  up  the  trial  and
calculating the results. It would like to thank all the participating businesses for providing
their time, products and raw materials free of charge. The Agency wishes also to thank
Somerset County Council for their work on the project.
69
Annex G1
CALCULATED MEAT CONTENTS - RESULTS
Product
Meat species
FSA
CLITRAVI
N Factor
1.  Economy sausage
Pork
33
34
38
2.  Pork sausage
Pork
68
73
73
3.  Pork sausage
Pork
61
68
64
4.  Pork Sausage
Pork
47
58
56
5.  Canned sausage
Pork
35
33
57¹
Chicken
28
28
-
6.  Uncooked chipolata sausage
Pork
48
52
63
7.  Economy burger
Pork
29
38
51¹
Chicken
20
20
-
8.  Economy burger
Pork
63
58
73²
9.  Beefburger
Beef
90
90
93¹
Pork
5
5
-
10. Beefburger
Beef
72
80
80
11. Beefburger
Beef
82
82
84
12. Cured Pork Pie Filling
Pork
60
85
89
13. Sausage roll meat mixture
Pork
18
21
20
14. Minced beef and onion pie
filling
Beef
27
27
28
¹ These are products containing meat from two different species.  The result obtained using the
nitrogen factor calculation relates to the total meat content of the product.
² This product contains MRM (which is not considered “meat” under the new definition)  The
result however includes the protein contributed by the MRM in the calculation.
70
Annex G2
CALCULATIONS USED
1. 
The FSA method was devised as an accessible method for use by small businesses,
and in other instances where analytical data is not available.  The method is based on the
use of a table of typical values for fat and connective tissue in commonly used meat cuts.
The CLITRAVI Method is intended for use with analytically determined values for fat and
connective tissue.  The two calculations underpinning the FSA method and the CLITRAVI
method differ in their treatment of connective tissue.  However, assuming the same data is
used, the results obtained will only differ where there is excess connective tissue in the
product.  The  FSA  Method  and  CLITRAVI  Method  are  detailed  in  Annexes  B  and  E
respectively of these Guidelines.
2. 
Results were also calculated using appropriate nitrogen factors.  The results include
corrections  for  non-meat  protein  and  excess  collagen;  and  also  take  account  of  the
statutory limits for fat.  It should be noted therefore that this approach could only be taken in
practice where full recipe details are available.
Nitrogen Factor Method
Step1
Calculate meat protein excluding contributions from non-meat nitrogenous sources:
Meat Nitrogen (N
M
) =
Total Nitrogen (N
T
)     -   non-meat Nitrogen (N
NM
)
Meat Protein (P
M
)  =  6.25 x N
M
Carbohydrate % (C) is normally determined by difference:
Carbohydrate % (C) = 100 - (water% + fat% + protein% + ash%)
(Where there is no information on non-meat nitrogen it is assumed that
Non meat nitrogen = 0.02 x C.
Where the non meat nitrogen is known from analysis of the ingredients this figure can be
used)
Step2
Calculate the collagen free meat protein:
Collagen-free meat protein (P
MCTFREE
) = P
  
-  Collagen (8 x %hydroxyproline)
Step3
Calculate the ratio between the collagen content and the meat protein content
Connective Tissue% (CT%)   =     Collagen %
x 100
P
M
Step4
Calculate the meat protein with the allowed collagen:
a. If CT% < CT
LIMIT 
%
Where:  CT
LIMIT
%  =  Limits for connective tissue provided by the EU Definition.
Meat protein with allowed collagen (P
M+CT
) = P
MCTFREE
+ collagen
b. If CT% > CT
LIMIT
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested