3|Simple Harmonic Motion
117
The two capacitors are the same,
C
,and the two inductances on the ends are
L
.The one in the middle
is
L
0
. The resulting equations for the two parts of the circuit are
L
L
0
L
I
1
I
2
1
C
I
1
+
L
d
2
I
1
dt
2
+
L
0
d
2
dt
2
I
1
+
I
2
=0
1
C
I
2
+
L
d
2
I
2
dt
2
+
L
0
d
2
dt
2
I
1
+
I
2
=0
Find the modes of oscillation of the currents
I
1
and
I
2
,then write the general form of
I
1
(
t
)and
I
2
(
t
).
Draw pictures of how the currents move in each mode.
3.61 Thecarbonmonoxidemolecule,CO,canbemodeledastwomassesontheendsofaspring.Solve
for the oscillations of this molecule, assuming that the motion is along the single long axis between the
atoms. Compare your result to what appears in section6.7, especially Eq. (6.46), derived by dierent
methods.
3.62 Two masses,
m
and
m
, are sitting on a table with no friction and
initially at rest. They are connected by a spring. At time
t
=0, start to apply
aconstant force
F
0
to one of the masses, along the line connecting the masses.
The motions of the two masses are (maybe)
x
1
;
2
(
t
)=
F
0
t
2
=
4
m
(
F
0
=
4
k
)
1  cos
!
0
t
(
!
2
0
=2
k=m
)
Analyze these equations to determine if they are plausible.
3.63_Derivethemotion,
x
1
(
t
)and
x
2
(
t
), in the preceding problem.
3.64_Fromtheresultoftheprecedingproblem,(a)computetheworkdonebytheforceuptotime
t
.
(b) Compute the total mechanical energy in the system at that time and compare the two results.
3.65_Twoequalmasses
m
are attached to three springs as shown on page100. The spring constants
on the ends are
k
and the one in the middle is
k
0
.A constant horizontal force
F
0
is now applied to the
mass on the left.
(a) Write all the dierential equations of motion for the coordinates
x
1
and
x
2
.
(b) Find an inhomogeneous solution to the equations.
(c) Find the general solutions for the homogeneous part of the equations.
(d) Write the total solution.
(e) At time
t
=0 both masses are at their equilibrium position with zero velocity. Find their future
positions.
3.66 Forthecasethattheharmonicoscillatorisdamped(underdamped),ndGreen’sfunctionforthe
solution, deriving Eq. (3.74).
3.67The motion n in the potential energy y function n of problem 3.45 can be e solved, , resulting in an
anharmonic oscillator. The solution is
x
(
t
)= (
cos
2
t
+
sin
2
t
)
1
=
2
for appropriate values of the
constants. Verify that this is so by substituting it into the conservation of energy equation
K
+
U
=
E
and showing that for appropriate
,
,and
it is correct. You can solve for these in terms of
E
,
a
,and
b
,but it is simpler if you work backwards and let
a
,
b
,and
be the controlling parameters,
expressing
E
,
and
in terms of them. And of course analyze the results. Isthefrequencycorrect?
And draw graphs. What does the graph of
x
(
t
)look like for small energy and for large energy? And
can you anticipate what the graphshould look like even before trying to use the equation to sketch it?
Convert pdf file to text file - application control utility:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf file to text file - application control utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
118
The reason this problem can be solved will be clear after doing problem6.50.
Ans:
=
p
2
a=m
,
E
=
a
+
b=
,
=(
b=a
),
x
min
=
p
,
x
max
=
p
.
3.68 Apotentialenergyisspeciedtobe(
>
0)
U
(
x
)=
0
(
x
0)
x
2
(
x>
0)
Amass
m
starts at a point
x
d
with a speed
v
0
to the right. How much time does it take to return
to its initial point? Also, sketch a graph of the force function that comes from this potential.
3.69 InEq.(3.56)thereisaspecialcasethatyoucandoapproximatelyinordertochecktheanalysis.
Assume that
0
=
2
0
and that
0
is small. Expand the cosines near
=
2and do the resulting
(now pretty easy) integral. This is a result that you can compare to a simple
at
2
=
2type of calculation,
where you just let the mass at the end of the pendulum drop a short distance.
3.70Forthosewhowanttotryanumericalintegral,lookatthecomparisonoftheexactintegraland
the linear approximation in Eqs. (3.54) and (3.56) to check the numerical results stated there. To do
this integral numerically you must rst recognize that the integrand is singular at
=
0
.If you make
the substitution
0
=
x
2
,then the integrand in the
x
variable is no longer singular, but you must
evaluate it as
x
!0 in order to nd its valueat zero. Then integrate
dx
from
x
=0 to where
=
=
2.
3.71_TheAtwood’smachinedescribedinsection1.4hasthemasses
m
1
and
m
2
as indicated, but now
the cord has a constant linear mass density
. Neglect the mass of the pulley. The system starts at
time zero with velocity equals zero and the initial coordinate is
y
(0) =
y
0
. The position
y
of mass
m
1
is claimed to be one or another of these results. Check the dimensions of the proposed answers,
then consider various special values of the parameters
m
1
,
m
2
,
,
y
0
and demonstrate that all of these
proposed answers are impossible. Donot solve the problem and try to compare the answer to these
proposed. (That comes next.)
y
(
t
)=
y
0
cosh
!t
with
!
2
=
m
1
m
2
m
1
+
m
2
+
L
y
(
t
)=
y
0
cosh
!t
+
m
1
m
2
2
 cosh
!t
with
!
2
=
2
g
m
1
+
m
2
+
L
3.72 Solvetheequation (2.40) forthemotion of Atwood’s machine. . AssumeItstarts s from restat
initial
y
=
y
0
.Many cases to analyze here: (a)
=0, (b)
m
1
=
m
2
=0, (c) there’s an exponential in
this solution. Can the acceleration ever be larger than
g
? The special case (b) will suce for this one.
3.73 (a) Writethe equation forconservation ofenergy forthepotentialfunction
U
(
x
)=  
kx
2
=
2,
and sketch the graph of
U
.
(b)Separate variables to get
dt
and write the integral that will allow you to nd
t
in terms of
x
.
(c) Evaluate the integral for the special case that
E
=0 and apply the initial condition that
x
(0) =
x
0
to solve for
x
(
t
).
3.74_Twomasses,
m
1
and
m
2
,are sitting on a table with no friction. They are connected by a spring,
and a force
F
0
cos
!t
is applied to
m
1
along the line connecting the masses. (a) Find the steady-state
solution (the inhomogeneous solution) for the motion. (b) Graph the amplitude for the motion of each
mass as a function of the applied
!
.
3.75 For the e simple harmonic oscillator, , the period is s independent of f the e energy. . For r the e quartic
potential,
U
/
x
4
,how does the period depend on the energy? Also compare these to the solutions of
problems2.19 and3.32. Is there a pattern?
application control utility:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
3|Simple Harmonic Motion
119
3.76 Twopendulumsarecoupledwithalightspring. Thetwolengthsofthependulums
are the same, but the masses are dierent. The spring is attached at a common distance
from the support and the lengths of the pendulums are
L
. The masses are
m
1
and
m
2
.
When the masses are hanging vertically the spring is unstretched. Set up the equations of
motion and nd the frequencies and modes of oscillation. If you think that you’re getting
involved in solving a quartic equation, look more closely; it’s not that hard. Verify that
these solutions are orthogonal in the sense of Eq. (3.69). [This is an easy demonstration
to set up and to see that the mass matrix is important in making these modes orthogonal.]
3.77 ThemanipulationsthatledfromEq.(3.75)toEq.(3.77):dothesameforthesimpleharmonic
oscillator.
3.78 Dothenumericalintegral,Eq.(3.77)from0to2. Usethemidpointrulewith
N
=1 and with
N
=2 (or Simpson|look it up). The more accurate answer for this
u
when
z
=2 is 1
:
311029.
3.79 Inthesame waythatyou plotpositionversustimeingure3.16,plotthemotionforproblem
3.32.
3.80 InEq.(3.70)youseetheorthogonalityrelationfornormalmodes. Considerthesametwo-mass,
three-spring example you used in section 3.9, but take all the springs to be equal and take one mass
to be much larger than the other, say
m
2
=100
m
1
or so. You can go through the whole solution of a
quadratic equation, the determinant of Eq. (3.62), but without the symmetry. But don’t. Instead, draw
pictures of what you expect the modes ought to look like and then apply the orthogonality relation.
Your rst guess may not be right, but use the fact that they have to be orthogonal to adjust the factors.
What then are the two frequencies, at least approximately? Justify your reasoning for the shape of the
modes. In other words, solve this problem approximately without solving the equations.
application control utility:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Professional VB.NET PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio and .NET framework 2.0. Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online.
www.rasteredge.com
Three Dimensional Motion
.
Read sections 0.3 0.4 4 0.6 0.11
The world isn’t one dimensional. The added complexities you get when you leave the straight
line lead to some pretty results, some surprising results, some perplexing results, and some just plain
hard results.
Stay with the case of constant mass for now, so that
~
F
=
m~a
for a single particle. Start with
the same sort of special cases that you have in one dimension, for which the force is a function of time
or velocity or position, and then put them together.
When
~
F
is a function of time alone, there’s seems to be not much dierence from the one-
dimensional case except to turn everything into vectors:
d
2
~r=dt
2
=
~
F
(
t
)
=m
. Can that be all there is
to this case? Pretty nearly so. You have three times as much calculation to do, and the pictures of the
results will be harder to draw, but there’s no new concept here|at least in rectangular coordinates!
In polar coordinates, the dierential equation for
r
will involve the angle
(
t
)and the equation for
will involve
r
. Not necessarily simple.
4.1 Projectile Motion
A standard problem that every introductory physics text handles is that of guring out motion in a
uniform gravitational eld,
~
F
=
m~g
. You do a couple of easy integrals and the rest is interpreting
the algebra. Of course you neglect air resistance because you have to start with the easiest problems
rst. What if you don’t neglect it? How do you describe air resistance mathematically? To do so
fully is quite dicult and complicated, because it depends on many factors. Why does a golf ball have
dimples? Because if you use a smooth ball you can’t hit it nearly as far. The reasons for this are
complex, involving the change in air resistance when turbulence is induced and the lift caused by the
interaction of the ball’s spin with the air |the Magnus force that appears in Eq. (4.51).
Air resistance with any object is strongly dependent on velocity. At low enough speeds it is
typically a linear function of
v
,then at somewhat higher speeds it’s more nearly quadratic. At still
higher speeds it can even decrease with increasing speed for some ranges of
v
.
Assume that the resistance is linear in
v
,not because it is a good approximation for ordinary
speeds, but because it is the only assumption that allows you to use straight-forward mathematics.
Every other model is more dicult to handle. Qualitatively though, it’s still pretty good.
In this model the equation to examine is
~
F
=
m~g
b~v
=
m~a;
or
mg^y
b~v
=
m
d
2
~r
dt
2
(4
:
1)
where I pick the
y
-axis to be up. Take the initial conditions to be
~r
(0) = 0
;
and
~v
(0) =
v
x
0
^
x
+
v
y
0
^
y
=
v
0
cos
^
x
+
v
0
sin
^
y
With these conditions the
z
-coordinate stays at zero.
m
d
2
x
dt
2
+
b
dx
dt
=0
;
m
d
2
y
dt
2
+
b
dy
dt
mg
(4
:
2)
These are linear constant coecient dierential equations, one inhomogeneous. You can solve them in
several dierent ways, and I choose to use the method of section0.9.
120
application control utility:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction.
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
4|Three Dimensional Motion
121
Both of Eqs. (4.2) have the same homogeneous part, so do that rst. Assume an exponential.
x
=
Ae
t
=)
mA
2
e
t
+
bAe
t
=0
;
so
=0
or
b=m
The homogeneous solution is then
x
(
t
) =
A
+
Be
bt=m
. The same for
y
, though with dierent
constants.
The inhomogeneous part of the dierential equation is a constant, so try a constant times time
for a solution:
y
=
Ct
=)
m
.
0+
bC
mg;
or
C
mg=b
Put these together and the total solution is
x
(
t
)=
A
+
Be
bt=m
;
y
(
t
)=
A
0
+
B
0
e
bt=m
mgt=b
Apply the initial conditions to evaluate the constants.
x
(0) = 0 =
A
+
B;
y
(0) = 0 =
A
0
+
B
0
;
and
v
x
(0) =
v
0
cos
b
m
B;
v
y
(0) =
v
0
sin
b
m
B
0
mg
b
!
x
(
t
)=
m
b
v
0
cos
e
bt=m
y
(
t
)=
m
b
h
v
0
sin
+
mg
b
i
e
bt=m
mgt
b
(4
:
3)
First check that the dimensions are correct. This has to be a re ex, so I’ll leave it to you. [Quickly:
Look at the exponent in
e
bt=m
and determine the units for
m=b
. Then look at all the other places
that
m=b
appears.] Of course you should also go back to the very rst equation where
b
shows up and
check that the units you found for
m=b
match there.
Back in chapter 2 you looked at what linear viscosity did to the motion of a particle, but that
was without gravity, and the solution appears in the equations (2.13) through (2.16) in section2.2(b).
The results here, Eqs. (4.3), should agree with those previous equations if you simply turn o gravity.
Check it out.
The next step is to check that these new results are plausible. If there is no air resistance after
all, then you know the answer is a simple
1
2
gt
2
sort of result. Does this give the right answer if
b
!0?
Start with the
e
bt=m
term. You’ve got 0
=
0and 1   1, so use power series expansions. Start with
the
e
bt=m
term; the exponential is, from Eq. (0.1)
e
bt=m
=1  
bt
m
+
b
2
t
2
2
m
2
b
3
t
3
6
m
3
+ 
Substitute into
x
(
t
)and you have
x
(
t
)=
m
b
v
0
cos
bt
m
+
b
2
t
2
2
m
2
b
3
t
3
6
m
3
+ 

=
m
b
v
0
cos
bt
m
 
=
v
0
cos
t
+ 
(4
:
4)
All the rest of the terms go to zero as
b
!0, and this is the correct result for zero resistance.
application control utility:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to Jpeg. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File and Page
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
C#.NET PDF text extracting library package, you can easily extract all or partial text content from target PDF document file, edit selected text content, and
www.rasteredge.com
4|Three Dimensional Motion
122
Next examine
y
:
y
(
t
)=
m
b
h
v
0
sin
+
mg
b
i
bt
m
+
b
2
t
2
2
m
2
b
3
t
3
6
m
3
+ 

mgt
b
=
m
b
h
v
0
sin
+
mg
b
i
bt
m
b
2
t
2
2
m
2
+
b
3
t
3
6
m
3
+ 
mgt
b
=
v
0
sin
t
1
2
gt
2
+ 
(4
:
5)
Again, the rest of the terms vanish as
b
!0. These two limiting equations for
x
and
y
are what you
mustndoryouhavetogobackanddiscoveryourmistake.
Go to the opposite extreme now. What happens to this trajectory after a long time? This is
pretty simple: In the equations (4.3), the exponential factor
e
bt=m
will go to zero after a long enough
time, and all that is left after that is
x
(
t
)
m
b
v
0
cos
and
y
(
t
)
m
b
h
v
0
sin
+
mg
b
i
mgt
b
(4
:
6)
It has gone some distance horizontally and is then dropping vertically at constant velocity. The terminal
speed is
mg=b
. It may of course hit the ground before this \long enough" time has been reached. You
can get into this terminal speed zone if you re something from the edge of a cli, which allows enough
time before hitting the ground. You can also get into this domain if you re the projectile into a large
barrel of honey, increasing
b
suciently.
We’re not done yet. Just as with the zero viscosity case you can eliminate
t
between the equations
(4.3) for
x
and
y
to get a non-parametric equation for the trajectory.
y
=
x
tan
+
mg
bv
0
cos
+
m
2
g
b
2
ln
bx
mv
0
cos
(4
:
7)
That helps a lot, doesn’t it?
x
y
Fig. 4.1
There really are some things that you can dig out of this equation.
As
x
starts at zero, this is zero. When
x
increases, the argument of the
logarithm drops from one to zero. The log goes to  1 there, and that point
is
x
=
mv
0
cos
=b
,the same value as computed from Eq. (4.6). What is
the behavior for small
x
?Is it what you expect? Again you do a power series
expansion, remembering the series for a logarithm, ln(1+
x
)=
x
+ . Then
the terms in 1
=
cos
cancel each other and you are left with
y
=
x
tan
,
precisely as needed.
The vertical dashed line in the gure shows a vertical asymptote
x
=
mv
0
cos
=b
, and the
trajectory approaches that vertical motion as time goes to innity (or until it hits the ground). The
curved dashed line is the trajectory the of the same mass with the same initial conditions but without
friction. The shape of the motion with friction is no longer the symmetric parabola that you’ve seen
so often in elementary work, and you cannot make some of the simplifying assumptions that you may
have then taken for granted. Does it take the same time to come down as to go up? No. Is the peak
of the curve halfway between the left and right intercepts with the
x
-axis? No.
Example
To get a qualitative feel for how equations such as Eq. (4.7) behave, examine it forsmall not zero
values of the air resistance. Use a series expansion to see the eect of the air. The rst
b
is in the
denominator, so it looks like the right side is approaching innity as
b
approaches zero, but carry on.
The series for the logarithm from page1 is all that’s needed.
application control utility:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
application control utility:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with good
www.rasteredge.com
4|Three Dimensional Motion
123
y
=
x
tan
+
mg
bv
0
cos
+
m
2
g
b
2
ln
bx
mv
0
cos
=
x
tan
+
mg
bv
0
cos
+
m
2
g
b
2
"
bx
mv
0
cos
1
2
bx
mv
0
cos
2
1
3
bx
mv
0
cos
3
 
#
=
x
tan
gx
2
2
v
2
0
cos2
gbx
3
3
mv
3
0
cos3
gb
2
x
4
4
m
2
v
4
0
cos4
 
(4
:
8)
and the 1
=b
terms have disappeared. Where does it land? Assume the simplest case, that it is red on
alevel surface so that the equation for the ground is
y
=0. You solve that as a simultaneous equation
with (4.8). One root factors instantly,
x
=0, and the rest is
tan
gx
2
v
2
0
cos2
gbx
2
3
mv
3
0
cos3
gb
2
x
3
4
m
2
v
4
0
cos4
  = 0
(4
:
9)
You could look up the cubic formula and nd the solution, but let’s not. You could try examining the
eect of the rst new term, the one in
bx
2
,using the more familiar quadratic formula for that. But no.
If the air resistance is small, then this equation isalmost linear, consisting of the rst two terms. This
calls for the iterative methods described in section 0.11. If you’ve skipped it, then read it now. You
will see it again several times.
Apply the iteration method to Eq. (4.9) to see the eect of the frictional factor
b
.
tan
gx
2
v
2
0
cos2
gbx
2
3
mv
3
0
cos3
=0  !
x
=
2
v
2
0
g
cos
2
tan
2
b
3
mv
0
cos
x
2
(4
:
10)
In the lowest order approximation neglect the nal term, proportional to
b
. This gives the zeroth order
approximation
x
0
=
2
v
2
0
g
cos
sin
=
v
2
0
g
sin2
showing the range in a vacuum. This is the case in which you nd that the maximum range occurs
for a ring angle of 45
,where sin2
=1. The correction to this as caused by air resistance is what
comes next. Iterate the quadratic equation to get an improved root,
x
1
,by putting
x
0
into the right
hand side of Eq. (4.10).
x
1
=
2
v
2
0
g
cos
sin
2
b
3
mv
0
cos
2
v
2
0
g
cos
sin
2
=
v
2
0
g
sin 2
8
bv
3
0
3
mg
2
cos
sin
2
=
v
2
0
g
sin 2
4
bv
3
0
3
mg
2
sin2
sin
(4
:
11)
You see that the range has decreased from the simple vacuum result. (Surprise!) Look at the coecient
of the second term. It is
bv
0
=mg
times the rst term (times
4
3
sin
). This is just the ratio of the force
by the air to the force by gravity, and that is just what you expect. Or is it? Did you anticipate that it
would come out this way? Maybe next time. Does the maximum range still occur for a ring angle of
45
?No.
4|Three Dimensional Motion
124
Why does the added factor in the second term have a sin
in it? Is it plausible? You see that
when
is very small, this correction is very small and when
is up near 90
the correction is bigger.
That makes sense because at small angles, it is not in the air for a long time; it stays in the air far
longer when red at larger angles. The correction should then be bigger for larger
than for smaller,
and it is. Compare the size of the correction for
=1
and
=89
.
Can you get a still better result by repeating this iteration, getting
x
2
by putting
x
1
into the
right hand side of Eq. (4.10)? No! That would be wrong. Can you gure out why? And what would
you have to do to nd the higher order correction correctly? Don’t worry; we won’t.
Without deriving the result, I will state that the maximum range, found by setting
dx
1
=d
=0
from Eq. (4.11), occurs for an angle slightly less than 45
:
max range
4
2
bv
0
mg
p
2
So you see what you get into when you start to add the slightest bit of reality to these previously
elementary problems.
4.2 General Results
If you read Newton’s Principia you will not nd the equation
~
F
=
m~a
. You will not even nd
the equation
~
F
=
d~p=dt
. His presentation of physics was nothing like the modern way to develop
the subject, and it is close to unreadable today.* The treatment we are accustomed to was mostly
developed by Leonard Euler, and if you look up Euler’s collected works you will nd the language and
the notation remarkable modern. That is because we mostly use Euler’s notation.
Starting from the basic equation describing the motion of a particle, there are some general
results to derive. Start with one dimension.
F
x
=
m
dv
x
dt
!
F
x
v
x
=
mv
x
dv
x
dt
!
F
x
v
x
=
m
2
dv
2
x
dt
Reading from right to left, this says that the power, the rate of change of energy is
dW
dt
=
d
dt
1
2
mv
2
x
=
F
x
v
x
Still another way to manipulate it is to integrate with respect to
t
.
Z
t
f
t
i
F
x
v
x
dt
=
Z
t
f
t
i
m
2
dv
2
x
dt
dt
=
Z
t
=
t
f
t
=
t
i
m
2
d
(
v
2
x
)=
1
2
mv
2
f
1
2
mv
2
i
(4
:
12)
This is the simplest form of the work-energy theorem,
W
total
=
Z
t
f
t
i
F
x
v
x
dt
=
Z
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx
=
K
=
K
f
K
i
(4
:
13)
Does this look familiar? If so, that may be because you’ve studied sections1.3 and2.3, but I thought
it worth repeating.
In one dimension,
F
x
v
x
dt
=
F
x
dx
,and if the force
F
x
is a function of the coordinate
x
alone,
then the integral depends on the initial and nal values of
x
and not on how fast or how slowly you went
* though there is an amazing book by S. Chandrasekhar that attempts to make it accessible:
\Newton’s Principia for the common reader".
4|Three Dimensional Motion
125
from the start to the nish.
F
x
(
x
) has an anti-derivative, and the fundamental theorem of calculus
says that you evaluate this anti-derivative at the endpoints and subtract. Call this anti-derivative  
U
.
F
x
(
x
)=  
dU
dx
;
then
Z
x
f
x
i
F
x
(
x
)
dx
U
(
x
)
x
f
x
i
U
(
x
f
)+
U
(
x
i
)
(4
:
14)
Put this into the preceding equation and rearrange it.
U
(
x
f
)+
U
(
x
i
)=
1
2
mv
2
f
1
2
mv
2
i
!
1
2
mv
2
i
+
U
(
x
i
)=
1
2
mv
2
f
+
U
(
x
f
)
(4
:
15)
This is in the form of a conservation law. Something evaluated at one time equals the same thing
evaluated at a later time: Conservation of mechanical energy. This is the reason for choosing the minus
sign on
U
.It produces a nicer result.
Staying with one dimension for a moment, what can go wrong? A simple form of force that
you’ve seen in an introductory course is friction. Common dry friction is velocity dependent, violating
the assumptions leading to this conservation law. When an object slides along a surface, dry friction is
represented by
F
fr
=
k
F
N
,where
F
N
is the perpendicular (normal) component of the object’s force
on the surface and
k
is the coecient of kinetic (sliding) friction. Assuming that this coecient is
independent of the speed of sliding, the component of force,
F
x
,depends on thedirection of the motion.
It may not depend on the magnitude of the velocity, but it depends on ^
v
. At one value of
x
,if the
object slides to the right then the force is to the left; if it slides left, the force is to the right. There is
no
F
x
(
x
)and so no
U
(
x
). A more complete form for the equation of dry friction appears in Eq. (1.8).
Example
x
Fig. 4.2
For a simple example of this, look at a mass sliding up and back down
aslope. It starts uphill with speed
v
0
. How fast is it moving when it
comes back to its starting position (assuming that it does)? For this
example you have to take two cases, corresponding to the direction of
motion and so to the direction of friction.
(up)
F
x
mg
sin
k
mg
cos
;
then
W
=
Z
x
top
0
dxF
x
=
mg
sin
k
mg
cos
x
top
=
K
=0  
1
2
mv
2
0
That was on the way up. Coming down it is
(down)
F
x
mg
sin
+
k
mg
cos
;
and
W
=
Z
0
x
top
dxF
x
mg
sin
+
k
mg
cos
x
top
=
K
=
1
2
mv
2
f
0
Divide these equations to eliminate
x
top
,leaving a relation between
v
f
and
v
0
. Then simplify the result.
v
2
f
=
v
2
0
sin
k
cos
sin
+
k
cos
(4
:
16)
If the friction is too large or the angle too small, of course it doesn’t return. Then too there is the
pesky fact that static friction is not the same as kinetic. This will aect whether it sticks at the top or
not. In any case, you do not have conservation of mechanical energy. There is no
U
.
4|Three Dimensional Motion
126
Even in this example with friction there is a part of the force (gravity) for which potential energy
exists. In the work-energy theorem it is useful to divide the force into two types: Conservative (there is
apotential energy) and Nonconservative (there isn’t).
F
x
=
F
x;
cons
+
F
x;
other
;
then
F
x;
cons
(
x
)=  
dU
dx
and
W
total
=
Z
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx
U
(
x
)
x
f
x
i
+
Z
x
f
x
i
F
x;
other
dx
Put this into (4.12) and rearrange.
Z
x
f
x
i
F
x;
other
(
x
)
dx
=
1
2
mv
2
f
+
U
(
x
f
)
1
2
mv
2
i
+
U
(
x
i
)
W
other
=
E
(4
:
17)
and this
E
is the total mechanical energy,
K
+
U
. This form of the work-energy theorem is equivalent
to the others, but it includes the other forms as special cases. If there is no \other" force then you
have conservation of mechanical energy. If you decide not to use the potential energy then you simply
make \other" the whole thing.
Potential Energy, 3-d
Eqs. (4.12) and (4.17) applies to one dimension, and in two or three dimensions there are more com-
plexities. Even if the force is a function of position alone, the resulting work integral may not be a
function of position alone (i.e. not a function of its endpoints alone). Eq. (4.12) relates the change in
kinetic energy to an integral of the force, and that integral will usually depend on the path that you
took to go from the initial position to the nal position. It is a function, not of the endpoints of the
path, but of the whole path. Did you go on a straight line? Did you move along the arc of a circle? In
Eq. (4.14), if there is a potential energy function of position the initial value of the energy has some
determined value, so the nal value does too. The work integral cannot then depend on the way you
went from the initial to the nal position. In three dimensions the same condition must hold.
There are conditions on the force needed in order that the potential energy exist. When the force
is a function of the rectangular coordinates,
~
F
(
x;y; z
), the necessary conditions are
@F
x
@y
@F
y
@x
=0
(4
:
18)
You also need the same equations, but with (
y; z
)and with (
z; x
)instead of (
x;y
), giving a total of
three equations. The partial derivative notation (
@
instead of
d
)means that the other two coordinates
are treated as constants during the dierentiation. To see why this equation is needed, look at the case
where the potential energy integral goes around a loop, so that the nal point is the same as the initial
point. See problem4.30 for a quick derivation.
In three dimensions the dierential relation between force and energy simply extends that of
Eq. (4.14) to more components.
F
x
(
x; y; z
)=  
@U
@x
;
F
y
(
x;y;z
)=  
@U
@y
;
F
z
(
x; y; z
)=  
@U
@z
(4
:
19)
And you see from these that Eq. (4.18) is the statement that you can do partial derivatives in either
order:
@
2
U
@x@y
=
@
2
U
@y@x
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested