4|Three Dimensional Motion
147
is not included. You can handle that if you remember that  
mg
isnot the only force that acts on the
projectile. You had to apply a force to give it the initial velocity; that is an impulse, a large force acting
for a very short time, and it is
F
y
(0)
dt
=
mv
0
sin
.If you include this in the integral, so that the very
rst time interval contributes a large chunk to the whole integral, you add this to the result from part
(a) to get the full solution for
y
(
t
)in agreement with Eq. (4.3).
4.13_Startfrom
~r
(
t
)=^
xr
(
t
)cos
(
t
)
+^
yr
(
t
)sin
(
t
)
and dierentiate it once and twice. Rear-
range the components and group the terms in order to derive the expression for acceleration found in
Eq. (0.41), expressed in polar coordinates. Here you are getting the same result by a dierent method,
and you will need this a lot in chapter six.
4.14 Drawpicturesoftheequipotentialsandof
~
F
for the example in Eq. (4.24).
4.15 Amass
m
is attached to a very light string, and the other end of the string is attached to the
ceiling. Set the mass moving so that it goes in a circle parallel to the  oor, a conical pendulum. Find
the relations among the length
of the string, the angle
that the string makes with the vertical, the
radius of the circle, the speed of the mass, and any other parameters that may enter the problem. How
does the speed vary with the angle from the vertical? Same for the rotational frequency. In the end,
express your answer in terms of constants and the angle
. And of course your answer makes sense
doesn’t it?
4.16 _In the precedingproblem ofaconical pendulum, add some realitytoit byassumingnowthat
there is a small air resistance aecting the motion of the mass. Take this force to be  
b~v
. As energy
it lost, the angle
will gradually drop, and it is claimed that the rate at which this angle changes is
d
dt
= 2
b
m
sin
cos
1+ 3 cos2
Is this plausible?
4.17Derivetheresultclaimedintheprecedingproblem.Whatisthekineticenergyandthepotential
energy of the mass? Express the total mechanical energy in term of the angle
the string makes with
the vertical, eliminating any other parameters that depend on time. Assume that the air resistance is
b~v
,and determine the rate of loss of energy due to this resistance,
dE=dt
. (a) What then is
d=dt
?
Recall:
d=dt
=(
dE=dt
)
(
dE=d
). Ans: see the preceding problem. (b) Since you’ve done all this
work, what is the result if the air resistance is  
bv
2
,which is a more realistic value anyway. You need
not do any more than about two additional lines of algebra because you have already done the hard
part. There are some signicant dierences in the way these two solutions behave. What are they?
Ans: (b)
d=dt
2
b‘
1
=
2
g
1
=
2
=m

sin
2
cos
1
=
2
=
1+ 3 cos
2

4.18 Eq.(4.28)canbesolvedseveraldierentways,asmentionedintheparagraphrightafterit.Do
it using method (2), assuming a solution _
x
=
A
1
e
t
and _
y
=
A
2
e
t
just as in Eq. (3.60). Follow that
method through to get a non-zero solution for
A
1
and
A
2
and then on to the complete solution.
4.19 Asstatedinthesecondparagraphofsection4.3,youcansolveforthemotionofachargeina
uniform magnetic eld by elementary means, using such equations as
a
=
v
2
=r
. Do so. Is the result
compatible with the expression
!
=
qB
0
=m
as found in the text?
4.20 ShowthatthesolutionsinEqs.(4.36)and(4.31)agree.
4.21 Formotioninuniformelectricandmagneticelds,startachargeattheoriginwithzerovelocity
and take
~
E
=
E
0
^
x
,with
~
B
=
B
0
^
x
. Find the motion of the charge.
Convert pdf to text document - software control project:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text document - software control project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
4|Three Dimensional Motion
148
4.22 There is alot of algebra between equations (4.56) and (4.63). (a) Fill in the missing steps.
(b) Then evaluate the integrals for the rst two terms in the series Eqs. (4.62) and (4.63), through
sin
2
.
4.23_ThereisonecaseforwhichtheintegralinEq.(4.57)ispossibleintermsofelementaryfunctions:
E
=2
mg‘
. Start the pendulum at the bottom with exactly this kinetic energy and you want the angle
as a function of time. The answer is proposed to be
(
t
)= 2 tan
1
sinh
!t
where
!
=
q
g=‘
(a) First show that this is the same as
2cos
1
sech
!t
and
2sin
1
tanh
!t
You never know which form of the result will be easier to interpret. (b) Also show that this result is,
for large values of time, approximately
4
e
!t
. If you can’t nd the trigonometric identities to
tell you this, then at least check it numerically for a couple of values of
!t
. (c) Are these equations for
plausible? Is the energy even correct? Include a graph of
(
t
).
4.24Derivetheresultclaimedintheprecedingproblem.Thisisatoughintegral,soinsteadofbeating
your head against it (or looking up the subject of Gudermannians), verify that this function as written
in any one of these three forms, satises the conservation of energy equation (4.56).
4.25 Aparticle ofmass
m
can slide freely along a wire. The wire is straight and horizontal, and is
made to rotate in a horizontal plane about an axis perpendicular to one end at a xed angular speed
!
0
. At time
t
=0 the mass is at radius
r
0
and has zero radial velocity. Find the future motion of
m
.
Assume zero friction. What is the force that the wire exerts on
m
? Have you done problem4.13 yet?
Sketch the motion. Ans:
r
=
r
0
cosh
!
0
t
,
F
=2
m!
2
0
r
0
sinh
!
0
t
4.26 A particle ofmass
m
is displaced slightly from its equilibrium position at the top of a smooth
xed sphere of radius
R
,and it slides because of gravity. Through what angle does the particle move
before it leaves the sphere?
4.27 InEq.(2.27)youdeterminetheescapespeedfromtheEarth. Thatassumedthattheplanetis
not rotating. At the equator you have the speed of the ground added to the total velocity vector. Take
that into account and determine the minimum speed that you have to give the rocket relative to the
ground so that it escapes. Put in the numbers and compare the two speeds.
4.28 Agravitationalforceis
~
F
GMm^r=r
2
. Show that
F
x
GMmx=r
3
and that this force
satises Eq. (4.18).
4.29 InEq.(4.59)andthoseprecedingit,whathappensif
E>
2
mg‘
?And draw some graphs.
4.30 Iftheworkintegralinthreedimensionsisindependentofpath,theninparticular,the
work going around a closed loop is zero. (One possible path from a point to itself just sits
still, going nowhere.) Apply this to a very tiny rectangular loop in the
x
-
y
plane, from
y
to
y
+
y
and from
x
to
x
+
x
. Since this rectangle is so small, you can approximate the
value of the integral along each side by assuming that
~
F
has the constant value it attains
at the midpoint of each side. For example, on the right-hand side
~
F
=
~
F
(
x
+
x; y
+
1
2
y
). For that
side,
d
~
!^
y
y
. The integral in this approximation is just the sum of four dot products. Divide by
the area of the rectangle and take the limit as 
x
and 
y
!0. Show that the result is Eq. (4.18).
software control project:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
easy for C# developers to convert and transform style that are included in target PDF document file original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical
www.rasteredge.com
4|Three Dimensional Motion
149
4.31 Using crossed electric and magnetic elds s as s in n Eq. . (4.38), nd the initial conditions on the
velocity so that the charge is unaccelerated, and determine if these conditions are possible.
4.32 ToobtainEq.(4.40)thechargestartedatrest. Whatistheshapeofthepathofthechargeif
the initial velocity is in the  ^
x
direction? In the +^
x
direction?
4.33 _A charged particle has an n initial velocity y perpendicular to auniform magnetic c eld (no
~
E
).
Now there is friction with the air, assumed to be a force  
b~v
. Find (and of course sketch) the
charge’s subsequent motion. Note: This assumption  
b~v
is not a good one for this process. A
constant magnitude force (like dry friction) is better, but the mathematics is much harder in that case.
Suggestion: You’ve seen in chapter three what a damped oscillator looks like. This is more of the same,
so a substitution
~v
(
t
)=
~v
1
(
t
)
e
t
will help. You will have to choose
. Using the complex combination
_= x+iy _ is useful too.. . Ans: x(t) = Rcos(!t+)e
bt=m
; y
(
t
) =  
R
sin(
!t
+
)
e
bt=m
(depending on choice of origin)
4.34 Inthemagneticmirrorofsection4.4,andformotionalongthecentralaxis,whereisthestopping
point? Did you do the exercise #8 to express this in terms of the cyclotron frequency?
4.35 Forthe samemagnetic mirror,whatisthe frequency ofoscillation determined by Eq.(4.46)?
Also get the numerical value for an electron in a eld the size of Earth’s: 0
:
5Gauss = 0
:
5 10
4
T,
with
half the Earth’s radius. Pick radii for the electron’s circular motion of 1 mm and 1 m. Look up
the data for the Sun and for Jupiter to do the similar computations.
4.36 Onpage 135youndtheequationto describeallthemagneticeld linesforthemirror
stated to be
p
x
2+
y
=
r
?
=
=
p
2+
z
2. Toderivethis,useGauss’slawformagnetism,
H
~
B
.
d
~
A
=0, applying it to the closed surface that consists of two disks, centered on the
z
-axis
and parallel to the
x
-
y
plane at
z
=
z
1
and
z
=
z
2
. The rest of the closed surface follows the
~
B
-eld lines to connect the edges of the two disks. (That means that given
z
1
and
z
2
,the radius
of one disk determines the radius of the other, and no  ux escapes the side.)
4.37 In thesame spiritas theoperatorsolution insection 4.3, startingatEq.(4.33), interpretthe
following operator acting on functions of the real variable
x
.
e
h
d
dx
f
(
x
)
(
h
is a constant)
4.38_Goingbacktosection4.1again,thereis anequation,(4.11),thatgivesanapproximateresult
for the ring range with air resistance. At what angle is the range maximum? It is no longer 45
.
Dierentiate with respect to
and remember that the second term is small andalso that cos2
is small
near the root. This will let you use an iterative method again to get a simple solution.
=
4
+
.
Ans:
=
bv
0
=
3
mg
p
2
4.39 AnAtwoodmachinehastwomasseshungoverapulley,andidealizedversionsusemasslessstrings
and pulleys. In this otherwise ideal Atwood machine, submerge one of the masses in water so that it
feels a force  
b~v
. Now solve for the motion assuming that you start the system from rest. Neglect
buoyancy eects.
4.40_There’smoretosayaboutthecoupled oscillatorsof section 3.9. Apply y an oscillatingforceto
one of the masses:
F
0
cos
t
. Write the equations of motion as done there, and now examine the
inhomogeneous (steady-state)solutiontotheequations. Doitinthesymmetriccase
m
1
=
m
2
and
software control project:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width). Free library for .NET framework. Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code?
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
SharePoint. Extract text from adobe PDF document in VB.NET Programming. Extract file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image
www.rasteredge.com
4|Three Dimensional Motion
150
k
1
=
k
3
. It is just like the forced simple harmonic oscillator except that the two functions
x
1
(
t
)and
x
2
(
t
)will have dierent amplitudes. Compare it to problem3.13. The proposed solution is
x
1
(
t
)=
F
0
m
1
2
(
!
2
1
+
!
2
2
)  
2
(
!
2
1
2)(
!
2
2
2)
cos
t
x
2
(
t
)=
F
0
m
1
2
(
!
2
1
!
2
2
)
(
!
2
1
2)(
!
2
2
2)
cos
t
!
2
1
=
k
+2
k
2
m
!
2
2
=
k
m
Examine this to see if it is plausible. Mostimportant: draw graphs of the amplitudes of each mass’s
oscillation. One graph for each mass, showing the amplitude of its oscillation versus the applied
frequency   (or versus 
2
will be easier). I suggest you start by examining the neighborhood of the
singularities. Why do the graphs behave this way?
4.41_Solvethedierentialequationsofmotionthatyouwroteintheprecedingproblem. Followthe
same procedure as in problem3.13, except that you have simultaneous equations now, and derive the
solution stated in the preceding problem.
4.42_Whatifairresistanceismodeledthesamewayascommondryfriction? Thatis
~
F
air resistance
=
b
^
v
b~v=v
. Use the iteration method of section4.5 with the same initial conditions used in the rst
example there. That is, look at the trajectory that starts with Eq. (4.47) and use this form of friction
to nd the velocity as a function of time.
4.43Problem4.33hasachargedparticlemovinginamagneticeld,butwithairresistance. Dothis
again, but use the model for friction as in the preceding problem,
~
F
airresistance
b
^
v
b~v=v
. This
is a much more realistic model for the behavior of ions in a medium than is problem4.33. Here, the
energy loss per distance travelled in constant. Again, an iterative solution is appropriate.
4.44 Inchapterthree,Eq.(3.26),thereisanapproximateexpressionforthefrequencyofapendulum.
Derive it from Eq. (4.63).
4.45 Inproblem3.39onespringwasreplacedbyadamper. Whatifallthreespringsarereplacedby
dampers? Again, make the problem symmetric so that the two on the end are the same.
4.46 _The Earth’s gravity dropsowith height.
g
(
y
) =  
g
0
R
2
=r
2
where
R
is the Earth’s radius;
r
=
R
+
y
is the distance from its center;
g
0
is the gravitational eld at the surface. Expand this to
the rst order in
y
,getting the variation of
g
with altitude near the surface. Fire a projectile from the
surface at initial speed
v
0
and angle from the horizontal
. Set up and solve
~
F
=
m~a
for this case,
neglecting air resistance this time. Still assuming a  at Earth, nd where it hits the ground and then
the dierence between this answer and the traditional one that assumes
g
has the constant value it
had at the surface. How large is this change if
=45
and
v
0
is large enough to get an uncorrected
distance of 30 km? How does the answer scale with the uncorrected distance so that without further
eort you can answer the same question changing 30 to 3 or to 60. Depending on how you solved this
problem you may need to do a series expansion to get a simple result. Ans: about 100m.
4.47_TheelectromagneticforcethatonechargedparticleexertsonanotherstartswiththeCoulomb
law. The next approximation is that a moving charge creates a magnetic eld that will aect the other
charge if it too is moving. The total of these is
~
F
on2by 1
=
q
1
q
2
4

0
r
2
h
^r+
1
c2
~v
2
~v
1
^
r
i
software control project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic .NET project. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
need to get text content from PDF file, this C# PDF to text conversion code If you want to transform and convert PDF document to Jpeg image file format, this
www.rasteredge.com
4|Three Dimensional Motion
151
where^
r
is the unit vector pointing from charge
q
1
toward charge
q
2
.What is the total force on the two
interacting particles,
~
F
on1by 2
+
~
F
on2by1
? To simplify the result you will have to hunt up theJacobi
Identity involving cross products. . Be e sure tocheck some special cases toverify yourresult. . What
happened to Newton’s third law? And if you can’t answer this last question then ask someone about
the momentum carried by radiation. Ans:
q
1
q
2
=
4

0
c
2
r
2
^
r
~v
1
~v
2
4.48_DerivetheresultstatedintheGravitronproblem 1.14. Recallthatthefrictionalcomponentof
the force is related to the normal component by  
s
F
N
<F
fr
<
+
s
F
N
If you follow the rules stated
in section1.4, not skipping any steps, then this is a straight-forward problem. The only twist is that
because of the nature of dry friction you have to write down two inequalities instead of one equation.
Pick your basis with some thought to it. Don’t forget that when you multiply or divide an inequality by
anegative number you have to reverse the direction of the inequality, so you have to watch for various
cases.
4.49 InthediscussionaftertheapproximatesolutionfoundinEq.(4.50),itsaysthatiftheprojectile
is moving rather fast, the solution still looks like a parabola, but a tilted one. Analyze this statement
to see of it makes sense. Draw enough pictures to explain what is happening.
4.50Thisisinthespiritofproblem2.33. Placeagunattheoriginandreabulletwithspeed
v
0
at an angle
with respect to the horizontal ground. Where does it land? (Ignore air resistance.) give
that distance the coordinate
x
as measured from the origin. Now re many bullets at random angles
uniformly spread from 0 to
=
2, all with the same speed and all in the same plane. (a) What is the
probability density for a bullet’s landing near the point
x
.Stated another way, the fraction of the bullets
that are red between angles
and
+
is 
=
(
=
2). These land between
x
and
x
+
x
. What is
the fraction per 
x
?In the limit as 
x
!0 you have
dP=dx
as the probability density for the bullets
to land. Graph
dP=dx
versus
x
.The integral
R
dP
should be one. Is it? Cautions: A particular value
of
x
can come from two dierent
’s. You have to add these fractions. Also:Sometimes a positive
d
corresponds to a positive
dx
;sometimes not. (b) The mean value of
x
is h
x
i=
R
xdP
. What is it?
Also show its position on your graph of
dP=dx
.(c) Where is the median
x
|half above, half below.
Ans: 2
 
p
x
2
max
x
2
(0
<x < x
max
), h
x
i= 0
:
637
x
max
,
x
med
=0
:
707
x
max
software control project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET
www.rasteredge.com
software control project:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
Non-Inertial Systems
.
Read sections 0.1 0.4 4 0.11
The rst of Newton’s laws, chapter one, is the denition of an inertial system. The second law
says thatif you’re in an inertial systemthen
~
F
=
m~a
(or
d~p=dt
). The Earth is not an inertial system;
it is rotating. That means that you can’t use this equation on the Earth. Well no, not really. The Earth
isn’t rotating all that fast, so it’s probably o.k. to ignore the error. Is it? How big is the error and are
there any circumstances where it matters? Look at page34 again.
If you are looking at something small, the size of a house or a bathtub or even a golf course, the
eect is too small to detect without delicate instruments and careful controls. If you want to understand
the Gulf Stream or weather systems or how to re long-range artillery, then the eect is very important.
If you want to use the basic equation, Newton’s second law, you must be in an inertial system.
That means that to describe something on the Earth you should use a sun-centered coordinate system.
Trying to understand the weather is complicated enough without adding that sort of obstacle, so the
better way to do it is to work out the mathematics to nd out what changes you have to make to
~
F
=
m~a
in order to apply it to a non-inertial system.
5.1 Galilean Transformation
Before jumping to the rotating case, work out the simpler example of transforming to a coordinate system
that is accelerating in a straight line, a car perhaps. And before that I’ll look at the transformation to
acoordinate system moving at constant velocity, the Galilean transformation. My coordinate system
is (
x; y; z; t
)and your (moving) coordinate system is (
x
0
;y
0
;z
0
;t
0
). You are in motion along the my
x
-axis at a velocity
v
0
,so the change of coordinates is
x
0
=
x
v
0
t;
y
0
=
y;
z
0
=
z;
t
0
=
t
(5
:
1)
y
y
0
O
O
0
x
x
0
x
0
=
x
v
0
t
Fig. 5.1
To check that the signs are right, your moving coordinate’s
origin is at
x
0
=0 and that’s
x
v
0
t
=0. This is exactly what it’s
supposed to be because it is what I will write down inmy coordinate
system for your position. Now what are the velocity and acceleration
in your system?
dx
0
dt
0
=
d
(
x
v
0
t
)
dt
=
dx
dt
v
0
d
2
x
0
dt
2
=
d
dt
dx
dt
v
0
=
d
2
x
dt
2
(5
:
2)
Time is the same for each system, so it doesn’t matter whether you use
t
or
t
0
.(That will change when
you get into special relativity, section9.6.) Here the acceleration is the same for both, so
~
F
=
m~a
is
the same for both. Or is it? Suppose that the force is velocity dependent; frictional forces commonly
depend on velocity. Does that mean that the force will be dierent in the two systems? No. All
frictional forces depend on therelative velocity of two things. A book sliding on a table, an airplane
going through the air, a swimmer in water. When you transform the velocity of one object you have
to do it for all, and that means that the dierence of two velocities will not change and that the forces
remain unaected.
152
5|Non-Inertial Systems
153
Accelerated System
Now suppose that your moving coordinate system is accelerated at a constant rate.
x
0
=
x
v
0
t
1
2
a
0
t
2
;
y
0
=
y;
z
0
=
z;
t
0
=
t
(5
:
3)
The position
x
0
=0 again denes the position of the moving observer. Repeat the previous calculation:
dx
0
dt
0
=
d
(
x
v
0
t
a
0
t
2
=
2)
dt
=
dx
dt
v
0
a
0
t
d
2
x
0
dt
2
=
d
dt
dx
dt
v
0
a
0
t
=
d
2
x
dt
2
a
0
(5
:
4)
In the primed coordinate system Newton’s second law now becomes
F
x
=
m
d
2
x
dt
2
=
m
d
2
x
0
dt
2
+
a
0
Rearrange this and make is look like the old
F
=
ma
.
F
x
ma
0
=
m
d
2
x
0
dt
2
The
y
and
z
part are unchanged
(5
:
5)
If you are in the accelerated system this looks like the normal
~
F
=
m~a
, but with an extra term
that looks and behaves just like an extra force. It is not one of the basic forces of nature (gravity,
electromagnetism,etc.) but mathematically you can handle it as if it is. It is variously called an \inertial
force" or a \ctitious force" and it appears simply because of the transformation to a non-inertial system
of coordinates.
Could you do something even more complicated? Sure. Let the position of the moving observer
be
f
(
t
)where
f
is anything you want. Mimic the derivation that starts with Eq. (5.3) and everything
works.
x
0
=
x
f
(
t
 !
dx
0
dt
=
dx
dt
_
f
(
t
 !
d
2
x
0
dt
2
=
d
2
x
dt
2
f
(
t
 !
F
x
m
f
=
m
d
2
x
0
dt
2
Example
y
y
0
Fig. 5.2
If you are in an elevator that is accelerating upward, take the
y
-axis up and let the
y
0
coordinate be xed inside the elevator. In the elevator’s coordinate system the forces on
you are (1) gravity, (2)  oor, and (3) inertial force. Here you are analyzing the motion
in your own (self-centered) coordinate system, so you must include the extra inertial
force. Your coordinate
y
0
is constant,
d
2
y
0
=dt
2
=0, and the equation of motion (5.5)
in this system is
m
d
2
y
0
dt
2
=0 =
F
oor
mg
ma
0
;
implying
F
oor
=
m
(
g
+
a
0
)
The rst two terms, from the  oor and from gravity, are the two \real" forces, but the
non-inertial system adds the extra term. The force that you feel from the  oor makes it feel that your
weight has increased, because from your perspective you’re standing still and not accelerating.
5|Non-Inertial Systems
154
What would this system look like from the inertial frame? The nal answer must be the same,
but now there are just the two real forces.
m
d
2
y
dt
2
=
ma
0
=
F
oor
mg;
implying
F
oor
=
m
(
g
+
a
0
)
You never feel a gravitational force! You don’t feel your weight because every atom in your body
is pulled in the same way. What you perceive as weight is the force by the  oor on your feet, and
that’s really molecule-to-molecule contact |electromagnetic forces in disguise. If you jump o a diving
board, that force from the  oor is removed and you temporarily feel weightless. That doesn’t mean
that gravity has stopped, just that the force that you are able to feel (the contact force) has stopped.
If you don’t believe this, the next time you jump o a high-diving board carry a bathroom scale and
weigh yourself on the way down. For an example to (sort of) contradict this claim, see Exercise 7 on
page176.
Example
When you are a passenger in a car that is turning the corner to the left, accelerating left, you are
sitting still (with respect to yourself). It’s the rest of the universe that is accelerating. From your
self-centered viewpoint your acceleration is zero and there are two horizontal forces on you: the seat
is pushing you left and some other force is pushing you right. That’s  
ma
0
. The force from the seat
and the inertial force combined to keep you in equilibrium. From the vantage of an inertial pedestrian
there’s only one horizontal force pushing on you and that’s the seat pushing left. You respond to that
push by accelerating left |moving the
ma
0
term from one side of the equation to the other.
This idea of an accelerated coordinate system will be essential in understanding the daily tides in
the ocean. See section5.6.
5.2 Rotating System
To work out the transformation to a rotating system, it’s the same idea as in the preceding work, but
with vectors. The key calculation is pretty much the same as for straight-line motion: what is the time
derivative of a vector that is itself expressed in the transformed system? The result has two terms, one
from the change of the vector within the transformed system and the other from the change of the
transformed system itself. For an arbitrary time-dependent vector
~
Q
,the result will be
d
~
Q
dt
=
d
~
Q
dt
0
+
~!
~
Q
(5
:
6)
To derive this, look at it in terms of components and it is nothing more than the product rule. The
vector
~
Q
is the vector
~
Q
in either coordinate system.
~
Q
=
Q
x
^x+Q
y
^y+Q
z
^z=Q
0
x
^x
0
+
Q
0
y
^y
0
+
Q
0
z
^z
0
The rst set of components,
Q
x
,
:: :
,is expressed with respect to a stationary set of basis vectors, so
to dierentiate
~
Q
all you need to do is to dierentiate its components. The second (primed) set is in
terms of the rotating basis vectors. For the time-derivative of
~
Q
inthis basis, use the product rule for
dierentiation.
d
~
Q
dt
=
dQ
0
x
dt
^
x
0
+
Q
0
x
d
^
x
0
dt
+ 
(5
:
7)
The rst term, such as (
dQ
0
x
=dt
)^
x
0
,of each pair is nothing more than the time derivative that the
rotating observer sees. That person says that^
x
0
is xed, but that the component
Q
0
x
may be changing.
5|Non-Inertial Systems
155
To complete the equation, all that’s left is to do the derivatives of the rotating unit vectors with respect
to the xed (inertial) system. That is, to compute
d
^
x
0
=dt
. The rst observation to make about such a
derivative is that rotations leave magnitudes unchanged. For any vector, unit vector or not, if the time
derivative of
u
2
is zero, then
u
u
sin
~!
d
=
!dt
Fig. 5.3
d
dt
~u
.
~u
=0 = 2
~u
.
d~u
dt
That means that if the vector
~u
has constant length then the time
derivative of
~u
is perpendicular to
~u
itself. To get the details of this
derivative, draw a picture of a vector rotating about an axis with
angular speed
!
.
In time
dt
the tip of the vector
~u
rotates by an angle
d
=
!dt
about the
~!
-axis, and along a circle of radius
u
sin
. The length of
the arc along this circle is then
rd
=
u
sin
!dt
,and the length of
the derivative is
j
d~u
j
dt
=
u
sin
!dt
dt
=
u
sin
!
The direction of
d~u=dt
is perpendicular to
~u
and from the picture it is also perpendicular to the vector
~!
. Put those two facts together with this magnitude,
u!
sin
,and that is the denition of the cross
product, where
~!
is the angular velocity vector.
d~u
dt
=
~!
~u
(5
:
8)
Now go back to Eq. (5.7) and apply this result to the derivatives of the rotating unit vectors.
d
~
Q
dt
=
dQ
0
x
dt
^
x
0
+
Q
0
x
d
^
x
0
dt
+ 
=
dQ
0
x
dt
^x
0
+
Q
0
x
~!
^
x
0
+
dQ
0
y
dt
^y
0
+
Q
0
y
~!
^
y
0
+
dQ
0
z
dt
^z
0
+
Q
0
z
~!
^
z
0
=
dQ
0
x
dt
^x
0
+
dQ
0
y
dt
^y
0
+
dQ
0
z
dt
^z
0
+
~!
~
Q
(5
:
9)
The rst three terms form the time-derivative of
~
Q
as seen in the rotating system. That’s the meaning
of the rst term in Eq. (5.6).
Now back to the question of transforming
~
F
=
m~a
into a rotating coordinate system. In the
preceding equation
~
Q
can be anything. I’ll rst compute it for the vector
~r
and then for the velocity
vector.
~v
=
d~r
dt
=
d~r
dt
0
+
~!
~r
In order not to get too bogged down in notation, call the rst term on the right
_
~r
,andestablish,for
this chapter* only, the conventionthat
d=dt
means the time derivative in the inertial system and
the dot means the time derivative in the rotating system.
~v
=
d~r
dt
=
_
~r
+
~!
~r
(5
:
10)
andsection8.6
5|Non-Inertial Systems
156
If
!
=0 this equation says that there’s no dierence between the inertial system and the non-rotating
system. Duh. If
_
~r
=0 then an object’s velocity comes solely from the fact that it is held xed in the
rotating system. E.g.
d
^
x
0
=dt
=
~!
^
x
0
.
Now repeat the process with
~
Q
=
~v
and compute the acceleration
~a
=
d~v
dt
=
d
dt
_
~r
+
~!
~r
=
_
~r
+
~!
~r
.
+
~!
_
~r
+
~!
~r
=
~r
+
_
~!
~r
+
~!
_
~r
+
~!
_
~r
+
~!
~r
=
~r
+
_
~!
~r
+2
~!
_
~r
+
~!
(
~!
~r
)
(5
:
11)
Put this into
~
F
=
m~a
and move everything but the
~r
term to the other side.
~
F
m
_
~!
~r
2
m~!
_
~r
m~!
(
~!
~r
)=
m
~r
(5
:
12)
This is the modied form of Newton’s second law that you use in a rotating coordinate system. Every-
thing in this equation is now expressed in the rotating system, so all that you need to have given is
~!
and
_
~!
.That last vector,
_
~!
,has a simplication that you can easily overlook. Apply the same equation
(5.9) to the vector
~!
itself. How does
_
~!
compare to
d~!=dt
?
d~!
dt
=
_
~!
+
~!
~!
=
_
~!
(5
:
13)
This time derivative of
~!
is the same in both systems. This means for example that if the rotation axis
is xed in the stationary system, then
~!
is xed in the rotating system. Look at the gure on page280
for a not-so-obvious example of this. In fact the
_
~!
term in Eq. (5.12) seldom comes up; it’s the other
two terms that are important. They’re important enough to have names:
2
m~!
_
~r
\Coriolis force"
m~!
(
~!
~r
) \Centrifugal Force"
Example
You are rotating at constant angular velocity and according to youa mass is standing still at a distance
r
away. What does this equation say? You say that the mass is not moving, so your coordinates have
_
~r
and
~r
both zero. Also
_
~!
=0. Take your angular velocity to be ^
z
0
!
,and put the mass along the
x
0
-axis, at^
x
0
r
.Plug in to Eq. (5.12).
x
y
x
0
y
0
inertial
rotating
~
F
0   0  
m^z
0
!
(^
z
0
!
~r
)= 0
~
F
m^z
0
!
^
y
0
!r
=
~
F
+
m^x
0
r!
2
=0
(5
:
14)
This says that there must be some force
~
F
pulling the mass toward you and holding it in place. Perhaps
it is gravity, perhaps it is your hand, but it is some real force on
m
,and the equation dictates just what
value that force must have. For the moment I am preserving the notation that
x
0
is the coordinate in
the rotating frame. (Of course^
z
0
=^
z
.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested