5|Non-Inertial Systems
157
Example
What does this equation say about a mass that is just sitting at rest in empty space, but where you
are still rotating at constant
~!
=
!
^
z
and looking at it move around you. Make it a distant star, and
you are on the rotating Earth. Just to keep the picture simple, examine the specic time that the mass
crosses your
x
0
-axis. That way according to you the star’s velocity will by in the  ^
y
0
direction and its
acceleration will (according to you) be the usual
v
2
=r
=
r!
2
toward the center of the circle. Use the
same equation (5.12) as before, then
~
F
=0
;
_
~!
=0
;
_
~r
^
y
0
r!;
~r
^
x
0
r!
2
x
y
x
0
y
0
inertial
rotating
 0   2
m
(
!
^
z
0
) ( ^
y
0
r!
)
m!^z
0
(
!^z
0
^
x
0
r
)=
m
^
x
0
r!
2
)
2
m
^
x
0
r!
2
+
m
^
x
0
r!
2
m
^
x
0
r!
2
(5
:
15)
This equation says that it is a combination of the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force that keeps the
star rotating about you (accordingtoyou) The rst of this pair of examples, Eq. (5.14), should look
very familiar. This second one, Eq. (5.15), is dierent from what you are used to, and it will take some
time to get a feeling for the Coriolis force.
5.3 Coriolis Force
Picturing the eects of this term ( 2
m~!
_
~r
) takes some eort because it doesn’t behave the way
that you’re accustomed to, and you need practice with a variety of examples to become used to it. The
most interesting applications occur when you try to gure out what eects the Earth’s rotation has on
the motion of the atmosphere and the oceans, but that can wait.
~!
Fig. 5.4
Example
When you want to throw a ball to someone else, you expect to throw it in the direction toward the
person trying to catch it. What if however, the two of you are in a playground, standing on opposite
sides of a spinning platform? If you throw it straight at your friend on the other side of the turntable,
what direction will it go? What path will it take? The answer will depend very much on who’s watching
the ball, and someone standing on the ground will give a description very dierent from yours. If you
are in the Rotor of problem1.13 or in a rotating space station, you can ask the same question.
you
~v
total
~!
out
inertial system
top views
~!
out
~v
0
~!
~v
0
you
rotating system
Fig. 5.5
The left picture is a top view as seen by someone standing still and watching the platform
rotate|the inertial system. (Forget about gravity for this example; it just causes the ball to drop.)
You throw the ball straight toward the catcher, but a bystander will say that you are moving and that
you gave the ball an initial sideways component of velocity
R!
.In that inertial system as pictured on
Converting image pdf to text - application software cloud:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Converting image pdf to text - application software cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
158
the left, the equations to describe the motion are simple: the ball moves in a straight line. This is true
even if you choose not to throw the ball directly across, but instead give it your own extra sideways
component
v
1
. The solution is trivial:
x
R
+
v
0
t
y
=(
v
1
R!
)
t
(5
:
16)
If
v
1
=0, the ball starts with a negative
y
-component of velocity because of the turntable’s rotation.
If
v
1
=
R!
,the ball will (in this inertial system) go straight across the turntable, passing through its
center. Does that mean that the ball will hit the catcher? No. Remember that in this system the
catcher is moving too, rotating around by an angle
!t
in the time
t
=2
R=v
0
Drawthepicture.
The right hand picture is a top viewin the rotating system, so that the platform appears stationary
as the world turns around you. The initial Coriolis force is  2
m
times the vector
~!
~v
0
drawn in the
second gure, and that pushes the ball to the thrower’s right. It gives a trajectory something like the
one drawn. This is a circumstance for which the equations just aren’t enough to let you easily visualize
what happens in this rotating system. Fortunately, there are videos readily available demonstrating
exactly what happens. Here is a good example on YouTube, and a search for the word Coriolis on that
site will provide others.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAX3ALdienQ
How do you compute the details of this trajectory? There are two ways. You can write
~
F
=
m~a
in
the rotating system, using Eq. (5.12) and solving it. Or, you can solve it in the non-rotating coordinate
system for which all those extra inertial forces are absent. Then do a coordinate transformation at the
end to get the equations in the rotating system. The second way is easier here; in fact the equations
for the rotated coordinate system are already done in Eq. (5.16). All that it involves is transforming the
(now simple) solution from one coordinate system to another. The rst method is more involved, but
it does not involve any math dierent from what you’ve done here in previous chapters, so it is readily,
if tediously, doable.
Either way you derive it, in the rotating system with the origin of coordinates at the center of
the circle, the solution is
x
y
rotating system
x
R
cos
!t
+
v
0
t
cos
!t
+(
v
1
R!
)
t
sin
!t
y
=
R
sin
!t
v
0
t
sin
!t
+(
v
1
R!
)
t
cos
!t
(5
:
17)
This starts the ball moving at the left edge of the disk with initial velocity in the rotating system
v
0
^
x
+
v
1
^
y
.The picture in Figure5.5 has
v
1
=0, so the thrower there aims directly across. Come back
to deriving these equations* later, but for now, just analyze them, trying to understand just what they
are doing.
Near
t
=0, do a series expansion, keeping only a couple of terms and assuming that the thrower aims
straight across the turntable:
v
1
=0.
x
R
1
2
!
2
t
2
+
v
0
t
1
2
!
2
t
2
R!t
!t
1
6
!
3
t
3
y
=
R
!t
1
6
!
3
t
3
v
0
t
!t
1
6
!
3
t
3
R!t
1
2
!
2
t
2
The constant terms:
x
R
,
y
=0. Yes, it starts at the left edge.
* The transformation equations you need appear in Eqs. (9.4) and (9.5). Their derivation involves
only knowing the cosine and sine of the dierence of two angles.
application software cloud:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
This guide give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office which users may quickly render and convert TIFF image file to PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
NET SDK library and components for converting PDF file in convert PDF to various document and image file formats Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
159
The \
t
"terms:
x
R
+
v
0
t
,
y
=0. No initial motion along
y
,but just a couple of paragraphs back
didn’t I say that it should have a sideways component of magnitude
!R
?What’s wrong? Go back and
read that paragraph again.
The \
t
2
"terms:
x
R
+
v
0
t
1
2
R!
2
t
2
,
y
v
0
!t
2
.It has an acceleration left and down in this
picture. I can interpret the
R!
2
term as coming from the centrifugal force; it is outward and has the
right magnitude. The
v
0
!
term is from the Coriolis force; it is sideways (the cross product) and the
size of this acceleration is 2
v
0
!
.
Here are two pictures of the equations Eq. (5.17). In the rst picture, the lowest trajectory has
v
1
=0 so that it is thrown straight across (in the rotating frame). Each successive path has larger
v
1
so that the ball is thrown laterally harder and harder. The 4
th
one comes close enough to the catcher
that he should easily be able to eld it.
In the second picture both
v
0
and
v
1
are varied, decreasing
v
0
and increasing
v
1
so that successive
curves represent throws that come closer to being a loop. You see that for the last throw the ball returns
very near to the person who threw it, and you don’t even need a boomerang.
Fig. 5.6
rotating system
inertial system
~!
~!
N
N
Fig. 5.7
Coriolis Force on Earth
On the Earth,
~!
is pointing out of the North Pole.
(The sun rises in the East.) If you are standing at
the North Pole the vector
~r
from the Earth’s center
to you is parallel to
~!
,and the term representing
the centrifugal force on you has a factor (
~!
~r
),
so it is zero. If you now throw a rock horizontally,
what does the Coriolis term do?
~!
is up and
_
~r
is
horizontal in front of you.
2
m~!
_
~r
is to your right.
The rock that you threw will (in this rotating system) experience a Coriolis force to the right and that
is the direction its trajectory will curve, as in the rst picture. This is easy to understand if you just
step o the Earth for a moment. No more Coriolis force, but the Earth is rotating counterclockwise
under you. The rock will go straight, but the Earth turns left underneath it as in the second picture.
It’s the same thing.
This Coriolis force resembles the magnetic force on a moving charge,
q~v
~
B
. You shouldn’t
then be surprised when it twists motion around at right angles just as the magnetic eld does for the
motion of a charge.
From the previous paragraph you may get the impression that the Coriolis force is easy to
understand intuitively. To reassure you that it is not, consider the case that you are standing on the
equator and that you throw the same rock straight up. Now see what  2
m~!
_
~r
becomes.
application software cloud:VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
VB.NET Project for Converting Image to Byte Array, Convert Word to Image in VB.NET Application. Use VB.NET Code to Convert Image to Stream, PDF to Image
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
160
N
UP
W
~!
2
m~!
_
~r
 
^
north 
^
up = +
^
west
and the rock will experience a Coriolis force that pushes it a little west of where
you threw it. This is not so obvious, even if you stand o the Earth to look at it.
It then gets even more complicated because when the rock comes back down, its
velocity is reversed|coming down instead of up. The Coriolis force is reversed
as it drops, pushing it east. Which one wins? Wait until Eqs. (5.22) and (5.26) to see.
If you play golf do you have to consider the Coriolis force? What if you’re handling a large gun
on a battleship, aiming at something ve or ten kilometers away? For both of these cases ignore the
curvature of the Earth; that isn’t important in the rst case and approximating the Earth as  at doesn’t
even have a huge eect in the second case. Does it make sense to have a rotating,  at Earth? Yes. All
it means is that you’re still dealing with distances that don’t take you over the horizon. For now I will
ignore the centrifugal force term and air resistance, what’s left is
m
~r
=
m~g
2
m~!
_
~r
(5
:
18)
To see how big this new term is, plug in some numbers. Fire a ri e bullet at 300m/s and compare the
Coriolis term to the gravitational term.
2
m!v
mg
=
2
.
(2
=
day)
.
(300 m
=
s)
10 m
=
s2
.
1day
86 400 s
=
4
.
300
864000
4  10
3
This correction is small even at this speed, and at low speeds such as walking, or at the speed of water
draining from a sink, it is more like 10
5
so the Coriolis eect at these small speeds is imperceptible,
despite all contrary urban legends and stage magic.
Equation (5.18) is a linear, inhomogeneous, constant coecient dierential equation for
~r
,and
as such you can solve the homogeneous part using an exponential solution, just as in section 3.9. In
components this would look like
x
=
Ae
t
;
y
=
Be
t
;
z
=
Ce
t
or more simply,
~r
=
~r
0
e
t
I’m not going to do it this way. It is not that it’s wrong. It is rather that it’s complicated and hard to
interpret the results. I can take advantage of the fact that the Earth is rotating slowly, so the corrections
due to the
!
terms are small. That suggests an iterative attack, for which I ignore the Coriolis term at
rst and then go back and treat it as a correction. This is the method described in section0.11 and
used both at the end of section4.1 and in section4.5.
In the equation (5.18), the lowest order approximation to the equation is
~r
=
~g
2
~!
_
~r
!
~r
0
=
~g
(5
:
19)
This is pretty easy. Take initial conditions to start from the origin with velocity
~v
0
,then
_
~r
0
=
~gt
+
~
C
=
~gt
+
~v
0
;
and
~r
0
=
1
2
~gt
2
+
~
Ct
+
~
D
=
1
2
~gt
2
+
~v
0
t
(5
:
20)
The subscript zero on
r
indicates that this is the lowest order approximation to the nal answer, ignoring
Coriolis eects. Use these equations as input to the right-hand side of Eq. (5.18), canceling the
m
’s.
The improved approximation is
~r
1
,which now satises
~r
1
=
~g
2
~!
_
~r
0
=
~g
2
~!
~gt
+
~v
0
(5
:
21)
application software cloud:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
source code for quick integration and converting PDF to HTML is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which that are included in target PDF document file.
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C# programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting. // Load a PDF file. String
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
161
Integrate this equation to get
~r
1
,including a couple of arbitrary constants, then reapply the initial
conditions to evaluate these constants.
~r
1
(0) = 0 and
_
~r
1
(0) =
~v
0
.
~r
1
=
1
2
~gt
2
2
~!
1
6
~gt
3
+
1
2
~v
0
t
2
+
~
Et
+
~
F
=
~v
0
t
+
1
2
~gt
2
2
~!
1
6
~gt
3
+
1
2
~v
0
t
2
(5
:
22)
If you need still higher order accuracy, putthis into the right side of Eq. (5.18) and repeat the process
to get a still better result:
~r
2
=
~g
2
~!
_
~r
1
.If this looks familiar then you’ve probably studied section
4.5aboutcurveballs. Ifnot,thenyoumaywanttolookbackatit.
To understand this result, try lots of special cases:
1. At the North Pole and ring directly up, the
~g
and
~v
0
terms in Eq. (5.22) are along the vector
~!
,
so the cross products vanish and the Coriolis force contributes nothing. What goes straight up comes
straight down.
2. At the equator aiming due North the
~!
~v
0
term is zero, but the term in  
~!
~g
points East.
~r
1
=
~v
0
t
+
1
2
~gt
2
1
3
~!
~gt
3
These three terms are respectively North, Down, and East. Why East? Step o the Earth for a moment
and watch what happens. The projectile moves North and starts to drop. As it drops, it is moving
closer to the axis of rotation,but it keeps the larger Eastern component of velocity that it had when
it started at the larger distance from the axis. That means that it’s getting ahead of its surroundings
and that means that it drifts East.
3. At the equator aiming due East the  
~!
~v
0
term is Up and the  
~!
~g
term still points East.
Eq. (5.22) is
~r
1
=
~v
0
t
+
1
2
~gt
2
1
3
~!
~gt
3
~!
~v
0
t
2
These terms are respectively East, Down, East, and Up. The fourth one is new, and it is not easy to
track down a simple interpretation for it. It does come out of the equations though.
4. With the same equation but at the equator ring straight up
~!
~g
is West, and
~!
~v
0
is East.
To nd where the projectile hits the ground, note that neither of these two terms aect the amount of
time that the projectile stays in the air, because East and West are not up and down. The time aloft is
governed solely by the old terms in
~r
1
(
t
):
1
2
~gt
2
+
~v
0
t
=0. At the value of
t
that this determines, you
compute the position of the projectile,
~r
1
,from Eq. (5.22).
1
2
gt
2
+
v
0
t
=0 )
t
f
=
2
v
0
g
then the corrected term
~r
1
back at ground level is
~r
1
(
t
f
)=  2
~!
1
6
~g
2
v
0
g
+
1
2
~v
0

2
v
0
g
2
= 2
1
3
+
1
2
~!
~v
0
2
v
0
g
2
=
4
!v
3
0
3
g
2
West
(5
:
23)
For a speed of 300m/s this is
4
.
(2
=
day)
.
(300 m
=
s)
3
3
.
10 m
=
s2
2
.
1day
86 400s
=26 m
(5
:
24)
At least this answers the question raised a few paragraphs back: Which part of the Coriolis force wins?
The one while the rock is going up or the one when it’s going down? Well, which is it?
application software cloud:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
RasterEdge PDF to JPEG converting control SDK (XDoc.PDF for .NET) supports converting PDF document to JPEG image file in .NET developing platforms using simple
www.rasteredge.com
application software cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF Converting DLLs for PDF-to-Word. This is an example for converting PDF to Word (.docx) file in VB.NET program. ' Load a PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
162
Does this result of 26 m seem to be much larger than you would expect? To see how reasonable
this is, ask how much time the bullet is it in the air and how high does it go? Answer:
t
f
=
2
.
v
0
g
=
2
.
300
10
=60 seconds
;
max height =
v
2
0
2
g
=
2
.
300
2
2
.
10
=4
:
5km
(5
:
25)
Will a bullet go that high? No, not even close. Air resistance isvery important here, and it cuts these
results by a big factor. Still, the Coriolis eect is signicant.
To see how much air resistance can aect these results, go back to problem2.30. For a 30 caliber
bullet (not tumbling) the terminal speed is about 100 m/s, and if it is red up at 300 or 400 m/s it
comes to the maximum height in under 15 seconds. You can make a very crude estimate of the Coriolis
eect in this case by assuming the extreme case that it reaches terminal speed very fast. Then replace
the 300 m/s in Eq. (5.24) by 100 m/s, changing the result from 26 m to 1 m. Reality is closer to the
latter number than the former, but working out the details requires a little eort. A simpler version of
this calculation appears in problem5.13.
x
z
What is the trajectory of the bullet you just red? It is no longer a straight line up and
down, but something described by Eq. (5.22). For this, use a coordinate system with
x
East,
y
North, and
z
Up|like the coordinate system sketched below, but on the equator. The
motion described by this equation is then all in the
x
-
z
plane.
~!
=
!
^
y;
~g
g
^
z;
~v
0
=
v
0
^
z
~r
1
=
x
1
^
x
+
z
1
^
z
1
2
g
^
zt
2
2
!
^
y
1
6
g
^
zt
3
+
1
2
v
0
^
zt
2
+
v
0
^
zt
x
1
=
1
3
!gt
3
!v
0
t
2
;
z
1
1
2
gt
2
+
v
0
t
(5
:
26)
These equations,
x
1
(
t
)and
z
1
(
t
)describe the
x
-
z
coordinates in terms of the time parameter,
and this graph shows the path of the bullet. The horizontal scale on this graph is greatly
exaggerated so that you can see the eect.
5. For another example, re a projectile and see where it lands, but this time start from an
arbitrary latitude. Again use coordinates
x
-East,
y
-North,^
z
=^
x
^
y
.The latitude is
,so
~!
^
x
^
y
~!
=
!
(^
y
cos
+^
z
sin
)
(5
:
27)
The initial conditions are _
x
0
=0 and the other initial velocity components non-zero. Eq. (5.22) is
~r
1
=
1
2
~gt
2
+
~v
0
t
2
!
(^
y
cos
+^
z
sin
)
1
6
~gt
3
+
1
2
~v
0
t
2
(5
:
28)
~g
g
^
z
,and
~v
0
_
y
0
^
y
_
z
0
^
z
,so this is
~r
1
=
1
2
~gt
2
+
~v
0
t
+
1
3
!gt
3
^
x
cos
+
!t
2
^
x
(_
y
0
sin
_
z
0
cos
)
which says that the
y
and
z
-coordinates are not aected by
!
(to this approximation), only
x
is. Where
will it land? That is determined by
z
.
z
1
(
t
)=
z
0
(
t
)= 0 = _
z
0
t
gt
2
=
2 =)
t
f
=2_
z
0
=g
then
y
1
_
y
0
t
f
=2_
z
0
_
y
0
=g
(5
:
29)
5|Non-Inertial Systems
163
and
x
1
=
1
3
g!
cos
(2_
z
0
=g
)
3
+
!
_
y
0
sin
_
z
0
cos
(2_
z
0
=g
)
2
You can simplify this. Group terms and express the initial velocity in terms of speed
v
0
and the
angle
above the horizontal.
x
1
4
3
!
_
z
3
0
g
2
cos
+4
!
sin
_
y
0
_
z
2
0
g
2
=
!
v
3
0
g
2
4
3
sin
3
cos
+4 sin
2
cos
sin
(5
:
30)
How big is this for a golf ball? Choose the latitude of Scotland,
=55
,with spherical coordinate
=90
,and hit the golf ball
=45
above the horizontal. Your average world champion golfer
can hit the ball about 300 meters, so from Eq. (5.29)
y
1
=
2_
z
0
_
y
0
g
=
2
v
2
0
cos
sin
g
=
v
2
0
sin2
g
=300 m =)
v
0
=
p
3000 = 55m/s
Then the de ection is
x
1
=
2
day
(55 m/s)
3
(10 m/s
2
)2
4
3
.
1
23
=
2
.
0
:
57 + 4
.
1
23
=
2
.
0
:
82

1day
86 400s
=0
:
11m = 11 cm
Compared to all the other variables, especially wind, this is not much, and I suppose that an expert
golfer will have even this eect trained into the muscles. What happens when the tournament is in
Southern Australia?
Take the same equations and re a large artillery shell in the same way, but fast enough to go
30 km instead of 300m. Everything else is the same, so all I have to do is see how the result scales with
the range. The distance is 100 times greater, so Eq. (5.29) for
y
1
says the speed is larger by 100
1
=
2
.
Then Eq. (5.30) says that the deviation, the value of
x
,varies as speed cubed, so 100
3
=
2
=1000 and
the deviation is 110 meters, which is not so small any more.
The result for
x
1
is positive, meaning that the de ection is toward the East. Stand o the Earth
amoment and try to visualize the motion in an inertial coordinate system. Is that the direction it
should move?
Example
For us, the most important application of the Coriolis force is to weather, and a large part about
understanding weather comes not from
~
F
=
m~a
,but from
~
F
=0. The accelerations are commonly
very small, and the forces within the atmosphere almost cancel out. Are there exceptions? Yes! Start
with tornadoes and work down. Still, this is a place to start.
N
H
H
L
L
Fig. 5.8
(
~!
)
If there is a low pressure region somewhere, and there always is, why does
it rotate and why does it rotate in the direction that it does? Look at the forces
involved. A higher pressure region will exert a larger force on the adjacent air
than does a low pressure region|no surprise there. You would expect then that
air would be pushed by a surrounding high pressure inward toward a region of
lower pressure and that everything would quickly reach an equilibrium.
But then there’s the Coriolis force,  2
m~!
~v
.In the Northern hemisphere,
the vertical component of
~!
is up. If the surrounding air pressure accelerates some
air in toward the center of the low pressure region, then  
~!
~v
is in the direction
up in , and that is to the right. The air will start to circulate counter-clockwise around the center
of the low pressure region. Now there is a Coriolis force from the velocity of this counter-clockwise
circulation. The  
~!
~v
term from this is in the direction  up right, and that is outward, away
from the center of the low pressure region. When the circulation is big enough then the force from the
5|Non-Inertial Systems
164
pressure gradient and the Coriolis force from the wind around the center will tend to cancel, leaving you
with a steady counter-clockwise circulation around the low, called \cyclonic"  ow. With a high pressure
region, the circulation reverses, and you then have \anti-cyclonic"  ow|clockwise in the North.
The preceding paragraph is a bare sketch of the very dicult reality. The atmosphere is not in
equilibrium. There’s friction. Everything depends on altitude. And probably a dozen other complica-
tions. It’s a full profession to sort it all out.
AUseful Analogy
There is a familiar analog to the Coriolis Force: Magnetism.
Coriolis force:   2
m~!
~v;
Magnetic force:
q~v
~
B
Except for an exchange of symbols between
~
B
and
~!
and an extra factor of
q=
2
m
,they are the same.
This means that whatever intuition that you have about the motion of charges in a magnetic eld can
now be carried over directly to intuition about the motion of of masses in a rotating system, with
~!
replacing
~
B
. Go back to the several examples in this section and translate them into this language.
Does it help? Only you can answer that.
5.4 Centrifugal Force
This is easier to visualize than the Coriolis force; It behaves more like things you’re accustomed to.
Return to the general equation (5.12) and look closely at the other inertial force term,  
m~!
(
~!
~r
),
and now ignore the Coriolis term. Use
~
A
(
~
B
~
C
)=
~
B
(
~
A
.
~
C
~
C
(
~
A
.
~
B
)
m~!
(
~!
~r
)=  
m~!
(
!
.
~r
)+
m~r!
2
Choose the coordinate system so that^
z
is along
~!
,and this is
^
zm!
(
!z
)+
m
(
x^x
+
y^y
+
z^z
)
!
2
=
m!
2
(
x^x
+
y^y
)
It points away from the axis of rotation. In this rotating system an extra force then appears, pushing
away from the axis.
There is a problem in notation here. The symbol
~r
is overused. It is the vector from the origin
in spherical coordinates. It is the vector from the axis in cylindrical coordinates. This doesn’t usually
cause confusion, but here I need both in the same discussion. I’ll resolve the dispute by using a special
notation for the vector perpendicular to the axis as in cylindrical coordinates:
~r
?
=
x
^
x
+
y
^
y
then
~r
=
z
^
z
+
~r
?
(5
:
31)
~r
?
is perpendicular to the
z
-axis, letting
~r
remain as the vector from the origin. The centrifugal force
term is then
m!
2
~r
?
.
If you’re in a car turning a corner then you can take the perfectly common point of view that
you’re the center of the universe and that you are not moving. This is certainly not an inertial system,
so you have to include the centrifugal force term to make sense of the observations.
~r
=0, so
~
F
m~!
(
~!
~r
)=
m
~r
=0
;
or
~
F
+
m!
2
~r
?
=0
The seat cushion friction pushes you in toward the center of rotation and the centrifugal force pushes
you out, giving a total force of zero. You then have zero acceleration with respect to yourself.
When you’re standing still on the surface of the Earth, what eect does the centrifugal force
have? At the North and South Poles nothing, because
~r
?
=0 there. At the equator,
!
2
~r
?
is away
5|Non-Inertial Systems
165
from the Earth and of magnitude
!
2
R
= (2
=
1day)
2
(6400 km) = 0
:
034 m/s
2
. This gives you an
apparent decrease in weight of about 0
:
3%.
It is not quite as simple as the preceding paragraph implies, because the Earth isn’t exactly
spherical. It has an equatorial bulge with about 41km greater diameter at the equator than through
the poles. This changes the gravitational eld of the Earth from the simple 1
=r
2
of a spherical Earth
to a more complicated eld, and that fact provides a signicant change. You haven’t computed your
apparent weight until you include both eects.
Example
Put water into a bucket, suspend it from a rope, and spin the rope about its vertical axis so that
the bucket spins in the same way. The surface of the water will come to an equilibrium in a concave
shape; what is that shape?
~!
z
r
mg
mr!
2
F
p
In the rotating coordinate system, the forces on a molecule at the surface are
1.centrifugal, 2. gravity, and 3.the surrounding molecules,
and their sum is zero. These forces have respective magnitudes
mg
,
mr!
2
, and an unknown
F
p
.
All that you know about
~
F
p
is that its direction is perpendicular to the surface, but that is enough.
Temporarily and to save clutter, this
r
is the cylindrical coordinate. The
z
-coordinate of the surface is
afunction of this radial coordinate
r
,and its slope is
tan
=
dz
dr
with
tan
=
mr!
2
mg
Combine these to get
dz
dr
=
r!
2
g
!
z
=
r
2
!
2
2
g
+
C
(5
:
32)
This is a paraboloid. The bigger the spin rate, the steeper the surface is. This result is the foundation
of spin casting, a method for constructing very large mirrors for astronomical telescopes (among other
things).
5.5 Shape of the Earth
In an Earth-centered coordinate system the eective force is the gravitational force plus the centrifugal
force. What does this do to the shape of the Earth? Think of the oceans rst, because it is easier to
see that the ocean surface should be an equipotential. If it isn’t then the higher parts would slide over
to the lower parts at a lower potential energy and you would be right back to an equipotential. What
about the tides? That brings in the Moon, and one thing at a time if you don’t mind.
What is the potential energy of a mass
m
in this system? The force on a mass
m
at the distance
r
from the center of a spherical Earth is
~
F
=
F
r
^r
where
F
r
(
r
)=  
GMm=r
2
M
is the mass of the Earth. The equation (2.22) relates force to the potential energy; this is
F
r
dU=dr
which implies
U
(
r
)=  
GMm=r
5|Non-Inertial Systems
166
The potential energy associated with the centrifugal force follows from the same dening equa-
tion, but here the only component is the cylindrical radius
r
?
,not the spherical
r
.
~
F
=+
m!
2
~r
?
;
or
F
r
?
=+
m!
2
r
?
d
dr
?
U
(
r
?
)  !
U
m!
2
r
2
?
=
2
The total potential energy for a mass
m
near the Earth’s surface is the sum of these two:
U
GMm
r
1
2
m!
2
r
2
?
(5
:
33)
But wait, the whole point of this section is the shape of the Earth, so how can I assume that the Earth
is spherical in getting that rst term? You can’t really, but as a rst approximation to guring it out I’ll
try the simplifying assumption that it is almost spherical and then return to see if that is good enough.
(It is pretty good rst try, butnot good enough; the result will be o by a factor of about two.)
The centrifugal potential energy is like a harmonic oscillator energy turned upside down, and this
centrifugal term is much smaller than the gravitational energy, so the Earth is nearly spherical. Its shape
is
r
=
R
+
,where
R
is some average radius that can be specied later. Using spherical coordinates,
as in Figure0.3,
is a function of the angle
alone, measured from the North Pole. The distance to
the axis is
r
?
=
r
sin
.
U
GMm
R
+
1
2
m!
2
(
R
+
)
2
sin
2
GMm
R
R
1
2
m!
2
R
2
+2
R
sin
2
R
N
S
Fig. 5.9
This is a binomial expansion on each term, keeping only the rst order in
. For an equipotential, set
this to a constant.
U
0
GMm
R
1
2
m!
2
R
2
sin
2
+
GMm
R
R
m!
2
R
sin
2
(5
:
34)
The fourth term is much less than the third term. To see this, simply interpret the meaning of the two
coecients of
:
GMm
R
2
is the gravitational force on
m
,and
mR!
2
is the centrifugal force.
The latter is much less than the former ( 0
:
3%), so I can neglect the
m!
2
R
sin
2
term in Eq. (5.34).
This leaves
U
0
GMm
R
1
2
m!
2
R
2
sin
2
+
GMm
R
R
or
=
R
2
GMm
U
0
+
GMm
R
+
1
2
m!
2
R
2
sin
2
The last term is the only
-dependent part of
,so pull it out for examination.
=  +
R
2
GMm
1
2
m!
2
R
2
sin
2
=  +
1
2
m!
2
R
2
GMm=R
2
sin
2
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested