how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to text online no email SDK Library API wpf asp.net winforms sharepoint mechanics17-part705

5|Non-Inertial Systems
167
Pull out a factor of
R
from the top in order to make the nal quotient dimensionless. Also cancel the
m
’s:
=  +
R
2
!
2
R
GM=R
2
sin
2
(5
:
35)
The coecient of sin
2
is
R=
2times the ratio of the centrifugal acceleration at the equator to
g
.
Compute the dierence of the equatorial and polar diameters (2
). It is
R
2
!
2
g
=
(6400km)
2
(2
=
day)
2
10 m
=
s2
.
1day
86 400s
2
.
1000 m
1km
=22 km
How accurate it this 22 km result? Not very, as the measured value of the dierence in the diameters
is closer to twice this. The major error in this calculation is in the assumption that the gravitational
eld is spherically symmetric. It is a plausible assumption, but it turns out to introduce an error that is
about as big as the eect you’re calculating, so it is not good enough. Working out the more correct
version would take too much time and eort for this single result, so I’ll leave it to other sources.
Is it necessary to evaluate the constant
C
? No. There is however one manipulation that will
relate this expression to something that you will encounter often in electromagnetism and even elsewhere
in this chapter. It’s simply a dierent way to write
,and though not really needed here, I’ll describe it
anyway. The equatorial bulge is
(
)/ sin
2
. This measures the deviation from a sphere by taking it
to be zero at the poles. That’s arbitrary, but convenient. Another way to set the zero point is to make
the average value over the surface of the Earth zero. That will make the redened
negative at the
two poles and positive at the equator. The result is
0
(
)=  
R
3
!
2
R
GM=R
2
3
2
cos
2
1
2
(5
:
36)
The last expression that appears in parentheses is a combination that you will soon come to know and
love (or not). It is a Legendre polynomial, and these sort of polynomials appear often whenever you are
looking at any problems involving potentials. And lots of other places too. You can at least see that
because cos
2
=1   sin
2
,this expression gives the same coecient that you see in Eq. (5.35). Use
spherical coordinates as in Figure0.7, and integrate this over the whole Earth and the result is zero.
5.6 Tides
Why are there tides? The Moon’s pull on the side of the Earth nearer the Moon is stronger than its
pull on the farther side of Earth. Now, why are there two tides? Air is much easier to push around
than water, so are there air tides? (Yes.) Are there Earth tides? (Also yes, but smaller.) For now, look
at the ocean.
There are several steps in understanding this. The rst is to ask what determines the shape of
the ocean’s surface. That is the same question that I asked when determining the shape of the rotating
Earth. The surface of the ocean is an equipotential. This time however the combining forces are not
gravity and centrifugal forces, but the gravity of the Earth and of the Moon and the inertial force from
the acceleration of the Earth. Take into account the presence of the Moon but ignore the distortion of
the Earth caused by the Earth’s rotation. The potential energies from the Earth and from the Moon
are the rst term in Eq. (5.33).
GMm
r
and
GM
0
m
r
0
Earth
Moon
r
r
0
M
M
0
Fig. 5.10
Why am I carrying along the factor
m
for the mass of a drop of ocean water? No good reason. The
gravitational potential, as distinct from the gravitational potential energy is the potential energy per
Convert pdf to text online no email - SDK Library API:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text online no email - SDK Library API:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
168
mass. It’seasiertodealwith
V
GM=r
and  
GM
0
=r
0
. Near the Earth’s surface, where you can
use
U
=
mgh
,the gravitational potential is
V
=
gh
. And why is all of this in a chapter on non-inertial
systems? That will be the nal step, yet to come. Remember that the Moon pulls on the Earth,
accelerating it. What willthat do?
Find the total gravitational potential near the Earth’s surface by adding the potentials from both
Earth and Moon. Use
R
for the distance between the centers of the two bodies.
V
GM
r
GM
0
r
0
GM
r
GM
0
p
r
2+
R
2
rR
cos
Earth
r
r
0
Moon
R
Fig. 5.11
The last line used the law of cosines (problem0.25) in order to express all the information in terms of
coordinates centered on the Earth.
Now recall the geometry of the system.
r
=6400km and
R
=380 000 km. This suggests a
series expansion because
r
R
.
V
GM
r
GM
0
R
p
1+ (
r
2
=R
2) 2(
r=R
)cos
Use the binomial expansion with
n
= 1
=
2 (and youwillneed terms out to
x
2
).
(1 +
x
)
n
=1 +
nx
+
n
(
n
1)
2
x
2
+  = 1  
1
2
x
+
3
8
x
2
+ 
V
GM
r
GM
0
R
"
1
2
r
2
R
2
2
r
R
cos
+
3
8
r
2
R
2
2
r
R
cos
2
+ 
#
GM
r
GM
0
R
1+
r
R
cos
+
r
2
R
2
3
2
cos
2
1
2
+ 
(5
:
37)
In the last step I collected all the terms out to the order
r
2
=R
2
,dropping the higher powers of
r=R
.
Again, Legendre polynomials show up.
If you dropall the terms in
r=R
because it is small, the equipotential is
V
GM
r
GM
0
R
= a constant
and that says that
r
is constant, a sphere, and to the lowest order that is correct. Call it
R
E
. The
ocean surface is only approximately a sphere, so try including the next term.
GM
r
GM
0
R
h
1+
r
R
cos
i
= a constant
(5
:
38)
The radius
r
is approximately
R
E
,but it’s the correction that is important here. Let
be the tide’s
height above (or below) mean sea level, then
r
=
R
E
+
and
(a)
GM
R
E
+
GM
0
R
1+
R
E
+
R
cos
=
C
(b)
GM
R
E
R
E
GM
0
R
1+
R
E
+
R
cos
=
C
SDK Library API:RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
Q3: Why there's no license information in my it via the email which RasterEdge's online store sends powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:RasterEdge Product License Agreement
is active, you may contact RasterEdge via email. permitted by applicable law, in no event shall powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
169
(c)
GM
R
2
E
=
C
+
GM
R
E
+
GM
0
R
+
GM
0
R
E
R
2
cos
(d)
=
R
2
E
GM
.
GM
0
R
E
R
2
cos
=
M
0
M
R
3
E
R
2
cos
(5
:
39)
=
7
:
35  10
22
kg
5
:
98  1024 kg
.
6
:
37  10
6
m
3
3
:
84  108 m
2
cos
=21
:
5m cos
(a) is Eq. (5.38) written in terms of
.
(b) used the binomial expansion on the rst term.
(c) solved for
while dropping
=R
2
=R
2
E
.
(d) that the mean sea level is at
=0 determines
C
.*
N
Moon
Fig. 5.12
The equation (5.39) is most positive at
=0 and most negative
at
=
. That is one (very large) high tide underneath the Moon and
one very low tide on the opposite side of the Earth. The range from
low tide to high tide is 2  21
:
5= 43 m. There are two diculties with
this approximation. First it has only one high tide per day, and second
the height of that tide is about 22 meters, making life along the ocean
coasts very wet. About 3/4 of Florida would be underwater at high tide,
as would the entirety of some nations.
What is missing? It is the fact that the Earth is accelerating toward the Moon, and is not an
inertial system (even ignoring its daily rotation). This gure looks down from above the North Pole
and the Moon is on the right.
What is the Earth’s acceleration as caused by the Moon?
a
=
F=M
=
GMM
0
=MR
2
=
GM
0
=R
2
3  10
5
m
=
s
2
It doesn’t sound like much, but it is enough to change everything. Call this acceleration
a
0
and apply
Eq. (5.5), to transform to the accelerated (Earth) coordinate system.
F
x
ma
0
=
m
d
2
x
0
dt
2
This says that a mass
m
sitting on the Earth or in its oceans feels an inertial force
ma
0
down, and here
\down" means away from the Moon. In this system
a
0
behaves like an extra, uniform gravitational
eld. What is the potential energy for that?
mgh
,or in this case
ma
0
h
.The \height" h is the distance
toward the Moon from your origin, the center of the Earth. The \inertial energy" is then
U
inertial
=
ma
0
h
=
ma
0
r
cos
=
m
GM
0
R
2
r
cos
;
so
V
inertial
=
U
m
=
GM
0
R
2
r
cos
Add this to Eq. (5.37) and that troublesome cos
term precisely cancels, leaving you with
V
total
GM
r
GM
0
R
1+
r
2
R
2
3
2
cos
2
1
2
+ 
Already you can see that the problem of the single high tide is gone, because where before there was
acos
there is now a cos
2
and that is positive on both sides of the Earth. Now solve the size of the
How so? What is the average value of cos
over the whole sphere? Use Eq. (0.18).
SDK Library API:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Convert Excel to PDF document free
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
170
tides in exactly the same way as led to Eq. (5.39). (That’s up to you to do.)
N
Moon
=
M
0
M
R
4
E
R
3
3
2
cos
2
1
2
(5
:
40)
This is positive at
=0 and
=
|toward and away from the Moon. It is negative halfway between,
the low tides. How big is it? As compared to the previous result, Eq. (5.39), it is smaller by a factor
R
E
=R
=6400
=
380000 = 0
:
017, bringing it down to a size comparable to what you see at the shore,
though at 21
:
5 0
:
017 = 0
:
36 m it seems a bittoo small. (But keep going. There’s a lot more to
come.) The tidal range (low to high tide) is
3
2
0
:
36 = 0
:
54m. Why
3
2
? Evaluate the quantity in
parentheses in Eq. (5.40) at
=0 and at
=
=
2. The dierence is 1   ( 
1
2
)=
3
2
.
Notice that the tidal eect varies as the inverse cube of the distance to the Moon (/ 1
=R
3
).
That’s because the gravitational force from the Moon varies as 1
=r
2
,so thechange in the force over
the diameter of the Earth varies as the derivative of this with respect to distance; hence 1
=r
3
.
Asimple point: The Moon goes around the Earth in a month. Why are there daily tides? The
Earth rotates, and if the bulge stays aligned with the Moon, the Earth’s surface rotates underneath the
bulge to give you the two daily tides.
Does the sun have an eect? It is much farther away, but it is also much more massive. Let
M
be the sun’s mass and
R
the Earth-sun distance, then the ratio of the tidal eects is, from Eq. (5.40)
solar tide
lunar tide
=
(
M
=M
)(
R
4
E
=R
3
)
(
M
0
=M
)(
R
4
E
=R
3)
=
M
M
0
R
3
R
3
=
2
:
0 10
30
kg
7
:
4 10
22
kg
380 000km
1
:
5 10
8
km
3
=0
:
44
The solar tide is almost half as large as the lunar tide. This means that when the Sun and Moon are
roughly lined up near new Moon and full Moon the eects add, and when they are at right angles as
seen from Earth, they try to cancel. The trigonometric factor in Eq. (5.40) is +1 at
=0 and  1
=
2
at
=90
. The high tide when they are adding is then 1.44 times the Moon’s eect alone. The high
tide when the are subtracting is a factor of 1 0.22=0.78. The ratio of the highest high tide to lowest
high tide is then about 1.44/0.78= 1.85.
Is this the whole story of tides? Far from it. There’s the Earth’s rotation. Then the Moon’s orbit
is not above the equator nor is its orbital distance constant. Nor is the Earth’s orbital distance from
the Sun constant and the Earth’s rotational axis is tilted with respect to the plane of its orbit. Then
friction. And don’t forget continents. And maybe resonant interactions with natural ocean sloshing
(e.g. The Bay of Fundy, which has a tidal range of 15 to 20 meters). We have barely started.
Fig. 5.13
The most important of these is the fact that the oceans arenot in static
equilibrium. It is a dynamical system in which the periodic tidal force from
the Moon (and Sun) are acting on a system that is already a sort of harmonic
oscillator. To see why, ignore the continents for a start and think of a wave
moving West across the ocean. Why West? We’re in an Earth-centered system,
in which the Moon rises in the East, so if it starts a wave moving in the ocean,
that’s the direction it will start it moving. This wave would try to go around the
Earth with its own natural period, and depending on latitude, the natural period
of such a long wave trying to go around the Earth can be more or less than a
day. How does the natural period of this circumpolar wave vary with latitude? Simple: the distance
SDK Library API:VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
in PDF file can also be viewed and processed online through our VB.NET PDF web viewer. coding algorithm to encode images which are neither text or halftones
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:C#: Frequently Asked Questions for Using XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .
If you have additional questions or requests, please send email to support@rasteredge. com. The site configured in IIS has no permission to operate.
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
171
around is
=2
R
sin
=2
cos
,where
is the usual polar coordinate and
is the latitude. The
natural period of the wave around the Earth is this distance over its speed,
‘=v
.
The Moon’s apparent daily motion around the Earth (still viewed in our system) applies a force
to this wave. How does the frequency of this force compare to the natural frequency with which ocean
waves will naturally move around the Earth?
Look back at the material on forced harmonic oscillators in chapter three, and the graphs,
Figure3.5. Notice especially the graph of
,showing the phase dierence between the forcing function
and the response function. When the forcing function has a frequency higher than the natural frequency
of the oscillator, the response of the oscillator is between 90
and 180
out of phase with the force.
That’s what happens with the tides. The period of the Moon’s tidal force is just over 12hours (two
per day remember), but the natural period for the tidal sloshing is substantially longer. This forced
oscillator (the ocean) will have a steady-state response that follows the frequency of the Moon’s tidal
force, and the phase dierence between force and response puts them as much as 180
out of phase.
This implies that the high tides willnot occur when the Moon is overhead (or even on the opposite side
of the Earth). At the extreme case, for which there is a 180
phase shift, high tide would occur when
the Moon is on the horizon. That is a six hour dierence.* In the more realistic cases, the tidal bulge
is ahead the point under the Moon’s position, but by less than 90
of longitude. Watch out for a point
of confusion here, as degrees of longitude and degrees of phase shift dier from each other by a factor
of about two because there are almost two high tides per day. See section7.14 for a more quantitative
analysis of this subject.
Sample Tide Tabley for the Eastern Atlantic (St. Augustine, FL) June 1, 2011 (New Moon)
high
tide
height
sunrise
moonrise
/low
time
feet
sunset
moonset
Low
3:03 AM
0.5
High
8:52 AM
4.3
6:25 AM
6:03 AM
Low
2:57 PM
0.3
High
9:14 PM
5.4
8:21 PM
8:26 PM
In this sample from a large tide table, you see that the high tides are not exactly at moon- or
sunrise, but they can be close. In the morning they’re about midway between high and low tides, while
in the evening the moon/sun-rise is only an hour away from the time of high tides.
The Moon does not orbit above the equator, so one lunar tidal bulge can be north of the equator
and one south of it. As your point on the Earth moves around, you may move through the middle
of a bulge at one time and then about 12 hours later you move through the edge of the bulge. You
experience a higher high tide and then a lower high tide. They aren’t the same, and if you are far
enough north you may experience only one high tide in a day.
Qualitatively, what does friction do to the water? A simplistic model would say that the Earth
is rotating underneath the tidal bulge, so it pushes the water ahead. This means that as the Moon
orbits the Earth, the Earth’s rotation pushes the bulge a few degrees ahead of the Moon’s position.
As you are carried around by the Earth’s surface, you will pass under the Moon’s position and a little
later you will pass through the center of the tidal bulge. This too simple model is overwhelmed by
the dynamic processes described in the last few paragraphs, but one aspect of it does apply: The tidal
friction aects the Earth. It acts as a brake, gradually increasing the length of a day. The tidal bulge
also applies atorque to the Moon: The leading bulge applies a component of force forward, parallel
to the Moon’s velocity vector, and the trailing bulge applies a smaller component backwards|the
* Recall: 180
phase dierence is about 90
of longitude.
www.saltwatertides.com
SDK Library API:C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Dicom to Tiff Image File
in C# program, there would be no need for dcm"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.tif"; // Convert Dicom to You may directly copy and paste this PDF to
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library API:RasterEdge Product License Options
Among all listed products on purchase page, Twain SDK has no Server License and only SDK To know more details or make an order, please contact us via email.
www.rasteredge.com
5|Non-Inertial Systems
172
trailing bulge is farther away. The actual computation of this eect can’t be done separately from the
resonance phenomenon discussed two paragraphs back.
~v
Fig. 5.14
This torque on the Moon tries to accelerate the Moon, and that puts it into a higher orbit. The
tides on the Earth cause the Moon to recede gradually from the Earth. You can see this another way:
The tidal friction slows the Earth’s rotation, causing it to lose some of its rotational kinetic energy
(
I!
2
=
2). Where does that energy go? Part of it goes into heating, the way friction usually does, but a
signicant part of it puts the Moon into a gradually higher energy orbit (farther away). This recession
rate is a few centimeters per year. Notice that this forward force on the Moon causes the Moon toslow
down.
There is more discussion of the tides in section 7.14, part of chapter seven on waves. There
you will nd a more detailed analysis about the relationship between the position of the Moon and the
position of high tide. In particular, how can low tide happen when the Moon is more-or-less overhead?
5.7 Foucault Pendulum_
Aclassic experiment to give a decisive answer to the question: Does the Earth rotate? After all, just
because such authorities as Galileo and Newton said it does, is that enough? As late as the middle
1800’s this was an important question because people wanted to have some simple, easy-to-see evidence
of the rotation, evidence not depending on the motion of the stars. If you have a pendulum swinging at
the South* Pole, what will the Earth’s rotation do to it? Stand o the Earth again and the pendulum
will be swinging back and forth in a plane while the Earth rotates underneath it. To someone standing
on the surface it will appear that the plane of the pendulum’s swing will rotate counterclockwise once
every 23 hours and 56 minutes, the time it takes the Earth to rotate once on its axis.
www.phys.unsw.edu.au/PHYSICS_!/FOUCAULT_PENDULUM/foucault_pendulum
^
x
^
y
^
z
m
Fig. 5.15
To gure out what happens at any point on the Earth other than the poles
takes some eort and the apparatus of rotating coordinate systems developed in this
chapter. To describe the mechanics, use the same coordinate system as in Eq. (5.27),
except that now there’s another force on the mass, that of the cord that suspends the
mass from the ceiling. These equations become
m
~r
mg^z
F
cord
^2m~!
_
~r
m
~r
mg
^
z
+
F
cord
(^
z
cos
^
x
sin
cos
^
y
sin
sin
 2
m~!
_
~r
(5
:
41)
and
are the spherical coordinates from the point of suspension on the ceiling as in
section0.3,except that contrary to tradition the angle
is measured from the  
z
axis.
The pendulum becomes a simple problem only if you make the approximation that it
is oscillating through a small angle. That means that the cord is almost vertical.
is
small and the
z
-component of acceleration is small, so the
z
-component of the force is small too.
cos
1
and
F
cord
mg
(5
:
42)
* Why not the North Pole? There’s an ocean there.
5|Non-Inertial Systems
173
The
x
and
y
-coordinates are related as in Eq. (0.13) to the spherical coordinates:
x
=
sin
cos
;
and
y
=
sin
sin
Put these into the equation of motion and you have approximately
m
~r
=
mg
^
xx
^
yy
 2
m~!
_
~r
=
mg
^
xx
^
yy
 2
m!
^
y
cos
+^
z
sin
_
~r
(5
:
43)
Look at the components in the
x
-
y
plane, the plane parallel to the Earth’s surface.
x
g
x
+2
!
sin
_
y
y
g
y
2
!
sin
_
x
(5
:
44)
To solve these, you can note that these are simultaneous, linear, constant coecient equations and
use an exponential solution. This is a perfectly correct method and it works, but I’ll show two other
methods to solve these equations more easily.
The use of complex algebra leads to much simpler equations. Take the rst of the equations
(5.44) and add
i
times the second equation.
x
+
i
y
g
(
x
+
iy
)+ 2
!
sin
(_
y
i
_
x
)=  
g
(
x
+
iy
 2
i!
sin
(_
x
+
i
_
y
)
(5
:
45)
Let
q
=
x
+
iy
and this is
q
g
q
2
i!
sin
_
q
This is an ordinary constant coecient equation with a solution
q
(
t
)=
Ae
t
with
2
+2
i!
sin

+
g
=0
i!
sin
q
!
2sin
2
g=‘
=
i
h
!
sin
q
!
2sin
2
+
g=‘
i
To interpret this, recall that the Earth is rotating slowly so that
!
2
g=‘
. Use this observation to get
asimpler approximate value of
by a series expansion. Let
!
2
0
=
g=‘
,then
!
2
=!
2
0
1.
=
i
h
!
sin
!
0
q
1+
!
2sin
2
=!
2
0
i
=
i
!
sin
!
0
1+
!
2
sin
2
=
2
!
2
0

=
i!
0
i!
sin
More directly, note that you are going to keep just the lowest order terms in
!
,dropping
!
2
. This
means that you can drop it while it is still inside the square root, getting the answer more quickly.
Start the pendulum by pulling it to one side and releasing it gently.
x
(0) =
R;
_
x
(0) = 0
; y
(0) = 0
;
_
y
(0) = 0
!
q
(0) =
R;
_
q
(0) = 0
q
(
t
)=
Ae
i
(
!
0
!
sin
)
t
+
Be
i
!
0
!
sin
)
t
q
(0) =
A
+
B
=
R;
_
q
(0) =
Ai
(
!
0
!
sin
)+
Bi
!
0
!
sin
)= 0
In these equations for the coecients
A
and
B
,do I need to include the terms in
!
sin
?No. All the
action occurs in the exponents controlling the phase of the exponentials.
A
=
B
=
R=
2
;
q
(
t
)=
R
2
h
e
i
(
!
0
!
sin
)
t
+
e
i
!
0
!
sin
)
t
i
=
R
cos
!
0
te
i!
sin
t
5|Non-Inertial Systems
174
The real and imaginary parts of this are
>
0
x
(
t
)=
R
cos
!
0
t
cos(
!
sin
t
)
y
(
t
)=  
R
cos
!
0
t
sin(
!
sin
t
)
(5
:
46)
and this is an oscillation in the
x
-
y
plane with frequency
!
0
,but the plane of the oscillation is rotating
with the slow rotation rate
!
sin
. In this picture the rotation of this plane is greatly exaggerated,
and during one swing the pendulum appears to execute a gure eight. If the oscillation period of this
pendulum is two seconds, the period of rotation of the Earth would have to be less than one minute for
this picture. For the real case the gure-eight motion will squeeze into something so close to a line you
can’t tell the dierence, and the pendulum will appear to move back and forth in a plane that rotates
once per day if you’re at the Earth’s pole or once every two days if you are at latitude 30
.
Sometimes you will see an explanation of the Foucault pendulum claiming that the plane of the
pendulum’s oscillation stays xed with respect to the stars. That’s true if you areat the North or South
Pole, but nowhere else. The equator is an extreme case that clearly shows the error of this statement.
Simply start the pendulum moving in a north-south plane and it stays there, having no rotation with
respect to the Earth, but rotating once per day with respect to the stars.
The Slick Way
And then there’s another, more clever way to solve this. Go back to the equations (5.44). Forget about
the fact that these refer to a rotating coordinate system and pretend that someone handed them to
you in an inertial system. These are now (except for
m
’s)
~
F
=
m~a
in a (pretend) inertial system.
Transform these
x
-
y
coordinates into a new rotating system. If I do it right I can cancel the
!
terms.
The new rotating system will have (unknown) angular velocity about the
z
-axis,
~!
0
^
z!
0
.
Equation (5.12) tells you how to modify the equations of motion by adding the inertial forces. As
before, don’t bother with the centrifugal force term and simply add the Coriolis term to the forces,
2
~!
0
_
~r
.
x
g
x
+2
!
sin
_
y
y=
g
y
2
!
sin
x_
!
x
g
x
+2
!
sin
_
y
+2
!
0
_
y
y=
g
y
2
!
sin
_x
2
!
0
_x
If I choose
!
0
!
sin
the equations become two separate harmonic oscillators and in that system
the pendulum does not rotate. Go back to the system xed in the Earth and it says that the plane of
oscillation of the pendulum will rotate at this rate
!
0
and it even gets the direction right. If you’re at
the North Pole it gives
!
0
!
,or
~!
0
^
z!
so that it’s rotating clockwise. Again step o the Earth
for a moment to verify that this is correct. (I had to use dots for time derivatives in both systems.
What else can I do?)
In the next chapter, in section6.6 you will see an analysis of the precession of a pendulum even
without arotating Earth. . The e case examined there is quite along way from theone here because
it concerns a pendulum going around almost in a circle, but the basic ideas will still apply. If the
pendulum is swinging back and forth but started with even a tiny amount of angular momentum about
the vertical axis, so that the original motion is not a straight line but a very narrow ellipse, then there is
aprecession that can easily be much larger than that caused by the Earth’s rotation. It will completely
5|Non-Inertial Systems
175
mask the Foucault eect. This is one reason it was so dicult to build a pendulum to measure the
Earth’s rotation. Foucault’s achievement was not trivial!*
The Really Slick Way
Go back to Eq. (5.41) and leave everything in vector form. After all isn’t the use of vectors supposed
to simplify the mathematics? Take the cross product of each side with
~r
.
m
~r
mg
^
z
F
cord
^
r
2
m~!
_
~r
Eq. (5.41)
m~r
~r
mg~r
^
z
~r
F
cord
^2m~r
~!
_
~r
(5
:
47)
m
~r
_
~r
.
mg~r
^
z
  2
m
~!
(
~r
.
_
~r
_
~r
(
~!
.
~r
)
_
~
L
mg~r
^
z
+2
m
_
~r
(
~!
.
~r
)
mg~r
^
z
2
m
_
~r !‘
sin
(5
:
48)
This is how you derive the angular momentum equation from
~
F
=
m~a
,as in section1.3. The right
side is the torque: The rst term is the vector version of
mg‘
sin
,and the last term is the one that
causes all the interesting problems.
As was done a couple of paragraphs back, pretend this is a stationary system and go to a new
system rotating with respect to it.
d
~
L
dt
mg~r
^
z
2
m
_
~r !‘
sin
=
_
~
L
+
~!
0
~
L
(5
:
49)
where this new unknown
~!
0
is the rotation with respect to the old coordinate system.
_
~
L
+
~!
0
~
L
=
_
~
L
+
m~!
0
~r
_
~r
=
_
~
L
+
m
~r
(
~!
0.
_
~r
_
~r
(
~!
0.
~r
)
(5
:
50)
If the rotation of this system is about the vertical axis, the vector
~!
0
is perpendicular to the velocity
vector
_
~r
. (Remember: small angle approximations here.) The equation is now
_
~
L
m
_
~r
(
~!
0.
~r
)=  
mg~r
^
z
2
m
_
~r !‘
sin
(5
:
51)
Now let
~!
0
= 2
!
sin
^
z
and the second terms on the two sides then cancel, leaving only the
mg‘
sin
term that causes the pendulum to swing back and forth. There’s no rotation left, so this denes the
coordinate system in which the pendulum does not precess. Notice: slicker does not mean easier.
Exercises
Whenacarturnsacornerwitharadialaccelerationofmagnitudenomorethan
g
,how fast can it
be moving to go from the right lane into the right lane if the lanes are 12 feet wide?
Amassisatrestinacoordinate system thatis alsoatrest. . Nowthemassremains s atrestwith
respect to this coordinate system, but the system starts to rotate at constant angular acceleration, so
* The book "Pendulum: Leon Foucault and the Triumph of Science" by Aczel is a good history of
the subject.
5|Non-Inertial Systems
176
!
=
t
. Just as the rotation starts, what does Eq. (5.11) tell you about the mass, and what force does
it take to hold it at rest in this system?
Ifavectorisstationaryinaninertialsystem,whatisitstimederivativeinarotatingsystem?
Findarootof0
:
001
x
3
+
x
+1 = 0 to at least four signicant gures.
Findarootof
x
2 +
:
01sin
x
=0 to ve or more signicant gures.
InFigure5.4,ifthepersonthrowingtheballthrowsitdirectlytohisright,whatdirectionwillthe
Coriolis force on it be? And if he throws it to his left?
Thesameastheimmediatelyprecedingexercise,onlynowdescribewhatanaerialviewbyastationary
observer will be.
FillinthealgebratogetEq.(5.40).
IftheSuniscompressedtoapoint,ablackhole,andyouarefallingintoitfeetrst,howfarfrom
the origin would you have to be so that the gravitational eld on your head and on your feet dier
by 10 m/s
2
(the onset of spaghettication)? This is just an extreme version of a tide. [Ans: about
3700km] See also problem6.14 for another aspect of this question. You can do this the hard way or
you can compute
dg=dr
.
10 Intheprecedingexerciseonspaghettication,atwhatspeedwouldyoubemovingifyouarefalling
in from very far away?
11 Onpage172itsaysthattheMoonisrecedingfromtheEarthatafewcentimetersperyear.How
far away would this say that it will be in one billion years? Why is this estimate a great exaggeration?
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested