how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to word editable text online application SDK tool html wpf winforms online mechanics19-part708

6|Orbits
187
Divide these.
T
H
T
E
=
a
H
a
E
3
=
2
!
a
H
a
E
=
T
H
T
E
2
=
3
The longest distance the comet could go occurs if its elliptical orbit is a straight line|an extreme case.
That would make the maximum distance from the sun twice its semi-major axis.
2
a
H
=2
a
E
T
H
T
E
2
=
3
=2
a
E
.
75
:
32
2
=
3
=35
:
67
a
E
(6
:
11)
The true distance will be a little less than this, and is measured to be 35.1AU, where one astronomical
unit (AU) equals 150  10
9
m= 150 Gm, which is almost exactly the semi-major axis of Earth’s orbit.
This puts the greatest radial distance of Halley’s comet out beyond Neptune’s orbit.
6.3 Kepler Problem
Now pick a specic
f
that varies as 1
=r
2
.A straightforward attack on equation (6.10) is dicult, but
there’s a clue leading to a method that does work. Kepler’s analysis of the orbits of planets shows that
there are some simple-looking results, one of which is that the orbits are shaped as ellipses. That you
know the shape of the orbit doesn’t tell you anything about how the planet movesasafunctionoftime.
It provides no clue about solving (6.10) directly. The clue is that you may get a simple result if you
eliminate the time variable in favor of another. This works, and the other independent variable to use is
. If I can solve for the function
r
(
)perhaps I’ll recognize it as the equation for an ellipse. Now how
many people know enough analytic geometry to write the polar equation for an ellipse? Rectangular
coordinates maybe, but probably not polar.
The equation in question is
r
(
)=
A
B
+
C
cos
j
C
j
<
j
B
j
(6
:
12)
Amore familiar rectangular equation for an ellipse is
x
2
a
2
+
y
2
b
2
=1 centered at the origin, or more generally,
(
x
x
0
)
2
a
2
+
(
y
y
0
)
2
b
2
=1
(6
:
13)
Write Eq. (6.12) as
Br
+
Cr
cos
=
A
;write
r
and
r
cos
in terms of
x
and
y
,and you can nish it
easily in problem6.4, showing that the polar form and the rectangular form describe the same curve.
Another way to dene an ellipse parallels the denition of a circle. A circle is the set of points all at
aconstant distance from one xed point. An ellipse taketwo points and looks for the set of points so
that the sum of the distances to the two points is a constant, as in the picture at Eq. (6.17).* The two
points are the foci of the ellipse.
This polar equation for an ellipse doesn’t have any obvious properties that I might recognize in
adierential equation, but what about 1
=r
?That’s proportional to
B
+
C
cos
and we spent a whole
chapter on functions such as that |harmonic oscillators. Working backwards from the experimental
results then suggests two changes of variables, both the independent and the dependent ones.
t
!
and
r
!
u
=1
=r
* What about dierence, product, or quotient of distances? Also the sum or dierence of squares
of distances? They’re fun too.
Convert pdf to word editable text online - application SDK tool:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to word editable text online - application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
188
Now it’s a lot of application of the chain rule. You can do the changes one at a time in either order,
but once you’ve done this you will ask if there’s an easier way. There is: Do both at once.
Recall:
=
r
2
_
;
so
‘u
2
=
_
dr
dt
=
dr
du
du
d
d
dt
1
u
2
du
d
‘u
2
du
d
d
2
r
dt
2
d
2
u
d
2
d
dt
2
u
2
d
2
u
d
2
Put this change into Eq. (6.10) to get
2
u
2
d
2
u
d
2
=
1
m
f
1
u
+
2
u
3
;
or
d
2
u
d
2
+
u
1
m‘
2
u
2
f
1
u
(6
:
14)
This is starting to look like a harmonic oscillator. Can you solve it? That depends on
f
,and for
which functions
f
is iteasy? If the right side is a constant or if it is proportional to
u
,then you can do
it without diculty, otherwise it’s hard. What happens with the Kepler problem?
f
(
r
)=  
GMm
r
2
=)
d
2
u
d
2
+
u
1
m‘
2
u
2
GMmu
2
=+
GM
2
(6
:
15)
Leave the other easy case for later, section6.9, because though those results are amusing, they’re not
very important. (What
f
would that be?) Most of the rest of this chapter will concern the exact
solutions to the Kepler problem and approximate solutions to all the others.
Equation (6.15) is easy.
u
=
GM
2
+
C
cos(
0
)
;
or
1
u
=
r
=
2
=GM
1+
cos(
0
)
(6
:
16)
C
was an arbitrary constant so
=
C‘
2
=GM
is too, and it’s dimensionless. This is the ellipse as
stated in Kepler’s laws as long as the parameter
has magnitude less than one. (More on that later,
section6.10.) The numerator of (6.16) is a length, and
0
is an angle. I may as well assume that
0
because if not, then I can redene the parameter
0
by adding
to it. That changes the sign in front
of the cosine back to positive again. With this convention on
,the angle
0
is the direction in which
the denominator is largest. It points toward the smallest
r
in the orbit.
When you’re talking about planets going around the Sun, the orbital point nearest the Sun is the
perihelion, and the one farthest away is the aphelion. For objects orbiting the Earth, the corresponding
names are perigee and apogee, and the generic terms are periapsis and apoapsis.
=0
:
66
a
b
f
r
c
r
0
foci
r
=
a
(1  
2
)
1+
cos
f
=
a
b
=
a
p
2
a
2
b
2
=
f
2
r
+
r
0
=2
a
A
=
ab
c
=
a
f
=
a
(1  
)
(6
:
17)
application SDK tool:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc Create editable Word file online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins.
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
189
This gure summarizes many properties of the ellipse. The two governing parameters are
a
,the semi-
major axis, and
,the eccentricity. Other values that can be derived in terms of these start with the
semi-minor axis
b
,the distance from the center to a focus
f
,and the perihelion distance
c
.The origin
of the polar coordinate system is at the right hand focus. That’s where the Sun is. The other focus is
symmetrically placed on the other side of the ellipse, and the sum of the distances from the two foci
(
r
+
r
0
)is a constant. The ellipse in the drawing has a fairly large eccentricity,
=0
:
66, which is far
larger than the eccentricity of any planet. Earth’s is 0.017, and even Mercury has an eccentricity of
only 0.21, the largest of all the planets.* On the scale of this drawing, Earth’s orbit is so non-eccentric
that the Sun’s position would be almost in the center of the ellipse|just on the edge of the darkened
part of the vertical axis in the picture. Only Venus has a lower eccentricity than Earth’s: 0.0068. The
error in drawing Earth’s orbit as a perfect circle is about the thickness of the line representing the orbit.
Despite this, Tycho’s observational data, taken before 1600 and before the invention of the telescope,
were so accurate that Kepler was able to use them to discover his laws. For the derivations of these
properties of the ellipse, see the exercises on page218
Example
What happens to this ellipse if it is stretched out to innity along the major axis? That depends
on how you do it, because you could stretch it while keeping
b
constant. That will result in two lines
parallel to the horizontal axis and a distance 2
b
apart. A more interesting limit appears if you let
a
!1
while keeping
c
constant.
c
is the distance of closest approach on the right end.
c
=
a
(1  
)
;
so this requires
!1 as
a
!1
Go up to the rst equation, the one for
r
.
r
=
a
(1  
2
)
1+
cos
=
c
(1 +
)
1+
cos
!
r
=
2
c
1+ cos
as
!1
To see what this represents, put it in rectangular coordinates, with the origin at the focus.
r
+
r
cos
=2
c
!
p
x
2+
y
2+
x
=2
c
!
p
x
2+
y
=2
c
x
!
x
2
+
y
2
=4
c
2
4
cx
+
x
2
!
y
2
=4
c
2
4
cx
(6
:
18)
This is a parabola opening to the left (
x
y
2
). It has its vertex at
y
=0,
x
=
c
.
How much time does it take a planet to orbit the Sun? There are enough relations here to gure
that out. Start with
=
r
2
_
.Solve it for
dt
=
1
r
2
d
r
rd
At this point you can substitute Eq. (6.16) and if you know something about complex variables and
contour integration you can do the integral fairly easily. (If you don’t you should learn, but that’s
another story.) There’s an easier trick here anyway. The factor
r
2
d
is an area. It is twice the area of
atriangle with vertex at the origin.
dA
=
1
2
r
.
rd
so
dt
=
2
dA
(6
:
19)
* Now that Pluto (0.25) has been dethroned.
application SDK tool:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic control to export Word from multiple PDF files in Create editable Word file online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
190
Notice that this equationis Kepler’s second law as in section6.2! The area swept out is proportional
to the time elapsed. Integrate this over the whole ellipse, 0
< <
2
,you have the period
T
=2
A=‘
.
Combine this with the known area of an ellipse,
ab
,Eq. (6.16), and the other properties in Eq. (6.17).
T
=
2
ab
=
2
a
2
p
2
:
Now use
2
=
GMa
(1  
2
)from Eqs. (6.16) and (6.17)
Solve the last expression for
p
2
to get
p
=
p
GMa
then
T
=
2
a
2
.
p
GMa
=
2
p
GM
a
3
=
2
(6
:
20)
and this is the third of Kepler’s laws. When the eccentricity is zero the semi-major axis is the radius of
the circle,
T
/
r
3
=
2
,and you can derive this special case by elementary methods.
Energy
Angular momentum conservation has played an important role in this analysis; count the number of
times that
=
r
2
_
has been used so far. What about energy? That should have some signicance too.
E
=
1
2
mv
2
+
U
(
r
)
;
where
dU
dr
=
f
(
r
)
In the same cylindrical coordinates, this is
E
=
1
2
m
_r^r+r
_
^
2
+
U
=
1
2
m
_r
2
+
r
2
_
2
+
U
(6
:
21)
Combine this equation with angular momentum,
=
r
2
_
,to eliminate the
variable.
E
=
1
2
m
_
r
2
+
2
r
2
+
U
=
1
2
m
_
r
2
+
m‘
2
2
r
2
+
U
(
r
)
(6
:
22)
This looks like a one-dimensional problem again, with the
x
-coordinate replaced by
r
. The role of
potential energy is played by the nal combination in the last equation, not
U
alone, but combined
with another term called the \centrifugal potential" energy. The combination is called the \eective
potential energy".
U
e
=
U
(
r
)+
m‘
2
2
r
2
(6
:
23)
For the Kepler problem Eq. (6.23) is
U
e
(
r
)=  
GMm
r
+
m‘
2
2
r
2
U
e
r
E
1
E
2
E
3
/1
=r
2
/ 1
=r
(6
:
24)
The same sort of analysis done in section 2.3 applies here too. In this eectively one-dimensional
problem the total energy determines the qualitative behavior of the solution. If
E
=
E
2
,the allowed
application SDK tool:C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online in ASP Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
The Word document file created by RasterEdge C# Word document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
191
motion is back and forth between the two stopping points where the line
E
2
intersects the eective
potential energy curve. This is just the elliptical orbit described in the preceding section, and the
stopping points are the perihelion and aphelion. You can’t however tell from just this simple energy
analysis that it is an ellipse. The value of the energy in this case is
application SDK tool:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK tool:C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
file created by RasterEdge C# Word document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics Create Word From PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
192
The annual energy received from the Sun is the integral
P
R
2
Z
dt
1
4
r
2
=
P
R
2
I
d
dt
d
1
4
r
2
=
P
R
2
I
d
r
2
1
4
r
2
=
P
R
2
2
4
=
P
R
2
2
(6
:
27)
and in this equation the eccentricity cancels, leaving only the dependence on angular momentum. As
acheck, what should this be for a circular orbit, where
=
vr
,and does it agree with this result?
It is worth looking at the result expressed in terms of other variables. Combine pieces of
Eqs. (6.26) to get
=
p
GMa
(1  
2
)
;
so
P
R
2
2
=
P
R
2
2
p
GMa
(1  
2
)
(6
:
28)
Without further information about the parameters, it is not clear that there are any implications
to be drawn from these equations. A detailed analysis of the interactions of the planets does lead
to important consequences however. The solar system consists of the Sun and Jupiter plus detritus.
Maybe you can include Saturn too, but that’s about it. The question is: what is the eect of Jupiter
on Earth’s orbit. That takes you far beyond this text, but I can quote some results.
The shape of Earth’s orbit changes over time so that the eccentricity will vary slightly, as will
the direction of the perihelion with respect to the distant stars, and the time scale for these changes is
the order of 100000 years. One thing that does not change on this time scale is
a
,the semi-major axis.
The immediate consequence of this is that the annual energy reaching the Earth will vary over time as
varies. This is apparent in the last form in Eq. (6.28). This is a suciently complicated problem that
it is still not fully understood, and you can search for information relating to it under the heading of
\Milankovitch cycles". There you will see that I’ve barely started on the subject.
What is the quantitative implication of the preceding paragraph? That depends on how much
varies. If it varies from 0
:
01 to 0
:
06 (not out of line with expected values), the ratio of the mean
insolations will be [(1  
:
01
2
)
=
(1  
:
06
2
)]
1
=
2
=1
:
0018. A nave calculation would imply that this will
provide a temperature change of about 0
:
13
C. Life is never that simple of course. There are probably
interactions with the precession of the Earth itself, and it may matter whether perihelion occurs during
the Northern winter as it does now, or during the Northern summer as it will in about a dozen millenia.
6.5 Approximate Solutions
There are few orbit problems that can be solved exactly in terms of familiar functions. And if there
are others that can be solved in terms of unfamiliar functions, then which gives more insight, an exact
complicated solution or an approximate simple solution? Usually the latter.
Some examples of force laws that can really happen:
(1) Is our sun exactly spherical? If it is slightly oblate the way that the Earth is, then its gravitational
eld isn’t exactly the same as a point mass at its center. It will have a small part that drops o as
1
=r
4
added to the usual 1
=r
2
force.
(2) If the solar system is embedded in a background of a uniformly dense material (dark matter? dust?)
how does that aect orbits?
(3) There are relativistic corrections to the equations, and they will aect the orbit.
(4) The gravitational pull by the other planets, especially Jupiter, contribute. This is by far the largest
of all these eects, but deriving it can wait until the end of the chapter, section6.12, as it is somewhat
involved.
There are two sorts of questions I want to examine about orbits: What is their shape? What is
the time dependence of the object in orbit? There are two starting points for this analysis, Eqs. (6.10)
and (6.14). The second is concerned withonly the shape of the orbit and the rst can do either, but
not as easily.
6|Orbits
193
Example
A reminder of the methods: If you apply
F
=
ma
to the case
F
x
(
x
)=
m
x
,what happens at or
near a point of equilibrium? You will use series expansions. For example,
F
x
(
x
) =
x
x
3
and
equilibrium occurs when this is zero.
F
x
(
x
0
)= 0
!
F
x
(
x
)=
F
x
(
x
0
)+ (
x
x
0
)
F
0
x
(
x
0
)+ 
mx
=
F
0
(
x
0
)(
x
x
0
)
Let
z
=
x
x
0
mz
F
0
(
x
0
)
z
=0
x
0
x
3
0
=0
x
0
=(
=
)
1
=
2
F
0
x
=
3
x
2
F
0
x
(
x
0
)=  2
F
x
(
x
)= 0 +  2
(
x
x
0
)
m
x
= 2
(
x
x
0
)
m
z
+2
z
=0
And the last equation is a harmonic oscillator, assuming that
is positive of course.
First Method
Start with Eq. (6.10). First write the equation dening a circular orbit,
r
=
r
0
.This is for an arbitrary
radial force at this point.
r
=
1
m
f
(
r
)+
2
r
3
;
then
0=
1
m
f
(
r
0
)+
2
r
3
0
(6
:
29)
For anearly circular orbit,
r
will be nearly
r
0
.That means that I can write
r
=
r
0
+
x
and assume that
x
is small compared to
r
0
. Next do a series expansion to determine the properties of
x
. As with the
sort of expansions you did so many of in chapter three, this will turn out to be a harmonic oscillator.
r= x=
1
m
f
(
r
0
+
x
)+
2
(
r
0
+
x
)
3
=
1
m
f
(
r
0
)+
xf
0
(
r
0
)+ 
+
2
r
3
0
(1 +
x=r
0
)3
=
1
m
f
(
r
0
)+
xf
0
(
r
0
)+  
+
2
r
3
0
 3
x
r
0
x
=
1
m
f
0
(
r
0
)  3
2
r
4
0
x
=
1
m
f
0
(
r
0
)+
3
r
0
f
(
r
0
)
x
(6
:
30)
The leading terms, the ones without the
x
,add to zero. I used Eq. (6.29) twice in the last line, rst to
eliminate the constant term, then to rearrange the coecient of
x
. Is this a harmonic oscillator? That
depends on the sign of the last factor: Is it negative? Try the Kepler case; you already know the exact
answer there, so it’s a good laboratory.
Agraph of the eective radial force versus
r
:
f
(
r
)=  
GMm
r
2
;
f
0
(
r
0
)+
3
r
0
f
(
r
0
)= 2
GMm
r
3
0
3
r
0
GMm
r
2
0
GMm
r
3
0
r
0
f
e
(
r
)=  
GMm
r2
+
2
r3
r
6|Orbits
194
The dierential equation (6.30) for
x
is then a harmonic oscillator equation.
x=
GM
r
3
0
x
=)
r
(
t
)=
r
0
+
x
=
r
0
+
x
0
cos(
!
0
t
+
)
;
where
!
2
0
=
GM
r
3
0
=
2
r
4
0
Where did that last equation for
!
2
0
come from? That is Eq. (6.29) for the case that
f
(
r
) =
GMm=r
2
. This equation tells only the way that
r
oscillates. It doesn’t by itself describe the
orbit because you need to know the angular variable
(
t
)for that. This angular coordinate will come
from Eq. (6.9) for angular momentum per mass.
_
=
r
2
=
(
r
0
+
x
)2
!
r
2
0
2
x
r
0
=
!
0
2
x
r
0
If
x
=
x
0
cos
!
0
t;
then
(
t
)=
!
0
t
2
x
0
r
0
sin
!
0
t
(6
:
31)
If all you want is the shape of the orbit, the second (small) term in
(
t
)isn’t important, so I will
start by ignoring it. At the end, come back and see what it does.
(
t
)=
!
0
t;
r
(
t
)=
r
0
+
x
0
cos
!
0
t
As
t
increases from 0 to 2
=!
0
,the angle
goes from zero to 2
. The planet orbits once. In that
same period,
r
starts at
r
0
+
x
0
,decreases to
r
0
x
0
,and then returns to its starting point. It is a
closed orbit.
r
0
r
0
x
0
r
0
+
x
0
Fig. 6.4
Compare this to the exact result from Eq. (6.16), and then look at the rst term in its series expansion.
r
=
2
=GM
1+
cos(
0
)
r
0
cos(
0
)
Is
2
=GM
equal to
r
0
?Yes, go back and check it out. How about the sign? Take
0
=
and it’s the
same.
x
0
=
r
0
.
The shape of the approximate orbit matches the shape of the exact orbit. Now, what about that
extra term in Eq. (6.31)?
=
!
0
t
(2
x
0
=r
0
)sin
!
0
t
. At time zero, the positions match, but
_
is a
little smaller than the
!
0
that it had without this extra term. Farther away from the sun, the angular
speed is less, and that is nothing more than conservation of angular momentum,
mr
2
_
. Now what
about the linear speed?
v
=(
r
0
+
x
0
)
_
=(
r
0
+
x
0
)
!
0
(1   2
x
0
=r
0
)=
r
0
!
0
(1  
x
0
=r
0
)
It is a little less than the
r
0
!
0
that you have for the original circle. That makes sense; the planet is
farther away, so its kinetic energy is a little less. It has climbed up the potential well. On the other side
of the orbit the speed is correspondingly larger than
r!
0
so it catches up.
6|Orbits
195
To see an example of what another shape of orbit could be, suppose that the rate of radial
oscillation is exactly ve times the revolution rate.
=
!
0
t;
r
=
r
0
+
cos(5
!
0
t
)
Second Method
Start with Eq. (6.14) to examine the orbit alone, without following the time dependence. The aim
again will be to examine somealmost circular orbits. With
u
=1
=r
,
d
2
u
d
2
+
u
1
m‘
2
u
2
f
1
u
Eq. (6.14) (6
:
32)
Acircular orbit is
r
(
)=
r
0
=constant. For this case the term
d
2
u=d
2
is zero, so
u
0
=1
=r
0
satises
u
0
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
f
1
u
0
(6
:
33)
This may be a hard equation to solve or it may be easy, but leave it alone for now because it isn’t yet
clear just how much of the equationneeds to be solved. If and when I have to come back and solve it
Iwill. To determine the shape of an orbit that is almost circular, assume that
u
is almost constant, so
you look for a solution in the form
u
(
)=
u
0
+
x
(
)
;
so that
d
2
x
d
2
+
u
0
+
x
1
m‘
2(
u
0
+
x
)2
f
1
u
0
+
x
When
x
0 this of course satises the immediately preceding equation for the circle. If
x
is small
(
u
0
)do a series expansion on everything
d
2
x
d
2
+
u
0
+
x
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
(1 +
x=u
0
)2
f
1
u
0
(1 +
x=u
0
)
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
(1   2
x=u
0
)
f
1
u
0
(1  
x=u
0
)
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
(1   2
x=u
0
)
f
1
u
0
f
0
1
u
0
x
u
2
0
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
f
1
u
0
+
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
f
1
u
0
2
x
u
0
+
x
u
2
0
f
0
1
u
0
d
2
x
d
2
+
x
=+
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
f
1
u
0
2
u
0
+
1
u
2
0
f
0
1
u
0
x
(6
:
34)
The last simplication used the equation for a circular orbit, (6.33). This is now a simple equation for
x
(
), because all the coecients are constants. Does this provide a solution for
r
(
)? Just one more
step.
r
=
1
u
=
1
r
0
+
x
=
1
u
0
x
u
0
=
r
0
r
2
0
x
(6
:
35)
6|Orbits
196
You already know the exact solution for the Kepler problem, where the force varies as 1
=r
2
,so
the rst question to ask should be whether this approximate equation predicts correct results when you
know theanswer. I’llleavethistotheproblem(6.11),butwiththecautionthatithasaminorpitfall
near the start of the problem, so if you get a result that fails to agree with the exact one, go way back.
Example
Suppose the radial force is constant,
f
f
0
.The equation (6.34) is then
d
2
x
d
2
+
x
=
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
f
2
u
0
x
then
d
2
x
d
2
+
x
1+ 2
f
0
=m‘
2
u
3
0
=0
Istill need the equation for
r
0
.
u
0
=+
1
m‘
2
u
2
0
f
0
;
or
u
3
0
=
f
0
=m‘
2
The equation for the perturbation
x
is now
d
2
x
d
2
+
x
1+ 2
=0
;
x
(
)=
A
cos(
p
3
+
)
The orbit is
r
(
)=
r
0
+
r
1
cos(
p
3
+
), where
r
1
Ar
2
0
is another form for the arbitrary constant
representing the small deviation from a circular orbit.
Fig. 6.5
When
by 2
,the oscillation in radius will have gone through a phase of
2
p
3, a little less that 13
=
4
cycles. In the Kepler problem, when the planet has
gone around once,
=2
,the planet is back where it started and with the same
velocity. The orbit is closed. In contrast you have this example, in which no matter
how many times you go around, you’re never back to exactly the same position and
velocity.
p
3is not a rational number; it can’t be expressed as the quotient of two
integers, so no integer multiple of it will be an integer. Can this happen?
Yes, remember that the calculations for the Kepler problem assumed that thesingle thing aecting
the motions of a planet is the sun. What about the pull by the other planets? When you take them
into account the problem is of course far more dicult, but one consequence is that the elliptical orbits
are only a (very good) rst approximation and the orbits don’tquite close. The perihelion of Mercury
precesses around the Sun at the rate of about 574 seconds of arc per Earth century. That is 0.16
per
century. It doesn’t sound like much, but it was measured by about 1800 and (most but not all of) the
explanation was worked out by Laplace as due to the pulls by the other planets.
Example
If the solar system is led with a uniform dust cloud of density
,it will provide an added force on
the planets:
F
r
(
r
)=  
Gmr=
3. Evaluate the eect on the planet’s orbit caused by this dust. It will
be enough to nd the orbit without nding the time dependence.
The total force on the planet is  
GMm=r
2
Gmr=
3, and using the same change of variables
as in Eq. (6.14),
u
=1
=r
,the equation for the shape of the orbit is
d
2
u
d
2
+
u
1
m‘
2
u
2
f
1
u
1
m‘
2
u
2
h
GMmu
2
Gm=
3
u
i
=
GM
2
+
G
3
2
u
3
For small oscillations about the constant radius,
u
=
u
0
+
x
,and this becomes
d
2
x
d
2
+
u
0
+
x
=
GM
2
+
G
3
2(
u
0
+
x
)3
GM
2
+
G
3
2
u
3
0
1  3
x=u
0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested