Mathematical Prependix
17
Read the components from these equations. E.g.
a
x
x
=
d
2
x=dt
2
. For cylindrical coordinates
the appropriate basis vectors conform to this system, with ^
r
pointing away from the origin and
^
perpendicular to that.
~r
=
z^z
+
r^r
,and plane polar simply omits the
z
. Now the unit vectors are
functions of position, implying that as a particle moves these unit vectors will change, and you have to
use the product rule to dierentiate the terms. ^
z
is constant so it causes no trouble.
~v
_
z^z
+_
r^r
+
r
_
^r
The one new feature is the third term, and for that you need to notice that ^
r
is a function of the
coordinate
,though not of
z
or
r
. To evaluate this derivative, use the chain rule.
d^r
dt
=
d^r
d
d
dt
The rst of these derivatives,
d
^
r=d
,is now a problem in geometry, and there’s a result about dier-
entiating vectors that have a constant magnitude: the derivative is perpendicular to the original vector.
To show this, let
~u
beany vector of constant magnitude. That is,
~u
.
~u
=
C
. Dierentiate this with
respect toanything.
d
dt
~u
.
~u
=
dC
dt
=0 = 2
~u
.
d~u
dt
(0
:
38)
That’s all you need, because it says that the derivative is either zero or is perpendicular to
~u
as claimed.
d
^
r=d
is perpendicular to ^
r
. It is in the
^
direction. Now, what is its magnitude? A sketch
answers the question. The sketch will also answer the question: \Why is it in the +
^
direction and not
along  
^
?"
^
r
(
)
^
r
(
+
)
^
r
Fig. 0.11
The three vectors ^
r
(
),^
r
(
+
), and ^
r
form an isosceles triangle. Construct the bisector
of the vertex angle, and you immediately see that the length of ^
r
is
^
r
=2
.
1
.
sin(
=
2)
As 
!0, the sine behaves as 
=
2itself, so the quotient
^
r
=
!1.
d
^
r
d
=
^
;
and similarly
d
^
d
^
r
(0
:
39)
Now back to velocity and acceleration.
~v
=
d~r=dt
_
z^z
+_
r^r
+
r
_
^r= z_^z+ _r^r+r
_
^
(0
:
40)
Another derivative:
~a
=
d~v=dt
=
z
^
z
+
r
^
r
+_
r
_
^
r
+_
r
_
^
+
r
^
+
r
_
_
^
=
z^z
+
r^r
+_
r
d^r
d
_
+_
r
_
^
+
r
^
+
r
_
d
^
d
_
=
z
^
z
+^
r
r
r
_
2
+
^
r
+2_
r
_
(0
:
41)
Convert pdf to text without losing formatting - software SDK cloud:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to text without losing formatting - software SDK cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
Mathematical Prependix
18
Here you need
d
^
=d
,another derivative of a unit vector, so it’s perpendicular to
^
. How big is it?
You can do the same sort of geometry as with^
r
,or notice that
^r
.
^
=0  !
d
d
^r
.
^
=0 =
d^r
d
.
^
+^
r
.
d
^
d
=1 +^
r
.
d
^
d
and this establishes the sign and magnitude of
d
^
=d
as in Eq. (0.39). Increasing the angle
alittle
bit rotates an object a little bit counterclockwise. That rotates ^
r
toward
^
.It rotates
^
toward  ^
r
.
That the basis vectors vary with position and are not parallel to each other as you move around
the coordinate system is a familiar idea in another context: geography.
^
Up,
^
South, and
^
East are not
parallel vectors as you move around the Earth.
For spherical coordinates the derivations can be done along the same lines, but with a lot more
algebra. It is not worth the trouble to go through it, and you don’t need the results as often. The
answer is (remember to distinguish the spherical coordinate
r
from the cylindrical one|they’re spelled
the same).
~r
=
r
^
r
~v
=
_
~r
_
r^r
+
r
_
^
+
r
_
sin
^
~a
=
r
r
_
2
sin
2
r
_
2
^
r
+
r
+2_
r
_
r
_
2
sin
cos
^
+
r
sin
+2_
r
_
sin
+2
r
_
_
cos
^
(0
:
42)
In geographical terms,
^
r
c
Up
^
S
c
outh
^
E
b
ast
Example
Circular motion is a familiar example from introductory courses. If
z
=0 and
r
=a constant, the
equations (0.40) and (0.41) are
~v
=
r
_
^
and
~a
^
rr
_
2
+
^
r
^
r
v
2
r
+
^
dv
dt
(0
:
43)
The last form comes from using the magnitude of the rst of these equations for
~v
,that is
v
=
r
_
,and
it reproduces the familiar inward radial acceleration for circular motion (
r
_
2
=
v
2
=r
). The tangential
component is
r
=
d
(
r
_
)
=dt
=
dv=dt
Now waita minute! If you believe this manipulation, look
again more critically. Is the motion counterclockwise or clockwise and does it matter? Is
_
positive or
negative? Is the magnitude of a vector positive? When you express a vector in terms of components,
is the coecient of the unit vector the magnitude of the vector or a component of the vector? Answer:
the correct equation is not
v
=
r
_
,but
v
=
r
_
,stating that the phi-component of the velocity is
r
_
.
Go back and modify these equations appropriately.
Example
x
=
x
0
,a constant,
y
=
v
0
t
should have constant velocity and zero acceleration, but that’s not so
obvious if you see it in polar coordinates.
r
=
p
x
2
+
y
2
=
q
x
2
0
+
v
2
0
t
2
and
=tan
1
(
y=x
)= tan
1
v
0
t
x
0
~v
=^
r
_
r
+
^
r
_
=^
r
v
2
0
t
p
x
2
0
+
v
2
0
t
2
+
^
q
x
2
0
+
v
2
0
t
2
1
1+
v
0
t=x
0
2
.
v
0
x
0
=^
r
v
2
0
t
p
x
2
0
+
v
2
0
t
2
+
^
v
0
x
0
p
x
2
0
+
v
2
0
t
2
(0
:
44)
software SDK cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET merge PDF files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET convert PDF to tiff, VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Convert to PDF with embedded
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages
www.rasteredge.com
Mathematical Prependix
19
You can see that this has the correct behavior at
t
= 0 and as
t
! 1. Does it have the correct
magnitude? And what is its derivative?
0.7 Complex Algebra
This section appears in chapters 3, 4, 6, and implicitly many other places.
There are some standard manipulations with complex arithmetic that take some practice. Even the
basic +,  , , and  are not exactly what you learned in third grade, so I’ll start with those. The
standard commutative, associative, and distributive laws apply to the rst three, so
(7 + 2
i
)(6 + 3
i
)= (6 + 3
i
)(7 + 2
i
)= 36 + 33
i
(1 + 2
i
)
(3 + 4
i
)(5 + 6
i
)
=
(1 + 2
i
)(3 + 4
i
)
(5 + 6
i
)= (1 + 2
i
)( 9 + 38
i
)=  85 + 20
i
(1 + 2
i
)
(3 + 4
i
)+ (5 + 6
i
)
=(1 + 2
i
)(3 + 4
i
)+ (1 + 2
i
)(5 + 6
i
)=
(1 + 2
i
)(8 + 10
i
)=  12 + 26
i
As for division, it is no more commutative here than it is for real numbers, but a simple trick
allows you to simplify some expressions. The complex conjugate of a number is the number found by
changing the sign of the imaginary part.
z
=5 + 7
i
=)
z
=5   7
i
The
notation is a common one for this operation, though 
z
is another notation that many prefer.
What is the product of a number and its complex conjugate?
z
=5 + 7
i; z
=5   7
i
=)
z
z
=(5   7
i
)(5 + 7
i
)= 25 + 49 + 35
i
35
i
=74
z
z
is always real and positive: (
a
+
ib
)(
a
ib
) =
a
2
+
b
2
is the square of the magnitude of the
complex number, the square of
p
a
2
+
b
2
.How do you use this to manipulate division? Rationalize the
denominator of a quotient.
1+ 2
i
3+ 4
i
=
(1 + 2
i
)(3   4
i
)
(3 + 4
i
)(3   4
i
)
=
11 + 2
i
25
(0
:
45)
Multiplying a number by its complex conjugate results in a real, so you can multiply the numerator and
denominator of a quotient by the complex conjugate of the denominator in order to bring the result
into a simpler form. If you ever want to make the numerator real instead, use the same idea.
Example
Afew cases of such manipulation, simplifying complex expressions:
 4
i
i
=
(3   4
i
)(2 +
i
)
(2  
i
)(2 +
i
)
=
10   5
i
5
=2  
i:
(3
i
+1)
2
1
i
+
3
i
2+
i
=( 8 + 6
i
)
(2 +
i
)+ 3
i
(2  
i
)
(2  
i
)(2 +
i
)
=( 8 + 6
i
)
5+ 7
i
5
=
2  26
i
5
:
i
3
+
i
10
+
i
i
2
+
i
137
+1
=
i
)+ ( 1) +
i
( 1) + (
i
)+ (1)
=
1
i
=
i:
What is the geometric interpretation of
i
?It is a factor it rotates you by 90
.
z
=1 + 3
i
iz
i
2
z
i
3
z
iz
=
i
(1 + 3
i
)=  3 +
i
i
2
z
=
i
( 3 +
i
)=  1   3
i
i
3
z
=
i
( 1   3
i
)= 3  
i
i
4
z
=
z
software SDK cloud:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Convert to PDF with embedded
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert multiple pages Word to
www.rasteredge.com
Mathematical Prependix
20
What is
i
n
? Each multiplication by
i
rotates you by 90
in the complex plane, so
i
4
=1, and
i
217
=
i
4
.
54+1
=
i
.
Various roots of 1 or of  1 or of
i
appear commonly, and you need the exponential representation,
Euler’s formula, to nd them. This is
x
+
iy
=
r
cos
+
ir
sin
=
re
i
x
y
(0
:
46)
You can derive this equation from the series (0.1). Put
i
into the series for the exponential and collect
the real and imaginary pieces, done in section3.2. The result is
e
i
=cos
+
i
sin
.
Special cases of this equation say
e
2
i
=1
;
e
i
= 1
;
e
i=
2
=
i;
e
2
ni
=1
There are three cube roots of one, and all that you need to nd them is the preceding line.
1
1
=
3
=
e
2
ni
1
=
3
Take
n
to be a succession of integers
n
=0  ! 1
1
=
3
=1
n
=1  !
e
2
i
1
=
3
=
e
2
i=
3
=cos2
=
3+
i
sin2
=
3= ( 1 +
i
p
3)
=
2
n
=2  !
e
4
i
1
=
3
=
e
4
i=
3
=cos4
=
3+
i
sin4
=
3= ( 1  
i
p
3)
=
2
If you keep going to
n
=3
;
4
;
etc.orusenegativeintegers,you simply repeatthese threevalues. . A
picture of the roots shows them equally spaced around the unit circle, exactly as dictated by Euler’s
equation, and the same sort of picture appears for higher roots too.
e
2
i=
3
e
2
i=
8
e
10
i=
8
The polar form of complex numbers uses the exponential representation, and here are some
examples that use this manipulation.
p
i
=
e
i=
2
1
=
2
=
e
i=
4
=
1+
i
p
2
:
i
1+
i
3
=
p
2
e
i=
4
p
2
e
i=
4
!
3
=
e
i=
2
3
=
e
3
i=
2
=
i:
2
i
1+
i
p
3
25
=
2
e
i=
2
2
1
2
+
i
1
2
p
3
!
25
=
2
e
i=
2
2
ei=
3
!
25
=
e
i=
6
25
=
e
i
(4+1
=
2)
=
i
software SDK cloud:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
An excellent .NET control support convert PDF to multiple Excel formats in C#.NET Turn all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Excellent .NET control for turning all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without losing formatting in C#.NET Class. Convert to PDF with embedded
www.rasteredge.com
Mathematical Prependix
21
Another application of Euler’s formula is to ordinary trigonometry. What happens when you
multiply two complex numbers expressed in polar form?
z
1
z
2
=
r
1
e
i
1
r
2
e
i
2
=
r
1
r
2
e
i
(
1
+
2
)
(0
:
47)
Putting it into words, you multiply the magnitudes and add the angles in polar form.
From this you can immediately deduce some of the common trigonometric identities. Use Euler’s
formula in the preceding equation and write out the two sides.
r
1
(cos
1
+
i
sin
1
)
r
2
(cos
2
+
i
sin
2
)=
r
1
r
2
cos(
1
+
2
)+
i
sin(
1
+
2
)
The factors
r
1
and
r
2
cancel. Now multiply the two binomials on the left and match the real and the
imaginary parts to the corresponding terms on the right. The result is the pair of equations
cos(
1
+
2
)= cos
1
cos
2
sin
1
sin
2
sin(
1
+
2
)= cos
1
sin
2
+sin
1
cos
2
(0
:
48)
and you have a much simpler than usual derivation of these common identities. You can do similar
manipulations for other trigonometric identities, and in some cases you will encounter relations for which
there’s really no other way to get the result. That is why you will nd that in physics applications where
you might use sines or cosines (oscillations, waves) no one uses anything but complex exponentials.
Get used to it.
The important applications of complex numbers in this text appear when you want to dierentiate
complex functions, especially the exponential.
d
dx
e
ix
=
ie
ix
=
d
dx
cos
x
+
i
sin
x
=  sin
x
+
i
cos
x
and you can easily see that the second and the fourth forms agree. Do another derivative and you get
d
2
dx
2
e
ix
=
i
2
e
ix
e
ix
so this function
e
ix
satises the harmonic oscillator equation, the subject of chapter three.
There are some practice exercises on complex algebra at the end of this chapter, but for more
examples see chapter three ofMathematicalTools, mentioned in the bibliography on pageiii.
0.8 Separation of variables
This section appears in chapters 2, 3, 4, and in another version, in chapter 7.
The subject of dierential equations is large enough that you can make a profession of it and still
not exhaust the subject, but in this text, when you solve dierential equations, there are just two
methods that show up with any regularity. \Separation of variables" is one. \Linear constant coecient
equations" is the other (next section). After that there are a few equations such as Eq. (6.10) that
stand on their own, and you can wait until you get there to nd out about them.
Adierential equation is an equation relating a function and one or more of its derivatives, and
~
F
=
m~a
is this semester’s dierential equation. The rst tool in your kit is separation of variables, and
it is easiest to understand if you start with an example or two. Let
c
be a constant.
dx
dt
=
c
2
+
x
2
!
dx
c
2+
x
2
=
dt
!
Z
dx
c
2+
x
2
=
Z
dt
software SDK cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
finish high-fidelity PDF to Word conversion without depending on pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are Why do we need to convert PDF to Word file
www.rasteredge.com
Mathematical Prependix
22
The rst of these is the dierential equation to be solved. It is a rst order equation, meaning that it
is a relation between the function
x
and only the rst derivative
dx=dt
. There are two variables here,
the independent variable
t
,and the dependent variable
x
.You can’t simply integrate this with respect
to
t
because the right side is a function of
x
,and that is an (unknown) function of the variable
t
. To
separate variables put all the
x
’s on one side of the equation and all the
t
’s on the other. The second
equation does this. It is now set up for integration.
Now do the integral, a trig substitution works:
x
=
c
tan
.
dx
=
c
sec
2
d
!
Z
c
sec
2
d
c
2
+
c
2
tan
2
=
Z
1
c
d
=
1
c
=
1
c
tan
1
x
c
=
t
+
D
and the solution is
x
(
t
)=
c
tan
c
(
t
+
D
). With an initial conditions such as
x
(0) =
x
0
you have
x
(0) =
x
0
=
c
tan(
cD
)  !
D
=
1
c
tan
1
x
0
=c
!
x
(
t
)=
c
tan
ct
+tan
1
(
x
0
=c
)
Check the last expression:
x
(0) =
c
tan
tan
1
(
x
0
=c
)
=
x
0
Neverassumethatyouhaven’tmadea
mistake. Astimeincreases,
x
(
t
)increases, so (
c
2
+
x
2
)increases, so
dx=dt
increases, so the slope of
the curve
x
versus
t
gets bigger and bigger|that’s how the tangent of
t
behaves.
This method looks like such a special one; the combination of factors that will let you do this
seems so improbable that it can’t work very often. True. But, it happens in enough important special
cases that you have to know about it and learn to recognize when it can apply.
1:
dN=dt
N;
2:
d
2
x
dt
2
!
2
x;
3:
t
dx
dt
=
x
+
;
4:
t
dx
dt
+
tx
=
x
(0
:
49)
Equations 1, 3, and 4 are separable, but not 2, though in chapters 2 and 3 you will see some manipu-
lations that will dig a separable equation out of even that one.
Wait, couldn’t you manipulate the second of these to be
d2x
x
!
2
dt
2
and integrate? No!
There’s no such mathematics as this, so don’t try.
For other examples of this method, look at Eqs. (2.13), (2.17), (2.23), (3.55).
0.9 Constant Coecient ODEs
This sort of dierential equation shows up often in this course, starting in chapter two, and commonly
after that. It looks like
3
d
2
x
dt
2
4
dx
dt
+7
x
=0
or
d
3
x
dt
3
+
d
2
x
dt
2
+
dx
dt
+
x
=
A
cos
!t
The dependent variable can have any number of derivatives, but it appears just to the rst power, no
x
2
or
x
dx
dt
or sin(
kx
). That makes these equationlinear. That the coecient of the
x
’s are constants make
theseconstantcoecient linear equations. That the rst one has only terms in
x
or its derivatives makes
ithomogeneous and that the second one has an extra term with no
x
at all makes itinhomogeneous .
The precise denition of homogeneous is that if you multiply the variable
x
by a constant
,then the
whole expression is multiplied by some power of
,i.e.
n
. Here
n
=1.
The rst case, the linear constant coecient homogeneous one, has a simple solution. All you
have to notice is that the derivative of an exponential is an exponential, and try a solution
x
(
t
)=
Ae
t
.
3
d
2
x
dt
2
4
dx
dt
+7
x
=0  ! 3
A
2
e
t
4
Ae
t
+7
Ae
t
=0
Ae
t
[3
2
4
+7] = 0
Mathematical Prependix
23
Since neither
A
nor the exponential are zero, that leaves 3
2
4
+7 = 0, a polynomial equation with
two roots, giving two solutions to the equation. Because you are trying to undo two derivatives to get
x
you will somehow get two arbitrary constants. The key property of linear homogeneous equations is
that the sum of two solutions is a solution, so the full solution to this equation is
A
1
e
1
t
+
A
2
e
2
t
;
where
1
;
2
=
2
i
p
17

3
How do you handle the inhomogeneous case example above? An exponential won’t work here.
You will not get
A
cos
!t
out of it in order to match the right-hand side. The sum of two solutions is
no longer a solution. But, there is one simplication: If you (temporarily) throw away the inhomoge-
neous term (
A
cos
!t
), you can solve the remaining homogeneous part of the equation with a simple
exponential. O.k. you get a cubic equation, but it’s only a polynomial equation so there are ways to
handle it. This partial solution will have three arbitrary constants. Now if somehow you can nd any
one solution to the whole equation the trick is to add the two partial solutions.
d
3
x
hom
dt
3
+
d
2
x
hom
dt
2
+
dx
hom
dt
+
x
hom
=0
;
with three arbitrary constants
d
3
x
inh
dt
3
+
d
2
x
inh
dt
2
+
dx
inh
dt
+
x
inh
=
A
cos
!t;
with none
Then
x
(
t
)=
x
inh
(
t
)+
x
hom
(
t
). How do you verify this? Plug in to the original equation and watch it
work.
For the problems you encounter in this book, nding the special, inhomogeneous solution will
not be dicult, and later you will see some general methods for nding such solutions even when itis
dicult.
0.10 Matrices
This section appears in chapters 4, 8, 10.
Just as you have components of vectors with respect to a basis you will have components of certain
types of vector-valued functions. You have (
v
x
;v
y
;v
z
)or (
v
r
;v
;v
) with three components for a
vector. An important sort of function (a linear, vector-valued function of a vector variable) appears in
describing the angular momentum of a rigid body. It also appears in describing dielectric properties of
acrystal. And in describing rotations of vectors. And
:: :
. Anyway, it too has components (nine this
time) and these form matrices. The development of these ideas, showing the reason for the odd-looking
rules that matrices obey, can wait until they’re needed in section 8.2. For the moment this will be a
summary of some rules without any discussion of the reasons that they are the way they are.
For the moment then a matrix is a square array of numbers. They can be rectangular too, but
not here. They can be added, multiplied, divided, even exponentiated.
a b
c d
+
e f
g h
=
a
+
e b
+
f
c
+
g d
+
h
(0
:
50)
and of course subtraction just changes all the + signs to  . What matrix plays the role of zero so that
adding it changes nothing? An array of all zeroes.
Isaid that there are nine components and these objects have only four. If you know everything
about 2  2 arrays, the extension to 3  3 is easy. Just as with with either mechanics or calculus, the
step from one dimension to two is the big one. After that the step to three dimensions or even
N
dimensions is relatively small. Besides, it’s easier to write these and they take only about 8/
27
of the
arithmetic to manipulate them.
Mathematical Prependix
24
Multiplication obeys
a b
c d

e f
g h
=
ae
+
bg af
+
bh
ce
+
dg cf
+
dh
(0
:
51)
You run across the rows of the rst matrix and down the columns of the second matrix in order to
construct the entries in the product. Just as there is a zero matrix for addition, there is a unit matrix
for multiplication. What is it? What entries in the rst factor of (0.51) make the product equal the
array of
e; f; g; h
,thereby reproducing the second factor? For the top left entry of the product,
ae
+
bg
=
e
for all
e
and for all
g
=)
a
=1
; b
=0
This makes the top right entry work too. Similarly for the bottom entries you need to have
c
=0 and
d
=1. That makes the identity matrix
(
I
)=
1 0
0 1
The order of multiplication matters, and multiplication is not commutative. You can however check
the special case showing that this identity matrix functions just as well as the right hand factor as it
does on the left.
The inverse of a matrix is that matrix such that the product with the original is the identity. Set
the right side of Eq. (0.51) to the identity matrix and solve the four equations in the four unknowns
a; b; c; d
. I’ll just write the answer, but you should carry out the algebra so that the result is yours
and not mine.
e f
g h
1
=
1
eh
fg
h
f
g
e
(0
:
52)
Multiply this by the original matrix and verify that you get the identity. It works in either order, so
check it both ways.
There is no common notation for a matrix as there is for vectors. In the latter case you see
boldface type or an arrow or sometimes a squiggly underline, but for matrices there are no standards.
Sometimes a boldface sans serif font is chosen for this purpose, and it serves as well as anything else
so that’s what I will use here.
A=
a b
c d
;
B=
e f
g h
;
then
AB= C=
ae
+
bg af
+
bh
ce
+
dg cf
+
dh
The inverse matrix as in Eq. (0.52) obeys
BB
1
=B
1
B= I
The statement that matrix multiplication is not commutative isAB 6=BA. You do have the associative
law though: A(BC) = (AB)C. Also the distributive law: A(B +C) =AB +AC.
Simultaneous equations
Matrices appear in many interesting and elegant contexts. They also appear in mundane settings, but
these are no less important. How do you solve two linear equations in two unknowns?
ax
+
by
=
p;
cx
+
dy
=
q:
multiply the rst by
d
and the second by
b
,then subtract
dax
+
dby
=
dp;
bcx
+
bdy
=
bq
!
dax
bcx
=
dp
bq
!
x
=
dp
bq
da
bc
multiply the rst by
c
and the second by
a
,then subtract
(0
:
53)
cax
+
cby
=
cp;
acx
+
ady
=
aq
!
cby
ady
=
cp
aq
!
y
=
cp
aq
bc
ad
Mathematical Prependix
25
This is matrix inversion in disguise.
a b
c d

x
y
=
p
q
or
Mx= p
Multiply both sides of this matrix equation by the inverse ofM from Eq. (0.52).
M
1
Mx= x= M
1
p=
1
ad
bc
d
b
c a

p
q
=
x
y
This is exactly the same as the preceding explicit solution for
x
and
y
.In fact, that explicit solution is
how the inverse matrix is derived, so this comparison is really circular.
Does this always work? No. You can’t divide by zero, and in Eq. (0.53) I ignored that important
point.
dax
bcx
=
dp
bq
! (
da
bc
)
x
=
dp
bq
also
(
da
bc
)
y
=
aq
cp
(0
:
54)
What if
da
bc
=0? then the right sides of the equations must be zero, otherwise there is no solution.
You can have a solution if
p
and
q
are both zero or if a particular combination of
p
,
q
,and the elements
of the matrix conspire to make the right side zero.
ad
bc
=determinant of the matrix
The determinant determines the nature of the solutions (deterministically of course).
1. If the determinant is non-zero then the solution exists and is unique.
2. If the determinant is zero and
p
or
q
is non-zero there is no solution unless special
circumstances occur; then there are an innite number of solutions.
3. If the determinant is zero and both
p
and
q
are zero there are an innite number of
solutions.
Case #1 is routine. You solve simultaneous equations and you expect to nd a solution. The
second case is exceptional, and it can be used to determine properties of the right-hand side. It will
show up in disguise in sections7.10 and10.7. The third case is the most common for the purposes of
this book. It means that the two equations you are solving are
ax
+
by
=0
;
cx
+
dy
=0
but
ad
bc
=0
(0
:
55)
If for example
d
and
b
are 6= 0, multiply the rst of these by
d
:
dax
+
dby
=0. Now
ad
=
bc
,so this
equation is the same as
bcx
+
bdy
=0 or
cx
+
dy
=0. That means you really have one equation for
the two unknowns, not two. That in turn means that you have an innite number of solutions
x
and
y
for the answer. Once you have found one, simply multiply
x
and
y
by any constant and you have
another. You can understand this most simply by a graphical interpretation.
ax
+
by
=0 is a straight line through the origin.
and this graph represents an innite number of possible solutions.
And how do you write \boldface sans serif" on paper? Perhaps by using \Blackboard Bold"
style:
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
.This is a way to fake boldface type in writing.
Index Notation
A
ij
is the set of elements of the matrixA. The indices
i
and
j
run from one to whatever the size of
the matrix is (two in these examples). The rst index species the row and the second the column.
A
row
;
column
=
A
ij
A  !
A
11
A
12
A
21
A
22
rst row
second row
Mathematical Prependix
26
These are three notations for the same thing because you don’t have to think of the subscripts
i
and
j
as particular values. It is like the common notation for a function,
f
(
x
). You are not supposed to
think of this as some particular \
x
"but as a placeholder for any value that argument can take on.* In
this notation matrix addition and multiplication are
A+ B= C  !
A
ij
+
B
ij
=
C
ij
and
AB= C  !
N
X
j
=1
A
ij
B
jk
=
C
ik
Acolumn matrix has a single index
x
i
x  !
x
1
x
2
and
Ax= y  !
X
k
A
jk
x
k
=
y
j
!
A
11
A
12
A
21
A
22

x
1
x
2
=
y
1
y
2
This sort of product-and-sum occurs so often that the conventional notation is again to omit the
summation symbol just as in Eq. (0.28). Whenever a product appears with a repeated indexsummation
is implied. Thetwosumsjustabovethenappearas
A
ij
B
jk
=
C
ik
and
A
jk
x
k
=
y
j
(0
:
56)
In this kind of manipulation you will nd that a repeated index always appears as a pair. If you nd a
combination such as
A
ij
B
jk
C
jn
then go back and nd your mistake. It shouldn’t happen.
0.11 Iterative Solutions
This material is used in chapters 4 and 5.
Sometimes a complicated equation is really a simple equation in disguise. You just have to look at it
the right way. You can take the quadratic equation
:
01
x
2
x
+1 = 0
;
and solve:
x
=
1
p
0
:
96
=:
02
but really, this is almost a linear equation:  
x
+1 = 0  !
x
=1, and that’s much easier. What if
you need more accuracy? Just rearrange the equation to be
x
=1 +
:
01
x
2
;
then an improved solution is
x
=1 +
:
01(1)
2
=1
:
01
If that’s still not good enough then you can iterate the process until you’re tired of it.
x
=1 +
:
01(1
:
01)
2
=1
:
010201
and again,
x
=1 +
:
01(1
:
010201)
2
=1
:
01020506060401
or maybe you want to do it again to get 1
:
0102051426447 or just 1
:
0102051, and you may then decide
that 1
:
01 was probably good enough.
* Mathematicians will argue that this is bad notation, and that you should think of
f
at the
function and
f
(
x
)as the particular value of the function at the point
x
. They have a point. That is
technically the correct thing to do, and making that distinction can help keep you out of trouble, but it
is cumbersome, and this good advice is often ignored. There is a case in chapter eight however, where
Iwill raise this issue again, and there I will side with the mathematicians.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested