how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Best pdf to text software application dll windows winforms .net web forms mechanics20-part710

6|Orbits
197
The equation for the circular orbit is just
x
0, which determines
u
0
. The equation for
x
itself is then
d
2
x
d
2
+
x
G
3
2
u
3
0
3
x
u
0
This is familiar:
x
(
)=
x
0
cos
!
where
!
=
1+
G=‘
2
u
4
0
1
=
2
(1 +
G=
2
2
u
4
0
1+
Gr
4
0
=
2
2
(Check the units.) This is a little larger than one, so when
goes around by 2
, the product
!
is slightly large than 2
. This means that the perihelion will have been reached slightly before the
full revolution about the sun. The planet precesses backwards (retrograde). By how much? Just set
!
=2
to get
=2
=!
. This in turn gives
2
!
2
=2
1
!
1
=2
1
1+
Gr
4
0
=
2
2
1
Gr
4
0
2
=
How does this vary? The rst thing to ask then is what is
? Look back and nd that
2
=
GMa
for
acircular orbit (with no perturbation). That implies that this 
 
a
3
=M
.That’s
3
4
the ratio of
the mass of dust in the orbital sphere to the solar mass, a very plausible result.
Does friction ever play a role in the motion of objects going around the Sun? Surprisingly, yes.
There is an eect discussed in section 9.13 that is unimportant for describing the motion of planets,
but is very important for the orbital motion of dust in the solar system. There is no dust you say?
Actually there is some, but not much, and the reason there’s not much is a relativistic eect described
in that section, showing how sunlight exerts a drag on the dust.
For a major application of these methods see sections6.12 and6.13. They describe a calculation
of the precession of the orbit of Mercury, and this was the basis of an important test of Einstein’s theory
of gravity (General Relativity).
6.6 Spherical Pendulum
This is an example of a problem that involves all the apparatus of perturbed orbits, but that doesn’t
require you to leave Earth to check its validity. Hang a heavy mass from the ceiling and start it moving
around a circle parallel to the  oor. Finding the period of this motion is an elementary exercise, giving
T
=2
p
L
cos
=g
,where
L
is the length of the cord.
That is a conical pendulum, but what if the orbit of the pendulum is not exactly circular? The
coordinate system to describe this is of course spherical. You can use
~
F
=
m~a
directly, using the result
stated in Eq. (0.42), and this is a perfectly workable method. This problem is still suciently simple
however, that you can use conservation laws to nd the equations of motion. The velocity in spherical
coordinates is easy:
x
y
z
r
dr
rd
r
sin
d
^
z
m
Fig. 6.6
Best pdf to text - software application dll:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Best pdf to text - software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
198
Change the
r
-coordinate by
dr
and that is the displacement in the ^
r
-direction. Change the
-coordinate by
d
and the displacement in the
^
-direction is
rd
. Change the
-coordinate by
d
and the displacement in the
^
-direction is
r
sin
d
|note that as
changes you are moving around
asmall circle of radius
r
sin
.Put these together, divide by
dt
,and
~v
=
d~r
dt
_
r^r
+
r
_
^
+
r
sin
_
^
Set the
z
-coordinate to be positive downward and the energy is
E
=
1
2
mv
2
+
U
=
m
2
_
r
2
+
r
2
_
2
+
r
2
sin
2
_
2
mgr
cos
(6
:
36)
The
z
-component of angular momentum is also conserved because there is no torque about that axis.
Compute it
~r
m~v
=
mr
^
r
_
r
^
r
+
r
_
^
+
r
sin
_
^
=
mr
^
r
r
_
^
+
r
sin
_
^
The product^
r
^
is in the
^
-direction, and that is perpendicular to the
z
-axis so it doesn’t contribute.
The other term has ^
r
^
^
,which does have a
z
-component. (Remember the denitions of the
unit vectors: ^
r
is in the direction of increasing
r
;
^
is in the direction of increasing
;
^
is in the
direction of increasing
.)
^
z
.
~
L
=^
z
.
mr
^
r
r
sin
_
^
=^
z
.
mrr
sin
_
^
)=
mr
2
sin
2
_
(6
:
37)
That is
L
z
=
mr
2
sin
2
_
.Simplify the expression for the energy by eliminating
_
from
E
.
E
=
m
2
_
r
2
+
r
2
_
2
+
r
2
sin
2
L
2
z
m
2
r
4sin
4
mgr
cos
For the spherical pendulum the length of the cord is constant so _
r
=0 and the equation for conservation
of energy is
dE=dt
=0
dE
dt
=
d
dt
m
2
r
2
_
2
+
L
2
z
m
2
r
2sin
2
mgr
cos
=0
=
mr
2
_
+
L
2
z
mr
2
cos
sin
3
_
+
mgr
sin
_
Cancel the common factor
_
and rearrange the terms to get
+
g
r
sin
L
2
z
m
2
r
4
cos
sin
3
=0
with
_
=
L
z
mr
2sin
2
(6
:
38)
These have the same structure as the equations (6.9) and (6.10), which were analyzed starting in
Eq. (6.29).
But rst, there’s a simple special case to check. What if the angular momentum is zero? That
is, the pendulum is going back and forth in a single plane. The equation is then
+
g
r
sin
=0
software application dll:Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and compatible with C# programming
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
199
and this is Eq. (3.23), precisely as required.
If the pendulum is swinging in an almost circular orbit that is almost parallel to the  oor, use a
series expansion about this orbit. Start with the exact, simple solution,
aconstant, so that the orbit
is a circle,
g
r
sin
0
L
2
z
m
2
r
4
cos
0
sin
3
0
=0
then
sin
4
0
=
r
g
L
2
z
m
2
r
4
cos
0
(6
:
39)
Eliminate
L
z
in favor of
_
0
,combining (6.39) with the second of the equations (6.38).
_
0
is the angular
speed for the circular orbit. You get
_
0
=
q
g=r
cos
0
(6
:
40)
This special case of a conical pendulum gives an equation that you can also (and should) derive by
elementary methods, problem4.15.
Now expand the dierential equation (6.38) about
0
.Let
=
0
+
,then
+
g
r
sin
0
+
L
2
z
m
2
r
4
cos
0
+
sin
3
+
=0
Expand in powers of
up to the rst.
+
g
r
sin
0
+
cos
0
L
2
z
m
2
r
4
cos
0
sin
0
sin
3
0
+3
sin
2
0
cos
0
=0
+
g
r
sin
0
+
cos
0
g
r
sin
4
0
cos
0
cos
0
sin
3
0
sin
0
sin
3
0
cos
0
sin
3
0
3
cos
0
sin
0
=0
+
g
r
cos
0
+
sin
2
0
cos
0
+3 cos
0
=0
+
g
r
1+ 3cos
2
0
cos
0
=0
This manipulation used the general form of Taylor’s series, Eq. (0.4). Then the relation for
L
z
in
Eq. (6.39). Then the binomial expansion. Then some routine manipulation.
Now everything is set up to solve and analyze.
+
g
r
1+ 3 cos
2
0
cos
0
=0
and
_
0
=
r
g
r
cos
0
(6
:
41)
The simplest case rst, always. Suppose that the angle
0
is small, so that the pendulum is hanging
almost vertically, then
+
4
g
r
=0
and
_
0
=
r
g
r
The rate of oscillation about the circular orbit is governed by
:
=
0
0
=
0
+
0
(
t
)
(
t
)=
0
+
(
t
)=
0
+
0
cos
!t
(
t
)=
_
0
t
with
!
=2
_
0
(6
:
42)
software application dll:C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Using C# Programming Language. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
200
This is a closed orbit, and is approximately an ellipse. When the angle
goes from 0 to
,the argument
of the cosine goes from 0 to
and all the way to 2
,giving two points of maximum excursion. Does
it go clockwise or counterclockwise? That depends on how you start it out.
Is there an easy way to see that this is the form the solution must take? Yes, solve it in rectangular
coordinates and you will nd yourself back in the middle of section6.1, Figure6.2.
What if the mean angle
0
is small but not negligible? The key parameter that determines the
result is the ratio of the two angular frequencies in Eq. (6.41).
!
2
_
2
0
=
1+ 3cos
2
0
=
cos
0
1
=
cos
0
=1 + 3 cos
2
0
=1 + 3
2
0
=
2+  
2
=4   3
2
0
The ratio of the frequencies is
!=
_
0
=2
p
1  3
2
0
=
4= 2
 3
2
0
=
8
. This is not a simple ratio of
integers, so the orbit doesn’t close|it precesses. What happens to the position of the farthest point
on the orbit as
m
goes around once and returns to the farthest point? The radial oscillation is governed
by
!t
,and when that has oscillated twice what had
done?
When
!t
=4
;
then angle
changes by
_
0
t
=
_
0
!
!t
=
1
2
 3
2
0
=
8
.
4
=2
1+ 3
2
0
=
8
The apex of the ellipse has precessed forward by an angle 3

2
0
=
4in one orbit, and this is something
that you can check experimentally by hanging a cord from the ceiling. Attach a mass to it and set it
going in analmost circular path. You can put paper on the  oor to mark the changing apex and see
how far it goes in ten revolutions or so. Because of friction, the angle
0
will decrease slightly during
the experiment. It will be a reasonable approximation to use the average of its initial and nal values
of
0
in computing 3
2
0
=
8.
6.7 Center of Mass Transformation
When there are two bodies interacting, such as the Sun and Jupiter or Earth and the Moon, you have
six coordinates to contend with. This can quickly become unmanageable, so it’s fortunate that there’s
away to transform these six coordinates to two simpler and independent sets of three each. Assume
that you have two masses that act on each other; also allow for some external forces.
~
F
on 1
=
~
F
on 1 by2
+
~
F
on 1
;
external
=
m
1
d
2
~r
1
=dt
2
~
F
on 2
=
~
F
on 2 by1
+
~
F
on 2
;
external
=
m
2
d
2
~r
2
=dt
2
(6
:
43)
Add these equations and use the property that the two mutual forces add to zero by Newton’s third
law:
~
F
on1 by 2
~
F
on2 by 1
.This gives
~
F
on1
;
ext
+
~
F
on 2
;
ext
=
m
1
d
2
~r
1
dt
2
+
m
2
d
2
~r
2
dt
2
=(
m
1
+
m
2
)
d
2
dt
2
m
1
~r
1
+
m
2
~r
2
m
1
+
m
2
~
F
total
=
m
total
d
2
~r
cm
dt
2
(6
:
44)
The last parenthesis presents the denition of the center of mass of two objects|of
N
objects if you
extend the sums in the numerator and the denominator.
~r
cm
represents three of the six new coordinates. For theother three, that will depend on thenature
of the external forces. To make things clearer, start by assumingno external forces,
~
F
on1
;
2ext
=0. Now
software application dll:C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
PDF Page in C#.NET Class. Best PDF document reader SDK control that can highlight PDF text in Visual C# .NET framework application.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET WinForms application for PDF conversion. Export PDF text content to TXT file with original layout.
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
201
in the equations (6.43) divide by
m
1
and
m
2
respectively, then subtract 1 from 2 and use Newton’s
third law again.
1
m
2
~
F
on2 by 1
1
m
1
~
F
on 1 by2
=
d
2
~r
2
=dt
2
d
2
~r
1
=dt
2
1
m
2
+
1
m
1
~
F
on 2 by1
=
d
2
dt
2
~r
2
~r
1
(6
:
45)
Rearrange the last equation: multiply by
m
1
m
2
;divide by (
m
1
+
m
2
).
~
F
on2 by 1
=
m
1
m
2
m
1
+
m
2
d
2
~r
dt
2
where
~r
=
~r
2
~r
1
(6
:
46)
This is an equation for the other three new coordinates,
~r
,the relative coordinates.
That this switch from
~r
1
,
~r
2
to
~r
cm
,
~r
is justachangeofcoordinates,andcanbereversed
if needed, is easy to see with a little algebra; just solve the rst line to get the second
~r
cm
=
m
1
~r
1
+
m
2
~r
2
m
1
+
m
2
~r
2
=
~r
cm
+
m
1
m
1
+
m
2
~r
~r
=
~r
2
~r
1
~r
1
=
~r
cm
m
2
m
1
+
m
2
~r
(6
:
47)
~r
1
~r
2
~r
cm
~r
m
1
m
2
What happens to these equations when
m
1
m
2
? when
m
2
m
1
?
How often do you encounter cases in which the external forces are zero (or at least negligible)?
Atoms or molecules in a gas will feel only small average forces from their neighbors, so this change
of coordinates will work in analyzing a diatomic molecule or a hydrogen atom. Even when there are
external forces, you can sometimes use this transformation anyway. For the case of gravity, the forces
are proportional to the masses of the object being aected, and if the external gravitational eld is
fairly uniform, then
~
F
on1
;
ext
=
m
1
~g
ext
;
~
F
on2
;
ext
=
m
2
~g
ext
(6
:
48)
with nearly the same external
~g
for both. The Sun acts on the Earth and the Moon, and at this distance
the Sun’s gravitational eld at the Earth’s position is nearly the same as that at the Moon’s position.
Use Eq. (6.48) in Eqs. (6.43), and divide the equations by
m
1
and
m
2
respectively. Now subtract,
and the external force terms will cancel.
1
m
2
~
F
on2 by 1
+
1
m
2
m
2
~g
ext
1
m
1
~
F
on 1 by2
1
m
1
m
1
~g
ext
=
d
2
~r
2
=dt
2
d
2
~r
1
=dt
2
The external forces are gone, and the internal forces are related because of Newton’s third law just as
in Eqs. (6.45) and (6.46).
~
F
on2 by 1
=
m
1
m
2
m
1
+
m
2
d
2
~r
dt
2
where
~r
=
~r
2
~r
1
(6
:
49)
software application dll:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to Generally, for a full-featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
202
This process took the six coordinates and separated them into three plus three. The center of mass
~r
cm
obeys equation (6.44) involving the total external force. The relative coordinate
~r
obeys the equation
(6.49), and it is aected by the internal force alone. Each of these has the appearance of a single mass
under a single force, though the masses in the two cases are neither
m
1
nor
m
2
,but
m
total
=
m
1
+
m
2
and
m
reduced
=
=
m
1
m
2
m
1
+
m
2
(6
:
50)
The reduced mass is the combination that takes the place of the ordinary mass in the transformed
equation. These two equations are
~
F
tot
;
ext
=
M
tot
d
2
~r
cm
dt
2
and
~
F
on2 by 1
=
d
2
~r
dt
2
(6
:
51)
where
is a common notation for the reduced mass, though some prefer to use
m
r
.
If the mass
m
1
is much larger than
m
2
,this reduced mass is close to
m
2
and the correction
from treating
m
1
as xed is small|the Sun (
m
1
)and Earth (
m
2
)for example, or even the Sun and
Jupiter. All the mathematics done in solving the gravitational orbit problem is now the same except for
achange in one symbol: the
m
in \
~
F
=
m~a
"becomes
,but watch out, because the
m
in
GMm=r
2
remains
m
. Eq. (6.20) for the orbital period becomes (check it out). Look back at section 1.2 and
gure out whichtypes of mass apply to these two
m
’s.
T
=
2
p
G
(
M
+
m
)
a
3
=
2
(6
:
52)
The equation for the acceleration of the center of mass is independent of anything else, and
the interesting action is in the other, the relative coordinate. When you study some quantum theory,
enough to be able to compute the structure of the hydrogen atom, the reduced mass of the nucleus and
the electron is what appears in the energy calculations. It is a small correction because the proton’s
mass is 1836 times that of the electron. If you replace the proton by a deuteron (twice the mass) the
energies will change only slightly, though still enough to be detected.
For the Earth-Moon system,
m
Earth
=81
m
Moon
,so the reduced mass
=(81
=
82)
m
Moon
. The
distance of the center of mass from the origin is j
~r
cm
~r
1
j =
m
2
r=
(
m
1
+
m
2
), and this is about
4700km, placing it a little more than 1000km below the Earth’s surface. In a binary star system, two
stars orbit each other. If their masses are the same, then the reduced mass is
=
m
2
=
2
m
=
m=
2.
This center of mass change of variables is of great general utility. It appears in the study of
atomic and molecular structure. It greatly simplies calculations in scattering theory. It is necessary in
doing orbital calculations of binary stars. The next section uses it in trying to understand how other
planetary systems were rst discovered.
Is it really correct to apply this transformation to the Earth-Moon system, and to ignore the fact
that the Sun’s gravitational eld is not really uniform? To a good approximation yes, but not for precise
results. For those you can’t ignore the variation in the Sun’s gravity with distance, and the problem is
far more involved. It can’t fully be reduced to something elementary by a simple transformation such
as this one, and you have to go much farther into advanced mechanics to calculate the details of the
Moon’s orbit. Newton himself made great progress in analyzing the problem, but the whole theory took
acouple more centuries to gure out. The name Delaunay is not so well known, but in the middle
1800’s his pioneering work established the foundations for modern developments in the subject.
Example
Two separate masses have a combined mass
M
.They are released at zero velocity and attract each
other, nally colliding. For what ratio of the masses will the time until collision be the shortest?
software application dll:Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Buy Now. Raster XImage.Raster for .NET. Best .NET imaging SDK Buy Now. OCR XImage.OCR for .NET. Scan text from raster images, like jpeg, tiff, scanned pdf.
www.rasteredge.com
software application dll:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class. Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
6|Orbits
203
The relative distance,
r
obeys the equation (6.49) or equivalently, (6.51), so starting from rest
and then moving along a straight line, the equation becomes
d
2
r
dt
2
Gm
1
m
2
r
2
!
d
2
r
dt
2
G
(
m
1
+
m
2
)
r
2
GM
r
2
This acceleration depends on the sum of the masses only, not their separate values. It doesn’t make
any dierence what the mass ratio is; the time is the same.
6.8 Extrasolar Planets
For centuries, since the realization that Earth is a planet, people have speculated about the existence
of planets around other stars. Now there is in orbit a telescope with the primary function of scanning
for planets around other stars. It has found so many it’s hard to keep up.
Transits
To see a planet of another star directly, you have to be lucky, and the year 2008 was the rst time
that someone observed a planet* passing in front of its star, causing the star’s light to be dimmed.
It’s a tiny eect, but now it is being used even by (some very good) amateur astronomers to nd new
planets. Of course for this to be possible, the plane of the planet’s orbit has to allow the planet to pass
directly between us and the star, and that is a rare occurrence. Or is it?
If a star has radius
R
st
and a planet of radius
r
pl
is orbiting the star at a distance
R
orbit
,what is
the probability that the planet will pass in front of the star? To be specic, ask for the likelihood that
the center of the planet passes in front of the star.
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
R
star
R
orbit
planet
US
orbit normal direction
3
In the left sketch, it shows the star with several possible (circular) planetary orbits. They are all
the same distance from the star, but they don’t all pass in front of it; only the number 3 and 4 do, with
1just grazing the edge. The vectors around the outside represent directionsnormalto the respectively
numbered orbital planes, and those are the precisely the vectors that will determine just how likely we
are to see a transit. From the center of the star, all directions are equally likely, so you expect that these
normal directions are randomly and uniformly distributed around the sphere. If such a normal points
directly at us, that means that the planetary orbit lies in the plane perpendicular to our line of sight
and will appear as a circle, denitely not giving a transit. Only those normals that lie close enough to
the planeperpendicular to our line of sight will produce transits.
The right hand sketch places us now as observers on the far right side, and only orbits whose
normals are within an angle
,with sin
=
R
star
=R
orbit
,of the perpendicular plane will have their
* other than Mercury or Venus
6|Orbits
204
center pass in front of the star. The orbit sketched has its orbital plane seen edge on, so that its normal
points toward the upper left and so that the center of the planet just grazes the edge of the star as
seen by US. On a sphere, what is the area within an angle
of the equator as compared to the area of
the whole sphere?
Z
r
2
d
=
Z
2
0
d
Z
+
+
=
2
+
=
2
d
sin
r
2
=2
r
2
h
cos
i
+
+
=
2
+
=
2
=2
r
2.
2sin
The whole area is 4
r
2
,so the ratio of these two numbers is the probability of a transit, and that is
simply sin
=
R
star
=R
orbit
. This is the case in which you ask about the center of the planet passing
in front of the star. If you ask aboutany part of the star passing in front, it becomes slightly larger,
roughly
R
star
+
R
planet
=R
orbit
.
How big is this number for the Earth? About 700 000 km
=
150 000000 km = 0
:
0047, which means
that if we use this method and nd one planet in an Earth-sized orbit around a Sun-sized star, the
probability is that there are more than 1
=
0
:
0047  200 other such planets that we can’t detect this
way. The surprise has been just how many planets have been found at all by this method. The easiest
planet to observe would be one in a small orbit, so that the probability of its passing in front of the
star is much larger. Also, if it does pass in front of the star it will do it frequently|the orbital period
is small. The next thing to make it easy to see is if it is a large planet, more like Jupiter than like
Earth. Then the drop in the light from the star will be much more, being proportional to the planet’s
area. The Kepler satellite, now in orbit but out of commission, was specially designed to search for
such planets, and it has been a roaring success. Many such planets have now been found, far more
than previous theories of planetary formation had predicted. Back to the drawing boards
:: :
The detailed measurement of these transits gives more information about the orbits, and you do
not assume that they are circles as I have done in this introduction. If there are variations in the times
of the transits, it even provides a sensitive method to detect the presence ofother planets that do not
pass in front of the star, but whose gravitational pull aects the ones that you do detect. (\Transit
Timing Variation")
Wobbling
The rst time that a planet was found around another star was 1995, and it involved a method that
has the center of mass transformation at its core. It did not involve the stellar dimming caused by a
planet passing in front of the star. That transit method came later, and each has its uses.
From Eqs. (6.51), if there is no net external force, then the center of mass will move with constant
velocity, and using Eqs. (6.47) you see that the star (
~r
1
)will wobble because of the pull of the planet.
As the relative coordinate
~r
represents the planet’s orbital motion, the star’s motion will wobble by the
amount  
m
2
~r=
(
m
1
+
m
2
). Because the planet’s mass
m
2
will be a lot less than the star’s,
m
1
,you
see that the star’s motion will be small, but itcan be detected.
Solve for
~r
st
and
~r
pl
.
~r
cm
=
m
st
~r
st
+
m
pl
~r
pl
m
st
+
m
pl
and
~r
=
~r
pl
~r
st
=)
~r
st
=
~r
cm
m
pl
m
st
+
m
pl
~r
and
~r
pl
=
~r
cm
+
m
st
m
st
+
m
pl
~r
When
m
st
m
pl
, the small mass
m
pl
moves on a big ellipse. The star in turn moves on an orbit
scaled down by a factor
m
pl
=m
st
from the planet’s orbit, and even for a planet as large as Jupiter this
is 1/1050.
6|Orbits
205
m
st
m
pl
How do you detect the motion of the star? The Doppler eect. As the planet orbits its star, the
star’s velocity is
_
~r
st
_
~r m
pl
=
(
m
st
+
m
pl
). As a rst attack on the problem, start with the simplifying
assumption that the orbit is circular. The equation for the motion is then
Gm
st
m
pl
=r
2
=
r!
2
!
G
(
m
st
+
m
pl
)=
r
3
!
2
(6
:
53)
The speed of the star in its own circular orbit is then
v
st
=j
_
~r
st
j=
m
pl
m
st
+
m
pl
r!
=
m
pl
m
st
+
m
pl
r
G
(
m
st
+
m
pl
)
r
=
m
pl
s
G
r
(
m
st
+
m
pl
)
(6
:
54)
The component of the star’s velocity in the direction of the Earth is
v
st
cos
!t
sin
,where
is the
angle the normal to the orbit makes with the direction to Earth. The Doppler equation then says that
the wavelength of the light received is related to that emitted as
=
v
st
c
cos
!t
sin
(6
:
55)
If you can measure this shift over time, what information can you dig out of it? The orbital
frequency
!
of course and the product
v
st
sin
. Next, if you are examining a particular star then you
already know its spectral classication and so you have a decent estimate of its mass
m
st
,at least
to within 5 10%. This mass is much larger than a planetary mass, so from Eq. (6.53) you have the
distance
r
between the star and the planet. Equation (6.54) isn’t enough to tell you the mass
m
pl
of
the planet, because you know only
v
st
sin
,not
v
st
. Multiply this equation by sin
and you see that
you can determine
m
pl
sin
and that determines a lower bound on the planetary mass.
What can go wrong? 
=
is the tough part. It is small and dicult to measure, and the
techniques to measure it were developed in the 1980’s, but not with enough precision to believe
the results. Only as recently as 1995 did anyone develop suciently reliable techniques to produce
measurements that are widely believed. How big is
v=c
?Calculate it rst for our sun and Jupiter:
m
st
=1
:
99  10
30
kg
; m
pl
=1
:
9 10
27
kg
; r
=7
:
78  10
8
km
!
v
st
c
=
1
:
9 10
27
3 108
r
6
:
67  10 11
7
:
78  108
.
2
:
0 1030
=1
:
3 10
6
=
is still smaller by a factor sin
,so this is an impressively dicult quantity to measure, and
it is not surprising that the rst planets found were larger than Jupiter. Their masses were several
times more and their orbital radius was much less than that of Jupiter, a combination that very much
surprised astronomers.
What if the orbit isn’t circular? It’s an ellipse, the planet has varying speed so that the Doppler
shift is not simply a cosine as in Eq. (6.55). There is enough information in this time dependence to
determine the eccentricity of the orbit, but I will leave that to other references.
6|Orbits
206
6.9 Another Orbit
In section6.3, Eq. (6.14) you nd the equation for the shape of an orbit in a general central force.
The Kepler problem has the force
f
(
r
)=  
GMm=r
2
,leading to an easily solved equation. There’s
another case for which the orbital equation is just as easy, though it’s more of a curiosity than anything
else. The inverse cube force make this dierential equation simple, though interpreting the solutions is
more eort. Equation (6.14) is
u
=
1
r
;
=
r
2
_
;
d
2
u
d
2
+
u
1
m‘
2
u
2
f
1
u
Take the attractive force
f
(
r
)=  
m=r
3
. This is not a physically relevant example, but the solution
is interesting anyway.
d
2
u
d
2
+
u
=+
1
m‘
2
u
2
mu
3
=
2
u
!
d
2
u
d
2
+
2
u
=0
(6
:
56)
This is sometimes another harmonic oscillator, but with various forms of solution, depending on the
parameters.
2
<
1
1
u
=
r
(
)=
r
0
cos
(
0
)
=
q
=‘
2
2
=1
1
u
=
r
(
)=
r
0
0
2
>
1
1
u
=
r
(
)=
r
0
cosh
(
0
)
=
q
1 +
=‘
2
r
(
)=
r
0
sinh
(
0
)
r
(
)=
r
0
e
(
0
)
The arbitrary constants can be written in several ways, but these forms make the solutions easier to
interpret.
Why no 1/sine? That’s the same as 1/cosine with a dierent phase angle
0
. There’s no similar
(real) transformation for the hyperbolic functions, but see problem0.47. Here are a set of plots of these
orbits. Sometimes the value of one of the parameters
or
makes a signicant change in the shape,
so there are more plots than there are separate functions. It is up to you to gure out which plot goes
with which function and very roughly what parameter values are involved. The parameter
0
=0 in
all cases, and the scales are not necessarily the same from one sketch to the next, so you can’t say
anything about
r
0
.
1.
2.
3.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested