how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to word text document application SDK tool html winforms wpf online mechanics24-part717

7|Waves
237
This says that the derivative is continuous. The slope just to the right of the origin is the same as the
slope just to the left. What if the knot tying the two parts of the string together isn’t massless? Then
there is a dierent condition on the slope, a constraint on the discontinuity itself because the right side
of equation (7.32) isn’t zero in those circumstances. See problem7.45. What about
F
x
? If the knot
tying the strings together is massless, this better be zero; that’s why
T
is continuous.
For a straight mathematical treatment of the boundary conditions, remember that you are trying
to solve the dierential equation (7.29)everywhere, not just to the left and to the right of the origin,
but alsoat the origin. The method to nd the boundary conditions is a typical math trick: assume the
opposite and show that you get a contradiction. Assume that
f
does haveadiscontinuityat
x
=0.
Then dierentiate it with respect to
x
in order to plug it into the dierential equation. You can’t easily
dierentiate a discontinuous function, so draw a graph assuming that it rises in a very short interval.
Draw graphs of
f
,
@f=@x
,and
@
2
f=@x
2
. The rst graph has a step (almost), so the second has a
spike. The third (
f
00
)has a positive then a negative spike. The density
(
x
)has a step too (almost).
x
x
x
f
f
0
f
00
If
then
and
x
In Eq. (7.29) the time derivatives do not change the shape of the curve; only the
x
-derivatives
and the factor
(
x
)can do that. What is the graph of the terms in the dierential equation?
T
@
2
f
@x
2
?
=
(
x
)
@
2
f
@t
2
is graphically
f
00
?
=
f
There is no way that the product of two steps can equal the double spike on the left of the equation.
This is a contradiction, so
f
must be continuous.
Can it have a discontinuous derivative? No, and the reasoning is the same. Assume the slope of
f
changes abruptly at
x
=0, and the graphs of the derivatives of
f
are
x
x
x
f
f
0
f
00
If
then
and
Convert pdf to word text document - control Library system:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to word text document - control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
7|Waves
238
Again, try to insert these functions into the dierential equation to see if it works.
T
@
2
f
@x
2
?
=
(
x
)
@
2
f
@t
2
has the graph
f
00
f
?
=
As before, this does not match. The right side has a step, but no spike. This assumed discon-
tinuous slope doesn’t work, so the slope must be continuous.
Why go through all this extra manipulation when the physical derivation was so simple and clear?
The reason is that this sort of analysis appears in many other places where the physical intuition is
not clear. For example, it lets you nd the boundary conditions that occur when you solve Maxwell’s
equations. I’ve even used it in the somewhat esoteric subject of singular Sturm-Liouville equations, and
Idon’t knowanyone who can do that intuitively.
Back to the Problem
This started with a wave coming along a cord on which there is a discontinuous mass density. Now the
boundary conditions are well-settled, it is time to attack the original problem. When a wave comes in
from the left and hits the discontinuity, some part of the wave will continue forward and some part will
be re ected. If the incoming wave has a frequency
!
then the transmitted and the re ected waves will
have that frequency too.
f
(
x; t
)=
A
cos(
kx
!t
)+
B
cos(
kx
+
!t
) (
x<
0)
C
cos(
k
0
x
!t
)
(
x>
0)
(7
:
33)
The boundary conditions are
f
(0 
;t
)=
f
(0+
;t
) =)
A
cos( 
!t
)+
B
cos(
!t
)=
C
cos( 
!t
)
=)
A
+
B
=
C
f
0
(0 
;t
)=
f
0
(0+
;t
) =)  
kA
sin( 
!t
kB
sin
!t
k
0
C
sin( 
!t
)
=)
kA
kB
=
k
0
C
1
2
1
2
Fig. 7.4
Solve the equations for
B
and
C
in terms of
A
because you can control the incoming wave
amplitude (
A
)and you want to know where the wave goes.
A
+
B
=
C;
kA
kB
=
k
0
C
!
B
=
k
k
0
k
+
k
0
A
and
C
=
2
k
k
+
k
0
A
(7
:
34)
What happens to the energy in the wave? The incoming wave (
A
)carries energy and the two outgoing
waves (
B
and
C
)carry energy. You may then expect conservation of energy to say that
A
=
B
+
C
,
or maybe
A
2
=
B
2
+
C
2
. Neither is correct; compute them and nd out. Why not? Simply that
these coecients don’t represent the power. To get that you must use Eq. (7.24) applied to the wave
Eq. (7.33). On the left,
x<
0this is
P
T
@f
@t
@f
@x
T
A!
sin(
kx
!t
B!
sin(
kx
+
!t
)

Ak
sin(
kx
!t
Bk
sin(
kx
+
!t
)
=
T!kA
2
sin
2
(
kx
!t
B
2
A
2
sin
2
(
kx
+
!t
)
(
x<
0)
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
do we need this PDF to Word converting library third-party software, you can hardly edit PDF document. this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some
www.rasteredge.com
7|Waves
239
Notice how nicely this exhibits two terms that you can easily interpret as  ow right minus  ow left.
Next, on the right the power  ow is
P
T
C!
sin(
k
0
x
!t
)

Ck
0
sin(
k
0
x
!t
)
=
TC
2
!k
0
sin
2
(
k
0
x
!t
)
=
T!kA
2
k
0
k
C
2
A
2
sin
2
(
k
0
x
!t
)
(
x>
0)
The last manipulation makes it easier to compare the various expressions. Now all of them have the
factor
T!kA
2
. Except for this factor and the sin
2
factors, the power  ow is
1(incoming from the left)
;
B
2
A
2
=
k
k
0
k
+
k
0
2
(outgoing to the left)
;
k
0
k
C
2
A
2
=
k
0
k
2
k
k
+
k
0
2
(outgoing to the right)
(7
:
35)
The two outgoing power factors add to
k
k
0
k
+
k
0
2
+
k
0
k
2
k
k
+
k
0
2
=
k
2
2
kk
0
+
k
02
+4
kk
0
(
k
+
k
0
)
2
=1
and energy is conserved.
When you try to understand why light is re ected at a window, you are solving Maxwell’s
equations involving electric and magnetic elds. The details of the solution are dierent, but for the case
that the light is coming in perpendicular to the surface, the resulting equations (7.35) are identical. If
the light hits the glass at an angle other than along the normal, then the equations are more complicated
and depend on the polarization of the light. (Look up the Fresnel equations.) For light you usually see
the equations (7.35) expressed in terms of the index of refraction, so that the re ected and transmitted
intensities for light going from vacuum or air to glass with index
n
=
c=v
=(
!=k
)
(
!=k
0
)=
k
0
=k
are
1(incoming to the surface)
;
B
2
A
2
=
n
1+
n
2
(re ected from the glass)
;
k
0
k
C
2
A
2
=
n
2
1+
n
2
(transmitted into the glass)
(7
:
36)
Example
Do this calculation using complex exponentials instead. The setup is already there in the Eqs. (7.30).
For the same wave entering from the left you again have
D
=0, so
f
(
x; t
)=
Ae
i
(
kx
!t
)
+
Be
i
kx
!t
)
(
x<
0)
Ce
i
(
k0x
!t
)
(
x>
0)
The
e
i!t
is a common factor, so when you apply the continuity conditions, it will cancel. At
x
=0
then
f
(0 
;t
)=
f
(0+
;t
)  !
A
+
B
=
C
and
@f
@x
(0 
;t
)=
@f
@x
(0+
;t
)  !
ikA
ikB
=
ik
0
C
Multiply the rst of these by
ik
and add to get
C
. Multiply the rst by
ik
0
and subtract to get
B
.
You get the same results as before.
control Library system:C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft
Empower C# users to easily convert PDF document to Word document. Support fast Word and PDF conversion with original document page size remained.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable
www.rasteredge.com
7|Waves
240
Conservation of Frequency
In the equations (7.30) I assumed that the frequency is the same on both sides of the boundary. It’s
easy to believe, but shouldn’t it be possible to prove it? Assume that they arenot the same and discover
the consequences:
k
1
=
!
1
=v
1
k
2
=
!
2
=v
2
f
(
x; t
)=
A
cos(
k
1
x
!
1
t
)+
B
cos( 
k
1
x
!
1
t
) (
x<
0)
C
cos(
k
2
x
!
2
t
)+
D
cos( 
k
2
x
!
2
t
) (
x>
0)
What happens at the boundary? The wave is supposed to be continuous, so this is
f
(0 
;t
)=
f
(0+
;t
 !
A
cos( 
!
1
t
)+
B
cos(
!
1
t
)=
C
cos( 
!
2
t
)+
D
cos(
!
2
t
)
(
A
+
B
)cos(
!
1
t
)= (
C
+
D
)cos(
!
2
t
)
If either one of (
A
+
B
)or (
C
+
D
)is non-zero, this is a contradiction. The two cosines are linearly
independent. Specically, take the case
t
=0 then take the case
t
=
=
(2
!
2
)for which the right side
is zero but not the left. What else is needed? Don’t forget that the slope is continuous too. That
gives still another equation involving
k
1
(
A
B
)and
k
2
(
C
D
). They have to vanish also and that
makes the whole solution identically zero. This nails down the intuitively plausible statement that the
transmitted frequency is the same as for incoming frequency. If the power company is supposed to
delivery electricity to you at 60 Hz and you discover that it is only 59
:
9Hz, would you believe them if
they ascribe it to frequency loss in the lines?
7.8 Standing Waves
Aguitar string doesn’t have a wave moving toward plus or minus innity. The wave stops at the end
of the string, so I need dierent kinds of solutions for this case. I will consider the case for which
T
and
are constants, Eq. (7.7), but I’ll use a method for solving it that is common in these contexts:
separation of variables. I could simply guess the solution, as I did in Eq. (7.8), but this method is
almost as easy and it is of great general utility. It is in an extension of the ideas in section 0.8 about
the separation of ordinary dierential equations.
Assume a solution in the form of a product of functions, one of
x
and one of
t
.
f
(
x; t
)=
F
(
x
)
G
(
t
)
Not all solutions will be like this, but the important result is that all solutions aresums of solutions like
this. That means that if I can nd all the solutions that are products then I can add them and get all
the other solutions that aren’t. To see if it works, plug in.
@
2
f
@x
2
1
v
2
@
2
f
@t
2
=0 =
d
2
F
(
x
)
dx
2
G
(
t
1
v
2
F
(
x
)
d
2
G
(
t
)
dt
2
Now move one term to the other side of the equation and divide by the product
FG
.
1
F
(
x
)
d
2
F
(
x
)
dx
2
=
1
v
2
G
(
t
)
d
2
G
(
t
)
dt
2
The left side depends solely on the independent variable
x
. The right side depends solely on the
independent variable
t
. I can change
x
any way that I want without changing
t
,and in doing so the
control Library system:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
But sometimes, we need to extract or fetch text content from source PDF document file for word processing, presentation and desktop publishing applications.
www.rasteredge.com
7|Waves
241
right side stays constant. That means that the left side must be constant. A similar argument holds
for the right side, allowing
t
to vary. And the constants have to be the same.*
1
F
(
x
)
d
2
F
(
x
)
dx
2
=
C;
1
G
(
t
)
d
2
G
(
t
)
dt
2
=
Cv
2
(7
:
37)
These are ordinary dierential equations, and they’re the same equation that I spent a whole chapter
on: the harmonic oscillator. Or are they? Harmonic motion requires that
C
is negative and how do I
know that? At this point you don’t.
C
can be anything, even complex, and it provides a valid solution
to the wave equation. The equation doesn’t know that the string is tied down at its ends|that fact
presents you with a set ofboundaryconditions that will determine the details of the solution.
In order to represent a system that’s tied at the two ends I have to specify the function at those
points. Pick the coordinate
x
to be zero at the left and
L
at the right. The
y
-value is zero where the
string is at rest.
y
=
f
(0
;t
)= 0
and
y
=
f
(
L; t
)= 0
Apply this to the separated solution
F
(
x
)
G
(
t
) and it says that
F
(0) = 0 and
F
(
L
) = 0. The
equation that
F
satises is
F
00
=
CF
,and if
C
is a positive number its solutions are real exponentials.
A hyperbolic sine vanishes at one point, but only at one point, so you can’t make it match these
boundary conditions at both ends. If
C
is negative you have sinusoidal solutions, and these vanish at
many places, allowing the possibility of matching the boundary conditions at both places.
If
C
is negative, denote it by
C
k
2
,then
d
2
F
(
x
)
dx
2
k
2
F
=)
F
(
x
)=
A
sin(
kx
+
)
You have to use the same constant for the
G
equation,
G
=
Cv
2
G
k
2
v
2
G
=)
G
(
t
)=
B
sin(
!t
+
)
where
!
2
=
k
2
v
2
(7
:
38)
Now apply the boundary conditions.
f
(0
;t
)=
F
(0)
G
(
t
)= 0
;
so
F
(0) =
A
sin
=0
and
=0
You can pick another
,such as
or  9
,but that just changes everything by an overall minus sign
and you can absorb that into
A
.
Next the other end of the string:
f
(
L; t
)=
F
(
L
)
G
(
t
)= 0 =)
F
(
L
)=
A
sin
kL
=0
so
kL
=
n
for integer
n
.Now put them together.
!
=
kv
,so
f
(
x; t
)=
A
sin
nx
L
sin(
!
n
t
+
n
)
where
!
n
=
nv
L
;
n
=1
;
2
;
3
;: ::
(7
:
39)
You don’t need negative
n
here because they would just reproduce the same functions as does the
positive
n
.
Some pictures of these waves at maximum displacement,i.e. when sin(
!
n
t
+
n
)= 1:
* If
T
or
are functions of
x
then
v
is too, and you’d better move the
v
2
to the left side to make
this work. But then you may have to go back to the form where
T
is inside the derivative on the left
anyway.
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
SharePoint. Extract text from adobe PDF document in VB.NET Programming. Extract file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image
www.rasteredge.com
control Library system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width). Free library for .NET framework. Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code?
www.rasteredge.com
7|Waves
242
n = 4
n = 1
n = 2
n = 3
Stroboscopic pictures of the motion
Fig. 7.5
The rst set of graphs show the waves at one instant, the peak displacement for each mode. The
second set shows the waves at eleven instants, equally spaced in time from peak positive to peak
negative amplitude,i.e. over half a period of oscillation.
The respective frequencies for various
n
are
!
1
=
v=L
,
!
2
=2
v=L
,etc., and they are the
sequence of harmonics that you hear when you pluck the string on a musical instrument.
The lowest frequency, the fundamental, is
!
1
=
p
T=
L
.It says that the greater the tension
in the string, the higher the frequency. The same happens if the mass density of the string is less.
Tuning such a musical instrument means adjusting the tension. Could you change the mass density
instead? Actually yes. Look at the strings of a guitar or a piano and compare the strings for low
frequencies and those for high frequencies. The former have higher linear mass density.
You can hear the separate harmonics from a guitar string if you pluck it properly. Touch the tip
of your nger to the midpoint of the string and pluck the string with your thumb, immediately releasing
contact from your nger. You will hear the upper harmonic (
n
=2) because your nger damped out
the
n
=1 motion without aecting the
n
=2 component. Similarly place your nger at the 1/3 or
1/4 point to hear still higher harmonics. An expert musician can use this technique to good eect.
Orthogonality
These standing wave solutions have a special property that won’t appear particularly important now,
but it will later. The idea of orthogonal vectors is one that you’re familiar with:
~
A
.
~
B
=0. There
is a similar concept for waves. For each positive integer
n
,the equation (7.39) provides a mode of
oscillation shaped as
u
n
(
x
)= sin
nx=L
)
;
n
=1
;
2
;
3
;: ::
Take two dierent such modes and evaluate the integral
I
=
Z
L
0
dx
sin
nx
L
sin
mx
L
for
n
6=
m
(7
:
40)
You simply need the right trigonometric identity, and that is
sin
x
sin
y
=
1
2
cos(
x
+
y
)  cos(
x
y
)
I
=
Z
L
0
dx
1
2
cos
(
n
+
m
)
x
L
cos
(
n
m
)
x
L

=
1
2
L
(
n
+
m
)
sin
(
n
+
m
)
x
L
L
(
n
m
)
sin
(
n
m
)
x
L

L
0
=0
These functions
u
n
and
u
m
are said to be orthogonal to each other because of this integration. For an
analogy, you can compute the common three-dimensional scalar product as
A
x
B
x
+
A
y
B
y
+
A
z
B
z
,a
sum over three indices running over
x
,
y
,and
z
.The integral Eq. (7.40) is analogous to a sum over a
continuous index that runs from zero to
L
.
In what will probably seem like very dierent sorts of problems, essentially the same idea will
appear in the equations (8.42) and (10.21).
7|Waves
243
7.9 An Algebraic Aside
How do you solve a cubic equation? (And what does this have to do with waves? Patience.) That
depends on the cubic. Try to solve
x
  0
:
01
x
3
=0
If you’ve read section0.11 or solved problem0.59 or worked through Eqs. (4.9)-(4.11), you may think
that you have done this before and you have, but not this way. What follows is a dierent approach to
the same sort of problem, one that closely parallels what I will do for the wave equation. Just notice
that 0
:
01  1. There is a solution to the equation near
x
=1, and I can use the equation itself to
nd a series representation for this root. The coecient \0
:
01" is the expansion parameter. The idea
is that you assume the form of the series even though you do not know any of its coecients. Then
use the equation you’re solving todetermine those coecients. Let
=0
:
01 be the parameter.
x
 
x
3
=0
;
and
x
=
x
0
+
x
1
+
2
x
2
+
3
x
3
+ 
(7
:
41)
You don’t know any of the coecients
x
k
,but plug the assumed solution into the equation anyway. In
cubing the series treat
x
0
as one term and everything else as a second term; that way you are cubing
abinomial.
x
0
+
x
1
+
2
x
2
+    1  
x
0
+
x
1
+
2
x
2
+ 
3
=0
x
0
+
x
1
+
2
x
2
+    1
x
3
0
+3
x
2
0
x
1
+
2
x
2
+ 
+3
x
0
x
1
+ 
2
+
x
1
+ 
3
=0
Expand everything and collect terms in powers of
,multiplying out the square and cube of the paren-
thesized expressions and carefully getting all the terms with like powers of
. This can get tedious, but
carry on. You see that this is very dierent from the iteration methods used earlier.
x
0
+
x
1
+
2
x
2
+    1  
x
3
0
+3
x
2
0
x
1
+3
2
x
2
0
x
2
+3
2
x
0
x
2
1
+ 
=0
For this to be a valid series expansion in
,all the like coecients of powers of
must match.
0
:
x
0
1 = 0
1
:
x
1
x
3
0
=0
2
:
x
2
3
x
2
0
x
1
=0
(7
:
42)
3
:
x
3
3
x
2
0
x
2
3
x
0
x
2
1
=0
Solve these equations in sequence and you get
x
0
=1
;
x
1
=1
;
x
2
=3
;
x
3
=12
;

The value of the root is
x
=1 +
:
01 +
:
01
2
.
3+
:
01
3
.
12 +   = 1
:
010312 Put this into the original
cubic and the value is
x
 
:
01
x
3
= 5
:
61  10
7
. For comparison, if you put
x
=1 into the
equation, the error is 10
2
.The next term in the series for
x
is
4
x
4
=10
8
x
4
.This example shows the
essential idea of perturbation theory. Continuing this to higher orders in
produces 1.01031257881011
as a better approximation to the exact solution.
The spirit of this approximation is that you start with an easy solution to a simplied form of the
problem and then you improve the solution by using the complicated part to generate the correction.
Are there ways other then series expansions to do this? Yes, the subject of numerical analysis and of
perturbation theory is well-developed and you will nd many variations on this theme, which brings me
to the reason for this diversion.
7|Waves
244
7.10 Perturbation Theory_
If the mass density of the string isn’t constant, Eq. (7.3) is more complicated than the simple wave
equation. The same is true if the tension isn’t constant throughout. Can this happen? Yes, easily. For
anon-uniform density place a wad of chewing gum on the string. Or maybe use a bullwhip for the
string. To get non-constant tension, simply hold the string vertically. The part of the string at the top
has to support everything below, so the tension at the top will be greater than that at the bottom.
Will this be a big eect in a musical instrument? No. The tension in that case is always far greater
than the weight of the string, so this eect is not important, but if the string is not under great tension
then this will alter the harmonic structure substantially. Thereare other examples of physical systems
where the same equation appears and for which the eects of variable
T
(or its analog) are important.
There are a few special cases for which you can solve the equations exactly when
T
or
are not
constant, but instead of spending time on those I’ll show a general procedure that’s valid for any
T
or
as long as they arealmost constant.
The technique, perturbation theory, parallels the series solution for the cubic equation in the
preceding section, and it starts from what you already know, the solution for the uniform string. In this
case the solution for the non-uniform case should be very close to the known, simple solution.
Take the case for which
T
is constant and
is almost constant.
(
x
)=
0
+
1
(
x
)
;
j
1
j
0
If
1
is absent, I know how to solve the problem for which the string is tied down at two ends; that’s
section7.8 and Eq. (7.39). I said that the idea is to expand everything in power series, but what is the
variable to use? I’ll make one up. Change the preceding equation to
(
x
)=
0
+

1
(
x
)
and use
as a dimensionless parameter for the series. This allows me to keep track of the terms easily.
To be certain that I’m not missing anything, I will return to the original wave equation (7.3),
but with
T
=a constant and no gravity and no friction.
T
@
2
f
@x
2
=
(
x
)
@
2
f
@t
2
The technique of separation of variables still works, even when
(or even
T
)depends on
x
.
f
(
x; t
)=
F
(
x
)
G
(
t
)
;
then
T
d
2
F
(
x
)
dx
2
G
(
t
)=
(
x
)
F
(
x
)
d
2
G
(
t
)
dt
2
To separate variables now you have to divide by
FG
.
T
F
d
2
F
dx
2
=
1
G
d
2
G
(
t
)
dt
2
and again the equation is separated, with all the
x
’s on one side and all the
t
’s on the other. They
must therefore be (the same) constant. Back in Eq. (7.37) I called it
C
,but in the end it turned out
to be proportional to
!
2
,so I’ll use that notation from the outset.
1
G
d
2
G
(
t
)
dt
2
!
2
;
T
F
d
2
F
dx
2
!
2
(7
:
43)
7|Waves
245
The time equation is unchanged, so the solution is the familiar sine, cosine, or exponential:
e
i!t
or sin(
!t
+
). The dierence is in the equation for
F
,and that’s where the action occurs. I take the
same boundary conditions as before,
F
(0) =
F
(
L
)= 0, so that the string is tied down.
T
d
2
F
dx
2
!
2
F
(7
:
44)
Now however
,
F
,and
!
2
are dierent, though they should beclose to the unperturbed case. Write
all of them in terms of a power series in
,just as in Eq. (7.41). The density
of course has only two
terms, so it hardly warrants the name power series.
=
0
+

1
F
=
F
0
+
F
1
+
2
F
2
+
3
F
3
+ 
(7
:
45)
!
2
=
!
2
0
+
!
2
1
+
2
!
2
2
+ 
The coecients
F
0
,
F
1
,
!
2
2
,etc. are unknowns to be determined. The expansion for
!
may look a
little odd, but it is
!
2
that shows up as the natural parameter, not
!
itself, so this is the way to write
it. It would probably be more consistent notation to call the coecients (
!
2
)
0
,(
!
2
)
1
,
:: :
,but that is
being unnecessarily fussy and it is too clumsy, so I won’t. Now plug in.
T
F
00
0
+
F
00
1
+
2
F
00
2
+ 
0
+

1

!
2
0
+
!
2
1
+
2
!
2
2
+ 

F
0
+
F
1
+
2
F
2
+
This looks like I’m taking a dicult problem and turning it into an impossible one. Now I have an
innite number of unknowns.But,
The left side is a power series in
. The right side is a power series in
. They’re supposed to
agree no matter what
is. For that to happen all the coecients of like powers have to match. The
coecient of
0
,the coecient of
1
,etc.
TF
00
0
0
!
2
0
F
0
TF
00
1
0
!
2
0
F
1
1
!
2
0
F
0
0
!
2
1
F
0
TF
00
2
0
!
2
0
F
2
2
!
2
0
F
0
0
!
2
2
F
0
1
!
2
1
F
0
1
!
2
0
F
1
0
!
2
1
F
1
(7
:
46)
This is now an innite number of equations for an innite number of unknowns. It doesn’t look
promising. First, some reassurance: I’m going to go just as far as the rst two of these equations.
F
2
will have to nd itself.
Rearrange them.
TF
00
0
+
0
!
2
0
F
0
=0
(a)
TF
00
1
+
0
!
2
0
F
1
1
!
2
0
F
0
0
!
2
1
F
0
(b)
TF
00
2
+
0
!
2
0
F
2
2
!
2
0
F
0
0
!
2
2
F
0
1
!
2
1
F
0
1
!
2
0
F
1
0
!
2
1
F
1
(c)
(7
:
47)
The systematic procedure to solve these:
1. Solve the 1
st
,easy equation.
2. Use the
F
0
from step one to nd the frequency correction
!
2
1
from the 2
nd
equation.
3. Solve the 2
nd
equation for
F
1
.
4. Use the
F
1
from step two to nd the frequency correction
!
2
2
from the 3
nd
equation.
5. Solve for
F
2
etc.(I’mnotgoingpaststepthreeanyway.)
Ihaven’t yet chosen a particular problem that I want to solve, trying to leave the setup general.
Now to be specic, I have to set down the boundary conditions, and the ones I choose are the same
7|Waves
246
ones that I used before. Tie the string down at two ends. This says that
f
(0
;t
)=
f
(
L; t
) = 0 as
before. Eq. (7.47)(a) is the same as Eq. (7.38), so it has the same solution, Eq. (7.39).
TF
00
0
+
0
!
2
0
F
0
=0  !
F
0
(
x
)=
A
sin
nx
L
;
with
T
n
2
2
L
2
=
0
!
2
0
Now comes the key observation that breaks open this complicated looking set of equations.
If you take the unperturbed solution,
F
0
(
x
), multiply the left-hand side of the equation (7.47)(b)
by
F
0
,and integrate from 0 to
L
with respect to
x
,you get zero. Stated in the language of vectors,
F
0
is orthogonal to
TF
00
1
+
0
!
2
0
F
1
(7
:
48)
whatever
F
1
is (as long as it satises the same boundary conditions and vanishes at 0 and
L
).
The proof of this involves nothing more than a couple of partial integrations. I have to compute
the following integral, showing that it is zero.
Z
L
0
dxF
0
(
x
)
TF
00
1
+
0
!
2
0
F
1
?
=
0
(7
:
49)
Work on the rst term by itself, recalling that
T
and
0
are constants.
Z
L
0
dxF
0
(
x
)
TF
00
1
=
TF
0
(
x
)
F
0
1
(
x
)
L
0
T
Z
L
0
dx F
0
0
(
x
)
F
0
1
(
x
)
=
TF
0
(
x
)
F
0
1
(
x
)
L
0
TF
0
0
(
x
)
F
1
(
x
)
L
0
+
T
Z
L
0
dxF
00
0
(
x
)
F
1
(
x
)
Put this into the integral (7.49).
TF
0
(
x
)
F
1
(
x
)
L
0
TF
0
0
(
x
)
F
1
(
x
)
L
0
+
Z
L
0
dx
TF
00
0
(
x
)+
F
0
(
x
)
0
!
2
0
F
1
(
x
)= 0
(7
:
50)
This last integral is zero because by assumption
F
0
satises the original, unperturbed equation (7.47)(a),
and that is precisely what appears in brackets as the coecient of
F
1
inside the integral. The other
terms are evaluated at the boundaries, 0 and
L
, and the boundary conditions that I placed on the
problem, that
F
(0) = 0 =
F
(
L
), make this zero because
F
0
and
F
1
will vanish at these points. This
result parallels those you will see in Eqs. (8.40) and (10.19).
Now multiply Eq. (7.47)(b) by
F
0
and integrate the whole equation from 0 to
L
. The left side
is now zero.
Z
L
0
dx F
0
(
x
)
TF
00
1
+
0
!
2
0
F
1
=0 =
Z
L
0
dx
1
!
2
0
F
2
0
0
!
2
1
F
2
0
(7
:
51)
The single unknown here is
!
2
1
,the rst correction for the frequency-squared. Solve for it.
!
2
1
!
2
0
Z
L
0
dx
1
(
x
)
F
0
(
x
)
2
,
0
Z
L
0
dxF
0
(
x
)
2
(7
:
52)
The denominator is easy, and the numerator’s complexity depends on
1
. I didn’t have to solve any
complicated dierential equations to get this result, I have only to do two integrals.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested