how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : C# convert pdf to text file software SDK dll windows wpf .net web forms 6520410-part718

SUB-SAHARAN 
AFRICA 
Trends in U.S. and 
Chinese Economic 
Engagement 
Report to Congressional Requesters 
February 2013 
GAO-13-199 
United States Government Accountability Office 
GAO 
C# convert pdf to text file - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to searchable text; convert pdf to word to edit text
C# convert pdf to text file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf to word text online; batch convert pdf to txt
United States Government Accountability Office 
Highlights of GAO-13-199, a report to 
congressional requesters 
February 2013 
SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA 
Trends in U.S. and Chinese Economic Engagement  
Why GAO Did This Study 
Since 2001, China has rapidly 
increased its economic engagement 
with sub-Saharan African countries. 
The United States has increased aid to 
sub-Saharan Africa and in 2010 
provided more than a quarter of all 
U.S. international economic assistance 
to the region. According to some 
observers, China’s foreign assistance 
and investments in Africa have been 
driven in part by the desire for natural 
resources and stronger diplomatic 
relations. Some U.S. officials and other 
stakeholders also have questioned 
whether China’s activities affect U.S. 
interests in the region.  
GAO was asked to review the nature of 
the United States’ and China’s 
engagement in sub-Saharan Africa. 
This report examines (1) goals and 
policies in sub-Saharan Africa; (2) 
trade, grants and loans, and 
investment activities in the region; and 
(3) engagement in three case-study 
countries—Angola, Ghana, and Kenya. 
GAO obtained information from, 
among others, 11 U.S. agencies, U.S. 
firms, and host-government officials. 
GAO was not able to meet with 
Chinese officials. GAO did not include 
U.S. and Chinese security engagement 
in the scope of this study. 
What GAO Found 
The United States and China have emphasized different policies and approaches 
for their engagement with sub-Saharan Africa. U.S. goals have included 
strengthening democratic institutions, supporting human rights, using 
development assistance to improve health and education, and helping sub-
Saharan African countries build global trade. The Chinese government, in 
contrast, has stated the goal of establishing closer ties with African countries by 
seeking mutual benefit for China and African nations and by following a policy of 
noninterference in countries’ domestic affairs. 
Both the United States and China have seen sharp growth in trade with sub-
Saharan Africa over the past decade, with China’s total trade in goods increasing 
faster and surpassing U.S. trade in 2009. Petroleum imports constitute the 
majority of U.S. and Chinese imports from sub-Saharan Africa, with China also 
importing a large amount of other natural resources. China’s exports of goods to 
the region have grown and far exceed U.S. exports of goods. Information on 
other key aspects of China’s engagement in sub-Saharan Africa is limited in 
some cases, since China does not publish comprehensive data on its foreign 
assistance or government-sponsored loans to the region. Data-collection efforts 
focused on specific countries, as GAO’s case-study analysis shows, can provide 
further insights but do not fully eliminate these information gaps. 
U.S. and Chinese Imports from, and Exports to, Sub-Saharan Africa, 2001 and 2011 
Both the United States and China chiefly import natural resources from sub-
Saharan Africa, but data from Angola, Ghana, and Kenya suggest that U.S. and 
Chinese patterns of engagement have differed in other respects. The United 
States has primarily provided grants to Kenya for health and humanitarian 
programs. Data from Ghana and Kenya suggest that China has provided much 
smaller amounts of grant assistance and pursued increasing engagement 
through loans for large-scale infrastructure projects. Information from Angola, 
Ghana, and Kenya indicates that direct competition between U.S. and Chinese 
firms is limited, with U.S. firms concentrated in higher-technology areas. Further, 
differences across the three countries suggest that host-government 
requirements, such as regulations on hiring local labor, influence Chinese and 
U.S. firms’ engagement in each case-study country.   
View GAO-13-199. To view a supplemental 
report with more details on case-study 
countries see GAO-13-280SP. For more 
information, contact David Gootnick at (202) 
512-3149 or gootnickd@gao.gov
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
changing pdf to text; convert pdf to text
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
In the following example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
converting image pdf to text; convert pdf to text without losing formatting
Page i 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Letter 
Background 
3 
U.S. Goals Have Emphasized Democracy and Development in Sub-
Saharan Africa, while China’s Policy Underscores Mutual Benefit 
and Noninterference 
11 
Data Show Growth in U.S. and Chinese Trade with Sub-Saharan 
Africa since 2001, but Data on China’s Grants, Loans, and 
Investments Are Limited 
19 
Angola, Ghana, and Kenya Illustrate Trends and Goals of U.S. and 
Chinese Engagement in Sub-Saharan Africa 
39 
Concluding Observations 
66 
Agency and Third-Party Comments 
67 
Appendix I 
Objectives, Scope, and Methodology 
69 
Appendix II 
U.S. and Chinese Government Loans to Angola, Ghana,  
and Kenya 
77 
Appendix III 
GAO Contact and Staff Acknowledgments 
83 
Tables 
Table 1: Selected U.S. Government Entities’ Roles and Areas of 
Involvement in Sub-Saharan Africa 
9 
Table 2: Selected Chinese Government Entities’ Roles and Areas of 
Involvement in Sub-Saharan Africa 
10 
Table 3: Comparison of Selected Chinese Government Loans with 
U.S. Government and World Bank Loans to Angola, Ghana, 
and Kenya 
78 
Table 4: Additional U.S. and Chinese Government Loans to Angola 
and Ghana 
80 
Figures 
Figure 1: Selected Economic and Development Indicators for Sub-
Saharan Africa Compared with Angola, Ghana, and Kenya 
4 
Contents 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform The HTML document file, converted by C#.NET PDF style that are included in target PDF document file
remove text from pdf; converting pdf to plain text
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by number of pages.
.pdf to .txt converter; convert scanned pdf to word text
Page ii 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Figure 2: Key Chinese Government Announcements at the Forum 
on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), 2000-2012 
18 
Figure 3: U.S. and Chinese Total Trade, Imports, and Exports of 
Goods to Sub-Saharan Africa, 2001-2011 
20 
Figure 4: U.S. and Chinese Imports of Goods from Sub-Saharan 
Africa, 2001-2011 
22 
Figure 5: U.S. Imports of Goods from Sub-Saharan Africa under 
AGOA, 2001-2011 
23 
Figure 6: U.S. and Chinese Exports of Goods to Sub-Saharan 
Africa, 2001-2011 
25 
Figure 7: U.S. and Chinese Imports of Goods from Sub-Saharan 
Africa, by Value of Imports and Country of Origin, 2011 
26 
Figure 8: U.S. and Chinese Exports of Goods to Sub-Saharan 
Africa, by Value of Exports and Destination, 2011 
27 
Figure 9: World Bank–Financed Contracts Won by Firms from the 
United States, China, and Other Countries in Sub-Saharan 
Africa, 2001-2011 
30 
Figure 10: U.S. Government Development Assistance to Sub-
Saharan Africa, 2001-2010 
32 
Figure 11: U.S. Government Loans and Related Financing 
Committed for U.S.-Made Products and U.S. Firms’ 
Investments in Sub-Saharan Africa, 2001-2011 
34 
Figure 12: Reported Flows of Foreign Direct Investment from the 
United States and China to Sub-Saharan Africa, 2007-2011 
37 
Figure 13: U.S. and Chinese Crude Oil Imports and Total Trade 
with Angola, 2001-2011 
41 
Figure 14: U.S. and Chinese Firms’ Cumulative Reported Foreign 
Direct Investments in Angola and Ghana, 2007-2011 
42 
Figure 15: Numbers and Types of U.S. and Chinese Firms’ 
Investments in Oil Blocks in Angola and Ghana as of 2012 
44 
Figure 16: Available Data on U.S. Government and Chinese 
Government Loans and Related Financing Commitments 
for Angola, Ghana, and Kenya 
47 
Figure 17: Examples of Construction Projects Implemented by 
Chinese Firms in Angola, Ghana, and Kenya 
53 
Figure 18: World Bank–Financed Contracts with U.S., Chinese, and 
Other Firms in Angola, Ghana, and Kenya, 2001-2011 
56 
Figure 19: Nationality of Firms Competing for 47 Angolan, 
Ghanaian, and Kenyan Government Contracts, 2002-2012 
57 
Figure 20: U.S. Development Assistance Committed to Kenya, 2001-
2010 
61 
Figure 21: U.S. Imports from Kenya under AGOA, 2001-2011 
62 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
convert image pdf to text pdf; convert pdf file to txt file
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
convert pdf into text file; text from pdf
Page iii 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Abbreviations 
AGOA  
African Growth and Opportunity Act 
BEA  
Bureau of Economic Analysis  
Commerce Department of Commerce 
China Ex-Im Export-Import Bank of China 
FOCAC 
Forum on China-Africa Cooperation 
GDP  
gross domestic product 
GSP  
Generalized System of Preferences 
IMF  
International Monetary Fund 
MCC  
Millennium Challenge Corporation 
NGO  
nongovernmental organization 
OECD  
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 
OPIC  
Overseas Private Investment Corporation 
State  
Department of State 
Treasury 
Department of the Treasury 
UN 
United Nations 
USAID  
U.S. Agency for International Development 
U.S. Ex-Im Export-Import Bank of the United States 
USTR  
Office of the U.S. Trade Representative 
This is a work of the U.S. government and is not subject to copyright protection in the 
United States. The published product may be reproduced and distributed in its entirety 
without further permission from GAO. However, because this work may contain 
copyrighted images or other material, permission from the copyright holder may be 
necessary if you wish to reproduce this material separately. 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF page deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction. Remarkably, all those C#.NET PDF document page
convert pdf to text on; convert pdf to txt online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as
convert pdf to text vb; convert pdf to word searchable text
Page 1 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
United States Government Accountability Office 
Washington, DC 20548 
February 7, 2013 
The Honorable James M. Inhofe 
United States Senate 
The Honorable Jack Kingston 
House of Representatives 
China’s economic ties with sub-Saharan Africa, including its rapidly rising 
trade and investment in the region, have drawn global attention. While 
U.S. trade with the region has also increased, the United States has 
generally focused on providing development and humanitarian assistance 
to African countries, directing more than a quarter of its foreign economic 
assistance to the region in 2010. Since 2001, China has substantially 
increased its economic engagement with sub-Saharan African countries, 
with strong growth in both imports and exports. According to some 
observers, China’s foreign assistance and investments throughout Africa 
since that time have been driven in part by the Chinese government’s 
desire to obtain a share in Africa’s natural resources as well as by its 
interest in establishing diplomatic relations with countries in the region. 
Various U.S. officials and members of the U.S. business community have 
questioned whether China’s role in the region is affecting U.S. interests 
and opportunities for U.S. firms in sub-Saharan Africa. 
You asked us to review the nature of the United States’ and China’s 
engagement in sub-Saharan Africa.
1
To review U.S. and Chinese goals and policies with respect to sub-
Saharan Africa, we used U.S. government documents, publicly available 
Chinese government documents, and statements from U.S. government 
This report examines (1) U.S. and 
Chinese goals and policies for sub-Saharan Africa; (2) the United States’ 
and China’s trade, grants and loans, and investment activities in sub-
Saharan Africa; and (3) aspects of the United States’ and China’s 
engagement in three sub-Saharan African countries—Angola, Ghana, 
and Kenya. 
1
This review was conducted in response to a request from Representative Jack Kingston 
and Senator James Inhofe—then Ranking Member, Senate Foreign Relations 
Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs—to review U.S. and Chinese 
engagement in sub-Saharan Africa. 
Page 2 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
officials. To examine the United States’ and China’s engagement through 
trade, grants and loans, and investment in sub-Saharan Africa, we 
analyzed available data for the United States and China from a variety of 
U.S., multilateral, and Chinese government sources,
2
generally for 2001 
through 2010 or 2011.
3
2
The data sources we identified include trade data from the United Nations (UN) 
Commodity Trade database, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s (Commerce) Trade 
Policy Information System, and Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA); aid 
data from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and scholars; loan and 
other financing data from the Export-Import Bank of the United States (U.S. Ex-Im) and 
Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC); and investment data from BEA and 
China’s Ministry of Commerce.  
We did not include security issues within the 
scope of this study. To identify the best available data, as well as data 
limitations, we interviewed U.S. government officials and experts in 
Washington, D.C. We also analyzed information on U.S. programs and 
funding from the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce), the 
Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), the Overseas Private 
Investment Corporation (OPIC), the Export-Import Bank of the United 
States (U.S. Ex-Im), and the U.S. Agency for International Development 
(USAID). In addition, we analyzed publicly available information from 
Chinese government entities, such as the Ministry of Commerce; the 
World Bank; the International Monetary Fund (IMF); and scholarly 
literature, among other sources, and we obtained some data from case-
study country governments. To compare in depth the nature of the United 
States’ and China’s engagement in sub-Saharan Africa, we conducted 
case studies of Angola, Ghana, and Kenya. We selected these countries 
on the basis of our assessment of the levels, types, and intersection of 
the United States’ and China’s engagement in trade, grants and loans, 
and investment activity in each country; the three countries’ geographic 
diversity; and input from U.S. government officials and experts on China’s 
role in Africa. These case studies are meant to be illustrative and are not 
generalizable. We conducted work in Washington, D.C., and in Angola, 
Ghana, and Kenya, including meetings with officials from U.S. agencies, 
host-government ministries, U.S. businesses, other donors, and 
nongovernmental organizations (NGO). Despite our requests, we were 
unable to meet with Chinese government officials in Africa or in 
3
When data were unavailable for this period, we used data for shorter periods. For 
comparability, and given challenges in determining appropriate deflators for some data, 
we used nominal rather than inflation-adjusted values for data on trade, grants and loans, 
and investments. All information sources reported nominal data in U.S. dollars. All of the 
data we report are for calendar years, except where noted otherwise.  
Page 3 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Washington, D.C. We have noted data limitations as appropriate, such as 
lack of available data on China’s grants and loans to the region and likely 
underreporting of China’s investment data. Overall, we determined the 
data presented in this study to be generally reliable for the purposes for 
which they are used. Appendix I provides a more detailed discussion of 
our objectives, scope, and methodology. Additional information on the 
United States’ and China’s trade, grants and loans, and investment 
activities in Angola, Ghana, and Kenya is presented in a separate 
supplemental report, GAO-13-280SP
We conducted this performance audit from November 2011 to February 
2013 in accordance with generally accepted government auditing 
standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to 
obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence to provide a reasonable basis for 
our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. We believe 
that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our findings 
and conclusions based on our audit objectives. 
Sub-Saharan Africa comprises 49 countries,
4
including 4 of the 10 
economies worldwide that grew most rapidly from 2001 through 2011.
5
Figure 1 shows the location and selected characteristics of the sub-
Saharan Africa region and our case-study countries. 
Since 1990, overall decreases in maternal and child mortality rates, as 
well as improvements in indicators measuring education and poverty 
rates, have shown that economic and social conditions are improving in 
the region. However, countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including our three 
case-study countries—Angola, Ghana, and Kenya—continue to face 
significant development challenges, such as those related to governance 
and government transparency, and overall low income levels. 
4
Data in this report generally do not include South Sudan, which gained independence in 
July 2011. 
5
The four countries are Angola, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, and Sierra Leone. Analysis of 
economic growth was based on the World Bank’s data on annual gross domestic product 
(GDP) growth from 2001 through 2011. 
Background 
Page 4 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Figure 1: Selected Economic and Development Indicators for Sub-Saharan Africa Compared with Angola, Ghana, and Kenya 
Note: Data shown are the most recent available. 
a
Some data sources did not consistently classify countries in sub-Saharan Africa. For example, data 
for sub-Saharan Africa from the Human Development Index did not include Sudan. In addition, some 
data were not available for the sub-Saharan Africa region. 
b
Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita is based on purchasing power parity, which equalizes the 
purchasing power of different currencies in their home countries by taking into account the relative 
cost of living and the inflation rates of different countries, rather than by comparing the countries’ 
nominal GDP data. 
c
The World Bank classified income level by gross national income per capita as follows: low income, 
$1,025 or less; lower-middle income, $1,026 to $4,035; upper-middle income, $4,036 to $12,475; and 
high income, $12,476 or more. 
d
The Human Development Index provides a composite measure of three basic dimensions of human 
development: health, education, and income, where a ranking of 1 indicates a country with high social 
and economic development. 
e
Based on the perceived level of corruption of a country’s public sector, where a ranking of 1 indicates 
the lowest level of perceived corruption relative to other countries included in the index. 
• 
Angola. In 2002, Angola officially ended a 27-year civil war that 
resulted in the deaths of up to 1.5 million people and destroyed the 
country’s infrastructure. Since 2001, Angola has become one of the 
largest crude oil-producing countries in sub-Saharan Africa, and high 
international oil prices have driven the country’s high growth rate in 
recent years. The country’s efforts to rebuild following the war spurred 
Page 5 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
a construction boom and—although the country imports half of its 
food—an increased focus on agriculture. Despite Angola’s oil 
reserves and relatively high income level per capita, the UN classifies 
Angola as a least developed country, on the basis of its low ratings on 
human development indicators and the weakness of its economy. 
More than 54 percent of Angola’s population—the highest percentage 
among our three case-study countries—lives on the equivalent of less 
than $1.25 per day. In 2011, Transparency International ranked 
Angola’s public sector among the most corrupt in sub-Saharan Africa, 
and other sources have noted significant challenges including 
corruption and lack of transparency, particularly in the extractive 
industries.
6
• 
Ghana. In 1957, Ghana became the first sub-Saharan country in 
colonial Africa to gain its independence. Ghana’s economy has 
generally been strengthened by a quarter century of relatively sound 
management, a competitive business environment, and sustained 
reductions in poverty levels. The country is well endowed with natural 
resources, and oil production that began in 2010 is expected to boost 
Ghana’s economic growth. Agriculture accounts for roughly one-
quarter of Ghana’s gross domestic product (GDP) and employs half of 
the workforce. In 2011, the year that Ghana began to export oil, the 
World Bank elevated Ghana to lower-middle-income status based on 
its per capita income.
7
• 
Kenya. Kenya is considered a hub for trade and finance in the East 
Africa region of sub-Saharan Africa and is that region’s largest 
economy. Kenya’s economic growth has been affected by increasing 
inflation, high energy and food prices, and the 2011 drought in the 
Horn of Africa. In addition, contested national elections in 2008 and 
the resulting violence negatively affected the economy and foreign 
6
Transparency International, Corruption Perceptions Index 2011 (Berlin, Germany: 2011), 
4-5. 
7
According to a report by the Center for Global Development, Ghana was able to achieve 
this change in income status relatively quickly as a result of rebasing its GDP in 2009. The 
GDP rebasing—a statistical adjustment to correct for some underreporting in national 
accounts—put Ghana in a new income category. Although the World Bank calculates 
income status on the basis of gross national income, the Center for Global Development 
report states that gross national income and GDP amounts do not differ significantly. Todd 
Moss and Stephanie Majerowicz, No Longer Poor: Ghana’s New Income Status and 
Implications of Graduation from IDA (Washington, D.C.: Center for Global Development, 
2012). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested