Page 6 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
investments in Kenya. Although economic recovery continues, the 
country faces challenges including a growing trade imbalance, 
corruption, and rural and urban poverty. Kenya also faces challenges 
in its manufacturing and drought-affected agricultural sectors, which 
affect the country’s economic stability. The overall welfare of Kenyans 
has improved in the past decade, with a general decline in national 
poverty and rising primary education enrollment rates. However, 
because of Kenya’s low per-capita income levels, the World Bank 
classifies it as a low-income country. The World Bank has noted that 
poverty and climate change issues remain among the country’s top 
development challenges. 
The United States is the world’s largest trader in goods—that is, total 
imports and exports—and its market-based economy is the world’s 
largest economy, producing one-fifth of total global economic output.
8
In 
addition, the United States is the largest exporter of services, primarily 
education services; financial services; and business, professional, and 
technical services, among others. As a member of the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the United States 
collaborates with other countries and helps set international standards on 
economic, social, and scientific issues, to help member and nonmember 
countries promote economic growth, free markets, and efficient use of 
resources.
9
8
In 2011, U.S. GDP, based on purchasing power parity, was $15 trillion and U.S. per-
capita GDP was approximately $48,400.  
The United States also coordinates its development 
assistance activities with other members of the OECD Development 
Assistance Committee, a forum of many of the largest funders of aid that 
has a mandate to promote development cooperation and other policies 
for sustainable development. In accordance with the 2005 Paris 
Declaration on Aid Effectiveness, the U.S. government generally does not 
condition its aid on, or “tie” it to, the recipient country’s use of the aid to 
procure goods or services from the United States. 
9
OECD is an organization of 34 industrialized countries, operating by consensus, that 
fosters dialogue among members to discuss, develop, and refine economic and social 
policies and provides an arena for establishing multilateral agreements.   
U.S. and Chinese 
Economies 
Convert pdf to ascii text - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
c# read text from pdf; convert pdf file to text document
Convert pdf to ascii text - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
convert pdf image to text; convert pdf to editable text
Page 7 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
China is the world’s largest manufacturer and exporter of goods,
10
with 
overall economic output second only to the United States’.
11
In 2010, 
China was the fourth-highest-ranked global exporter of services, although 
it still imports more services than it exports. Unlike the United States, 
China is not a member of OECD. However, China’s entry into the World 
Trade Organization in 2001 has helped the country expand its economic 
integration with the global economy, and such integration is expected to 
help China increase its efficiency, innovation, and global 
competitiveness.
12
Over the past 3 decades, China has been transitioning 
from a rural, agricultural society to an urban, industrial society and from a 
planned economy, where the government makes key decisions about 
goods and production, toward one that is, like the U.S. economy, more 
market based. During this transformation, China’s growth has been driven 
by manufacturing, in part because of its relatively low labor costs. 
However, China’s overall growth has imposed increased pressure on the 
availability of natural resources. Moreover, according to a joint study by 
the World Bank and the Chinese government, state-owned enterprises 
are not yet clearly distinguished from the private sector.
13
10
See World Bank and People’s Republic of China Development Research Center of the 
State Council, China 2030: Building a Modern, Harmonious, and Creative High-Income 
Society (Washington, D.C.: 2012). China’s State Council is the highest executive and 
administrative entity in the Chinese government and oversees all major central 
government ministries, commissions, and other key state entities.  
This study 
notes that, more than in other economies, China’s state-owned 
enterprises and government are closely connected and generally are 
11
In 2011, China’s GDP, based on purchasing power parity, was $11.4 trillion, or about 
three-quarters of U.S. GDP; China’s per-capita GDP was approximately $8,500, or one-
sixth of U.S. per-capita GDP. 
12
See World Bank and People’s Republic of China Development Research Center of the 
State Council, China 2030. After 15 years of negotiations to join the World Trade 
Organization, on December 11, 2001, China bound itself to open and liberalize its 
economy and offer a more predictable environment for trade and foreign investment in 
accordance with the organization’s rules.  
13
World Bank and People’s Republic of China Development Research Center of the State 
Council, China 2030.   
Generate and draw Code 128 for Java
Various barcode image formats, like ASCII, BMP, DIB, EPS Preview, JPEG, etc, are valid Code 128 Auto"); //Encode data for Code 128 barcode image text in Java
best pdf to text; convert pdf table to text
Generate and draw Code 39 for Java
or not, text margin setting, show check sum digit or not choices for Code 39 linear barcode in java applications. Various barcode image formats, like ASCII, BMP
convert scanned pdf to text online; change pdf to txt file
Page 8 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
mutually supportive and that China’s large private enterprises also benefit 
from government financing and commercial diplomacy.
14
U.S. companies are subject to various regulations with respect to 
commercial activities abroad, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act 
of 1977, which prohibits payments to foreign government officials to assist 
in obtaining or retaining business.
15
The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act 
applies to all U.S. persons, including corporations, as well as foreign firms 
that issue securities regulated pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 
1934. The United States also adopted the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention 
in 1998.
16
In 2011, the Chinese government amended its anticorruption 
laws to outlaw bribery of foreign public officials by Chinese nationals, 
companies, and residents for commercial benefit. Both the United States 
and China signed the United Nations Convention against Corruption in 
2003.
17
According to Transparency International, in 2011, firms from 
China were perceived as among the most likely to pay bribes abroad, 
ranked at 27 among firms from 28 countries; U.S. firms, ranked at 10, 
were perceived as less likely to pay bribes abroad.
18
14
For example, state-owned enterprises in China will accept informal guidance from 
government officials and, in return, are more likely to receive preferential access to bank 
finance, privileged access to business opportunities, and even protection against 
competition. However, the study notes that more than one in four state-owned enterprises 
in China incurs a loss, and state-owned enterprises have exhibited lower growth in 
productivity than have private enterprises. 
15
Pub. L. No. 95-213, as amended (codified at 15 U.S.C. §§78dd-1 et seq). 
16
The OECD Anti-Bribery Convention establishes legally binding standards to criminalize 
bribery of foreign public officials in international business transactions. Five nonmember 
countries have adopted the OECD convention: Argentina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Russia, and 
South Africa. 
17
The UN Convention against Corruption calls for participating countries to criminalize 
acts of corruption and to agree to cooperate with one another to fight against and prevent 
corruption. Angola, Ghana, and Kenya, our case-study countries, are also signatories to 
this convention. 
18
Transparency International’s 2011 Bribe Payers Index ranks 28 of the world’s largest 
economies according to the perceived likelihood that companies from these countries 
would pay bribes abroad, based on the views of business executives as captured by 
Transparency International’s 2011 Bribe Payers Survey. In the index, lower rankings 
indicate lower perceived likelihood of paying bribes abroad. The index ranks only Russian 
firms higher than Chinese firms. 
Anticorruption Laws for 
U.S. and Chinese Firms 
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Tag Viewer SDK, Read & Edit TIFF Tag Using VB.
TiffTagID.ImageDescription, "Insert a private tiff tag", TiffTagDataType.Ascii)) file.Save VB.NET TIFF manipulating controls, like TIFF text extracting control
convert pdf file to txt; convert pdf to openoffice text
Data Matrix C#.NET Integration Tutorial
datamatrix.CodeToEncode = "C#DataMatrixGenerator"; //Data Matrix data mode, supporting ASCII, Auto, Base256, C40, Edifact, Text, X12. datamatrix.
converting pdf to editable text; convert pdf to txt file format
Page 9 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Multiple U.S. agencies oversee and implement U.S. aid, trade, and 
investment activities in sub-Saharan Africa. Table 1 lists selected U.S. 
government entities’ roles and responsibilities and areas of involvement. 
Table 1: Selected U.S. Government Entities’ Roles and Areas of Involvement in Sub-Saharan Africa 
U.S. government entity 
Roles and responsibilities 
Area(s) of 
involvement 
Department of State (State) 
Oversees policy development and bilateral relations; provides 
diplomatic presence supporting U.S. aid, trade, investment activities; 
supports Commerce’s commercial diplomacy activities, especially 
where Commerce is not present. 
Trade, aid, investment 
Department of Commerce 
(Commerce) 
Provides Commercial Service presence and supports trade missions to 
facilitate U.S. export and investment opportunities; helps U.S. firms 
resolve market-access problems and address trade-agreement 
compliance issues; assists U.S. firms competing for foreign-
government contracts through its Advocacy Center. 
Trade, investment 
Department of the Treasury 
(Treasury) 
Advocates for improvements to regulatory frameworks, transparency, 
and governance through multilateral development banks, such as the 
World Bank, to enhance private-sector investment; provides bilateral 
technical assistance in areas such as budget and economic policy.  
Aid, investment 
Office of the U.S. Trade 
Representative (USTR) 
Develops and coordinates implementation of U.S. trade and investment 
policy, including trade preferences; leads discussions with Trade and 
Investment Framework Agreement partners; negotiates bilateral 
investment treaties and other trade agreements. 
Trade, investment 
U.S. Agency for International 
Development (USADI) 
Formulates U.S. development policies; implements U.S. development 
assistance activities through grants.  
Aid 
Millennium Challenge Corporation 
(MCC) 
Implements bilateral compacts for grant-funded development projects, 
including infrastructure construction; has signed compacts with 13 sub-
Saharan African countries.  
Aid 
Export-Import Bank of the United 
States (U.S. Ex-Im) 
Provides financing—such as working capital guarantees (preexport 
financing), export credit insurance, loan guarantees, and direct loans 
(mostly nonconcessional)—to promote U.S. exports. 
Trade  
Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation (OPIC) 
Assists U.S. private sector investors overseas through direct loans, 
loan guarantees, political risk insurance, and support for private equity 
investment funds. 
Investment 
U.S. Trade and Development 
Agency  
Funds project-planning activities, such as feasibility studies, and U.S. 
visits for African entrepreneurs to facilitate exports of U.S. goods. and 
services 
Trade, investment 
Source: GAO analysis of information from State, Commerce, Treasury, USTR, USAID, MCC, U.S. Ex-Im, OPIC, and the U.S. Trade 
and Development Agency. 
U.S. and Chinese 
Government Agencies 
Engaged in Sub-Saharan 
Africa 
U.S. Government Entities 
PDF-417 C#.NET Integration Tutorial
PDF417; //Set PDF 417 encoding valid input: All ASCII characters, including 0-9 PDF417DataMode.Auto // Data mode, Auto, Byte, Numeric,Text supported //Set
c# pdf to txt; change pdf to text file
Image Converter | Convert Image, Document Formats
formats; Convert in memory for higher speeds; Multiple image formats Support, such as TIFF, GIF, BMP, JPEG Rich documents formats support, like ASCII, PDF,
batch pdf to text; convert pdf to plain text online
Page 10 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
China’s Ministry of Commerce formulates and implements policies for 
foreign trade, economic cooperation, and overseas investments, in 
collaboration with other agencies.
19
Table 2: Selected Chinese Government Entities’ Roles and Areas of Involvement in Sub-Saharan Africa 
The Ministry of Commerce also leads 
China’s foreign aid by selecting projects and organizing the 
implementation of aid activities. Table 2 lists selected Chinese 
government entities’ roles and responsibilities and areas of involvement. 
Chinese government entity 
Roles and responsibilities 
Areas of involvement 
Ministry of Commerce 
Formulates and implements policies on foreign trade and investment 
activities; leads foreign aid efforts. 
Trade, aid, investment 
Ministry of Finance 
Supervises and audits implementation of foreign aid budget.  
Aid 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs 
Coordinates with other Chinese ministries on issues including foreign 
trade and economic cooperation and assistance.  
Trade, aid, investment 
Export-Import Bank of China (China 
Ex-Im) 
Supports Chinese government policy to promote Chinese exports and 
investment through export credits, international guarantees, 
concessional and nonconcessional loans for overseas construction 
and investment, and official lines of credit. 
Trade, aid, investment 
China Development Bank  
Serves Chinese government’s policy to promote trade and investment 
by providing large-scale, long-term funding for construction of 
infrastructure and industrial projects; oversees China-Africa 
Development Fund, which encourages Chinese investments in Africa. 
Trade, investment  
Source: GAO analysis of information from the Brookings Institution, the Center for Global Development, the government of China, the 
World Bank, and China scholar Deborah Brautigam. 
Note: Although China does not have an official aid agency, China’s Ministries of Commerce, Finance, 
and Foreign Affairs and the Export-Import Bank of China are among the entities involved in China’s 
development assistance activities. 
According to a white paper issued by the Chinese government, the 
Ministry of Commerce is authorized to oversee foreign aid.
20
19
For example, China’s State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission 
of the State Council supervises and manages state-owned enterprises, and oversees 
related outbound investment. 
In addition, 
China’s Ministry of Finance manages the budget for foreign aid 
expenditures, in cooperation with the Ministry of Commerce. The Ministry 
20
The white paper was published on the Chinese state-run news agency’s website. See 
Information Office of the State Council, People’s Republic of China, “White Paper: China’s 
Foreign Aid” (April 2011), accessed Oct. 17, 2011, 
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2011-04/21/c_13839683.htm.   
Chinese Government Entities 
VB.NET Image: Generate GS1-128/EAN-128 Barcode on Image & Document
AddFloatingItem(item) rePage.MergeItemsToPage() REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/ean128.pdf", New PDFEncoder Data, All 128 ASCII characters (Char from 0 to 127).
c# extract text from pdf; convert pdf image to text online
Generate and Print 1D and 2D Barcodes in Java
Various barcode image formats, like ASCII, BMP, DIB, EPS Preview options include show text or not, text margin setting like QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in
conversion of pdf image to text; convert pdf file to text
Page 11 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
of Foreign Affairs manages China’s diplomatic presence and drafts 
annual aid plans with the Ministry of Commerce.
21
China Ex-Im and the China Development Bank, two of the Chinese 
government’s financing institutions, promote the government’s goals 
overseas. China Ex-Im maintains sole responsibility for concessional 
loans to support China’s exports to sub-Saharan Africa and promotes 
Chinese exports and investment through export credits, international 
guarantees, and concessional and nonconcessional loans for overseas 
construction and investment. The China Development Bank provides 
large-scale, long-term funding for infrastructure construction and industrial 
projects; provides market-rate (nonconcessional) loans; and oversees the 
China-Africa Development Fund, to encourage Chinese investments 
throughout Africa. 
The United States’ key priorities in sub-Saharan Africa include, among 
others, building democracy, promoting development, supporting 
commerce, and strengthening security. Also, in 2000, Congress passed 
the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), which extended trade 
preferences to eligible countries in the region.
22
The Chinese government 
has published policy papers that articulate its goal of establishing closer 
ties with African countries and state its principles of engagement, which 
include seeking mutual benefit for China and African nations and not 
interfering in African countries’ domestic affairs. 
21
According to scholar Deborah Brautigam, China’s Ministries of Commerce and Foreign 
Affairs have an uneasy division of labor and sharing of authorities over foreign aid. See 
Deborah Brautigam, The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa (New York, N.Y.: 
Oxford University Press, 2009), 111. 
22
Pub. L. No. 106-200, as amended (codified at 19 U.S.C. §§ 3701 et seq). 
U.S. Goals Have 
Emphasized 
Democracy and 
Development in Sub-
Saharan Africa, while 
China’s Policy 
Underscores Mutual 
Benefit and 
Noninterference 
Generate 2D Barcodes in .NET Winforms
Moreover, the generation of Truncated PDF-417 and Macro PDF417 are supported. ASCII Mode, Base256, C40, EDIFACT, Text, and X12 data mode are supported.
convert pdf to text document; pdf to text
Code 128 Bar Code .NET Windows Forms SDK
symbology and capable of encoding full 128 characters in ASCII table. code128 winformscode128.Symbology = Symbology.code128; // set code128 code text to encode
extract text from pdf; c# convert pdf to text file
Page 12 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
The U.S. government has articulated its goals for sub-Saharan Africa 
through annual Department of State (State) bureau plans for the region 
and through a U.S. strategy announced in June 2012. The fiscal year 
2013 State bureau plan for sub-Saharan Africa identifies a number of 
goals, including strengthening democratic institutions, building respect for 
human rights, ensuring countries are free of conflict, using U.S. 
development assistance to improve health and education indicators, and 
helping sub-Saharan African countries build their share of global trade.
23
According to State officials, State’s annual bureau plan had served as the 
primary U.S. strategy for the region. However, in June 2012, the U.S. 
government publicly issued its interagency “U.S. Strategy Toward Sub-
Saharan Africa.”
24
According to U.S. officials, the 2012 strategy is intended to encourage an 
interagency approach for engagement with sub-Saharan Africa, with 
greater emphasis on economic and commercial activities.
In his letter introducing the current strategy, President 
Obama highlighted goals related to strengthening democratic institutions 
and growing Africa’s economy as priority efforts critical to the region. The 
2012 U.S. strategy articulates four objectives for U.S. interaction with the 
region that are consistent with the goals in State’s bureau plan: 
strengthen democratic institutions; spur economic growth, trade, and 
investment; advance peace and security; and promote opportunity and 
development. 
25
23
State’s fiscal year 2013 bureau plan for sub-Saharan Africa identified additional goals 
related to adapting to climate change, enhancing food security and sustainable agricultural 
development, building public support for a mutually beneficial U.S.-Africa partnership, and 
increasing U.S. diplomatic effectiveness.   
State, 
Commerce, USAID, and USTR officials said that several agencies are 
developing plans to coordinate in implementing the strategy’s four 
objectives. Furthermore, according to a State document, U.S. agencies 
are working to better link trade policy and development objectives. In 
addition, State has issued a directive to prioritize economic issues in U.S. 
foreign policy worldwide, including efforts to improve regional economic 
integration and introduce U.S. businesses to new markets in sub-Saharan 
24
White House, “U.S. Strategy Toward Sub-Saharan Africa” (June 2012), accessed June 
14, 2012, http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/africa_strategy_2.pdf. 
25
Commerce officials noted that, pursuant to the 2012 strategy, Commerce is leading the 
development of an initiative called “Doing Business in Africa” that combines the tools of 
U.S. trade promotion agencies to assist U.S. firms in exploring commercial opportunities in 
sub-Saharan Africa. 
U.S. Goals and Programs 
for Sub-Saharan Africa 
Include Focus on 
Development and 
Emphasis on Democracy 
and Economic Growth 
Page 13 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Africa. In October 2011, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stated that, as 
part of this effort, the U.S. government is evolving its development efforts 
throughout Africa to increase investments and reinforce, but not replace, 
what these markets can achieve independently. The President’s 2011 
Trade Policy Agenda, coordinated by USTR, also states an interest in 
expanding markets for U.S. goods and services in sub-Saharan Africa 
and building the region’s economic development through trade.
26
Increased trade with sub-Saharan Africa was identified as a primary U.S. 
goal in the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), which was 
signed into law in 2000 to promote stable and sustainable economic 
growth and development in the region. AGOA allows eligible sub-Saharan 
African countries
27
to export to the United States, without import duties, 
qualifying goods from a list of more than 6,000 items.
28
Currently, 39 
countries are eligible for AGOA benefits. As part of AGOA’s “third-country 
fabric provision,” a subset of those countries can export to the United 
States, subject to a cap, apparel made with yarns and fabrics originating 
anywhere in the world.
29
26
Office of the United States Trade Representative, “2011 Trade Policy Agenda and 2010 
Annual Report,” accessed January 12, 2012, http://www.ustr.gov/webfm_send/2597.  
AGOA also called for an annual forum, known as 
the U.S.–Sub-Saharan Africa Trade and Economic Forum—a high-level 
economic dialogue among U.S. and African senior government officials, 
members of their respective private sectors, and representatives of civil 
society. U.S. officials have described the annual forum, which has been 
27
AGOA authorizes the President to designate countries as eligible to receive AGOA 
benefits if they are determined to have established, or are making continual progress 
toward establishing, the following: market-based economies; the rule of law and political 
pluralism; elimination of barriers to U.S. trade and investment; protection of intellectual 
property; efforts to combat corruption; policies to reduce poverty and increase availability 
of health care and educational opportunities; protection of human rights and worker rights; 
and elimination of certain child labor practices. 
28
The United States also offers tariff reductions for goods from most sub-Saharan African 
countries under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP). The Africa Investment 
Incentive Act of 2006, Pub. L. No. 109-432, div. D, Title VI, expanded the list of products 
that eligible sub-Saharan African countries may export to the United States duty free 
under GSP, which covers approximately 4,600 items. GSP and AGOA eligibility criteria 
overlap, and countries must be GSP eligible to take advantage of trade benefits under 
AGOA. 
29
This subset includes “lesser developed beneficiary countries” as defined by AGOA, 
which include countries, such as Ghana and Kenya, that the UN does not classify as least 
developed countries. In August 2012, Congress voted to extend the third-country fabric 
provision, which was set to expire the following month. See Pub. L. No. 112-163. 
Page 14 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
held in Washington, D.C., and various locations in Africa, as a way to link 
trade capacity building and trade opportunities. The U.S. government 
released the “U.S. Strategy Toward Sub-Saharan Africa” at the 2012 
forum, which was held in Washington, D.C., and focused on sub-Saharan 
Africa’s infrastructure development to promote trade among the countries 
of the region and with the United States. 
The U.S. government also established trade and investment agreements 
with sub-Saharan African countries and regional economic communities 
to promote cooperation on trade and investment issues, including 
strengthening bilateral ties, improving the business environment, and 
building trade capacity.
30
These agreements include bilateral investment 
treaties, which establish some protections and regulations for U.S. 
investments in partner countries.
31
In addition, the U.S. government maintains a number of development 
assistance programs in sub-Saharan Africa to help meet stated goals on 
promoting opportunity and development.
32
30
For example, the U.S. government has Trade and Investment Framework Agreements 
in sub-Saharan Africa with Angola, Ghana, Liberia, Mauritius, Mozambique, Nigeria, 
Rwanda, and South Africa as well as with the Common Market for Eastern and Southern 
Africa, the East African Community, and the West African Economic and Monetary Union. 
The U.S. government also has a Trade, Investment, and Development Cooperative 
Agreement with the Southern African Customs Union. In addition, according to Commerce 
officials, the U.S. Department of Commerce recently established the U.S.–East African 
Community Commercial Dialogue, the first such effort in Africa, to enable the United 
States and East African Community governments to work with their respective private 
sectors to increase two-way trade and investment. 
These programs include the 
Global Health Initiative, which integrates U.S.-funded global health efforts 
such as HIV/AIDS and malaria; Feed the Future, the U.S. government-
wide strategy to address global hunger and food security; the Global 
Climate Change Initiative, which is intended to better integrate climate-
change considerations into U.S. foreign assistance; Millennium Challenge 
Corporation (MCC) compacts and other programs, which provide grants 
31
The U.S. government has bilateral investment treaties with Cameroon, the Democratic 
Republic of the Congo, Mozambique, the Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Senegal. 
32
In addition to providing bilateral assistance to countries in sub-Saharan Africa, the 
United States assists the region through its membership in, and contributions to, 
multilateral organizations. According to U.S. officials, the U.S. government’s position as 
the largest shareholder at the World Bank and the largest nonregional shareholder at the 
African Development Bank enables it to advance U.S. priorities in sub-Saharan Africa 
through these institutions.  
Page 15 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
for development projects to eligible countries; and Partnership for Growth, 
a U.S. partnership with select countries to promote economic growth 
through country ownership and joint decision making.
33
The Chinese government’s policies and goals toward sub-Saharan Africa, 
while not specifically defined for the region, are reflected in two publicly 
released documents—its African Policy, issued in 2006,
34
and its policy 
on foreign aid, issued in 2011.
35
The 2006 African Policy states that 
China’s objective in Africa is to promote long-term China-Africa relations 
in a mutually beneficial manner. The 2006 policy document outlines an 
approach that includes the principles of respecting African countries’ 
independence and equality; seeking mutual benefit in economic 
development and cooperation on social development; fostering 
cooperation with Africa in the United Nations and other multilateral 
systems; and enhancing mutual learning in areas such as governance 
and development. Additionally, the 2006 document states that to establish 
relations with China, a country must adhere to the “one China” principle—
that is, cease official relations with Taiwan.
36
Regarding trade relations with Africa, China’s 2006 African Policy 
includes plans to facilitate access for African commodities to the Chinese 
market and provide duty-free treatment for imports of some goods from 
least developed countries, including those in Africa. Additionally, the 2006 
policy document expresses support for Chinese investments in Africa and 
33
In sub-Saharan Africa, Ghana and Tanzania participate in the Partnership for Growth 
Initiative. 
34
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, People’s Republic of China, “China’s African Policy,” 
accessed October 11, 2011, http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/eng/zxxx/t230615.htm. 
35
The policy is stated in a white paper published on the Chinese state-run news agency’s 
website. See Information Office of the State Council, People’s Republic of China, “White 
Paper: China’s Foreign Aid,” accessed October 11, 2011, 
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2011-04/21/c_13839683.htm. 
36
This report did not include an analysis of U.S. or Chinese security-related goals in sub-
Saharan Africa. We did not obtain information on China’s security goals or policies in the 
region. 
China’s Stated Policy for 
Africa Emphasizes Mutual 
Benefit and 
Noninterference 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested