how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf to plain text online control Library system azure asp.net windows console 6520415-part723

Page 46 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Available data indicate that Chinese government loans and related 
financing to Angola, Ghana, and Kenya have exceeded U.S. government 
loans and related financing.
83
As figure 16 shows, Chinese government 
credit lines to Angola from 2002 through 2011 exceeded U.S. loans and 
related financing by more than $11 billion, Chinese government loans to 
Ghana from 2006 through 2011 exceeded U.S. loans and related 
financing by more than $2.4 billion, and Chinese government loans to 
Kenya from July 2009 through June 2012 exceeded U.S. government 
loans and related financing by more than $77 million.
84
Chinese 
government loans and related financing were primarily for infrastructure 
projects, such as construction of roads, rail, hospitals, schools, housing, 
and water and energy infrastructure, to be implemented by Chinese firms, 
including state-owned firms.
85
83
In addition to loans, China has committed credit lines in some cases. A borrower draws 
funds from a credit line, incurring a loan. U.S. government agencies such as U.S. Ex-Im 
and OPIC provide loans as well as loan guarantees and insurance. 
U.S. officials observed that China’s 
infrastructure construction addresses a key need in Africa. In contrast to 
Chinese loans and related financing, U.S. government loans and related 
financing generally have supported private-sector and host-government 
purchases of U.S. exports, including aircraft and machinery, through U.S. 
Ex-Im, as well as investments in loan portfolios, geothermal energy, and 
medical equipment through OPIC. U.S. agencies such as U.S. Ex-Im and 
OPIC offer loans and related financing for specific transactions intended 
to increase U.S. exports or benefit U.S. firms’ investments. 
84
We obtained data on China’s loans to Angola from information published by the Angolan 
Ministry of Finance and from a U.S. official. Other sources corroborated data on China’s 
total lending and provided some additional information about its loans to Angola. 
Additionally, we obtained information about China’s loans and grants to Ghana and Kenya 
from documents published by the Ghanaian and Kenyan governments. Data on China’s 
loans were available for different time periods in each of the case-study countries. China 
does not publish country-specific data on its loans and grants.  
85
A joint study by the World Bank and the Chinese government states that China’s state-
owned enterprises and government are closely connected and that Chinese state-owned 
enterprises are more likely to receive preferential access to bank finance, privileged 
access to business opportunities, and even protection against competition. See World 
Bank and Development Research Center of the State Council, People’s Republic of 
China, China 2030: Building a Modern, Harmonious, and Creative High-Income Society
Chinese Government Loans 
Exceed U.S. Government Loans 
and Benefit Chinese Firms 
Convert pdf to plain text online - Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
convert pdf to txt format; convert pdf to text file online
Convert pdf to plain text online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
converting image pdf to text; change pdf to txt format
Page 47 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Figure 16: Available Data on U.S. Government and Chinese Government Loans and Related Financing Commitments for 
Angola, Ghana, and Kenya 
a
Data on Chinese government loans and related financing for each country were available only for the 
indicated periods. Although data on U.S. government loans and related financing are available for 
prior years, U.S. government commitments are shown only for the indicated periods. 
b
U.S. government commitments include loans and related financing such as loan guarantees and 
insurance. Chinese government commitments include credit lines as well as loans. In Angola, China 
committed credit lines, from which a borrower can draw funds, incurring a loan. 
c
The Ghanaian government published data on China’s loan commitments as of September of each 
year in its annual budget documents for 2006 through 2011. Available budget data did not include 
China’s $3 billion loan to Ghana signed in December 2011. We have included the $3 billion loan with 
previous loan commitments because this financing represents China’s most significant loan package 
to Ghana. 
d
U.S. government and Chinese government loans and related financing commitments are presented 
for Kenya’s fiscal years, from July 2009 through June 2012, because data for China were only 
available for this period. 
The government of China has generally committed loans and credit lines 
to support Chinese firms’ infrastructure construction in the three case-
study countries through high-level agreements with each country’s 
government. For example: 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
a single text character and text string to PDF files using online source codes in C#.NET class program. Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page using
convert pdf to word to edit text; convert scanned pdf to word text
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
doc.Save(outputFilePath). VB: Add Password to Plain PDF File. Following are examples for adding password to a plain PDF file in Visual Basic programming.
convert pdf to plain text online; pdf image to text
Page 48 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
• 
Angola. The Chinese government’s commitments of about $12 billion 
in credit lines to the Angolan government in 2002 through 2011 have 
driven much of Chinese firms’ engagement in the country, according 
to U.S. and Angolan officials.
86
• 
Ghana. The Chinese government signed a $3 billion loan agreement 
with the Ghanaian government in December 2011 for 12 eligible 
infrastructure projects to be implemented primarily by Chinese firms,
87
according to Ghana’s finance ministry.
88
• 
Kenya. The Chinese government’s commitments of about $480 million 
in loans, mostly for infrastructure construction, between July 2009 and 
June 2012 were generally provided under agreements between the 
Chinese and Kenyan governments. According to Kenyan finance 
ministry officials, these agreements identified Chinese firms that 
would implement loan-financed projects. 
Chinese government loans and related financing for projects in Africa 
have enabled Chinese firms to establish and expand operations within the 
region. For example, according to officials from an Angolan 
nongovernmental organization (NGO), Chinese state-owned enterprises 
and, later, Chinese private-sector firms began operating in Angola after 
the Chinese government agreed to provide loans to the Angolan 
government following the conclusion of the country’s civil war in 2002. 
According to Kenyan officials, China’s investments in Kenya have 
increased, in part because some Chinese firms that initially came to 
Kenya to work on Chinese government–financed projects have diversified 
into other sectors. 
86
Comprehensive information on disbursement of China’s credit lines and loans to Angola 
is not available. However, data published by the Angolan Ministry of Finance indicates that 
as of June 2008 about 30 percent China’s credit lines of $2 billion in 2004 and $2.5 billion 
in 2007 were disbursed.  
87
U.S. officials said that they questioned how much of China’s $3 billion loan commitment 
to Ghana in December 2011 will be disbursed. Although disbursement information for this 
loan is not yet available, data published by Ghana’s Ministry of Finance and Economic 
Planning for the construction of the Bui hydroelectric dam indicate that as of September 
2011, almost $129 million (70 percent) of the nearly $185 million committed by the 
Chinese government had been disbursed since 2008. 
88
In 2006 and 2011, the Chinese government also committed about $353 million to the 
Ghanaian government for several projects, including dam construction, communication 
infrastructure and systems, and electrification.  
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Able to convert plain text to various fonts, colors and sizes of text content in PDF. Free SDK component built in .NET framework. Online evaluation source code
converting pdf to plain text; convert pdf to word searchable text
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page. features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and Access to online VB.NET class source codes.
text from pdf; convert pdf to word text online
Page 49 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
In addition providing loans, the Chinese government has also provided 
small amounts of grant assistance, primarily for infrastructure such as 
hospitals, government buildings, and sports stadiums that were built by 
Chinese firms. For example, China committed almost $39 million in grant 
funding to Kenya from July 2009 through June 2012 for construction 
projects including roads, a sports stadium, and a hospital, according to 
Kenyan government reports on donor funding. In 2011, China committed 
$15 million in grants for the construction of Ghana’s Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs’ building, according to Ghanaian government budget reports.
89
U.S. officials from several agencies expressed concerns that some 
aspects of Chinese government loans—their lower cost, greater flexibility, 
and lack of transparency—may advantage Chinese firms over U.S. firms. 
• 
Lower cost. Our analysis of information on specific Chinese 
government infrastructure loans to Angola, Ghana, and Kenya 
showed that borrowers’ costs for these loans have generally been 
less than borrowers’ costs for U.S. government loans to Angola and 
Kenya, and, to a lesser extent, to Ghana (see app. II for more 
details).
90
The Chinese government loans that we analyzed generally 
required a lower repayment over time, in terms of net present value, 
than would a U.S. government loan for a similar project.
91
89
No published information is available regarding China’s grants to Angola. 
For 
example, compared with China Ex-Im’s and China Development 
Bank’s November 2009 loans of $6 billion and $1.5 billion, 
respectively, to Angola, the repayment required for a hypothetical U.S. 
Ex-Im loan to Angola at the same time and of the same size would be 
greater because of factors such as higher fees (7.62 percent up-front 
fees for the U.S. Ex-Im loan vs. 0.25 percent fees for the China Ex-Im 
and China Development Bank loans) and a shorter repayment period 
90
In addition, our analysis of information on specific Chinese government infrastructure 
loans to Angola, Ghana, and Kenya showed that these loans are more costly than World 
Bank loans to Ghana and Kenya, but not to Angola. 
91
Because U.S. Ex-Im did not offer loans for the construction sector during a similar period 
as the Chinese loans, U.S. Ex-Im provided us terms for hypothetical loans for the 
construction sector for the same country, on the same date, and of the same magnitude 
as the Chinese government loans. 
U.S. Officials Are Concerned 
That Chinese Government 
Loans May Disadvantage U.S. 
Firms 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF File in C#.NET.
convert pdf picture to text; convert pdf file to txt
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Convert plain text to PDF text with multiple fonts
change pdf to txt file; convert pdf to text document
Page 50 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
(5 years for the U.S. Ex-Im loan vs. 15 years for the China Ex-Im loan 
and 8 years for the China Development Bank loan).
92
• 
Greater flexibility. China’s loans may provide more flexible terms for 
the use of local content such as labor and materials, making them 
more attractive to host-country governments. U.S. Ex-Im finances the 
purchase of goods originated and shipped from the United States and 
also finances U.S.-provided services. In addition to financing U.S. 
exports, U.S. Ex-Im may in some cases provide financing for local 
costs, such as local labor and materials, up to 30 percent of the 
contract value of the export.
93
U.S. Ex-Im authorized more than $70 
million for local costs in Ghana between 2001 and 2011, equal to 
about 10 percent of its export financing for Ghana. Under its recent $3 
billion loan agreement with Ghana, China agreed to finance 60 
percent Chinese content and up to 40 percent Ghanaian content, 
according to a senior Ghanaian government official.
94
• 
Lack of transparency. U.S. officials and others noted that, in general, 
the Chinese government’s engagement with African countries lacks 
transparency. According to U.S. officials, in some cases the lack of 
transparency regarding aspects of Chinese government loans, such 
as their amount, terms, and purpose, may limit the U.S. government’s 
ability to provide competitive loans to support the purchase of U.S. 
exports, thus affecting U.S. firms’ ability to compete with Chinese 
92
We obtained information about loans such as the amount, interest rate, maturity, and 
repayment period. When we could not obtain information about specific loan terms, such 
as the disbursement periods and the commitment fees for China’s loans to Angola and 
Kenya, we made assumptions on the basis of comparable loans’ terms or as appropriate. 
The repayment value of loans can differ on the basis of each loan’s interest rate, maturity, 
and other fees. According to U.S. Ex-Im officials, U.S. Ex-Im’s fees reflect risk of the 
borrower’s defaulting on the loan and are based on country risk, the risk classification of 
the borrower, the terms of the loan, and the disbursement period. 
93
Under OECD rules, U.S. Ex-Im can provide up to 30 percent financing for local costs for 
medium- and long-term transactions if these expenses are related to the U.S. exporter’s 
scope of work and if the U.S. exporter has demonstrated that local cost support is 
available from a competitor export credit agency or that private market financing of local 
costs was difficult to obtain for the transaction. Between 2001 and 2011, U.S. Ex-Im 
committed more than $70 million for financing local costs in Ghana and committed an 
additional $1.2 million in Nigeria.  Information on large Chinese government loans 
indicates that China requires between 60 and 70 percent Chinese content.  
94
Chinese content includes materials made in China as well as Chinese labor to 
implement projects in the host country. 
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can be copied Click to convert PDF document to Word (.docx
changing pdf to text; convert pdf to word text document
C# Word: How to Extract Text from C# Word in .NET Project
Simple to convert a Visual C# MS Word doc Word text extractor preserves both the plain text as well powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to word editable text online; extract text from pdf
Page 51 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
firms’ costs of products and services. For instance, according to U.S. 
Ex-Im officials, absence of information on the cost of China’s loans 
may prevent U.S. Ex-Im from offering competitive loans for U.S. 
exports and may thus disadvantage U.S. firms interested in exporting 
their goods and services. According to agency officials, U.S. Ex-Im 
adheres to OECD rules, which in rare cases allow a participant export 
credit agency to match a non-OECD participant’s financing terms and 
conditions, if there is evidence or specific information about the non-
OECD country’s financing offer. However, according to U.S. Ex-Im, 
such information is typically difficult to obtain from the borrower, who 
is the potential beneficiary of the better terms. Moreover, because the 
Chinese government is generally not transparent in its lending 
practices, according to U.S. Ex-Im officials, it is difficult to obtain 
specific information on China’s financing terms and U.S. Ex-Im can 
rarely use this OECD provision.
95
Funding provided by other donors, such as the World Bank and the 
United States through MCC, has supported construction projects for 
which Chinese firms have competed in the case-study countries.
96
For 
example, according to data on World Bank-funded contracts in the three 
case-study countries, Chinese firms won about $455 million in contracts 
for construction projects.
97
95
In one instance, according to U.S. Ex-Im, it was able to obtain information to match 
China’s loan offer for a rail project in Pakistan in 2010.  
In Ghana, the only one of our three case-study 
countries to qualify for an MCC compact, Chinese firms won about $112 
million in contracts (22 percent of overall MCC-Ghana contract dollars) for 
construction projects. Chinese firms are also heavily engaged in 
construction contracts for the African Development Bank in Kenya, 
96
MCC signed a 5-year, $547 million agreement or compact with Ghana that began in 
2007. The MCC compact provided grants to fund agriculture, transportation, and rural 
services projects, including the construction of postharvest infrastructure such as a cargo 
center and packhouses, upgrades to a major highway and other roads, and improvements 
to the rural electrification infrastructure. 
97
Construction projects accounted for 89 percent of overall contract dollars won by 
Chinese firms for World Bank-funded projects. 
Other Donors Have Also 
Financed Construction by 
Chinese Firms 
Page 52 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
according to one donor official.
98
98
According to a report published by the World Bank in 2008, Chinese firms won more 
than 30 percent, by value, of construction contracts financed by the World Bank and 
African Development Bank in Africa from 2004 through 2006, making Chinese firms more 
successful than contractors of any other nationality. Furthermore, since 1999, China’s 
construction sector has seen annual growth of 20 percent, making China the largest 
construction market in the global economy. See Vivian Foster et al., Building Bridges: 
China’s Growing Role as Infrastructure Financier for Africa (Washington, D.C.: 
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank, 2008). 
Figure 17 shows examples of Chinese 
firms’ construction projects in Angola, Ghana, and Kenya. 
Page 53 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Figure 17: Examples of Construction Projects Implemented by Chinese Firms in Angola, Ghana, and Kenya 
Page 54 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
Chinese firms are competitive in the construction sector in part because 
their business practices keep construction costs low, according to officials 
from U.S. and host-country governments and other donor organizations. 
For example, Chinese firms house workers near project sites and 
maintain long work days. According to some host-government officials, 
because Chinese firms are engaged in infrastructure development in 
other parts of Africa, their cost of moving materials and equipment to new 
project sites may be lower than that of other firms. An official from a donor 
organization in Kenya noted that Chinese firms have bid below estimates 
developed by independent engineers who assessed costs for donor-
funded projects. 
U.S. and Chinese firms and products largely operate in different, 
noncompeting sectors in the three case-study countries, aside from their 
operations in the information and technology sector. U.S. and Chinese 
firms also face limited competition in part because U.S. firms are less 
willing to conduct business in some areas of sub-Saharan Africa, citing 
factors such as business risk and market size. In addition, counterfeits 
manufactured by Chinese firms adversely affect U.S. firms’ sales and 
reputation in Kenya. 
U.S. and Chinese firms and products generally operate in different 
sectors, with the exception of the information and communications sector, 
according to officials from U.S. agencies and U.S. firms in the three case-
study countries. For example, U.S. officials in Angola noted that U.S. 
firms are active primarily in the oil and gas sector, while Chinese firms are 
active in the construction sector.
99
Data on World Bank– and MCC-funded contracts illustrate U.S. and 
Chinese firms’ operations in noncompeting sectors. In all three case-
Similarly, U.S. officials and host-
government officials in Ghana stated that U.S. firms are generally more 
engaged in higher-technology sectors, while Chinese firms are most 
active in infrastructure construction. Moreover, according to Commerce 
officials, anecdotal evidence suggests that U.S. firms are choosing not to 
compete for projects such as major infrastructure construction for which 
they perceive competition with Chinese firms to be extremely difficult. 
99
Although Chinese firms have invested in Angola’s oil sector, they have done so in a 
nonoperator role. In contrast, U.S. firms have an operator role in several oil blocks in 
Angola. 
Competition between U.S. 
and Chinese Firms and 
Products Has Been Limited 
U.S. and Chinese Firms 
Generally Operate in Different 
Sectors 
Page 55 
GAO-13-199  Sub-Saharan Africa 
study countries, U.S. firms won a small share of the combined value of 
these donor-funded contracts, primarily for consulting services, while 
Chinese firms won a much larger share of these contracts’ combined 
value, primarily for construction services. In Ghana, the only case-study 
country to qualify for an MCC compact, no U.S. firms bid on MCC 
contracts for construction projects, according to officials who oversaw 
MCC contracts in Ghana, while Chinese firms won about $112 million in 
contracts (22 percent of overall MCC contract dollars), all for construction 
projects.
100
Similarly, in all three countries, Chinese firms won a large 
share of World Bank–financed construction contracts but won a very 
small share of consulting contracts.
101
100
Portuguese firms won the highest amount of MCC construction contracts in Ghana, by 
nationality, with a total of almost $114 million in contracts. Ghanaian firms were the top 
contractor by nationality overall, with a total of $192 million in contracts.  
Figure 18 shows World Bank–
financed contracts won by U.S. and Chinese firms, as well as firms from 
other countries, in Angola, Ghana, and Kenya from 2001 to 2011. 
101
Services provided by U.S. firms under World Bank-funded contracts represent a small 
fraction (less than 1 percent) of annual U.S. trade in service exports to Angola, Ghana, 
and Kenya. However, World Bank contracts represent one of the few instances where 
data are available for examination of potential competition between U.S. and Chinese 
firms. According to the World Bank, the data include only contracts reviewed by World 
Bank staff prior to award, which comprise about 40 percent of total World Bank investment 
lending. The nationality of a firm reflects the country where it is registered, although the 
firm’s parent may be headquartered in another country.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested