how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert scanned pdf to editable text SDK control service wpf web page azure dnn mechanics27-part728

8|Rigid Body Motion
267
Example
What is the angular momentum of a Hula Hoop when you are spinning it about your
waist? The hoop is a circle, but you are not spinning it about its center but about its
edge. If you are working really hard at it, then to a good approximation a point on the
edge is nearly standing still. What is the hoop’s angular momentum? Use the parallel axis
theorem and start by nding the angular momentum assuming that the hoop is spinning
about an axis through the center of the circle.
~!
is along this axis.
~!
~r
In the integral about the center (in the second picture),
~
L
=
R
dm~r
~!
~r
,
and all the radii have the same magnitude; all the
~!
~r
are tangent to the circle with
magnitude
!r
.In turn,
~r
this vector is along the axis with magnitude
!r
2
. That makes
~
L
=
Mr
2
~!
along the axis (out of the page and parallel to the angular velocity).
Now add the second term of Eq. (8.13), where
~r
cm
points from the right edge to the center
of the circle. Do the two cross products and this term adds an equal amount
Mr
2
~!
to
the total.
~
L
=2
Mr
2
~!
.
8.3 Tensor Components
Computing with tensors is like computing with vectors|the geometry gets out of hand quickly. For
vectors you can use the tool of components to do calculations, and the same thing is true here. Tensors
have components, but instead of the usual three components for vectors, you have nine* for tensors.
Go directly for the components of the inertia tensor. Other tensors are conceptually no dierent.
Start with the vectors
~!
and
~
L
,which have components with respect to a basis you’ve chosen
~!
=
!
x
^
x
+
!
y
^
y
+
!
z
^
z
and
~
L
=
L
x
^
x
+
L
y
^
y
+
L
z
^
z
Now relate them with the function
I
.
~
L
=
I
(
~!
)
is
L
x
^
x
+
L
y
^
y
+
L
z
^
z
=
I
(
!
x
^
x
+
!
y
^
y
+
!
z
^
z
)
(8
:
14)
Use the linearity property of Eq. (8.9), which is the dening property of a tensor.
I
(
!
x
^
x
+
!
y
^
y
+
!
z
^
z
)=
!
x
I
(^
x
)+
!
y
I
(^
y
)+
!
z
I
(^
z
)
(8
:
15)
The expression
I
(^
x
)is a vector. As such it has three components. Denote these as
I
(^
x
)=
I
xx
^
x
+
I
yx
^
y
+
I
zx
^
z
(8
:
16)
In the same way, the other terms are
I
(^
y
)=
I
xy
^
x
+
I
yy
^
y
+
I
zy
^
z
and
I
(^
z
)=
I
xz
^
x
+
I
yz
^
y
+
I
zz
^
z
(8
:
17)
The indices denote which output basis vector and which input basis vector you are referring to,
and the order of the indices is carefully chosen for later convenience. These nine numbers (e.g.
I
xy
)are
the components of the tensor
I
. Insert equations (8.15), (8.16), and (8.17) into equation (8.14) to get
L
x
^
x
+
L
y
^
y
+
L
z
^
z
=
!
x
I
xx
^
x
+
I
yx
^
y
+
I
zx
^
z
+
!
y
I
xy
^x+I
yy
^y+I
zy
^z
+
!
z
I
xz
^
x
+
I
yz
^
y
+
I
zz
^
z
* There are generalizations of this statement for more complicated kinds of tensors, but for today
this is good enough.
Convert scanned pdf to editable text - SDK control service:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert scanned pdf to editable text - SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
268
For these vectors to be equal, their respective components must match. Equate the coecient of^
x
on
the left to the similar coecient on the right. Now repeat the process for^
y
and^
z
. This expresses the
components of
~
L
in terms of the components of
~!
.
L
x
=
I
xx
!
x
+
I
xy
!
y
+
I
xz
!
z
L
y
=
I
yx
!
x
+
I
yy
!
y
+
I
yz
!
z
(8
:
18)
L
z
=
I
zx
!
x
+
I
zy
!
y
+
I
zz
!
z
In matrix notation this is
0
@
L
x
L
y
L
z
1
A
=
0
@
I
xx
I
xy
I
xz
I
yx
I
yy
I
yz
I
zx
I
zy
I
zz
1
A
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
(8
:
19)
and this is the reason for the peculiar-looking way that you are told to multiply matrices, across the row
of the rst factor and down the columns of the second. It all comes from the equations (8.14)-(8.17),
dening the components of a tensor. The meaning of the expression (8.19is the set of equations
(8.18). The matrix indices are arranged as
I
(whichrow)
;
(which column)
. Compare the placement of the
indices in Eq. (8.18) and in Eq. (8.17). The notation is designed to come out in the way conventionally
used with matrices.
An abbreviated form for these equations is easier to write if you use a unied notation for the
basis vectors.
~e
i
,with the index
i
running over the set
x
,
y
,
z
(or more often 1, 2, 3).
~e
i
replaces the
three vectors ^
x
,^
y
,^
z
,and the equations (8.16) and (8.17) become one equation.
I
(
~e
i
)=
X
j
I
ji
~e
j
(8
:
20)
Recall the discussion at Eq. (0.27).
The manipulations that took you from equation (8.14) through (8.19) become far more compact
if you use the notation of Eq. (8.20).
~
L
=
X
i
L
i
~e
i
=
I
(
~!
)=
I
X
j
!
j
~e
j
=
X
j
!
j
I
(
~e
j
)=
X
j
!
j
X
i
I
ij
~e
i
(8
:
21)
The basis vectors
~e
i
are independent, so the coecients of
~e
i
must agree on the two sides of the
equation. That is,
L
i
=
X
j
I
ij
!
j
(8
:
22)
These two lines are so much more compact that you should compare their content line-by-line with the
preceding equations to verify that they are what they claim to be.
To compute these components, go back to the denition of the inertia tensor, Eq. (8.7). You
need a vector identity for the triple cross product to manipulate this, Eq. (0.24).
~
A
(
~
B
~
C
)=
~
B
(
~
A
.
~
C
~
C
(
~
A
.
~
B
) =)
I
(
~!
)=
Z
dm~r
(
~!
~r
)=
Z
dm
r
2
~!
~r
(
~!
.
~r
)
(8
:
23)
Now compute
I
(^
x
).
I
(^
x
)=
Z
dm
r
2
^~r(^x
.
~r
)
=
Z
dm
(
x
2
+
y
2
+
z
2
)^
x
(
x^x
+
y^y
+
z^z
)
x
=
Z
dm
(
y
2
+
z
2
)^
x
yx
^
y
zx
^
z
=
I
xx
^
x
+
I
yx
^
y
+
I
zx
^
z
SDK control service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
269
The last line is the dening equation (8.16). Now all that you have to do is to read o the coecients
of^
x
,^
y
,and ^
z
to get the rst column of the matrix of components, and the calculations for the other
six components are identical, giving the second and thirdcolumns of the matrix.
I
xx
=
Z
dm
(
y
2
+
z
2
)
I
xy
Z
dmxy
I
xz
Z
dmxz
I
yx
Z
dmyx
I
yy
=
Z
dm
(
x
2
+
z
2
)
I
yz
Z
dmyz
I
zx
Z
dmzx
I
zy
Z
dmzy
I
zz
=
Z
dm
(
x
2
+
y
2
)
The three diagonal components,
I
xx
,
I
yy
,and
I
zz
,are the moments of inertia about the three
axes, and the other components are called the products of inertia. There’s some symmetry among
the nine components, as
I
xy
=
I
yx
etc,makingthematrixinEq.(8.19)symmetric. Thisisaspecial
property of the inertia tensor, and it is not true for all tensors. You can write this matrix as
(
I
)=
Z
dm
0
@
y
2
+
z
2
xy
xz
xy
x
2
+
z
2
yz
xz
yz
x
2
+
y
2
1
A
(8
:
24)
In the spirit of Eq. (8.21) can these calculations of the components of the inertia tensor be made
more compact? Yes. Use
x
1
,
x
2
,and
x
3
for the coordinates instead of
x
,
y
,and
z
,then apply the
summation convention as in Eq. (0.28), then Eq. (8.23) becomes
L
i
~e
i
=
I
(
~!
)=
Z
dm
x
j
x
j
!
i
~e
i
x
i
~e
i
!
j
x
j
L
i
=
Z
dm
x
j
x
j
!
i
x
i
!
j
x
j
=
Z
dm
x
j
x
j
ik
x
i
x
k
!
k
I
ik
=
Z
dm
x
j
x
j
ik
x
i
x
k
L
i
=
I
ik
!
k
(8
:
25)
Recall that now a repeated index within a single term is automatically summed. Also, such a summed
index is necessarily a dummy variable, so that you can change its name at will, a fact that was used
to advantage in the second line of this little calculation (look for it). This same summation convention
also simplies the appearance of Eq. (8.21) by removing all the explicit summation symbols. They are
unnecessary now.
Example
Athin uniform rectangular plate is placed with one corner at the origin and with the sides along the
x
and
y
axes: (0
<x < a
), (0
<y < b
). What are the components of the tensor of inertia?
Look at Eq. (8.24) and you see that a lot of terms are zero |everywhere there’s a
z
.This means
that the only integrals to do are
Z
dm
of
x
2
; y
2
; xy
The area mass density is
=
m=ab
,and
Z
a
0
dx
Z
b
0
dy x
2
=
ba
3
3
;
Z
a
0
dx
Z
b
0
dyy
2
=
ab
3
3
;
Z
a
0
dx
Z
b
0
dy xy
=
a
2
b
2
4
SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
270
Multiply each of the these expressions by the area mass density and put them into their appropriate
slots in the matrix for the tensor components.
(
I
)=
m
ab
0
@
1
3
ab
3
1
4
a
2
b
2
0
1
4
a
2
b
2
1
3
ba
3
0
0
0
1
3
(
ab
3
+
ba
3
)
1
A
=
m
0
@
1
3
b
2
1
4
ab
0
1
4
ab
1
3
a
2
0
0
0
1
3
(
a
2
+
b
2
)
1
A
(8
:
26)
What happens to this result if
a
or
b
equals zero? Does that result make sense? Perhaps relate it to
some equation appearing earlier in this chapter.
In an earlier study of rotations you encountered the moment of inertia as a subject in its own
right, leading to the equation
~
L
=
I~!
. You can see now that this was only a rst approximation to the
subject. But then whatis that old
I
as expressed in the new language? The answer is
Z
r
2
?
dm
or
~!
.
I
(
~!
)
=!
2
(8
:
27)
where
r
?
is the perpendicular distance to your axis. The rst expression is what you have likely seen
before, though perhaps not in this notation. If you use a coordinate system where this axis is the
z
-axis, then
r
?
=
p
x
2
+
y
2
and this is
I
zz
,the bottom right element of the above matrix. The other
diagonal elements of the matrix are then the moments of inertia about the
x
-and
y
-axes. The second,
more complicated looking expression in Eq. (8.27) is a more general way to relate the tensor to the
moment. You can derive it in problem8.11. Notice how easy it is to abuse the notation, using
I
for
the moment of inertia and
I
for the tensor of inertia. Stay alert.
Example
~
L
~!
^y
^z
^xout
1
2
Fig. 8.8
Repeat a previous example, Figure8.4, only now express it in a new language.
Two point masses are at the ends of a light rod lying in the
y
-
z
plane as shown
on the right. The integral is just a sum over two terms this time. For both
masses the value of
x
is zero, and when you evaluate this sum, the
y
2
+
z
2
factor is just
r
2
1
or
r
2
2
depending on which mass you’re dealing with.
I
xx
=
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
I
yy
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)sin
2
;
I
zz
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)cos
2
I
xy
=
I
xz
=0
;
I
yz
= (
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)sin
cos
As a matrix this is
(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
0
@
1
0
0
0
sin
2
cos
sin
  cos
sin
cos
2
1
A
(8
:
28)
If the angular velocity is along the
z
-axis, the angular momentum components are
0
@
L
x
L
y
L
z
1
A
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
0
@
1
0
0
0
sin
2
cos
sin
  cos
sin
cos
2
1
A
0
@
0
0
!
1
A
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
!
0
@
0
cos
sin
cos
2
1
A
=)
~
L
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
!
cos
^
y
sin
+^
z
cos
)
(8
:
29)
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
271
The angular momentum is pointing toward the upper left, perpendicular to the axis between the masses,
and not in the direction of
~!
. This behavior is typical, because it is only in the case of a symmetrical
rotating body or in cases of a special
~!
that these two vectors will line up. The impression that you may
have gotten in your rst introduction to this subject was no doubt restricted to such select examples.
If the angular velocity is along the axis of the rod,
~!
=^
y
sin
+^
z
cos
,then compute
~
L
as
(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
0
@
1
0
0
0
sin
2
cos
sin
  cos
sin
cos
2
1
A
0
@
0
!
cos
!
sin
1
A
=
0
@
0
0
0
1
A
~!
^
z
^
y
Around this line of rotation, all the mass is on the axis, so there’s no angular momentum in this
approximation that these arepoint masses.
If the axis of rotation is in the direction ( ^
y
sin
+^
z
cos
), the direction of the result in
Eq. (8.29), and the direction perpendicular to the axis between the masses, compute the angular
momentum:
(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
0
@
1
0
0
0
sin
2
cos
sin
  cos
sin
cos
2
1
A
0
@
0
!
sin
!
cos
1
A
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
0
@
0
!
sin
!
cos
1
A
This
~
L
is in the same direction as
~!
,and if you start with
~!
=
!
^
x
(out of the page), you get a similar
result, with the same proportionality factor, (
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
). Alongthese directions the vectors
~!
and
~
L
are aligned.
Perpendicular Axis Theorem
This is a special result about the components of the inertia tensor, and it is occasionally useful.
It applies when a mass is distributed in a plane, so that it is essentially two-dimensional. Make
that the
x
-
y
plane, then
I
zz
=
I
xx
+
I
yy
.The proof involves nothing more than writing the values of
the components from Eq. (8.24):
I
zz
=
Z
dm
(
x
2
+
y
2
)
;
but
I
xx
=
Z
dm
(
y
2
+
z
2
)=
Z
dmy
2
and
I
yy
=
Z
dm
(
x
2
+
z
2
)=
Z
dmx
2
(8
:
30)
because
z
=0 for all
dm
,and that’s all there is to it.
Example
x
y
z
R
Fig. 8.9
A thin disk of mass
M
and radius
R
has its center at the origin and has
z
=0. Compute the inertia components:
I
zz
=
Z
dm
(
x
2
+
y
2
)=
Z
R
0
2
r dr
M
R
2
r
2
=
MR
2
2
Use the perpendicular axis theorem, and because the symmetry of the disk
implies that
I
xx
=
I
yy
,you see that both of these are
MR
2
=
4. The products
SDK control service:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control service:VB.NET Image: Barcode Generator to Add UPC-A to Image, TIFF, PDF &
Generated UPC-A barcode can be scanned by common REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/upc-a.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). Word document is the most editable format for
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
272
of inertia are all zero because they all involve integrating an odd function over
asymmetric domain:
R
a
a
xdx
=0.
(
I
)=
MR
2
4
0
@
1 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 2
1
A
(8
:
31)
Suppose that at some instant the angular velocity is between the ^
z
and ^
y
directions:
~!
=
!
(^
z
cos
+^
y
sin
). Then
~
L
=
MR
2
!
(2^
z
cos
+^
y
sin
)
=
4. It points in a direction closer to^
z
than
does
~!
. If I keep turning the disk about this
~!
direction, the angular momentum will rotate around it.
All the components of the inertia tensor are now time dependent, but don’t worry about it because I’ve
already found the relation between
~
L
and
~!
,and that’s all I need.
~
L
will trace out a cone around
~!
,
and that means that you need to apply a time-varying torque to do this:
~
=
d
~
L=dt
.
The angle between the two vectors is (problem8.26).
sin
=cos
sin
=
p
3cos2
+1
(8
:
32)
~
L
~!
z
y
x
~
L
~!
Fig. 8.10
How much torque does it take to keep this disk rotating about the line
~!
?Forget the coordinate
system; that will just get in the way now. The vector
~
L
is spinning about a xed line dened by
~!
.
The length of
~
L
is constant, so its time derivative is perpendicular to itself. It is also perpendicular to
~!
,and its value is then
d
~
L=dt
=
~!
~
L
=
~
The magnitude of this torque is
!L
sin
,and you can get the magnitude
L
from the vector
~
L
in the
preceding paragraph.
!L
sin
=
1
4
!MR
2
!
4cos
2
+sin
2
1
=
2
cos
sin
p
3cos2
+1 =
1
4
M
2
!
2
cos
sin
There was so much cancellation of the complicated factors in this calculation that you should suspect
that there’s an easier way. There is. The magnitudes and angles are constant, so why not evaluate the
magnitude of the product at the initial time?
~!
~
L
=
!
(^
z
cos
+^
y
sin
)
MR
2
!
(2^
z
cos
+^
y
sin
)
=
4=
1
4
MR
2
!
2
^
x
cos
sin
Can you do this calculation of the torque without referring to a specic coordinate system, just
manipulating the original form for
I
(
~!
)? Yes, but it’s not much help:
~!
~
L
=
~!
I
(
~!
)=
~!
Z
dm~r
(
~!
~r
)
=
~!
Z
dm
r
2
~!
~r
(
~!
.
~r
)
Z
dm
(
~!
~r
)(
~!
.
~r
)
8|Rigid Body Motion
273
If you can nd a use for this equation, you’re welcome to it.
This calculation has a very practical application. When you have driven your car for a long time
it may need adjustment. If you hit a curb with the wheel of your car you can knock the wheel out
of alignment, and it will certainly need adjustment when you then feel strong vibrations in the car’s
steering wheel as you drive it. You then take the car in to the shop and ask a mechanic to adjust the
wheels so that their angular velocity and angular momentum vectors are parallel, hoping thereby to
eliminate the torque
~!
~
L
. Perhaps not. You may get better results if you ask for a wheel alignment.
Arelated problem will occur if the axis of rotation does not pass through the center of mass of
the wheel. It is then out of balance and will also cause vibrations, calling for a wheel balancing.
Example
What is the tensor of inertia of a ball about a point on its surface? In the problem
8.20youwillcomputethemomentofinertiaofauniformballaboutanaxisthrough
its center. The result is 2
MR
2
=
5. Once you know this, you immediately know all the
components of its inertia tensor because of the ball’s symmetry: this same moment
of inertia appears all along the matrix diagonal and all the o-diagonal elements are
zero. It is a multiple of the unit matrix. What are the components when the origin is
apoint on the surface of the ball? Choose the coordinate system so that the
z
-axis
passes through the center and you have
I
(
~!
)=
I
cm
(
~!
)+
M~r
cm
~!
~r
cm
!
(
I
)=
2
MR
2
5
0
@
1 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
1
A
+
M
0
@
y
2
+
z
2
xy
xz
xy
x
2
+
z
2
yz
xz
yz
x
2
+
y
2
1
A
at center
=
2
MR
2
5
0
@
1 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
1
A
+
M
0
@
R
2
0
0
0
R
2
0
0
0
0
1
A
=
MR
2
5
0
@
7 0 0
0 7 0
0 0 2
1
A
Kinetic Energy
When a rigid body is rotating about a xed axis, what is its kinetic energy? It is a straight-forward
calculation.
K
=
1
2
Z
v
2
dm
=
1
2
Z
dm
(
~!
~r
)
2
=
1
2
Z
dm
(
~!
~r
)
.
(
~!
~r
)
=
1
2
Z
dm~!
.
~r
(
~!
~r
)
=
1
2
~!
.
I
(
~!
)
(8
:
33)
The sole vector identity that you need for this is that you can interchange the dot and the cross product
in the triple scalar product:
~
A
.
~
B
~
C
=
~
A
~
B
.
~
C
.
If
~
L
and
~!
are aligned, so that
~
L
=
I~!
,then this kinetic energy is
1
2
I!
2
.
What if a body is both rotating and moving? For example rolling motion. The calculation is
similar, again adding all the pieces of kinetic energy in the body. Let
~!
be the rotation rate about the
moving origin, and let
~v
0
be the velocity of this origin with respect to you. The velocity of a mass
dm
is then
~v
0
+
!
~r
,where this
~r
is from the moving origin to
dm
.
~v
0
~!
dm
K
=
1
2
Z
dmv
2
=
1
2
Z
dm
~v
0
+
!
~r
2
=
1
2
Z
dmv
2
0
+
1
2
Z
dm
!
~r
2
+
~v
0
.
~!
Z
dm~r
=
1
2
mv
2
0
+
1
2
~!
.
I
~!
+
m~v
0
.
~!
~r
cm
(8
:
34)
8|Rigid Body Motion
274
If the origin for computing the inertia tensor is the center of mass, then the nal term is zero, and the
total kinetic energy is in that case the sum of the rotational energy about the center of mass and the
kinetic energy of a point massat the center of mass.
In the same spirit, what is the angular momentum for an object that is both moving and rotating?
~
L
=
Z
dm~r
~v
=
Z
dm~r
~v
0
+
!
~r
=
Z
dm~r
~v
0
+
Z
dm~r
!
~r
=
~r
cm
m~v
0
+
I
~!
(8
:
35)
This is the sum of the angular momentum of a point massat the center of mass plus the rotational
angular momentumabout the center of mass.
Having looked at kinetic energy and angular momentum from dierent origins, what about
torque? The torque on a piece of mass
dm
is
~r
d
~
F
. If you choose a dierent origin, so that the
position of the old origin is
~
R
with respect to the new origin, then the coordinate of
dm
is
~r
new
=
~r
+
~
R
so
~
new
=
Z
~r
new
d
~
F
=
Z
~r
+
~
R
d
~
F
=
~
old
+
~
R
Z
d
~
F
If the total force is zero, the torque is independent of the origin.
8.4 Principal Axes
Aside from spinning with zero torque, there are other reasons to be interested in lining up the angular
velocity and the angular momentum; it makes calculations easier. When calculating the components of
the inertia tensor for the example of two point masses, Eq. (8.28), the matrix would have been diagonal
if you had chosen the coordinate system dierently. If ^
y
is along the line connecting the masses then
~!
would have had two non-zero components, but the matrix of inertia components would have been
diagonal.
~
L
~!
^
y
^
z
The integral for the inertia components is the same as before, being a
sum of two terms, but this time the sum is easier.
I
xx
=
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
;
I
zz
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
All other components zero
The equation
~
L
=
I
(
~!
)translates into components as
0
@
L
x
L
y
L
z
1
A
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)
0
@
1 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 1
1
A
0
@
0
!
sin
!
cos
1
A
=)
~
L
=(
m
1
r
2
1
+
m
2
r
2
2
)^
z!
cos
This agrees exactly with Eq. (8.29). Look and see.
When you compute the components of
I
,the denition is
I
(
~e
i
)=
I
ji
~e
j
(recall the implied sum).
If there is a direction such that
~!
and
~
L
are parallel, choose
~e
1
along that direction. Then
~
L
=
I
(
~!
)
and
I
(
~e
1
)= (a multiple of)
~e
1
=
I
11
~e
1
. The rst column of the matrix has exactly one non-zero entry
in the upper left corner of the matrix. The matrix is symmetric, so the upper row has only a single
entry as well.
If you can nd other directions along which
~!
is parallel to
~
L
,you can use those directions for
basis vectors too. If there are three such directions, then you have a complete basis and the matrix is
diagonal. Can you do this? Yes. It’s guaranteed.
8|Rigid Body Motion
275
Eigenvectors and Eigenvalues
The statement that
~!
is parallel to
~
L
means that one vector is a multiple of the other:
~
L
=
~!
.This
is the equation
I
(
~!
)=
~!
(8
:
36)
If this is satised, then
~!
is an \eigenvector" of
I
,and
is an \eigenvalue". Several questions arise.
inertia tensor
all tensors
1. Do they always exist?
yes
yes
2. Can you always make a basis out of them?
yes
no
3. If you can make a basis, is it orthogonal?
yes
no
4. How do you nd them?
Therein lies a tale.
Translate the problem into components. In the notation of Eq. (8.19) the last equation (8.36)
becomes
0
@
I
xx
I
xy
I
xz
I
yx
I
yy
I
yz
I
zx
I
zy
I
zz
1
A
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
=
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
Assuming that you’ve already done the integrals to know the components of
I
,there are four unknowns
in these three equations:
and the three components of
~!
. It doesn’t sound promising. There is
always one solution,
~!
=0, so all three components of this vector are zero and
is arbitrary. That is
not a very interesting solution though, and you can’t start to construct a basis out of it. Are there any
non-zero solutions? No, at least not for arbitrary
. But, there are always certain values of
for which
there is a non-zero solution for
~!
.
Now would be a good idea to review section0.10, especially the material on
simultaneous equations. Also reread the material leading to equation (3.59).
Rewrite this set of equations by moving everything to one side.
2
4
0
@
I
xx
I
xy
I
xz
I
yx
I
yy
I
yz
I
zx
I
zy
I
zz
1
A
0
@
1 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
1
A
3
5
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
=
0
@
0
0
0
1
A
Further rewrite it as
0
@
I
xx
I
xy
I
xz
I
yx
I
yy
I
yz
I
zx
I
zy
I
zz
1
A
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
=
0
@
0
0
0
1
A
(8
:
37)
This matrix acting on the components of
~!
gives the zero vector. Under almost all circumstances
that requires
~!
to be zero, but there can be an exception. That is that the matrix be singular |
its determinant is zero. If you want a non-zero solution (and you do), then the determinant of the
coecients of the three linear equations must be zero*. That is an algebraic equation for
,a cubic
equation, and it will always have a solution. In the case at hand, the tensor of inertia, it will always have
three real solutions. For each solution
(an eigenvalue), there is a corresponding
~!
(an eigenvector).
There are a few general results to prove about this process, but rst I’ll carry through the solution
in a special case, one that doesn’t entail as much algebra as the general case, and the cubic equation
will be easy to solve. The mass is conned to a plane, and that will dene the
x
-
y
coordinates.
* Go through this statement for a 1  1 matrix with a one element column matrix. What does it
translate to?
8|Rigid Body Motion
276
Example
x
y
a
a
z
out
Four masses, all the same, are at the four corners of a square: (0
;
0), (0
;a
), (
a; a
),
(
a;
0), all at
z
=0. Now to compute the nine components of the inertia tensor, there
are really just three integrals,
Z
dmx
2
=2
ma
2
;
Z
dm y
2
=2
ma
2
;
and  
Z
dmxy
ma
2
Any term involving
z
gives zero, so the dening equation (8.24) produces the com-
ponents
(
I
)=
0
@
2
ma
2
ma
2
0
ma
2
2
ma
2
0
0
0
4
ma
2
1
A
The eigenvector equation
I
(
~!
~!
=0, expressed in components as (8.37) is
0
@
2
ma
2
ma
2
0
ma
2
2
ma
2
0
0
0
4
ma
2
1
A
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
=
0
@
0
0
0
1
A
Before setting the determinant of this matrix to zero, make a change of variables:
=
ma
2
0
. This
saves a lot of writing.
det
ma
2
0
@
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
A
=0 = (
ma
2
)
3
(4  
0
)
(2  
0
)
2
1
with roots
0
=4
;
3
;
1.
For each of these eigenvalues, compute the eigenvector.
0
=4  !
0
@
 1 0
 2 0
0
0
0
1
A
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
=
0
@
0
0
0
1
A
!
2
!
x
!
y
=0
!
x
2
!
y
=0
0= 0
The rst pair have the unique solution
!
x
=
!
y
=0, the last equation oers no constraint, so
!
z
is
arbitrary and the eigenvector is
!
z
^
z
.That is, any multiple of^
z
.
0
=3  !
0
@
 1 0
 1 0
0
0
1
1
A
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
=
0
@
0
0
0
1
A
!
!
x
!
y
=0
!
x
!
y
=0
!
z
=0
This has zero
z
-component for
~!
,and
!
x
!
y
. The eigenvector is then
~!
=^
x
^
y
or any multiple
of it.
0
=1  !
0
@
1
1 0
1
1
0
0
0
3
1
A
0
@
!
x
!
y
!
z
1
A
=
0
@
0
0
0
1
A
!
!
x
!
y
=0
!
x
+
!
y
=0
3
!
z
=0
This time the eigenvector is any multiple of ^
x
+^
y
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested