how to open pdf file in new tab in mvc : Convert pdf into text file control SDK platform web page wpf asp.net web browser mechanics28-part729

8|Rigid Body Motion
277
Picture these motions. For the
0
=1 case, the rotation is about the line from the origin to the
far corner of the square. Only two masses are moving and they are symmetrically placed with respect to
the rotation axis at a distance
r
?
=
a=
p
2. The angular momentum is obviously in the same direction,
and the moment of inertia about this axis is 2
m
a=
p
2
2
=
ma
2
.That’s precisely the eigenvalue
for
this case.
x
y
x
y
x
y
~!
~!
~!
out
0
=1
0
=3
0
=4
Fig. 8.11
For the
0
=3 case, the rotation axis is still in the
x
-
y
plane, but along ^
y
^
x
,perpendicular
to the preceding one. Now three masses are moving, and the rotational inertia about this axis is
2
m
a=
p
2
2
+
m
a
p
2
2
=3
ma
2
as promised. This direction still has enough symmetry that it is easy
to believe that
~
L
is in the same direction as
~!
.
For
0
= 4, the eigenvector is along ^
z
, and again three masses are in motion, with moment
2
ma
2
+
m
a
p
2
2
= 4
ma
2
. This is a suciently non-symmetric case that it is not immediately
obvious that the angular momentum is in the same direction as
~!
,but do a couple of cross products
and you can easily persuade yourself that it’s true. Again, the eigenvalue
=4
ma
2
is this moment of
inertia about the
z
-axis.
The basis ^
x
^
y
,^
z
,in which I computed the components of
I
in this example were arbitrary. I
picked them for their obvious convenience in computing the answer. What if I pick another basis, one
consisting of the three orthogonal eigenvectors that I just found? I’ll call them
~e
1
,
~e
2
,and
~e
3
as a
common notation used for basis vectors.
~e
1
=
^x+ ^y
=
p
2
;
~e
2
=
^ ^x
=
p
2
;
~e
3
=^
z
(8
:
38)
Does it matter that these are unit vectors? No, as long as they are independent that is good enough.
You could drop the
p
2 and compute the matrix for
I
, but for other manipulations you should be
consistent. In keeping with the change I will use subscripts 1, 2, 3 instead of
x
,
y
,
z
on the components
I
(
~e
1
)=
X
j
I
j
1
~e
j
=
I
11
~e
1
+
I
21
~e
2
+
I
31
~e
3
=
1
~e
1
This determines the rst column of the matrix for
I
in this basis. The other columns are found the
same way.
I
(
~e
2
)=
X
j
I
j
2
~e
j
=
I
12
~e
1
+
I
22
~e
2
+
I
32
~e
3
=
2
~e
2
I
(
~e
3
)=
X
j
I
j
3
~e
j
=
I
13
~e
1
+
I
23
~e
2
+
I
33
~e
3
=
3
~e
3
The matrix for
I
is now
(
I
)=
0
@
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
1
A
=
0
@
ma
2
0
0
0
3
ma
2
0
0
0
4
ma
2
1
A
Convert pdf into text file - software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
C# PDF to Text (TXT) Converting Library to Convert PDF to Text
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf into text file - software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
278
and you see that in this basis the matrix is diagonal. That can provide signicant advantages in
manipulation for further calculations. Notice that you would get the same matrix even if you do not
put in the
p
2factors in Eq. (8.38).
Is it always easy to nd the eigenvectors? No, this example is very easy and you didn’t really
have to confront a cubic equation to solve for the eigenvalues. Alas, it is not typical.
8.5 Properties of Eigenvectors
There are some general results to be proved about these eigenvectors and eigenvalues, and the methods
of proof used here will show up in several other important contexts, so they are worth learning. First
an identity about the inertia tensor.
I
(
~!
)=
Z
dm~r
(
~!
~r
)=
Z
dm
r
2
~!
~r
(
~!
.
~r
)
~!
*
1
.
I
(
~!
2
)=
~!
*
1
.
Z
dm
r
2
~!
2
~r
(
~!
2
.
~r
)
=
Z
dm
r
2
~!
*
1
.
~!
2
~!
*
1
.
~r
(
~!
2
.
~r
)
=
I
(
~!
*
1
)
.
~!
2
(8
:
39)
What is a complex conjugation doing here when all these vectors are supposed to be real? And what
does it mean anyway? Here I am allowing for the possibility that these may be complex in order to
prove that they aren’t. How can a vector be complex? In the usual basis, just allow the components
to be complex numbers. You won’t represent it by a single arrow any more (you could use two), but
you won’t need to do that anyway.
This symmetry property of the inertia tensor,
~!
*
1
.
I
(
~!
2
)=
I
(
~!
*
1
)
.
~!
2
(8
:
40)
plays a key role in much of this analysis. Very similar identities appear in very dierent-looking contexts
such as dierential equations, and there they will lead to results much like the ones here. A tensor
satisfying this equation is called \Hermitian" or \symmetric" depending on whether a physicist or a
mathematician respectively is talking. It parallels the results in the equations (7.48) to (7.50).
In the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors in the example of the preceding section, the
eigenvalues (roots of a cubic) were real and the eigenvectors are orthogonal. Is that a general property?
For tensors that satisfy the identity derived in Eq. (8.40) it is. To prove this the manipulations are
simple but not obvious. Assume that you have two eigenvectors:
I
(
~!
1
)=
1
~!
1
and
I
(
~!
2
)=
2
~!
2
Take the scalar product of the rst with
~!
*
2
and the second with
~!
*
1
.
~!
*
2
.
I
(
~!
1
)=
1
~!
*
2
.
~!
1
and
~!
*
1
.
I
(
~!
2
)=
2
~!
*
1
.
~!
2
Take the complex conjugate of the second equation:
~!
1
.
I
(
~!
*
2
)=
*
2
~!
1
.
~!
*
2
Subtract this from the rst of the preceding equations.
~!
*
2
.
I
(
~!
1
~!
1
.
I
(
~!
*
2
)= (
1
*
2
)
~!
1
.
~!
*
2
software application cloud:C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
If you want to add a text string to PDF file, please try this C# demo. // Open a document. value, The string text wil be added into PDF page, 0
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
279
The identity Eq. (8.40) says that the left side of this equation is zero, and the right side is
0=
1
*
2
~!
*
2
.
~!
1
(8
:
41)
Now take the special case that
~!
1
=
~!
2
.These two vectors are the same vector, so necessarily the two
eigenvalues are the same also
0=
1
*
1
~!
*
1
.
~!
1
The second factor is not zero, and this implies that the rst factor must be. That in turn says that
is real. With real
and real components of the inertia tensor, all the components of
~!
are real too.
Now Eq. (8.41) is
0=
1
2
~!
2
.
~!
1
(8
:
42)
and this implies that for two dierent eigenvalues, i.e.
1
6=
2
, the corresponding eigenvectors are
orthogonal, as exemplied in the example of Figure8.11: (^
z
)
?
(^
y
^
x
)
?
(^
x
+^
y
).
These eigenvalues are the moments of inertia about the axis dened by the eigenvector, and they
are of course non-negative. Of course? Yes, for an eigenvector,
!
2
=
~!
.
I
(
~!
)=
Z
dm
r
2
!
2
(
~r
.
~!
)
2
=
!
2
Z
dmr
2
?
where
r
?
is the perpendicular distance from
dm
to the axis dened by
~!
. This integral will be zero
only in the special case that all the mass is on the axis|when the body is a line. In all other cases it
is positive. This nal integral is the moment of inertia about the
~!
direction.
8.6 Dynamics
The basic equation for rotating objects is
~
=
d
~
L=dt
,Eq. (8.6). Now
~
L
is nothing more than a tensor
expression involving
~!
.
~
=
d
dt
I
(
~!
)=
I
d~!
dt
+
dI
dt
(
~!
)
Written this way all the components of the inertia tensor are time-dependent, and that’s not a fruitful
approach. The trick is to transform to the rotating coordinate system in which the body is at rest.
Then the the tensor
I
is constant. From the equation (5.6),
~
=
d
~
L
dt
=
_
~
L
+
~!
~
L
=
I
_
~!
+
~!
I
(
~!
)
and this again uses the chapter ve convention that thedotnowreferstothetimederivativeinthe
rotating system. Inthisrotatingsystem,youcanpickthecoordinatessothatthecomponentsof
I
are a diagonal matrix|the basis using eigenvectors of
I
.
~
=
I
_
~!
+
^
x!
x
+^
y!
y
+^
z!
z
I
xx
^
x!
x
+
I
yy
^
y!
y
+
I
zz
^
z!
z
x
=
I
xx
_
!
x
+
!
y
!
z
(
I
zz
I
yy
)
y
=
I
yy
_
!
y
+
!
z
!
x
(
I
xx
I
zz
)
(8
:
43)
z
=
I
zz
_
!
z
+
!
x
!
y
(
I
yy
I
xx
)
These are the Euler equations. (As if he didn’t have enough things named for him. He even used to be
on the Swiss ten franc note.)
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction. C# Demo Code: Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One in .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
280
Example
If your automobile tire is misaligned, its axis of rotation doesn’t line up with its axis of symmetry.
Call the
z
-axis the symmetry axis of the tire, then
I
xx
=
I
yy
. As you drive at constant velocity what
torque does this cause on your tire? In the inertial system
~!
is a constant because it is dened by the
axle of the car. What happens to
~!
in the rotating system? Again, Eqs. (5.6) and (5.13):
~!
z
-axis
x
-axis
~
Fig. 8.12
d~!
dt
=
_
~!
+
~!
~!
=
_
~!
=0
(8
:
44)
and this means that it is constant in the rotating system too. The equations (8.43) are now
x
=
!
y
!
z
(
I
zz
I
yy
)
;
y
=
!
z
!
x
(
I
xx
I
zz
)
;
z
=0
If the misalignment between
~!
and the axis of the tire is the angle
then pick the
x
-
y
coordinates
(rotating) so that
~!
=
!
^
z
cos
!
^
x
sin
.
x
=0
;
y
=
!
2
cos
sin
(
I
zz
I
xx
)
;
z
=0
This is a constant torque about the
y
-axis, so why does it cause the wheel to shake? This is therotating
system remember. In the inertial system (the driver) this torque vector,
y
^
y
,is spinning about the axle
at a rate
!
,and the size of this torque varies as the square of
!
.
How can you picture this? Imagine yourself standing on this disk (tire?) and hanging
on to the
z
-axis as hard as you can. Your feet are straddling the
x
-axis, which is stationary
between your legs. If you look straight ahead you see the angular velocity vector standing
still in front of you (
_
~!
= 0). But if you look in the distance you may get dizzy from
watching the world spinning around. If you look down and to your right you will see the
torque vector at your feet, pointing along the
y
-axis. (Notice that
I
zz
>I
xx
.) And where
is
~
L
?
~
L
=
I
(
~!
)=
I
(
!
^
z
cos
!
^
x
sin
)=
!
I
zz
^
z
cos
I
xx
^
x
sin
This points in a direction closer to the
z
-axis than the
~!
vector does. As you look straight
ahead you can see it xed in front of you on the near side of
~!
. Remember,
_
~
L
=0. I
didn’t draw this vector because the picture is cluttered enough already.
Free Rotation
What if there is no torque, and the object is free to rotate in space like a frisbee or a planet. The
equations (8.43) (with
~
=0) are dierential equations for
~!
. They can be solved, but except for the
case of a symmetric rigid body the solution is non-linear and tough. For that reason pick
I
xx
=
I
yy
.
0=
I
xx
_
!
x
+
!
y
!
z
(
I
zz
I
xx
)
0=
I
xx
_
!
y
+
!
z
!
x
(
I
xx
I
zz
)
(8
:
45)
0=
I
zz
_
!
z
+0
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in VB.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
281
The last line says that
!
z
is a constant. That in turn makes the rst two equations linear equations for
!
x
and
!
y
.You know how to solve those:
e
t
.
!
x
(
t
)=
Ae
t
;
!
y
(
t
)=
Be
t
0=
I
xx
A
+
!
z
(
I
zz
I
xx
)
B
0=
I
xx
B
!
z
(
I
zz
I
xx
)
A
Anon-zero solution for
A
and
B
requires that the determinant vanish.
I
2
xx
2
+
!
2
z
(
I
zz
I
xx
)
2
=0  !
=
i!
z
I
zz
I
xx
I
xx
=
i!
0
(8
:
46)
Put these back into one of the equations for
A
and
B
to get
0=
I
xx
A
i!
z
I
zz
I
xx
I
xx
+
!
z
(
I
zz
I
xx
)
B
! 
iA
+
B
=0
Asolution is now
!
x
=
Ae
i!0t
+
A
0
e
i!0t
;
!
y
iAe
i!0t
+
iA
0
e
i!0t
Chose some initial conditions:
!
x
(0) =
!
0
;
!
y
(0) = 0
then
!
x
(
t
)=
!
0
cos
!
0
t;
!
y
(
t
)=
!
0
sin
!
0
t
(8
:
47)
The rotation axis precesses about the
z
-axis at an angular velocity
!
0
.
Example
Earth. It is freely spinning in space and it is slightly ellipsoidal so that the moments of inertia aren’t
the same about all axes. The equatorial bulge makes
I
zz
>I
xx
=
I
yy
. If the angular velocity of the
planet exactly lined up with its axis of symmetry, the constant
!
0
in Eq. (8.47) would be zero. It would
be too much of a coincidence for the alignment to be perfect and it isn’t. It misses by an amount such
that if you go to the North pole and look for the angular velocity vector you will nd it several meters
away. Then it wanders around the pole at a rate
!
0
2
=
400 days. Its motion is not as regular as this
rigid body analysis would lead you to believe, but the Earth isn’t perfectly rigid either.
That the Earth isn’t rigid should lead to damping of this oscillation within years or centuries, but
it’s still here. It has been a puzzle what keeps thisChandlerwobble going, but recent analysis points to
uctuating pressure on the bottom of the ocean as the largest source of the excitation.
This precession can give geologists information about the interior of the planet. Equation (8.46)
tells you about
I
zz
I
xx
and that gives some constraints on the distribution of mass within the Earth.
And not just Earth; Mars too. One of the measuring devices sent to Mars looked at that planet’s
wobble, and that says something about the interior structure of Mars. Why hasn’t the wobble been
completely damped in the case of Mars? After all, it has no oceans to excite the oscillation. Unknown.
Maybe the idea that the oceans cause it on Earth is wrong. You will have to do a search of the current
literature on the subject to get some ideas of the complexity of the problem.
Stability of Rotations
What happens when you toss a hammer or a tennis racket up and set it spinning? The answer depends
very much on how you do it, and the motion can be very smooth or very wild. If you don’t have either
ahammer or a racket handy, perhaps you have a heavy rubber band. Then you can wrap it around a
book so that the pages don’t open up when you tossit up and spinning. Depending on the axis about
which it is spinning you will get very dierent results.
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF document file, RasterEdge C# .NET PDF document page processing and editing control toolkit
www.rasteredge.com
8|Rigid Body Motion
282
To analyze this, start again from Euler’s equations (8.43). This time assume that the three
moments of inertia are dierent from each other,but assume that the angular velocity vector is almost
along one of the principle axes. This calculation will involve a series expansion and a linearization.
Assume that the rotation is almost along the
z
-axis. The torque is zero because you have tossed the
object up and it is then free to rotate as it will.
~!
(
t
)=
!
0
^
z
+
~
(
t
)
;
with
!
0
Start from the equations (8.43) with
~
=0, and as usual with these expansions, keep only the rst
order terms in
.
0=
I
xx
_
x
+
y
!
0
(
I
zz
I
yy
)
0=
I
yy
_
y
+
x
!
0
(
I
xx
I
zz
)
0=
I
zz
_
z
Every place that an
2
appeared I dropped it, and the resulting equations are linear. In the third
equation, both
!
x
and
!
y
are rst order in
so that killed its nal term.
The third equation says that
z
is a constant, and I may as well take it to be zero because
anon-zero value would just be a redenition of the original rotation rate
!
0
about the
z
-axis. The
other two equations are linear dierential equations for
x
and
y
. You know how to handle those: an
exponential.
x
=
Ae
t
;
y
=
Be
t
then
0
0
=
I
xx
!
0
(
I
zz
I
yy
)
!
0
(
I
xx
I
zz
)
I
yy

A
B
To get a non-zero solution the determinant must vanish.
I
xx
I
yy
2
!
2
0
(
I
xx
I
zz
)(
I
zz
I
yy
)= 0
(8
:
48)
The nature of these solutions depends on the sign of
2
. If it is negative then
is imaginary and
you have oscillations about the ^
z
direction; if
2
is positive then
is real and you have exponential
movement away from there the^
z
-axis: that rotation is unstable.
2
/(
I
xx
I
zz
)(
I
zz
I
yy
)
If
z
has the largest moment,
I
zz
>I
xx
and
I
zz
>I
yy
;
then
2
<
0
and this says that
is imaginary and that the motion is stable. If
I
zz
is thesmallest of the three
moments you have the same result:
is imaginary and the motion is stable. It is only in the third
case, when
I
zz
is intermediate between the other two moments of inertia, that
2
is positive and
comes out to be real. That motion is unstable. Take a book and wrap a heavy rubber band about it.
Now toss it in the air, spinning about one of the three axes of symmetry. Do it for each axis, and the
dierence in the results will be very obvious. See for example the YouTube videoSolidBodyRotation,
done in orbit.
There is more to learn about the stability of these rotations. What is the kinetic energy of
rotation about each axis? Use Eq. (8.33) about each axis:
K
=
1
2
~!
.
~
L
.
~!
=
!
0
^
x
!
K
=
1
2
I
xx
!
2
0
;
~!
=
!
0
^
y
!
K
=
1
2
I
yy
!
2
0
;
~!
=
!
0
^
z
!
K
=
1
2
I
zz
!
2
0
8|Rigid Body Motion
283
The angular momentum in each case is easy because these are eigenvectors of the inertia tensor and
are respectively
L
x
=
I
xx
!
0
;
L
y
=
I
yy
!
0
;
L
z
=
I
zz
!
0
Write the energy in terms of these angular momenta.
~!
=
!
0
^
x
!
K
=
L
2
2
I
xx
; ~!
=
!
0
^
y
!
K
=
L
2
2
I
yy
; ~!
=
!
0
^
z
!
K
=
L
2
2
I
zz
This assumes the same magnitude for the angular momentum in every case, and these equations say
that for a given angular momentum the rotation about the axis with the largest moment of inertia has
the smallest kinetic energy.
Whether this object is a rigid body or not, if there are no torques on it the angular momentum
is conserved. If you have a truly rigid body, then both angular momentum and mechanical energy are
conserved, but completely rigid bodies are a mathematical ction. Any real object will  ex slightly, and
this has an important consequence. If a satellite is set to rotating about one of its principle axes and
if that is one of the two stable axes, then you might expect the rotation to remain about that axis
forever. But
:: :
Atiny  exibility will cause a tiny friction|a way to dissipate energy. The only truly
stable rotation in this case will be about the axis with the largest moment of inertia, the one that has
the smallest kinetic energy for the given angular momentum.
~!
Fig. 8.13
Early in the space program the satellite Explorer-1 was placed in orbit around Earth and set spinning
about its long axis, the one with the smallest moment, and one they thought would provide a stable
rotation. The satellite however, had whip antennas with more than enough  exibility to destabilize this
rotation and to set it tumbling about its really stable axis|end over end|much to the embarrassment
of the engineers and physicists involved.
If you have seen the motion pictures 2001 and its sequel 2010, a space ship was left in orbit
around Jupiter’s moon Io at the end of the rst picture, and when they returned in the sequel it was
tumbling end-over-end. They made no comment in the movie, but they got the physics right. The
same applies to the more recent movie, \Gravity". When Sandra Bullock was rst cut loose from the
spacecraft, she was tumbling wildly. After a brief time she was rotating smoothly head over feet. Was
that really about the axis with the largest moment of inertia? Should it be sideways or as shown, front
to back? That does depend on the mass of her backpack, and it appears that they did it correctly in
the movie.
8.7 Perturbation Theory_
If the equation for the eigenvalues of an inertia tensor is easy to solve then you’re lucky. What if it
isn’t? At worst you may have to resort to solving it numerically, but there is an intermediate situation
that comes up surprisingly often and that falls between these extremes. If the problem isclose to one
that is easily solved, then the method of perturbations is available. This involves a series expansion
that can be very useful in both the quantitative and qualitative analysis of these problems.
For example, if you have a mass of uniform density and in the shape of a rectangular box then
it’s easy to nd the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the inertia tensor using the center of the box as the
origin. The principle axes are parallel to the edges of the box, and the eigenvalues are easily computed.
8|Rigid Body Motion
284
What if you now add a small mass to the corner of the box? Suddenly the symmetry is lost and you
don’t have any intuitive feeling for the directions of the eigenvectors,but in some sense the eigenvectors
ought to be close to the original ones that were parallel to the edges.
Example
Compute the components of the inertia tensor in the example just mentioned. Then what are the
eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the tensor? Call the sides of the box
a
,
b
,
c
. First compute
R
dm x
2
.
After that it’s all downhill. For
dm
use a slice of the whole mass:
dm
=
M
abc
bc dx
!
Z
dmx
2
=
Z
a=
2
a=
2
M
abc
bcdxx
2
=
M
a
x
3
3
a=
2
a=
2
=
Ma
2
12
The integrals of
y
2
dm
and
z
2
dm
just change
a
to
b
to
c
,and the o-diagonal elements are zero.
This produces (
I
0
). For little
m
,it is just a point mass, so Eq. (8.24) produces the result without any
integration. This is (
I
1
).
(
I
0
)=
M
12
0
@
b
2
+
c
2
0
0
0
a
2
+
c
2
0
0
0
a
2
+
b
2
1
A
(
I
1
)=
m
4
0
@
b
2
+
c
2
ab
ac
ab
a
2
+
c
2
bc
ac
bc
b
2
+
c
2
1
A
Fig. 8.14
The total tensor comes from both of the masses and the components are the sum
of these two matrices. Suddenly, nding the eigenvectors and eigenvalues is hard. If you
want a general answer for this case, look up the formula for the solution of a general cubic
equation. You will then see why I’m not going to use it.
If
m
M
, the eigenvectors and eigenvalues will be close to those of
I
0
, and
because that matrix is diagonal, you already know what these approximate values are.
The next problem is to nd the corrections to them.
The idea is to assume that there is a power series expansion for these results and then to compute
the terms of that expansion one at a time. This is
I
=
I
0
+
I
1
and
I
(
~!
)=
~!;
with
~!
=
~!
0
+
~!
1
+
2
~!
2
+ 
and
=
0
+

1
+
2
2
+ 
(8
:
49)
This introduction of \
"is a convenient way to keep track of the many terms. None of these
~!
0
,
1
,
2
,
:::
or the similarly subscripted
’s are known. That doesn’t matter because you will let the equations
tell you what they are. Plug in:
I
0
+
I
1
 
~!
0
+
~!
1
+ 
=
0
+

1
+ 
 
~!
0
+
~!
1
+ 
Multiply everything and look for the various coecients of powers of
.
0
:
I
0
(
~!
0
)=
0
~!
0
1
:
I
0
(
~!
1
)+
I
1
(
~!
0
)=
0
~!
1
+
1
~!
0
2
:
I
0
(
~!
2
)+
I
1
(
~!
1
)=
0
~!
2
+
1
~!
1
+
2
~!
0

When you have two power series that equal each other, this requires that the individual terms must
match too, and that is all that I did to extract the separate equations.
8|Rigid Body Motion
285
Now rearrange these equations to put them into a standard form.
I
0
(
~!
0
0
~!
0
=0
(0)
I
0
(
~!
1
0
~!
1
=
1
~!
0
I
1
(
~!
0
)
(1)
I
0
(
~!
2
0
~!
2
=
1
~!
1
+
2
~!
0
I
1
(
~!
1
)
(2)

(8
:
50)
The most important property that these equations possess that that under almost all circumstances
theycannotbesolved. They have no solutions. If you plunge ahead and try to solve them anyway then
at some point you will nd yourself dividing by zero. This doesn’t mean that the problem is hopeless,
it just means that you have to nd the very special cases in which theycan be solved. There are two
ways to do this, brute force or cleverness. Both are instructive, but the second one is what you should
master because it is a technique that you will see many more times. You may have seen it already if
you have worked through the sections 7.9 and 7.10. Work problem8.52 for the brute force method.
It’s not hard in this case.
The 0
th
equation above is the one that you supposedly know how to solve. It’s the one without
the extra complicating term coming from the point mass on the corner. For the rest
:::
The clever method is to use Eq. (8.40), but now all the numbers are real:
~!
1
.
I
(
~!
2
) =
I
(
~!
1
)
.
~!
2
. Apply it to these perturbation equations. Take the scalar product of Eq. (8.50)(1) with
~!
0
.
~!
0
.
I
0
(
~!
1
0
~!
1
=
~!
0
.
1
~!
0
I
1
(
~!
0
)
(8
:
51)
Apply the symmetry property of the inertia tensor to change the left side of this to
I
0
(
~!
0
)
.
~!
1
0
~!
0
.
~!
1
=
I
0
(
~!
0
0
~!
0
.
~!
1
=0
This implies that the scalar product on the right side of Eq. (8.51) must be zero also. That is
~!
0
.
1
~!
0
~!
0
.
I
1
(
~!
0
)= 0  !
1
=
!
0
.
I
1
(
~!
0
)
~!
0
.
~!
0
and you have found the correction to the original eigenvalue without doing any additional matrix
manipulation|only taking a scalar product. The magnitude of
~!
0
cancels from this equation, so you
can make its size anything you want. Translate this into the notation of matrices and you have
~!
0
=
0
@
!
0
0
0
1
A
!
1
=(1 0 0 )
m
4
0
@
b
2
+
c
2
ab
ac
ab
a
2
+
c
2
bc
ac
bc
b
2
+
c
2
1
A
0
@
1
0
0
1
A
=
m
4
(
b
2
+
c
2
) (8
:
52)
as the rst order correction to the rst eigenvalue. You will easily see that the rst order corrections to
the other eigenvalues are the other diagonal elements of (
I
1
).
What is the rst order correction to the eigenvector?
~!
1
? That requires solving Eq. (8.50)(1).
Write it out in all its gory detail, and the the equations that you have to solve are surprisingly simple.
I
0
(
~!
1
0
~!
1
=
1
~!
0
I
1
(
~!
0
)
M
12
0
@
b
2
+
c
2
0
0
0
a
2
+
c
2
0
0
0
a
2
+
b
2
1
A
0
@
!
1
x
!
1
y
!
1
z
1
A
M
12
(
b
2
+
c
2
)
0
@
!
1
x
!
1
y
!
1
z
1
A
=
m
4
(
b
2
+
c
2
)
0
@
!
0
0
0
1
A
m
4
0
@
b
2
+
c
2
ab
ac
ab
a
2
+
c
2
bc
ac
bc
b
2
+
c
2
1
A
0
@
!
0
0
0
1
A
(8
:
53)
8|Rigid Body Motion
286
!
M
12
0
@
0
(
a
2
b
2
)
!
1
y
(
a
2
c
2
)
!
1
z
1
A
=
m
4
0
@
0
ab
ac
1
A
!
0
(8
:
54)
And here you have the equations for
!
1
y
and
!
1
z
.Their sizes are proportional to
m=M
,as bets their
being small corrections.
Are you done here? I may be but you aren’t. What does this resultlook like? If
a
,
b
,and
c
are
something like 1, 2, 3 in some units, then how does the direction of the eigenvector change when this
correction is added? Is it toward or away from
m
? And if the sides are instead 2, 3, 1, then does your
answer to this change? Play around with special cases.
What about
!
1
x
,the other component of the correction. Take that to be zero, because including
it would just redene the original
!
0
. (And there’s a technical reason, because if you go into the higher
order corrections it will really mess things up if you don’t do this.)
Exercises
Threeequal pointmasses
m
are at the corners of the right triangle (
x; y
)= (0
;
0), (
a;
0), (0
;b
).
Where is the center of mass?
Removethemassesfromtheprecedingtriangleandreplacethesideswiththinrodsofconstantlinear
mass density
.Where is the center of mass?
Removetherodsfromtheprecedingtriangleandreplacetheareawithauniformsheetofconstant
area mass density
. Where is the center of mass?
Writeouttheequations(8.4)explicitly for2+2=4pointmassesandverifythatitdoeswhatit
says.
Atensor
f
is dened by the equation
f
(
~v
)=
~v
for all
~v
.Compute the components of
f
.
Avector-valuedfunction
F
acts on vectors in the plane, reversing the direction of each. Compute
the components of this function, a 2  2 matrix.
Withrespecttotheorigin,whatarethecomponentsofthetensorofinertiaforapointmass
m
at
the point (
x; y; z
)= (
a;
0
;
0)?
Withrespecttotheorigin,whatarethecomponentsofthetensorofinertiaforapointmass
m
at
the point (
x; y; z
)= (
a;a;
0)? and what if its coordinates are (
a; a; a
)?
Use the summation convention andnotationof Eq.(0.56) to writethe equations (8.17),(8.21),
(8.22).
10 Forthespringsthatappearingure8.6,callthem
k
1
left and right and
k
2
top and bottom. What
are the components of the
f
in
~
d
=
f
(
~
F
)?
11 Whatarethedimensionsof
I
(^
x
)?
12 StartingatEq.(8.38),dropthedenominators
p
2from the basis vectors, so that
~e
1
=^
x
+^
y
etc.
Now compute the components of the same inertia tensor as done there.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested